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Consultation


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Pollard Thomas Edwards

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Making consultation count

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Consultation process map

10 Working with residents 12 Case Study 1 - Packington Estate Islington 14 Working with schools 16 Case Study 2 - Rushey Green School Lewisham 18 Working with multiple stakeholders 20 Case Study 3 - Tidemill Academy Lewisham 22 Working with neighbouring residents 24 Case Study 4 - Arundel Square Islington 26 New settlements and urban extensions 28 Case Study 5 - Wing Cambridgeshire 30 Collaborative design and Cohousing 32 Case Study 6 - OWCH Barnet 34 Working with young people 36 Case Study 7 - Action Dog 38 Working with older people 40 Case Study 8 - Priory Road South Hampstead 42 Post-occupancy evaluation 44 Case Study 9 - Highbury Quadrant Islington 46 Methods and materials 48 Working with specialists 49 Contacts


PTE offices at Diespeker Wharf

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Pollard Thomas Edwards

Pollard Thomas Edwards (PTE) specialises in the creation of new neighbourhoods and the revitalisation of old ones. Our projects embrace the whole spectrum of residential development and other essential ingredients which make our cities, towns and villages into thriving and sustainable places: schools and nurseries, health and community centres, shops and workspaces, places to recreate, exercise and enjoy civic life. This brochure divides our consultation work by user group and showcases a small selection of our recent projects within each of these.

Education

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Making consultation count

Consultation has always been at the heart of PTE’s work. From the very beginning, nearly 40 years ago, we have pioneered community and stakeholder engagement. Because we truly believe it is the best way to create genuinely sustainable communities. Initiating consultation can sometimes seem daunting. But it needn’t be. By managing the whole process, from start to finish, we can help deliver successful planning consents and award-winning developments.

We are experts at what we do. We know that each project is unique and has its own set of challenges and aims. This is why we always work with our clients to develop a bespoke consultation strategy from the outset. By organising carefully planned activities and using the right tools and techniques, we can help you to get the most out of the consultation process - securing a sustainable future for your developments. Read on to find out more about our consultation expertise, the techniques we use, and the many ways in which we have helped our clients – from managing complex groups of stakeholders to winning over residents.

Above: Insley House, coach trip with residents Left: Packington Estate, residents’ funday

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The PTE consultation process

STAGE

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Preparation Gathering information

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Concept Design Analyse + Explore

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Developed design Planning application

HELP ESTABLISH THE BRIEF

DEVELOPING THE BRIEF

AGREE ON PREFERRED OPTION AND DEVELOP

Confirm and develop briefing document with the client

Site analysis workshop

Establish preferred option

Presentation of initial ideas: Adjacency strategy Massing diagrams Precedent studies Phasing strategy Site logistics

Design workshops

Establish key aspirations Review any previous consultation Agree key contacts for consultation Establish consultation process with key dates Identify site constraints and planning restrictions

................................................. Additional services available Precedent site visits

Children’s events Work with TRA or RSG or school management team Planning exhibition for wider community ................................................. Additional services available Website/newsletters Public exhibitions to present design to local residents, occupants and end users

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Technical and specialist design

STAGE +

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Production information

Construction On site

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Use + Aftercare Handover, post occupancy

REVIEW DESIGN DATA

PROJECT ON SITE

POST OCCUPANCY EVALUATION

Regular update meetings/drop-in sessions

Final choice of materials, ICT and FFE

Soft Landings

Resident choices: Finishes Room elevations Fixtures and fittings

Site visits with end users Site meetings with schools/ residents’ representative

Maintainance and management: General operations Maintainance strategy

User interviews Questionnaires Workshops with end users

Contractor-led community notifications

.................................................. Additional services available Branding and graphics

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St Thomas’ School & Flats Kitchens Elevation B

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Working with residents

Over the past four decades PTE has helped turn around more than 20 estates, helping our clients to create better places for people to live, work and play. Convincing communities to buy into the regeneration process is really tough, but we know through experience how to achieve it. We start by listening - finding out exactly what people want from their homes and their aspirations for their neighbourhood. Only then, once we have established a shared vision for the future, do we move onto the next step – decision making. By communicating clearly, using the right tools and asking the right questions we help people make sensible, informed decisions. We use a whole host of different methods, always carefully tailored to suit the specific needs of the project. Our collaborative approach has helped us to build many strong and long-lasting relationships with residents over the years. This is why so many residential providers and local authorities rely on us to support them through the consultation process, helping them to achieve successful planning consents.

‘PTE do not shy away from meaningful resident consultation in regeneration projects where it is essential to have a dialogue...Their accessible and “personalised” approach gives great assistance to client and resident in confidence building that enables projects to move from concept to detailed design and implementation.’ Notting Hill Housing Group Top, right: Depford town centre, public consultation Top, left: Packington Estate, resident funday Left: Alfred Malmesbury Estate, mobile exhibition trailer Opposite: Lefevre Walk, postoccupancy interviews

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Case study 1: Packington Estate Islington

At Packington we are replacing a 1970s problem estate with a new neighbourhood of streets and squares, creating 791 mixed-tenure homes, community space, shops, an adventure playground, and youth centre.

Through this process we established that there was a strong desire to return to the type of community that had preceded the 1970s estate. Residents wanted family houses, front doors at street level and private back gardens.

Our competition-winning scheme was based on comprehensive pre-bid community consultation. Previous initiatives had failed to win the support of the community, so we knew how important it was to listen to residents and find out what they really wanted. Our first step was to organise a series of workshops to discover exactly what their aspirations for their neighbourhood were.

We worked closely with them to incorporate these things into our proposals, introducing a high proportion of family houses and reconnecting the estate to the surrounding neighbourhood. Our willingness to listen and respond positively to every point they made was instrumental in winning the residents’ backing. We have continued to work closely with residents to develop the design, and this is one of the key reasons why each completed phase has been such a resounding success.

Top, left: resident questionnaires Top, right: resident consultation Opposite: post-occupancy interview with resident

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‘Mostly, when you move into a house when you are a council tenant you don’t have a choice; you get shown around and that is it. To see what you are actually moving into was really good... you could choose and I liked the downstairs design.’ Resident, Packington Estate

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Working with schools

PTE has a growing portfolio of award-winning schools. This is testament to our expertise in designing buildings that really work for the people who use them every day. Whether we are remodelling existing schools, or creating entirely new buildings, we always put the school itself at the heart of the process. We regard school design as a collaborative effort, and we listen carefully to how individual schools want to use their spaces to support teaching and learning. We are also proud of our skill in working with young people. We are committed to unlocking the potential of architecture as an educational experience, and we regularly invite school children to our offices on the canal in Islington to help them explore and think critically about their own school environment. Working with schools often involves multiple stakeholders – we have dealt with projects where there are numerous educational institutions on one site, in addition to the local authority as ultimate client. Consultation with all these different groups has the potential to be complicated and timeconsuming, but we have the experience to make the process run as smoothly as possible.

‘You managed a complicated and extensive consultation process with such skill, encouraging the wide range of stakeholders in our school community to contribute their ideas and aspirations. The results of all your hard work are fantastic.’ Mark Elms, Former Headteacher, Tidemill Academy

Top, left and right: Junior Open House Above: Tidemill Academy workshop Above, left and opposite: Junior Open House

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Case study 2: Rushey Green Primary School Lewisham There was a clear need for a new school for Rushey Green: the existing buildings dated from 1974, and were run down and cramped. But the school was set within a generous green site, and the challenge was how to make the most of the school’s setting. To achieve this we worked closely with the school and local authority and actively sought the views of all stakeholders, including parents, children, school staff and members of the local community. This included inviting the children to our canalside offices to participate in the design process. We encouraged them to focus on specific design issues and to identify possible solutions – and then we returned to the school for followup sessions with the pupils which also helped to support the curriculum.

We also included an open-air grass amphitheatre and a wildlife area, orchard and allotment beds for the children to grow flowers, fruit and vegetables. When it became clear that it would be necessary to create accommodation for an additional form of entry, both LB Lewisham and the school were determined to re-appoint PTE. After a consultation process which included the Head, Head of Nursery, facilities manager, governors, and Chair of the local residents’ association, we have obtained planning permission for additional classrooms and group spaces.

We held workshops with staff and had regular meetings with the Head and our local authority client – and we also drew parents and local residents into the process by holding a consultation weekend at the school, tied into school events to ensure a good turnout. The final design captured all the essential elements the school had requested, with classrooms which extend to form outdoor rooms with raised planting beds.

Top, left: new school logo and graphic designed by PTE Top, right: workshop with Rushey Green pupils Above: new two-form entry school Opposite: pupils in the new playground

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‘Working with PTE has been one of the highlights of the project and the result has been spectacular.’ Rushey Green Assistant Headteacher

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Working with multiple stakeholders

Over the years PTE has built up a reputation for finding innovative solutions for complex sites and identifying new opportunities for adding value. We often achieve this by co-locating multiple uses over one site. Our work in this field covers a whole range of projects from combining schools with housing and community facilities to reorganising sites with multiple users. With this type of work comes the challenge of consulting with multiple clients, and we have developed real expertise in this area. We always start by agreeing on a robust and carefully considered consultation strategy, and we also use this opportunity to think carefully about the most appropriate methods of consultation for each group.

Working with multiple stakeholders means that conflicting needs and aspirations often emerge. Our clients really value our ability to find solutions that give all parties a sense of ownership and result in buildings that are sustainable for years to come.

Left: St Thomas’ CE School and flats Top: Deptford town centre flyer Above: stakeholder meeting at PTE offices Opposite: Deptford town centre public consultation

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Case Study 3: Tidemill Academy and Deptford Lounge Lewisham

The scheme for Tidemill Academy and Deptford Lounge has involved bringing together a wide range of stakeholders – Lewisham Council both as project sponsor and planning authority, Tidemill Academy, the library service and a housing provider - to turn the concept of co-located facilities into a workable reality. Co-location can bring real benefits: more funding, more facilities and higher space standards. But for co-location to work in practice, the needs of the various user groups need to be identified and carefully dovetailed.

We did this at Tidemill Academy by carrying out two parallel consultation processes – firstly, with the individual stakeholders and secondly with the joint stakeholder group. We also focused on how the whole scheme would be managed – essential to a co-located scheme. We produced management diagrams which mapped the use of different spaces through weekdays, weekends and holidays. These management diagrams were signed off by stakeholders and formed part of the planning application. This demonstrated how the combined complex would operate with a ‘moving wall’ access method allowing different users to securely use modular chunks of the building at allotted times of the day and evening, and ensuring that the facilities being used by the school are completely closed off to the public and vice versa. Top left: Deptford Lounge Library Top: Tidemill Academy playground Left: After the project was completed we returned to find out how the school and community were getting on in their new building, and we created a short film to document this process Opposite: Giffin Square

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‘Neither myself nor anyone else in the client team have undertaken as complicated an application as this before and without your advice, expertise and input we would not have got there.’ Senior Programme Manager for Tidemill Academy & Deptford Lounge, London Borough of Lewisham

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‘We’re thrilled that this London square is now complete, enlarged and refurbished for all to share and enjoy. Not only does it provide a lung, it gives the community a heart too.’ Anne Miller, Resident on Arundel Square

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Working with neighbouring residents

By looking at the bigger picture and carefully managing consultation with wider stakeholders, we have helped many of our clients achieve positive planning outcomes when the odds have been against us. Pre-empting potential issues is always the first step and initiating early communications is key, whether it is with neighbours, planning officers or local community groups. In this way we are able to help our clients find solutions and transform potential opposition into support for their schemes. There have been many occasions when our skills have helped us to bring on board wider stakeholders and neighbouring residents. The following case study is an example of where we have turned potential objections from wider stakeholders into positive outcomes.

Above and top: One Woolwich, Greenwich Opposite: Arundel Square

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Case study 4: Arundel Square Islington This scheme decks over a railway cutting, creating an extra acre of developable land in the heart of a conservation area in Islington. On this site we proposed to build a strikingly modern block of 150 flats, adding a fourth side to a previously incomplete Victorian square. We knew that our proposals had the potential to trigger a huge amount of opposition from the local community. With this in mind we initiated early consultation with neighbours and local amenity groups and spent many months in discussion with them. We won the support of the local community – and of the planners – by not only substantially increasing the size of the public gardens at the centre of the square, but also by re-landscaping the gardens and funding the restoration of the surrounding historic facades. Our proposal also permanently banished the constant noise of passing trains – much to the relief of residents. The project has gone on to win multiple design awards, including a Housing Design Award in 2011 and a New London Award in 2013 for Best Public Space.

‘I walk up the stairs and come to this space and I see an ocean of green and sky, it’s always a surprise.’ Stephen de Roeck, Resident, Arundel Square

‘They started decking over the railway line and the impact was enormous for us as we live right on the boundary and the noise went instantly. You suddenly saw that the park was going to be so much bigger.’ Susie Graves, Resident on Arundel Square

Above: Arundel Square opening event and party Right: Arundel Square film following on from winning a Housing Design Award Opposite: balconies overlooking Arundel Square

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‘Saffron Walden is one of England’s most beautiful market towns and the design of ‘The Avenue’ uses this existing context to brilliant effect. This is exactly the kind of scheme that challenges identikit houses by showing how to do something more contextual.’ Richard McCarthy, Director General for Housing and Planning, Department for Communities

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New settlements and urban extensions

PTE has completed over 40 masterplans for residential neighbourhoods, town centres, new settlements and urban extensions. Through our ability to listen, explain and inspire we have helped gain the confidence of many communities and assisted developers and local people in steering a course towards positive and lasting change. We have many years’ experience of organising and carrying out intensive stakeholder consultation and we use a wide variety of methods. These include design workshops, exhibitions, web forums, newsletters, film-making and fun-days. Our work is always evolving in response to the feedback we receive. We pride ourselves on our ability to communicate information clearly and effectively and this is something our clients value very highly. Building collective enthusiasm from early on in the process is key to successful consultation with communities and forms the basis for establishing a shared vision going forwards. The following case study demonstrates our approach to this and how we have helped clients to manage the consultation process.

‘This development is not just about providing apartments, but real homes in a community which is sustainable, that has a real impact on the life chances of local families and individuals.’ South Anglia Housing

Top: Outlook Place, Watford Above, left: design workshop Above and right: community workshops Opposite: The Avenue, Saffron Walden

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Case study 5: Wing Cambridge PTE has been appointed by the Marshall Group to create a masterplan for this 180 acre site which will become a new urban quarter and eastern expansion to Cambridge. The new neighbourhood will draw upon the urban design principles of the UK’s best projects to create a truly sustainable, mixed-use community. It will include between 1200 and 2000 homes with a primary school, local shops, extensive employment space and a variety of open spaces. This project is a great example of how initiating early consultation can help encourage stakeholders to buy into the development process and establish a shared vision. The first step in the process was a three-day series of Community Planning Workshops for potential residents, key stakeholders and neighbouring residents to give them the opportunity to each have their say and to share valuable information which will contribute towards the final proposals. Each workshop session addressed a different theme, with topics including movement around the site, facilities, the character of housing and densities. The workshops attracted over 1000 people, including local authority members and officers, other community leaders, Marshall’s employees and neighbouring residents. Their feedback was then organised into a report which was made publicly available on the Wing website. This report then informed the brief for the masterplanning team going forwards.

Top, right: stakeholder site visit Middle, right: aerial site plan Bottom, right: aerial view of site Opposite: community planning workshop from left, Andrew Beharrell of PTE, Emma Fletcher, property director at Marshall, Robert Marshall, group chief executive of Marshall, and Ben Bolgar, of the Prince’s Foundation

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‘This is a great opportunity to create a new urban quarter for Cambridge. We want to bring to the east side of Cambridge a quality of design and long-term stewardship which can compete with the very best in the City and with international exemplars. Working for a single landowner, with a commitment to the area and a track-record in technical innovation, is a very promising start.’ Andrew Beharrell, Senior Partner, PTE

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Collaborative design and Cohousing

Cohousing is not a new phenomenon, but over recent years the concept has been gaining momentum. More and more groups are being established, as like-minded individuals decide to take control of their futures. By working with developers to realise these aspirations and create financially viable schemes, cohousing groups have the potential to make this a realistic option for a wide range of people. Creating homes which meet the aspirations of cohousing groups is something at which PTE has become highly skilled. We have been working closely with a number of groups to help them build new communities which reflect their social values, and combine the independence of their own homes with the social opportunities of shared facilities, including gardens, common rooms and guest suites. Sharing the costs and responsibilities of maintenance is a valuable additional benefit, particularly for older residents. Developing the design for projects like these involves a very special kind of collaborative process and PTE has developed a series of workshop tools and techniques that can be adapted to suit the specific needs of each project. In this way we help each individual cohousing group to explore options and make informed design decisions. Read on to find out how we have gone about this with Older Women’s Cohousing in Barnet.

Left and opposite: design workshops at PTE’s office

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Case study 6: Older Women’s Cohousing Barnet PTE has been working with the Older Women’s Cohousing (OWCH) group and retirement housing provider Hanover to develop a site in Barnet which previously belonged to St Martha’s Convent. The finished scheme will include a co-house containing communal facilities and 26 flats all arranged around a central shared garden. We wanted to give the group the tools to understand the opportunities and constraints of the site, and to add to these an understanding of how to read architectural drawings. Most importantly, we helped them to understand how decisions about how they wanted to live would influence the design of the scheme. We did this through a series of workshops, starting with the scale of the site and its context, and focusing in turn on different aspects of the proposals as they evolved.

Using our experience in community engagement we developed a number of tools and techniques to help the group explore options for the site. These included a kit-of-parts for them to try out different site layouts and orientations, mood boards to help establish what building types they liked or disliked and a materials session towards the end of the process. In between each workshop session we developed the proposals based on the feedback received. These proposals were then developed to scale and presented at the next workshop for review. Our consultation work for OWCH has also extended to designing graphic material for flyers and exhibition boards for a positively received public exhibition. We have also produced a booklet outlining the purpose and character of the group and its members, as an introduction for Councillors and officers, whose support is needed to realise the development.

Below and opposite: members of OWCH take part in collaborative design workshops at PTE’s offices

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‘We have found PTE to be excellent communicators – effortlessly engaging young people in architectural exploration by means of talking, drawing, visiting and model-making. They are passionate about design and are adept at presenting challenging concepts to new audiences.’ Director of the Open House initiative

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Working with young people

Our skill in working with young people is something we are really proud of. Whether it is involving them in the design of their own school or inspiring them to take part in the regeneration of their neighbourhood, we have the experience and expertise to engage with young people meaningfully and effectively. We aim to give them a voice and help them contribute to their future. We place a great deal of emphasis on making sure our consultation programmes for young people are well-planned and structured and most importantly, appropriate to the group. This bespoke approach means our techniques and activities are always evolving. We often collaborate with specialists, combining new and innovative creative projects with design workshops, model-making and site visits. Our work with young people is not just projectbased. For many years we have enthusiastically contributed to education initiatives encouraging school pupils to learn about the built environment. We also take part in mentoring schemes for students wanting to pursue careers in architecture.

Junior Open House For the last six years, we have enthusiastically contributed to the Junior Open House initiative, which aims to introduce young people to London’s architectural legacy through making partnerships between schools and architects. We have hosted biannual workshops at our office and taken groups of school children on architectural tours. Accelerate into University! We are also involved in the new Accelerate into University! scheme which is an access programme for sixth form students at London state schools. It is delivered in partnership with Open City and UCL and is aimed at students from hard-to-reach backgrounds to support their ambitions to pursue a career in architecture or the built environment. The programme offers structured work experience with a professional mentor and workshops focusing on core design and presentation skills.

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Case study 7: Action Dog

The improvement and transformation of housing estates has been a focus of PTE’s work for nearly four decades. We know from experience that getting young people involved in this process can be tough and requires activities to involve them fully throughout. At the Alfred Malmesbury estate in Bow we worked with Action Dog, a company which specialises in creating projects for young people, and local community youth leaders to set up a two-week film workshop. This was held during the school summer holidays and was an opportunity for them to record their opinions and express their ideas about the local environment and facilities. Both the content and the technical delivery of the film were led by the young people themselves, carefully guided by the Action Dog team. As the project progressed, more and more young people came forward to give their opinions on camera and speak up about issues affecting them. The film was something they could be really proud of and was a great way to communicate their opinions to the wider community and feed back into the development proposals.

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Below and opposite: children on the Alfred Malmesbury Estate take part in a film workshop set up by PTE, Action Dog and local commuity youth leaders


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‘The new flat is much better; it has a much better kitchen and bathroom. The kitchen is lovely, it’s great to be able to have a table in there and to eat in there with friends.’ Rob, Waites Court Resident

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Working with older people

Our society is getting older. There are now more people over state pension age than there are children, and projections suggest that by 2025, people over the age of 60 will outnumber those under 25 for the first time in history. Demographic change on such a scale has made it necessary to rethink the future of housing for older people. This is a process in which PTE has been taking part through our involvement in the HAPPI report (Housing our Ageing Population: Panel for Innovation), commissioned by the DCLG and Department for Health, which has set out the case for change in the provision of housing for older people. The report was enthusiastically received by sector agencies and has become a policy driver for new types of development. Typically, these might be fully self-contained apartments providing convenient and spacious homes. They will be accessible, with lift access and bathrooms conforming to enhanced Lifetime Homes standards, but comfortable and attractive to buyers or tenants: this is not ‘sheltered’ or ‘care’ accommodation. Frequently these apartments form part of mixed developments, with general needs housing for rent or sale helping to provide income and ensuring the presence of a mixed community.

‘The great thing about this scheme is that we will get warm, modern, larger flats in the area we know, where our jobs, friends, doctors and churches are, whilst retaining our grounds which we love.’ Bernice Sullivan, Roden Court Tenants’ Association

The design of this housing calls for the engaged input of those who will live in it. We do this through involvement with new schemes explicitly designed for the over-55s, like the OWCH cohousing scheme described on page 30, or when we re-house an existing group of older residents.

Top and above: Roden Court, Haringey Opposite: resident at Waites House, South Hampstead

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Case study 8: Waites Court, Priory Road South Hampstead PTE was appointed to replace a 1970s apartment building based around a mature communal garden. It had been built as selfcontained, non-supported housing, although many of the permanent tenants had become very elderly. Our aim was to enable all those residents to remain living on the site during and after the redevelopment, which was phased to allow this to happen, and to provide suitable new homes for them within the overall design. The scheme also creates additional affordable and shared ownership homes suitable for families. We met with the existing tenants every six weeks to consult on design options. Discussions included the overall site arrangement and location of homes for existing residents and family homes for new and younger residents; the layout of individual flats for existing residents; and the future of the existing communal garden - one of the challenges of the design was to ensure that our design preserved this garden. After completion, Partner Tricia Patel revisited the scheme as part of the process of on-going consultation to carry out in-depth interviews with the residents whom she had known since the inception of the scheme.

Above: resident post-occupancy film Right: post-occupancy interview with Carolyn Parsons, Chair of the Waites Court Residents’ Association Opposite: residents in the new courtyard garden

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‘With this double insulation you have your privacy; they’re spacious, they’re light and economically there’s a great saving. Considering what I used to spend on utility bills, here is much, much cheaper... If this is what’s going to be in store for the future for new properties, I think that in general people will be very happy.’ Carolyn, Chair of Waites Court Residents’ Association


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‘A tricky sloping site and a sensitive neighbourhood made this project a design challenge which had been taken up with relish. A series of terraced townhouses...has made excellent use of the site and provided architectural identity through use of timber shingles. Attention to detail, both external and internal, was clear; the design is both uncompromisingly contemporary, but on the other hand respectful of adjacent housing and the local vernacular.’ Paul Finch, Chair of Judges, Haringey Design Awards 2012

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Post-occupancy evaluations

Proposed Services Post-occupancy evaluation: delivering performance-driven buildings

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Soft Landing

Introduction nt Soft Landings to the UK Governme nded buildings From 2016, all publicly-fu framework requires expectations. meet defined the gap between a aims to reduce deliver Soft Landings and the built result, to design intentions built product. better-performing

tasks Key support projects and — revisit previous d success factors — understan ce gaps performan Evaluation Performance — Building workshop and programme Objectives Stage 1 Core — Soft Landings Work 2013: RIBA Plan of Objectives Develop Project Objectives objectives and milestones ce targets Quality Identify including including performan Outcomes, and Project building outcomes — Aspirations, project s. Sustainability other Project Budget, ility aspiration or constraints sustainab parameters Initial Project and develop information Undertake Feasibility Review Brief. against review of Site check Studies and 2 Core Objectives — design reviewstargets StageInformation. Work 2013: RIBA Plan of preliminar y Concept Design,design, performance Prepare Concept proposals including outline n for structural informatio systems, cost design, building services and

RIBA Plan of

Stage 0 Core

Work 2013:

Services Research is a method by BSRIA (Building Championed n Agency), Soft Landings reality-checking and Informatio ce targets and the following: for setting performanactivities include them. Soft Landings k targets (e.g. clear benchmarce, occupant — establish performan environmental nt, testing satisfaction) during design developme user and — robust review defined outcomes, end design against ning needs management - prepare robust commissio ver — pre-hando training for buildings and guidance - management and user ce — initial aftercare - monitor performan ce pancy — post-occu surveys, quantitative performan necessary. (qualitative fine tune where monitoring),

g the more demandin beginning clients meet PTE can help the framework from the and of to completion requirements process throughoffer are shown in the of the design can services we beyond. The below: RIBA work stages

RIBA work stage brief and

Objectives

Identify strategic business case

Identify client’s and Business Case and Strategic Brief other core project

outline specifications Cost Information preliminary Project along with relevant accordance Strategies in Design Programme.

RIBA Plan

with to brief Objectives 3 Core alterations StageAgree Brief. of Work 2013: Final Project

including Developed designand structural design buiilding services

and issue Design, Prepare Developed and including coordinated for updated proposalsbuilding structural design, outline services systems, Cost specifications, Project and Information accordance Strategies in Programme. with Design

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RIBA Plan of

Work 2013:

Stage 4 Core

and Technical design specifications

Design in Prepare TechnicalDesign with accordance Matrix and Responsibility to include Project Strategiesstructural all architectural, www.ribaplanofwork.com services and building specialist information, design and subcontractor accordance in specifications, 5 Core Objectives 2013: Stagewith Design Programme. Plan of Work

- check against — design reviewstargets performance

on and On-site constructi re off-site manufactu

RIBA

Offsite manufacturing and onsite Construction with in accordance Programme Construction of Design and resolution site as Queries from they arise.

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RIBA Plan of

Work 2013:

RIBA Plan of

Stage 6 Core

Objectives

building and Handover of construction conclusion of contract

building Handover of of Building and conclusion Contract.

www.ribaplanofwork.com

Work

7 Core 2013: Stage

Objectives

and review In-use services ce of project performan

Use services Undertake In with Schedule in accordance of Services.

- check against — site reviews gaps performance

PROBLEM TO

AVOID

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3.0

MISSING EDGE

INSULATION OR MISSING INCORRECT EDGE INSULATION THERMAL BRIDGE FINISH SCREED INSULATION

SCREED BRIDGING

ion

ance Evaluat

Building Perform

- check against — design reviewstargets performance

Objectives

LDER HUB BUI

DOOR THRESHOLD

FLOOR STRUCTURE

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RBON ZERO CA

IMPRACTICAL POOR DETAILING TO BUILD ON SITE VOID

INSULATION MISSING

requirements.

Standard PTE services

PTE can carry out a post-occupancy evaluation role as an additional service. This entails leading RIBA Stage 7 or the ‘softlandings’ process of initial aftercare and extended building performance evaluation. We can lead post-occupancy reviews with client and design team, carry out occupier satisfaction surveys, and produce reports ranging from the highly technical to softer, residentfocused surveys. These can improve on the national standard Building User Survey by allowing specific queries to be raised by client, design team and end user.

Our technical evaluations are tailored to suit individual projects, so that only the most appropriate tests and surveys are carried out. This might include a co-heating test; indoor air quality evaluation; in-situ U values; thermography; electric and gas monitoring across units and site; and a building services evaluation, including renewables, for up to two years post-completion. These tests have been successfully used to help landlords to improve maintenance regimes and reduce running costs for tenants.

typical

ning process — robust commissio users for building training — guidance ent and user — managem Evaluation Performance and — Building pancy surveys — post-occu interviews

Soft Landings BPE services services

We have always worked closely with residents and end users from the outset of projects to ensure that we design buildings which incorporate their knowledge and meet their needs. There is now a general recognition that it is increasingly important to extend this approach to the end of projects. We know that housing providers, for example, want to ensure that the schemes which they envisaged at the planning stage will be delivered in line with their original vision. A lot of these concerns focus around environmental sustainability – the ‘performance gap’ and whether building services actually deliver in practice. Our post-occupancy evaluations help to close the loop between design expectation and reality.

THRESHOLD

WHAT TO DO? Follow the detail drawing or speak / with Architect technical team

OPTION 2

HRESHOLD INSULATION AT DOOR T

OPTION 1

OSER REINFORCED CAVITY CL

learn more’ approach ds a ‘do less, . This suggests PTE recommen ce Evaluation monitored, but to Building Performan and fewer homesce gap-prone areas less equipment n performan targeting well-know nt. in the developme who consultants specialist technical y and resulting cavity closer PTE manages technolog or reinforced door threshold monitor the include: insulation at 50mm thick measure and Technical evaluation can GOOD PRACTICE BEST PRACTICE performance. site office, ED GUIDE TO rg and use in your Please print - PTE-AUTHOR www.zerocarbonhub.o - mains ION BOOK for further information ion analysis CONSTRUCT BUILDERS’ use, E BUILDING check energy to — energy consumpt SUSTAINABL monitoring consumption costs and water use, and ce carbon output, anticipated performan compare against ntal conditions monitoring to — indoor environme in one or two dwellings re, humidity, – sensors installed air quality, temperatu periodic measure indoor thermography (requires in-situ U values, to download data) return to dwelling installation review – dwellings, — building servicescheck of one or two design commissioning checked against with results and calculations. specifications n, before occupatio n is collated both , measuring Ideally this informatio after completionce. CE then one year performan BUILDING PERFORMAN MEASURING winter and summer Install a thermal break at the at threshold – high least 25mm performance insulation proof Install dampgas membrane, and membraneslayer as separating necessary with Overlap doorleast cavity by at 50mm seal Ensure airtight under door

THRESHOLD DRAIN

REINFORCED CAVITY CLOSER

PERIMETER INSULATION

AIRCRETE

FINISH SCREED

INSULATION

STRUCTURE

RIGID INSULATION

5

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s iven building performance-dr evaluation Post-occupancy www.ribaplanofwork.com

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Pollard Thomas

Edwards

Opposite: Connaught Gardens Right: Lefevre Walk resident Far right: Waites Court residents Top right: PTE post-occupancy evaluation proposed services

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Case study 9: Highbury Quadrant Islington This scheme for Family Mosaic includes 38 affordable and shared ownership homes - a mix of flats, maisonettes and family houses. They are arranged in two terraces which define the perimeter of the site and surround communal gardens which can be accessed from the back gardens of the houses and maisonettes, as well as from the rear entrance to the flats. We completed this scheme in 2012, and it was one of the first which we had designed to achieve Code for Sustainable Homes Level 4. We were eager to find out how the building services were performing so together with our client we initiated a study to assess this in conjunction with University College London.

The study focused on two typical homes, looking at air quality and the performance of the ventilation system; acoustics; light; and the cost and use of energy and the performance of the heating system. It also looked at general design issues, including the layout of the homes and space standards. The study included both hard data and residents’ comments, bringing together objective information and residents’ perceptions. The study will enable Family Mosaic to help the residents of Highbury Quadrant to get the most out their homes. On an industry-wide level, the study also feeds into efforts to understand the causes of the performance gap – whether it is the result of contractors’ failure to build as designed; of designers including over-complex detail; or down to the unreliability of the Standard Assessment Procedure itself. To achieve this industry-wide benefit we worked with the Good Homes Alliance to disseminate the knowledge which we had gained from our study: together we visited the scheme and gave a series of presentations based on the findings of the study.

Top, left: family houses with their own street front doors Above: consultation handout Opposite: communal space

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Pollard Thomas Edwards


‘Delivery was sensitive due to the close proximity of adjoining residents. PTE played a major role in both of these key areas, with a fabulous mixed tenure design now delivered and occupied.’ Development Director, Family Mosaic

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Methods and materials

PTE is lucky enough to have its own in-house communications team who can offer clients a whole host of graphic design and copywriting services to aid consultation activities.

A new urban quarter for Cambridge

Welcome and Introduction Welcome to our second public engagement event on the emerging masterplan for Wing. Following the Enquiry by Design workshops in January, our team of consultants have been working hard to develop the initial ideas into a masterplan. This exhibition is another opportunity for us to explain our long term vision for Wing, for you to contribute to the proposals, and for the team to answer your questions.

What is Wing?

Marshall’s Commitment

The whole Airport site, including land south of Newmarket Road and land north of Newmarket Road, was identied for redevelopment in the 2003 County Structure Plan. The Cambridge City local plan and South Cambridgeshire District core strategy together allocated the land for up to 12,000 houses, and adopted an Area Action Plan to provide further guidance on its delivery, including a rst phase north of Newmarket Road.

We are very proud of our Cambridge heritage and in particular we value our exceptionally strong links with the local community, which includes many local businesses, the people of Cambridge, and the Universities.

Following extensive technical and viability studies, Marshall has decided to retain the Airport at its current location. It has also decided to release the allocated land north of Newmarket Road, known as ‘Wing’, to create a new vibrant mixed community of up to 1,300 homes, which will enhance Cambridge and in particular the communities in the east of the City of which the Airport is a long-established part.

Throughout the last 100 years we have been passionate about the creation of employment, the development of skills through robust training programmes, and the fostering of excellent relationships. As a privately owned family business, we are able to take a longterm view of investments in the community and are committed to the legacy and continuing longevity of our business, which is linked to quality and a real desire to help make Cambridge an even better place for future generations to live and work. We want Wing to be the best example of a new development on the edge of Cambridge in terms of proximity to the heart of Cambridge, the Science Park and the rural countryside beyond – indeed a place where people choose and are proud to live.

The importance of communicating a clear and consistent message to stakeholders throughout the consultation process cannot be emphasised enough, and our skills in presentation, graphic design and writing have helped our clients win the support of many communities. Over the course of many years, we have developed a variety of presentation techniques and are experts at translating community aspirations into visual proposals. A few examples of our design work are shown on these pages, ranging from exhibition banners, newsletters and reports through to logo design and websites.

Wing is a very personal project for Marshall as it is within what we consider to be our ‘back garden’.

Site location plan Robert Marshall ( Group CEO )

YOU ARE INVITED TO DISCUSS THE FUTURE OF YOUR NEIGHBOURHOOD JUNE/JULY 2012

The Westbourne Green Masterplan Exhibition is on at the Warwick Community Centre from Saturday 23rd June to Thursday 28th June and The Stowe Centre from Saturday 30th June to Thursday 5th July. (Full details of the exhibition opening times are listed on the back page.)

Site Aerial in Local Context Come to the exhibition

01

www.wingcambridge.co.uk Ro b e r t M y e r s

A s s o c i a t e s Landscape

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Architecture

Pollard Thomas Edwards

Westbourne Green renewal area

Find out about the investment and improvement proposals for your area, and tell us what you think of them. We welcome the opinions and suggestions of our community so why not get involved in the renewal plans for Westbourne Green.


Countryside Properties Who we are Countryside Properties is the UK’s leading responsible developer of new homes and communities. We are specialists in regeneration and design and build contracting. View looking south down Alma Road

Founded in 1958 we have over 55 years of development experience predominantly in London and the South East including 30 years of transforming local authority owned housing estates.

South Acton Estate, LB Ealing - 2,700 dwellings

Our Vision for Alma

View looking east towards the new Station building, across Station Square

‘Thinking beyond today’ articulates our vision, which is to create outstanding places for people to live, work and enjoy for generations to come. Whether we are creating new communities or enhancing existing neighbourhoods we engage with our stakeholders to develop sustainable places with their own distinctive character and identity.

Canning Town, LB Newham - 650 dwellings

Grahame Park, LB Barnet - 3,000 dwellings

Newlon Housing Trust We are working in partnership with Countryside Properties on the regeneration of the Alma Estate. If you choose us our part of the regeneration will be to provide new homes to rent at up to 80% of market rates and shared ownership homes to help local people to get onto the property ladder.

View along South Street (looking east) towards new retail and main public landscaped space leading upto Alma Primary School

We have an excellent track record of successfully managing estates and communities where we have delivered regeneration projects. View along Napier Road, looking east towards Alma Road

Outdoor Space for Everyone • Every home to have a garden or balcony. • 794 Units - 468 Private - 126 Affordable - Shared Ownership - 200 Affordable - Council • 475 Parking Spaces • 1050 Secure Cycle Storage • 6 New play areas • New Medical Centre and Gym • Attractive new landscaping including the woodland walkway.

As a charity we will manage the estate for the benefit of its residents rather than for profit. We involve and empower residents in checking the services we provide. This includes: • Resident involvement in choosing suppliers and contractors • Resident panels to manage contractor performance • Working together to regularly inspect the standards of services provided.

View looking south down Alma Road

We will also offer our award-winning ‘concierge service’, who work on the ground to carry out regular security and health and safety patrols.

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Working with specialists

Because every project is unique, the methods we use to engage people in the consultation process vary considerably and are constantly evolving. We know from experience that collaborating with consultants who engage in specialist types of consultation and activity can be extremely beneficial. By pooling our knowledge and resources we are able to target hard-to-reach groups and help them to get even more out of the consultation process. One example of this is our collaboration with Action Dog, an organisation which produces creative projects for young people. We worked with Action Dog on the Alfred Malmesbury Estate, a scheme described earlier in this brochure, to organise a film workshop for young people living on the estate.

Other collaborations include working with visual arts education charity Arts Express on the Havelock Estate Regeneration, where we helped to host a workshop giving local children the opportunity to create 3D models of their architectural fantasies. Whilst new consultation techniques and technology are always emerging, it is not always about getting involved in the ‘next big thing’ – what matters is that you select and develop the most appropriate and effective methods of consulting for each specific project. It is PTE’s ability to do this, coupled with our many years’ experience, that helps to ensure that we consistently achieve positive results for our clients.

Above: Havelock Estate Regeneration, children’s model making workshop Catalyst film - Children from the Havelock estate in Southall were asked to release their inner Blue Peter by creating their ideal home from cardboard and scrap material

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Pollard Thomas Edwards


Contacts

Tricia Patel Partner RIBA

Tim Metcalfe Associate

Tricia joined PTE in 1991, appointed Director in 2012 and became a Partner in 2014. Her enthusiasm, and talent for listening, can draw from clients and user groups a deep understanding of what they really want from their project. She is skilled at using the insights gained to produce successful outcomes.

Tim joined PTE in 2006 and has been an Associate since 2013. Tim manages the Communications Group and is heavily involved with consultation.

Tricia has long experience in the housing, mixed-use and regeneration sectors, and has both designed and delivered a series of successful and awardwinning projects, ranging from large-scale masterplans to infill sites and refurbishments. Tricia is also the practice’s ambassador for young people. She has won the Junior Open House Architectural Mentor award.

Tim has developed a variety of presentation techniques and is an expert at translating community aspirations into visual proposals. He devises strategies and delivers results. Consultation methods include; graphical presentations, photography, resident interviews, post occupancy films and consultation websites. tim.metcalfe@ptea.co.uk

tricia.patel@ptea.co.uk

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Diespeker Wharf 38 Graham Street London N1 8JX T 020 7336 7777 mail@ptea.co.uk @ptearchitects www.pollardthomasedwards.co.uk

PTE Consultation Brochure  

Consultation has always been at the heart of PTE’s work. From the very beginning, nearly 40 years ago, we have pioneered community and stake...

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