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Catching

autism earlier ‘Psychology’s Ghosts’ What to do when a colleague acts unethically The science of temptation


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MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


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Letters More data on mental health meds The article “Inappropriate prescribing” in the June Monitor had balance and breadth, but left out some facts that call into question the wisdom of using drugs at all in the treatment of persons diagnosed with mental disorders. The recovery rate from schizophrenia is twice as high in countries like Nigeria, India and Colombia, where drugs are not used, as it is in the United States.1 The Finnish users of the open-dialogue approach — which does not use drugs as a primary modality of treatment — report an 80 percent recovery rate from early psychosis.2 Since the advent of drugs as the primary modality of treatment, the number of Americans on Social Security Disability due to mental illness has increased from 1 in 468 to 1 in 76.3 In the United States, people diagnosed with schizophrenia who don’t use drugs recover at a rate of 40 percent. Those who use drugs recover at a rate of 5 percent.4 The worst thing about the use of drugs is that it gives patients a cynical view of themselves and other human beings. It tells them that they are subject to the whim of random biological forces. Human beings are not random organisms. They are meaning-making, desiring organisms who experience distress when they are not able to live the way they want to live. The symptoms of such distress are meaningful, somewhat functional and potentially useful in 4

helping them recover. The use of drugs says otherwise. That is a great disservice to people. AL GALVES, PHD Las Cruces, N.M.

Click here for references cited in this letter. According to the June Monitor article “Our Moral Motivations” on the new book by Jonathan Haidt, PhD (“The Righteous Mind”), Haidt dismisses self-interest as hostile to morality and, I infer, overlooks the essentialness embedded in selfinterest as a shot of brio livening up frequently supine human behavior. Haidt’s derogation of selfinterest is at odds with self-interest’s dominant and socially useful role in illuminating why we behave as we do. Further, his implied demonization of self-interest obscures heroic efforts to fathom the whys and wherefores of this crapshoot we call life. These views and this appreciation of selfinterest are presented exhaustively in my 1986 presidential address [American Psychologist (AP), 42, pp. 3-ll, 1987], “Self-Interest and Personal Responsibility Redux,” selected by a panel as AP’s best article in 1987. Trumpeting self-interest as an efficacious tool we use in our daily affairs, Adam Smith famously declared that “it is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer or the baker that

we expect our dinner, but from their regard to their interest,” where it is fair to equate “interest” with self-interest. Self-interest triggers and motivates performance, beneficially enabling us to cope with illness and traumatic life events. Congruently, Friedman and Friedman (1980) in their book, “Free to Choose, A Personal Statement” advise that “self-interest is not myopic selfishness. It is whatever they value, whatever goals they pursue. The scientist … the missionary … the philanthropist … are all pursuing their interests as they see them, as they judge them by their own values.” Again, a boost for selfinterest, a utilitarian tool that we should be thankful is in humankind’s quiver of accessories for assisting us to live better lives. Haidt’s implicit discrediting of self-interest is wide off the mark and should be balanced with the tsunami of benefits self-interest enables society to savor. Indeed, self-interest should be celebrated, not taken to the woodshed. To put down self-interest is an undeserved putdown. ROBERT PERLOFF, PHD University of Pittsburgh

The roots of mental illness The June article “The roots of mental illness” was an impressive exploration of the ways in which our understanding of the brain and the biological underpinnings of disorders has grown. However, this article failed to present a full picture of the limitations of these biological explanations of mental illness. Postmortem studies of the brains of people diagnosed with schizophrenia and other severe disorders are confounded by the fact that these patients are generally on lifelong continues on page 8

MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


President’s COLUMN

Addressing the obesity epidemic: Don’t blame the victim BY DR. SUZANNE BENNETT JOHNSON • APA PRESIDENT

The United States leads the world in many areas; unfortunately, obesity is one of them.1 Two-thirds of U.S. adults are overweight and one-third are obese. This has not always been the case. U.S. obesity rates have escalated rapidly in the last 20 years. In 1990, no state had an obesity rate of greater than 19 percent. By 2010, no state had an obesity rate of less than 20 percent. 2 In fact, in the United States, being overweight has become the “new normal.” The cost of the obesity epidemic is enormous. Obesity is now the second leading cause of the death in the United States — just behind smoking — and is expected to become the leading cause.3 Unless the obesity epidemic is successfully addressed, life expectancy will decline in the United States, with our children having shorter life expectancies than we do. 4 Obesity underlies a growing diabetes epidemic, with all the co-morbid disorders that entails: heart disease, kidney failure, leg amputations, blindness.5 Obesity and its co-morbidities will have a profound economic impact on our health-care system. Health care for obese individuals costs more than for normalweight individuals, and the costs increase with increasing levels of obesity. The annual health-care costs for people who are extremely obese are almost twice those of normal-weight people. Very sobering is the fact that severe obesity is increasing at a much faster rate than moderate obesity, quadrupling from 1986–2000.6 Some have argued that focusing on obesity only further stigmatizes overweight people. There is no question that obese individuals face stigmatization and discrimination in employment, education, interpersonal relationships, health care and the media.7, 8 Psychologists have played an important role in highlighting the pervasiveness of weight bias and its multiple serious negative consequences. Overweight children and adults are stereotyped as lazy, unmotivated and lacking in self-discipline.7, 9 In other words, overweight people are often blamed for their condition and as a consequence, some believe the solution to the obesity epidemic is one of personal responsibility. But stigmatizing people in this way is counterproductive. There is no evidence that it motivates people to make healthier choices and in fact may have the opposite effect, increasing OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

stress and unhealthy eating and deterring people from exercise.7, 9 Further, by blaming the individual, the real culprit behind the obesity epidemic — an obesogenic environment — can be ignored. The obesity epidemic is not the result of an increase in laziness and a decrease in motivation and selfdiscipline in U.S. adults and children. The fast food industry — a central player in our obesogenic environment — carefully

Psychologists must lead by addressing public policy and the multiple factors that create the obesogenic world we live in every day. targets the minority populations who suffer most from high obesity rates,10 while arguing against New York City’s restriction on the size of sugary drinks as unfairly restricting personal choice.11 It is no accident that industry-supported groups like the Center for Consumer Freedom: Promoting Personal Responsibility and Protecting Consumer Choice12 create Web and other information products for the public such as obesitymyths.com, which, in my mind, is misinformation that promotes obesity as a personal choice, but is very good for their bottom line. As psychologists, we know that blaming the victim does not work. Psychologists must lead by addressing public policy and the multiple factors that create the obesogenic world we live in every day. n Click here for references cited in this article.

5


Contents

Catching

autism earlier XX xx

A flood of new research is advancing our understanding of autism and highlighting the need for earlier interventions. 56

    44 6

APA’s council takes action on pressing issues The council earmarks $3 million to increase the number of accredited internship slots, adopts a resolution on psychotherapy effectiveness and takes steps to make the association’s governance more effective. Preparing for the ‘silver tsunami’ APA’s input shaped the behavioral health recommendations for the national plan for Alzheimer’s disease. Psychologists helping psychologists Determining your responsibilities when you believe a colleague may have behaved unethically. Bringing books to life Psychologists’ research points to new ways to nurture young readers. Parenting that works Seven research-backed ways to improve parenting.

   

Innovative education APA recognizes the counseling psychology program at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, for its Science-Practitioner-Advocate model. A view from Capitol Hill APA congressional fellows shape — and are shaped by — the policymaking process. APA members to vote on bylaws amendments APA’s Council of Representatives has proposed amendments to the association’s bylaws that members will vote on this fall. APA honors outstanding teachers of high school psychology APA’s Teachers of Psychology in Secondary Schools recognizes three high school teachers with its Excellence in Teaching Award.

www.facebook.com/American PsychologicalAssociation

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48

Money matters

28 Jerome Kagan on improving research Departments 4 Letters 5 President’s Column 9 From the CEO 11 By the Numbers 12 In Brief 24 Random Sample 26 Judicial Notebook 72 Division Spotlight 80 Personalities extra digital content

Upfront 10 Psychologist testifies on the risks of solitary confinement 11 Record number of students take AP psychology exam 11 Grant will help increase number of Native American psychologists

for the 32 Preparing ‘silver tsunami’

20 28 48 52 62 75

TIME CAPSULE Notes on a scandal How a racy rumor about the father of behaviorism made its way into 200 psychology textbooks. QUESTIONNAIRE The ghost in the lab In a new book, developmental psychologist Jerome Kagan offers his take on the biggest challenges facing psychological research — and outlines a few “modest suggestions” to address them. EARLY CAREER PSYCHOLOGY Money matters Psychologists are helping young couples stay afloat financially in increasingly turbulent economic waters. SCIENCE WATCH Overcoming temptation A twist on Pavlov’s famous conditioning experiment could point the way to new treatments for drug addiction and overeating. PSYCHOLOGIST PROFILE Grassroots go-getter Jennifer Kelly has a knack for communicating with politicians — a talent that is benefiting psychologists and those they serve. AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATION Better school-based care APF Pearson Early Career grantee Aaron Lyon is working to bring more evidencebased mental health interventions to school children. Awards and funding opportunities

7


Letters continues from page 4 medications that permanently damage the brain. Also, studies of children diagnosed with schizophrenia have shown that their healthy siblings have similar brain abnormalities that are no longer present by the time they reach adulthood (Gogtay, 2008), indicating that such abnormalities can potentially return to normal. In fact, studies have shown that remission of psychosis, as well as other psychiatric disorders, is associated with this plasticity of the brain (e.g., Gogtay & Rapoport; Lindauer et al., 2008). The acceptance of the strong biological roots of schizophrenia is undermined by the fact that the best

outcomes in the world for treating this disorder are psychotherapeutic approaches that rarely use neuroleptics (e.g., Aaltonen, Seikkula, & Lehtinen, 2011), as well as robust evidence of the relationship between childhood trauma and psychosis (see Read, van Os, Morrison, & Ross, 2005, for a review). The existence of brain abnormalities does not equate with etiology or prognosis. As psychologists, we must move beyond the biomedical research and give a strong voice to the powerful effects of psychosocial factors on biology. NOEL HUNTER Long Island Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Post

Spend more time helping people

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In the June Monitor, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The roots of mental illnessâ&#x20AC;? questioned the very underpinnings of our current mental illness model and another story, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Inappropriate prescribing,â&#x20AC;? pointed out serious problems with the appropriate use and effectiveness of psychotropic medication. Given the depth of the criticisms and abuses cited, it would be reasonable to ask what psychology is going to do to address the issues raised in the articles. Unfortunately, the take-away message was largely to ignore the findings and embrace the mental health industrial complex (i.e., medicine, insurance and pharmaceuticals) that pays homage to the very theoretical formulations and treatment modalities the articles bring into question. In the wake of the Supreme Courtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s momentous decision on the Affordable Care Act, the health industry is now being forced to re-examine and redefine its relationship with the American people. Is it time for APA to do the same by initiating a meaningful dialogue about the need for a more nuanced and realistic paradigm of mental illness that is less dependent on the tenuous but lucrative links to medicine and pharmaceuticals? To paraphrase an old fable, if APA is not willing to question whether the king really has any clothes, will they at least stop trying to sell him coat hangers? Or will even this limited challenge to the status quo be too high a price to pay for being allowed to remain in the kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s court? THOMAS W. WHITE, PHD Overland Park, Kan.

Please send letters to smartin@apa.org or Sara Martin, Monitor editor. Letters should be no more than 250 words and may be edited for space and clarity. 5761<7:768;A+0747/AÂ&#x152;7+<7*-:


FROM THE

CEO

Making psychotherapy the first-choice treatment BY DR. NORMAN B. ANDERSON • APA CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

Depression ranks among the top 10 chronic health problems in the United States, affecting more than 14 million adults.1 It’s typically diagnosed by primary-care providers. In fact, up to one in four primary-care patients suffers from depression.2 And, over the past decade, drug therapy has become the most popular course of treatment for depression, often implemented by primary-care physicians without the benefit of a psychological consultation. We’ve all seen the pharmaceutical industry ads promoting antidepressants, encouraging people to ask their physicians about medications if they show symptoms of depression. Although medication is an appropriate component of treatment for some patients, research demonstrates that psychotherapy is effective in treating depression and anxiety — and it carries far less risk of side effects than medication and a lower risk of relapse. Unfortunately, too few Americans and primary-care providers consider evidence-based psychotherapy first as a treatment option. In August, APA’s Council of Representatives took an important step in addressing that knowledge gap. The council adopted a resolution supporting psychotherapy and its effectiveness in treating a spectrum of health issues, including depression (see page 16). Every year in October, depression is highlighted during Mental Illness Awareness Week and National Depression Screening Day. This provides us with an opportunity to increase public understanding of how evidence-based psychotherapy helps in treating depression. This month, the APA Practice Directorate is implementing a psychotherapy awareness initiative, consisting of a multichannel communications effort including media outreach as well as digital and social media. New materials on psychotherapy and depression are available from APA’s Psychology Help Center, including the updated brochure For a Healthy Mind and Body…Talk to a Psychologist. The brochure explains how practicing psychologists can help people manage their stress and treat depression, anxiety and other behavioral health issues. It also highlights psychologists’ training and education and provides practical information on confidentiality and insurance coverage for psychological services. OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

The brochure, For a Healthy Mind and Body…Talk to a Psychologist, is available online in English and Spanish. APA members can order printed copies in bulk for free. To order, go to apa.org/helpcenter and click on “Order Free Brochures.”

In another segment of this campaign, APA is introducing an animated video series that draws attention to the value of evidence-based psychotherapy. Available on YouTube and apa. org/psychotherapy, the videos parody a typical drug ad. While the strategy of the videos is to favorably compare psychotherapy to drug therapy, it is careful not to deny the appropriate use of medications for some individuals. The videos use a simple cartoon style to tell a story about psychotherapy. By arming people with information, we are encouraging those with symptoms of depression or anxiety to ask their primary-care practitioners about psychotherapy as a first course of treatment. We want Americans to know that when it comes to treating depression and anxiety, they have choices about treatment, and psychotherapy is one of them. n 1 www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/the-numbers-countmental-disorders-in-america/index.shtml#MajorDepressive 2 (AHRQ 2009)

For more information on depression screening and Mental Illness Awareness Week, go to healthfinder.gov and www.mentalhealthscreening.org/events/national-depression-screening-day.aspx. 9


Upfront Psychologist testifies about the dangers of solitary confinement

10

MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012

Jay Mallin

Thinkstock

The nation’s roughly take his feces and smear 80,000 inmates in it all over his face.” solitary confinement Graves, who was are “at grave risk of exonerated in 2010, said psychological harm,” he still feels the effects Craig Haney, PhD, APA of the decade spent in member and professor of solitary confinement. psychology at University “I haven’t had a good of California, Santa Cruz, night sleep since my told the Senate Judiciary release,” he said. “I have Subcommittee on the mood swings that cause Constitution, Civil Rights emotional breakdowns.” and Human Rights. “The Such long-term effects conditions of confinement are common, Haney are far too severe to serve said. “One of the very any kind of penological serious psychological purpose,” he said. consequences of solitary Haney, who was confinement is that it appointed this year to renders many people a National Academy incapable of living of Sciences committee anywhere else.” Then, studying the causes and when prisoners are consequences of high released into cells or back rates of incarceration in into society, they are often the United States, has overwhelmed with anxiety. interviewed hundreds of “They actually get to the prison staff and inmates point where they become Roughly 80,000 inmates live alone in cells not much larger and toured and inspected frightened of other human than a king-sized bed. dozens of U.S. prisons. beings,” he said. At a June 19 hearing, he showed pictures to illustrate —SADIE DINGFELDER solitary confinement’s harsh conditions, including filthy cells that are “scarcely larger than a king-sized Read more about the mental health effects of solitary confinement bed,” he said. As a result of the endless monotony in the May Monitor. and lack of human contact, “for some prisoners ... solitary confinement precipitates a descent into madness.” Many inmates experience panic attacks, depression and paranoia, and some “The conditions of confinement suffer hallucinations, he said. are far too severe to serve any Former inmate Anthony Graves, who spent kind of penological purpose,” 18 years on death row, including 10 in solitary testified Dr. Craig Haney. confinement for a murder he didn’t commit, drove home Hanley’s points. “I would watch guys come to prison totally sane, and in three Watch the full hearing years they don’t live in the real world anymore,” he said. One fellow inmate, Graves said, “would go out into the recreation yard, get naked, lie down and urinate all over himself. He would


Nearly 200,000 take the AP psychology exam More proof of psychology’s popularity as a high school course: The number of students who have taken the Advanced Placement psychology exam increased to 197,719 in 2011, up nearly 12 percent from the previous year. The test, which includes a 70-minute multiplechoice section and a 50-minute free-response section, was first offered in 1992.

65

116,128

The average number of genetic mutations in a child born to a 40-year-old father. A 20-yearold dad, however, only passes on about 25, according to a 2012 study in Nature. (See “Catching autism early,” page 56.)

51,831

3,914

1992

18,628

1997

2002

Upper estimate of Americans age 65 and older who have mental health or substance abuse conditions, according to a 2012 Institute of Medicine report.

2007

2011

Source: The College Board

$3.5 million grant will help train more Native American psychologists The federal government has awarded the Center for Rural Health at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences a five-year, $3.5 million grant to be a Center of Excellence in Native Behavioral Health. The new Seven Generations Center of Excellence will recruit, mentor and retain promising American Indian, Alaskan Native and Native Hawaiian students who have an interest in becoming mental health professionals. The funding was awarded through the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Bureau of Health Professions. “The new center will serve to plug the leaks in the workforce pipeline,” says psychologist Jacque Gray, PhD, who will direct and be the principal investigator for the Seven Generations Center. “We have been losing excellent Native American students through discouragement, lack of funding and the shortage of specialized training in ethical work with Native American communities,” she says. Q 7+<7*-:Œ5761<7:768;A+0747/A

15

Thinkstock

Students who took the AP psychology exam

197,719

1/5

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By the numbers

Percentage of pre-teens and teens who have been bullied in the past year — an estimate far below rates found in past studies and common perception, according to a meta-analysis by Dan Olweus, PhD, of the University of Bergen, Norway.

4 times

How much more likely women diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder as girls are to attempt suicide when they are young women than those without ADHD, suggests a 2012 study in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.

11


Brief IN

Snapshots of some of the latest peer-reviewed research within psychology and related fields.

The following studies were among the research presented at APA’s 2012 Annual Convention: students’ socioeconomic status and their academic self-concept. In addition to cardiorespiratory fitness, social support — defined as reliable help from family and friends to solve problems or deal with emotions — was related to better reading scores among boys. n Telling the truth when tempted to lie improves a person’s mental and physical health and strengthens their relationships, according to as-yet-

Brand X Pictures

n Physically fit students get better grades, suggests an as-yet-unpublished study led by a team of University of North Texas psychologists. Researchers gathered data on physical fitness, academic performance, self-esteem and social support from more than 1,200 students at five Texas middle schools. They found that those who were more physically fit scored higher on reading and math tests, even after controlling for the influences of the

Middle-schoolers who are more physically fit score better on math and reading tests. 12

unpublished research by University of Notre Dame psychologist Anita Kelly, PhD. Researchers asked half of the study’s 110 participants to stop lying for 10 weeks and assessed their honesty with weekly polygraph tests. They found that during the weeks when participants from both groups lied less, they had fewer physical and mental health complaints, such as feeling tense or having sore throats or headaches. The participants also reported that their close personal relationships had improved and that their social interactions had gone more smoothly that week. n Grateful teens are not as likely as their less thankful peers to abuse drugs and alcohol or have behavior problems at school, finds an as-yet-unpublished study led by California State University psychologist Giacomo Bono, PhD. Seven hundred students age 10 to 14 completed gratitude and life-satisfaction questionnaires at the study’s start and four years later. When comparing the results of the least grateful 20 percent of the students with the most grateful 20 percent, they found that teens with the most gratitude by the end of the four-year period had: gained 15 percent more of a sense of meaning in their life; become 15 percent more satisfied with their life overall; become 17 percent more happy and more hopeful about their lives; and experienced a 13 percent drop in negative emotions and a 15 percent drop in depressive symptoms. Participants who became more thankful over time were slightly less likely to use alcohol and drugs, cheat on exams and skip school.

MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


Brief IN

n Modest weight loss can reap prolonged health benefits for those who are overweight and obese, according to a study conducted by Rena Wing, PhD, director of the Weight Control and Diabetes Research Center at The Miriam Hospital in Providence, R.I. Researchers followed more than 3,000 overweight people over 10 years. The subjects learned to keep track of everything they ate, reduce the amount of unhealthy food in their homes and increase their physical activity. The scientists found that even a small weight loss — an average of 14 pounds — reduced the participants’ risk of developing Type-2 diabetes by 58 percent. The health benefits of the loss lasted up to 10 years, even if people eventually regained the weight. n First-time mothers who focused mindfully on the emotional and physical changes brought on by pregnancy appeared to feel better and have healthier newborns than

Pixland

n Brain fitness games can help improve older adults’ memory and language skills, finds research conducted at the University of California, Los Angeles. Scientists split the study’s 59 older adult participants into two groups. The first group used a computerized memory-training program 12 times a month for six months, while the second group used the program less than eight times a month. The researchers found that the first group significantly improved in memory and language skills compared with the second group. (American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, June)

Pregnant women who practice mindfulness meditation have healthier newborns.

new mothers who didn’t practice such mindfulness, according to asyet-unpublished research led by Harvard University psychologist Ellen Langer, PhD. Researchers trained women pregnant with their first child in mindfulness, asking them to pay attention to subtle changes in their feelings and physical sensations each day. Compared with two other groups of first-time moms who had

OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

no mindfulness training, these women reported improved well-being, more positive feelings, less emotional distress and healthier newborns up to a month after birth.

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Brief IN

Other new research: n Mindfulness meditation reduces loneliness in older adults, according to a study of 40 healthy adults age 55 to 85, conducted at Carnegie Mellon University. Participants were randomly assigned to take part in an eight-week mindfulness-based, stress-reduction training course. The researchers found that people who practiced mindfulness showed a reduction in several measures of loneliness, as well as less expression of a loneliness-related pro-inflammatory gene compared with those in the notreatment group. (Brain, Behavior & Immunity, online July 20)

emotional development of infants born to 101 mothers who had consumed four or more drinks a day during pregnancy with 101 women who consumed no alcohol when they were pregnant. About 44 percent of children whose mothers drank during pregnancy displayed abnormalities of the nervous system, including language or intellectual delays and hyperactivity and attention deficits. However, abnormal facial features were present only in about 17 percent of alcohol-exposed children. (Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, online July 23)

n Boys’ impulsiveness may make them better at math, according to research led by University of Missouri investigators. The study followed 300 children from first to sixth grade. It found that in first and second grades, boys’ reliance on their memory and tendency to shout out addition-problem answers led to more responses from the boys in the class, but also more errors. Girls were more likely to compute the answer by counting and to respond more slowly and to fewer questions. By sixth grade, however, the boys answered more problems and got more correct. (Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, September)

n Pupil dilation may reveal a person’s sexual orientation, according to a study by Cornell University researchers. To determine which gender the study’s 325 participants found attractive, researchers used a specialized infrared lens to measure pupillary changes while the participants watched erotic videos. Heterosexual men showed more pupil dilation after being shown sexual videos of women, and little response to men, while homosexual men showed the opposite. Heterosexual women, however, responded to both sexes, in accord with previous research that women may have more fluidity in their sexuality, the authors said. (PLoS One, online Aug. 3)

n Sleep deprivation in the first few hours after exposure to a traumatic event may reduce the risk of posttraumatic stress disorder, according to a study by researchers from BenGurion University of the Negev and Tel Aviv University. Rats that underwent sleep deprivation after being exposed to the scent of a predator did not exhibit behavior indicating memory of the event, while a control group of rats that slept after the stressful exposure did remember, as indicated by their increased levels of anxiety and disordered sleep patterns — symptoms similar to humans with PTSD. (Neuropsychopharmacology, online June 20)

n People with serious mental illnesses appear to be more likely to develop cancer, finds research out of Johns Hopkins University. Researchers examined 10 years of data from 3,317 Maryland Medicaid beneficiaries with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. They found that when compared with

n Caffeine during pregnancy does not appear to affect a child’s later behavior, finds a study led by researchers at Tilburg University in the Netherlands. The study looked at the caffeine consumption of nearly 3,500 pregnant women and then assessed their children’s behavior at age 5. The

n Most fetuses exposed to high levels of alcohol in the womb do not develop the distinct facial features seen in fetal alcohol syndrome, but do show signs of abnormal intellectual or behavioral development, according to research conducted by scientists at the National Institutes of Health and the University of Chile in Santiago. The study compared the physical, intellectual and 14

the general population, patients with schizophrenia were more than four and a half times more likely to develop lung cancer, three and a half times more likely to develop colorectal cancer and nearly three times more likely to develop breast cancer. People with bipolar disorder experienced similarly high risk for lung, colorectal and breast cancers. The researchers say the reason behind this may be because patients with a serious mental illness don’t always receive appropriate cancer screenings and preventive care related to risk factors for cancer, such as smoking. (Psychiatric Services, July)

MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


Brief IN

n Morning people are happier, according to a study conducted by University of Toronto researchers. More than 700 people age 17 to 79 completed a survey about their sleeping routines, emotional state, health and preferred time of day. Self-professed early birds reported feeling happier and healthier than night owls. One reason for this finding may be that the biological clocks of morning people are more in line with societal expectations about when someone should wake up and go to sleep, leaving night owls to spend the week unhappy about having to get up early for work, the authors suggest. (Emotion, June) n Concussions may make the brain age faster, suggests a study by University of Michigan researchers. More than 200 college athletes — of whom 62 said they had experienced from one to four concussions — completed computer tasks while brain images were taken. Even up to six years after the head injuries occurred, the scientists found that there were differences in electrical activity in the brain, as well as in gait and balance, between college students who had had a concussion and those who hadn’t. The differences indicated a decline in cognitive functions typically associated with aging. (Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews, July)

Thinkstock

study found virtually no difference in the rate of emotional difficulties, hyperactivity, inattention or general behavioral problems between children whose mothers had consumed the most caffeine and those who had consumed the least. (Pediatrics, August)

U.S. psychology graduate students perceive more social stigma around seeking therapy than students in several other countries.

n American psychology students report higher levels of perceived social stigma around seeking therapy than do British and Argentinian psychology students, according to a study led by psychologists at Canterbury Christ Church University in England. Nearly 500 clinical psychology doctoral students from the three countries completed questionnaires about their attitudes and perceived social stigma associated with therapy seeking in general. Students in Argentina reported the lowest levels of perceived social stigma for receiving therapy, followed by students in Britain and America. (Psychotherapy, online Aug. 13)

of Notre Dame. Scientists followed 235 middle-class mothers, fathers and their children over seven years, focusing on the links between marital conflict when the children were in kindergarten and subsequent problems when the children were teens. The researchers found that conflict between parents when their children were young predicted the children’s emotional insecurity later in childhood, which, in turn, predicted adjustment problems in adolescence, including depression and anxiety. (Child Development, online June 13) —AMY NOVOTNEY

n Marital problems can affect children’s development, according to a study by researchers at the University

OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

15


APA’s council takes

action   on pressing Earmarks $3 million

issues

to increase the number of accredited internship slots and adopts a resolution on psychotherapy effectiveness. B Y RHE A K . FARBE RMAN Monitor Executive Editor

16

R

ecognizing the growing imbalance between the number of psychology graduate students who need a clinical internship to complete their degree requirements and the availability of those internships, APA’s Council of Representatives voted to fund a $3 million internship stimulus program to increase the number of accredited internship positions. The funding is expected to help as many as 150 programs move from non-APA accredited to accredited status and create 520 new accredited internship positions over the next three years. The council’s decision at its meeting in Orlando, Fla., in August commits APA to provide up to $1 million a year for three years to internship programs seeking APA accreditation. The money will help offset program expenses in such areas as application and site visit fees, program consultation fees and intern stipends and benefits. The typical maximum grant to an individual program will not exceed $20,000. Funding will be available starting this fall through an application process. APA has called on the entire psychology graduate education community to work together in the face of the imbalance problem. The association’s goal, in addition to ensuring that all students are able to complete their graduate training, is to ensure quality in all facets of that training. APA is particularly concerned that students who complete unaccredited internships limit their future career opportunities. In other action, the council adopted a resolution designed to increase the public and allied health professionals’ awareness MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


Silver Image

APA’s Council of Representatives held its biannual meeting at APA’s 2012 Annual Convention, Aug. 2–5 in Orlando, Fla.

of psychotherapy’s effectiveness in reducing people’s need for other health services and in improving long-term health. The resolution was organized by APA Past-President Melba J.T. Vasquez, PhD, to help educate the public about the value of psychotherapy, particularly as it compares with medications in addressing mental health problems. “Every day, consumers are bombarded with ads that tout drugs as the answer to their problems,” said Vasquez. “Our goal is to help consumers weigh those messages with researchbased information about how psychotherapy can provide them with safe, effective and long-lasting improvements in their mental and physical health.” The resolution cites more than 50 peer-reviewed studies on psychotherapy and its effectiveness in treating a spectrum of health issues and with a variety of populations, including children, members of minority groups and the elderly. (To read a press release about the resolution and link to its full text go to www.apa.org/news/press/ releases/2012/08/psychotherapy-effective.aspx.) The resolution also states that psychotherapy is effective for a variety of behavioral health issues and among various population groups, and that the average effects of psychotherapy are greater than those of many medical interventions. Large multi-site and meta-analytic studies have demonstrated that psychotherapy reduces disability, morbidity 7+<7*-:Œ5761<7:768;A+0747/A

and mortality; improves work functioning; and decreases psychiatric hospitalization. In addition, the resolution notes that psychotherapy teaches patients life skills that last beyond the course of treatment. Furthermore, while the resolution recognizes that in some instances the best treatment is a combination of medication and psychotherapy, the results of psychotherapy tend to last longer than psychopharmacological treatments and rarely produce harmful side effects. In further action, the council: s2ECEIVEDTHEREPORTOFTHE0RESIDENTIAL4ASK&ORCEON Educational Disparities. The report, produced by a task force appointed by Vasquez, focuses on the growing gap between minority and non-minority student achievement and the role psychology can play in addressing the impact of educational disparities on poor and racial and ethnic-minority students. The report recommends more funding for early childhood education programs and increased access to bilingual education. The task force also noted that more study is needed on the individual characteristics and educational programs that have allowed some minority and immigrant students to excel; the need for unbiased expectations for all student achievement; and the re-segregation occurring in some U.S. school systems. s!PPROVEDTHECREATIONOF!0!SlRSTOPENMETHODS OPEN data, open-access journal — Archives of Scientific Psychology. 17


“Every day, consumers are bombarded with ads that tout drugs as the answer to their problems. Our goal is to help consumers weigh those messages with researchbased information about how psychotherapy can provide them with safe, effective and long-lasting improvements in their mental and physical health.” MELBA J.T. VASQUEZ APA’s 2011 president

The publication will be APA’s first fee-based journal. According to APA Publisher Gary VandenBos, PhD, it will allow APA to gain valuable experience in the growing feebased, open-access publishing environment. Fee-based publishing now represents approximately 15 percent of all scholarly publishing. • Approved the 2012 class of APA fellows. A total of 109 members were elected to fellow status in recognition of their contributions to psychology. • Approved funding for representatives of the four ethnicminority psychological associations (EMPAs) to continue to attend APA council meetings as delegates/observers. In a related action, the council approved a bylaws amendment to create official council seats for the four EMPAs. Because the proposed change requires a bylaws amendment, it will be forwarded to the full APA membership for a vote this fall. The EMPAs are the Asian American Psychological Association, the Association of Black Psychologists, the National Latina/o Psychological Association and the Society of Indian Psychologists. • Approved funding for an APA task force that will study the trafficking of women and girls. • Approved the 2013 budget revenue forecast of $108 million. APA Chief Financial Officer Archie Turner reported that the association’s financial position is strong. Licensing revenue from APA’s databases continues to be the largest component of APA revenue budget. • The awarding of the 2012 Raymond D. Fowler Award to William C. Howell, PhD, was reported to the council. Howell, a longtime member, governance leader, psychology researcher and educator, and APA executive director for science, died in April (See the June Monitor). n 18

Council votes to make bold changes to governance structure APA’s Good Governance Project (GGP) Team is tasked with ensuring that APA’s governance structure is appropriate for the challenges psychology faces in the 21st century. Under the current system, APA’s council is the only governance body with the authority to determine policy, yet it only meets twice a year. The system is often criticized for being slow, cumbersome and unable to respond to rapidly changing circumstances, such as new legislation in Congress. With input from members and governance groups, the GGP team has developed a plan to create a nimbler, simpler and more flexible governance system that would allow for more direct member input and be more strategically focused. At its August meeting, the GGP team asked the council to consider the degree of change needed to meet those goals, whether through incremental change, moderate change or a “clean-slate” approach. In a show of overwhelming support for a new system, the council voted 135 to 22 for bolder change, moving toward the moderate change and clean-slate end of the continuum. The option for moderate governance transfers responsibility for budgeting, oversight of corporate responsibilities and internal policies to a newly created Board of Trustees, while a Communities of Interest Assembly would concentrate on strategically driven issues of interest to psychology and the public. The clean-slate option calls for a single governing body whose members are selected based on specific competencies. This body would be responsible for gathering broad input on a variety of issues through ad hoc advisory groups, expert summits, member surveys and more. Next, the GGP team will work on how these changes would be implemented, considering, for example, how members of the new governance groups could be selected. The GGP team will solicit further council input at its next meeting in February and throughout the spring. Final approval of the new governance plan is expected next August.  For a copy of the GGP report to the council, the approved motion and the chart outlining the three scenarios, go to www.apa.org/about/governance/ good-governance/index.aspx. If you have questions or ideas, contact APA Executive Director of Governance Affairs Nancy Gordon Moore, PhD, MBA, at nmoore@apa.org.

MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


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Capsule TIME

Notes on a scandal How a racy rumor about the father of behaviorism made its way into 200 psychology textbooks. BY JAMIE CHAMBERLIN Monitor staff

I

n January 1920, not long after John B. Watson published his emotion-conditioning research on Little Albert, Johns Hopkins University gave the superstar professor a 50 percent salary hike to ensure he stayed at the university. But by the end of that year, the father of behaviorism and former APA president was fighting to keep his job there.

Benjamin, PhD, a professor emeritus at Texas A&M University. That other woman was Rosalie Rayner, the 21-year-old graduate student who assisted Watson with his controversial Little Albert work. Watson’s divorce was front-page news. His wife, Mary Ickes Watson, hailed from a prominent Baltimore political family. Mary’s brother, Harold Ickes, was a notable figure in national politics and became secretary of the interior in 1932 for President Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

“Watson was at the height of his fame, and behaviorism, the brand of psychology that he promoted, was beginning to dominate psychology. [Psychology] almost certainly developed differently without his dynamic presence.” LUDY BENJAMIN Texas A&M University

Almost overnight, Watson became the Tiger Woods of his day, “on the losing end of a scandalous divorce that garnered newspaper coverage across the United States, including publication of excerpts of love letters to the ‘other woman,’” according to a 2007 American Psychologist article on Watson’s departure from Johns Hopkins. It was written by psychology historian Ludy 20

Johns Hopkins fired Watson for the public indiscretion, perhaps because the school had recently terminated another Hopkins professor linked to a prostitution raid, posits Benjamin. Unable to find another job in academe, Watson moved to New York City to work at the advertising firm J. Walter Thompson and never returned to academia.

Decades later, a spicy rumor spread, offering a different reason for Watson’s academic dismissal — that Johns Hopkins discovered he had been conducting sex research. The story was published as fact in at least 200 psychology textbooks between 1974–94, according to the AP article. Where did the story start? Records indicate it originated with psychologist James Vernon McConnell (1925–90), best known for his non-replicable research on memory transfer in planarians. “Why would a mere divorce,” McConnell wrote in a 1979 journal article, “cause a man of Watson’s stature to be fired?” Pass it on Even as a graduate student at the University of Texas in the 1940s, McConnell was convinced there was more to Watson’s firing. In the late 1950s, he got the “proof ” he was looking for when he interviewed advertising executive and Watson colleague Deke Coleman, who told him Watson was fired not only for the divorce, but because he and Rayner were measuring their physiological responses during sex in Watson’s lab at Johns Hopkins. McConnell — who later claimed that he had heard the same story from one of his professors — included the information in the first edition of his 1974 textbook, “Understanding Human Behavior: An Introduction to Psychology.” McConnell wrote that

MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


Archives of the History of American Psychology, The Center for the History of Psychology, the University of Akron

Voted “handsomest professor” in 1919 at Johns Hopkins, John B. Watson had the looks people wanted to associate with sexual experimentation.

7+<7*-:Œ5761<7:768;A+0747/A

21


Capsule TIME

Watson pioneered psychology’s interest in human sexuality. “John B. Watson was one of the first Americans to investigate the physiological aspects of the sexual response,” he wrote. “Watson wanted to know what kinds of biological changes occurred in humans during the stress of intercourse. Watson tackled the issue directly, by connecting his own body (and that of his female partner) to various scientific instruments while they made love.” Although the evidence for such research was slim, the story attracted

widespread attention. All of the major players were dead — Rayner in 1935, Watson in 1958 and Coleman in 1970 — so professors throughout the United States wrote to McConnell asking for his evidence. One such correspondent was British psychologist Robert Boakes, who was writing a book on the history of animal behavior. In response to Boakes’s letter, McConnell replied, “I will give you the facts as best I can. ... Watson — always adventuresome — realized that we knew little about human physiological reactions during sexual intercourse. Perhaps he used

this as a reason, perhaps as an excuse, for an affair with Rayner. At one point (about 1917 or 1918), they made love in Watson’s laboratory, having first hooked their bodies up to various recording devices. ... I gather that they generated a fair amount of data. Watson’s wife discovered the affair and, so Coleman told me, confiscated the data as ‘evidence’ for a divorce.” Yet records indicate that Rayner, who married Watson after his divorce, didn’t meet or start working with Watson until 1919, according to the AP article. In response to another letter asking

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MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


for evidence from Watson scholar Cedric Larson, McConnell replied, “Watson was a brilliant innovator, and he surely had the equipment around (or could have rigged it) had he wished to do so. The newspaper coverage [of the affair and the divorce] was scandalous, in all senses of the word. I can’t imagine that an ordinary case of infidelity would have caused quite that much sensation. ... I suppose my feeling is that Watson was so bright that he should have made the recordings even if he didn’t.” Sex sells It wasn’t until 2001 that the story was seriously investigated. That’s when Benjamin began his probe, eventually working with three graduate students to trace the story through introductory and history textbooks, the Watsons’ divorce record and the correspondence of Watson, Larson, McConnell and others. The research team found that the story stretched and changed, with other versions alleging that Watson and Rayner used a kymograph measuring device during intercourse. McConnell claimed that there was a photo of the instruments Watson used for the sex research. But Benjamin, who traveled to both Hopkins and the Canadian Psychological Association museum where they supposedly hailed from, found no evidence that the instruments existed or had ties to Watson. At least one textbook regarded the sex research story as gossip, the AP authors found. In the third version of his “History of Psychology” text, psychologist David Hothersall wrote: “A careful examination of Watson’s dismissal and divorce convinced a recent biographer of Watson that there is no

evidence that he was dismissed because of alleged experiments concerned with human sexual behavior.” Hothersall omitted the story entirely from his text’s 2004 fourth edition, as did most other authors by that time. How did a rumor become textbook fodder? “Nothing really sells like sex,” posits Jodi Whitaker, of The Ohio State University, one of Benjamin’s co-authors. “It was a wonderfully salacious story to spread around.” McConnell, who kept the Watson story in all eight versions of his textbook, between 1974 and 1994 (the last version was published after his death), likely fell prey to thinking about the past through present-day attitudes, says Benjamin. “Sexual affairs appeared more common in [McConnell’s] time and they didn’t seem to have the consequence of the Watson affair,” he says. It probably didn’t help that Watson — voted “handsomest professor” in 1919 at Johns Hopkins — had the movie-star looks people wanted to associate with sexual experimentation, says Benjamin. Watson’s outspoken interest in sex may also have fueled the rumor. He had also spoken about his professional curiosity in sex at an address at Columbia University in 1913, and wrote several popular-press articles about human sexuality when he worked in advertising. One historian, John Burnham, who interviewed Watson, his family and his colleagues, wrote, “each time that I tried to find out about his work in psychology … what I heard about instead was some woman with whom he supposedly went to bed.” And while historical evidence indicates that Watson didn’t conduct sex research and modern textbooks have omitted the story, Benjamin finds that

OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

colleagues still write to him saying that they have seen the story mentioned or heard about it in a lecture. “It’s hard to make myths die,” Benjamin says. As for Watson, he devoted his scientific training to advertising; he is credited with coining innovations we use even today, such as the term “coffee break” for a Maxwell House campaign. In spite of the gossip, his exit from academic psychology marked an important shift in the field, says Benjamin. “Watson was at the height of his fame, and behaviorism, the brand of psychology that he promoted, was beginning to dominate psychology,” says Benjamin. “[Psychology] almost certainly developed differently without his dynamic presence.” n Katharine S. Milar, PhD, of Earlham College, is historical editor for “Time Capsule.”

Further reading Benjamin, L.T., Jr., Whitaker, J.L., Ramsey, R.M., & Zeve, D.R. (2007) “John B. Watson’s Alleged Sex Research: An Appraisal of the Evidence.” American Psychologist, 62(2) 131–139. Coon, Deborah J. “’Not a Creature of Reason’: The Alleged Impact of Watsonian Behaviorism on Advertising in the 1920s.” In J.T. Todd & E.K. Morris, Modern Perspectives on John B. Watson and Classical Behaviorism. Greenwood Press, 1994.

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Random SAMPLE

Photo courtesy of University of St. Thomas

Patricia Stankovitch, PsyD

The former human resources exec dropped her “fancy title” to work as a counseling psychologist. “My family thought I was crazy,” she says, “but they’re proud of me now.”

Member since: 1997 What she does: Stankovitch is the director of psychological services at the University of St. Thomas’s Interprofessional Center, a Minneapolis clinic that offers free psychological, social work and legal services to underserved populations. She also sees patients and is a full-time clinical faculty member in the university’s Graduate School of Professional Psychology. The wrong wall: Twenty years ago, Stankovitch held a high-powered job in human resources with a great salary, good benefits and “a fancy corporate title,” she 24

says. But she was unhappy. “I remember reading a book about someone who had worked his way to the top of the ladder and then realized it was leaning against the wrong wall,” she says. “That was me.” After seeking guidance from a career counselor, Stankovitch realized that her strengths were in training employees and helping them work out conflicts with colleagues. “It was as if I’d been doing counseling without having the credentials,” she says. So, at age 43, she enrolled in St. Thomas’s Graduate School of Professional Psychology, where she earned her master’s degree in counseling and a PsyD in counseling psychology.

Her inspiration: Many of Stankovitch’s clients at the Interprofessional Center are heroes, she says. “I think about all the things they’ve been through and how courageous they are and it makes me wonder, if I was in that situation, would I be able to do the same thing?” One person whom Stankovitch particularly admires is a Kenyan woman who had fled to the United States to escape torture based on her political views and ethnicity. Stankovitch co-led the multidisciplinary team that evaluated her for posttraumatic stress disorder and other signs of psychological trauma, helped her find housing and learn English, and supported her in court when she fought for — and won — asylum. Today, Stankovitch says, the woman is living in a safe place, is enrolled in school and “has a hopeful future.” Maintaining her balance: When Stankovitch first joined the Interprofessional Center in 2007, it saw about 60 clients each year, but its client base has grown rapidly ever since. Last year, Stankovitch supervised about a dozen graduate and doctoral psychology students and interns who served 252 people. Despite her increasing responsibilities, Stankovitch finds time to read “non-psychology” books, such as mysteries by Janet Evanovich and Erica Spindler, and to go to cultural events with family and friends. “It’s really important to spend time away from work and engage in your own therapy,” she says. —ANNA MILLER

Each month, “Random Sample” profiles an APA member. You may be next.

MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


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Judicial NOTEBOOK

Suspect identifications and due process BY RICHARD A. WISE, JD, PHD, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA • BRETT HOLFELD, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA • MARC W. PEARCE, JD, PHD, UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA–LINCOLN

O

n Aug. 15, 2008, Officer Nicole Clay responded to a report that an African-American male was trying to break into cars parked outside an apartment building. At approximately 3 a.m., Clay arrived at the building and heard the sound of a metal bat hitting the ground. She then spotted Barion Perry standing between two cars and holding two car stereo amplifiers in his hands. A metal bat lay on the ground, and the windows of a nearby car had been shattered. When Clay asked Perry where the amplifiers came from, he said he found them on the ground. Clay asked Perry to stay with another officer while she entered the apartment building. Inside, Clay spoke with a witness who said she saw a tall, African-American man remove a large box from the car with smashed windows. When asked to provide a more specific description of the man, the witness pointed to her window and said that the man was standing outside next to a police officer. One month later, police officers showed the witness a photo array, but she was unable to identify Perry as the man she saw breaking into the car. Nevertheless, Perry was charged with theft and criminal mischief, and his case went to trial. Before trial, Perry argued that the jury should not be allowed to consider the witness’s initial identification of him. He claimed that the identification “amounted to a one-person show-up in the parking lot” that guaranteed he would be named the culprit, and the jury’s consideration of this unreliable identification would violate his due process rights (Perry v. New Hampshire, 2012). The court rejected Perry’s argument and he was ultimately convicted of theft. Perry pursued his argument to the U.S. Supreme Court. In an 8-1 decision, the court held that the Constitution’s due process clause does not require courts to prescreen eyewitness evidence for reliability when the police did not create the suggestive circumstances that allegedly tainted the identification. Although the court did not rule in Perry’s favor, both the majority and the dissent acknowledged that psychologists have raised concerns about the reliability of eyewitness identifications. These concerns, which are detailed in an amicus brief filed by APA on behalf of Perry (www.apa.org/about/ offices/ogc/amicus/new-hampshire.aspx), include the following: First, memory is a reconstructive process; thus, once it is altered 26

by a suggestive identification procedure, it is unlikely that the eyewitness’s original memory can be restored (e.g., Wells & Quinlivan, 2009). Also, research shows that approximately one out of every three eyewitnesses makes erroneous identifications,

Memory is a reconstructive process; thus, once it is altered by a suggestive identification procedure, it is unlikely that the eyewitness’s original memory can be restored. and jurors tend to overestimate eyewitness accuracy. Thus, there is significant risk that jurors will rely upon erroneous eyewitnesses (e.g., Sigler & Couch, 2002), and traditional legal safeguards such as cross-examination, jury instructions and expert testimony may be inadequate to compensate for this problem (e.g., Wise, Dauphinais & and Safer, 2007). In addition, studies suggest that one-person lineups, or “show-ups,” are the most suggestive type of identification procedure and are most likely to produce erroneous identifications (e.g., Steblay, Dysart, Fulero & Lindsay, 2003). Although Perry reduces the availability of due process challenges to certain eyewitness identifications, there are other ways to challenge identifications. First, identifications often involve police action, and the actions of police remain open to due process challenge after Perry. Second, suggestive identifications can be challenged under evidence rules. For example, evidence may be excluded when its probative value is substantially outweighed by its prejudicial impact (e.g., Fed. R. Evid. 403). Third, states can require greater judicial scrutiny of eyewitness testimony than the Supreme Court does (e.g., State v. Henderson, 2011). Fourth, legal professionals can be trained to enhance their ability to deal with eyewitness identifications. And finally, psychologists can continue to conduct research to improve jury instructions and expert testimony about eyewitness fallibility. n “Judicial Notebook” is a project of APA Div. 9 (Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues). MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


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PsycLINK a wiki platform “by psychologists, for psychologists.”

http://psyclink.apa.org


Questionnaire The ghost in the lab In a new book, developmental psychologist Jerome Kagan offers his take on the biggest challenges facing psychological research — and outlines a few “modest suggestions” to address them. BY LEA WINERMAN Monitor staff

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n his half-century career, Jerome Kagan, PhD, became one of the world’s pre-eminent researchers in developmental psychology, best known for his studies finding that some aspects of our temperament — such as anxiety and shyness — are inborn, appearing as early as infancy and staying with us throughout our lives. Never one to shy away from controversy, Kagan lays out in his new book of essays, “Psychology’s Ghosts: The Crisis in the Profession and the Way Back,” what he sees as the major problems facing psychological research — problems he says hold psychology back from making the kinds of grand discoveries possible in other scientific fields such as biology and physics. Kagan spoke to the Monitor about his vision for making psychology research more productive. What are “Psychology’s Ghosts?” “Ghosts” refer to many of the [unfounded] assumptions that psychologists make as they conduct their research. For example, there are many studies in which a team of psychologists uses one procedure in one setting, gets a result and assumes that that result would hold no matter where you did the study, no matter what the 28

procedure was and no matter what the population was. That strategy tempts the investigator to assume that the concept inferred from the data applies broadly. Another ghost is our approach to research on mental illness. The DSM categories for mental illness are the only disease categories in all of medicine that do not take etiology or cause into account. In psychiatry, we have disease categories based only on symptoms. That would never occur in cancer or cardiology or immunology, where you always diagnose on the basis of both the symptoms and the cause. So what that means is that every category today in the DSM-IV, and in the DSM-V, which will be published next year, has a heterogeneous etiology. So the only way to make progress is to collect other psychological and biological evidence, not just reports of symptoms. If we did that for a category like major depressive disorder, we’d see that it’s actually — I’m going to make up a number here — maybe six different diseases with six different causes. So what’s holding us back from developing these kinds of multiple categories in the DSM, based on genetic or other causes? We don’t know enough. But then the committee preparing the DSM and the psychiatrists and psychologists who use

it should be sensitive to that. That is to say, a psychologist or psychiatrist treating a depressed person should be sensitive to the possible cause and try to discern it, by gathering psychological data, by requesting biological data, so that he or she can provide better treatment. But few clinicians are doing that. Let’s talk about treatment. In another essay in the book, you argue that cognitive behavioral therapy may be on the verge of losing its effectiveness. Why is that? A new therapy usually is effective because it’s new, and the patient and the doctor think it’s very effective. It usually takes about 50 years for a therapeutic ritual to lose its effectiveness. For example, psychoanalysis was very effective for about 50 years, and then the therapists lost faith in it, and therefore it stopped working. The recent reviews of cognitive behavioral therapy, which is 50 years old, are beginning to show the same thing. Because it is not the specific ritual that matters, it is “does the therapist have faith in this ritual, whether it’s valid or not,” and does the therapist communicate that faith to the patient? A wonderful example is that, under Mao Zedong, psychoanalysis never took hold in China. Now that China is growing more capitalist, suddenly psychoanalytic theory is new there. And so psychoanalysts are practicing in

MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


Evan Richman

OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

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Questionnaire China and patients are getting better. Meanwhile, in the United States, very few therapists practice psychoanalysis, because the 50 years are up. So what type of therapy do you think will be big next in the United States? Therapy over the Internet. I can predict what’s going to happen. You’re going to have papers showing how effective therapy over the Internet is, because it’s new. And then in 50 years, no one will be doing it anymore. But the larger point is that obviously one size treatment can’t fit all. I’m willing to bet that there are some depressives for whom cognitive behavioral therapy is the perfect therapy. But until we find out for which depressives that is true, we’re going to continue this way, where some people get better and some don’t.

Now go to a typical psychological journal, our best journals. Most investigators spend a few years [on a problem] and when they get frustrated they shift to another topic. They become impatient. Psychologists also need to use varied methods and combine all kinds of techniques to learn. But 70

muscle tension, heart rate, blood pressure, skin conductance. The point is the more data you have, the more likely you will understand the puzzle you’re trying to solve. Every biologist understands that. Do you have any favorite examples of psychologists who have gotten it right? A nice example would be Marta Kutas at the University of California, San Diego, who has studied the N400 waveform in the event-related potential. Marta has clarified what that waveform means, because she stuck with it. Because every phenomenon in nature is difficult to detect accurately, she realized she had to vary all kinds of contexts to learn what she did. Another example is Gerard Bruder of Columbia University. Bruder examined the patients that were sent to him with a diagnosis of depressive disorder and tested them with EEG. He found that the ones who got better with SSRIs were left-frontal active and the ones who didn’t were right-frontal active. That’s a beautiful example of combining the verbal description of the symptoms with a biological measure. That strategy helps the clinician and scientist separate two kinds of depressives. One profits from SSRIs, the other doesn’t.

“How could an investigator make a significant discovery by examining only what people say? Humans have been listening to humans for 150,000 years, and we still don’t understand human behavior.”

At the end of the book, you lay out what you call “modest suggestions” to improve psychological research. Where did they come from? Right now, I’m reading the Nobel laureate acceptance speeches in biology from 1996 to 2000. Now, in every one of these cases, what did these investigators do? They picked a problem that was puzzling and they began to probe it. And their first probes were rarely successful — it took them 10, 15, 20 years. The man who studied hemoglobin worked for 30 years before he discovered its structure. 30

percent or more of the research on humans by research psychologists uses one method, and that method is most of the time a verbal report on a questionnaire. Now think about that. How could an investigator make a significant discovery by examining only what people say? Humans have been listening to humans for 150,000 years, and we still don’t understand human behavior. It’s absolutely necessary to gather more than one source of data, no matter what you’re studying. You have to combine verbal report with behavioral observations, and, better yet, combine it with behavioral observations and some biology: fMRI,

Are more people looking at these physiological measures as the technology improves? Yes. Compared with 20 years ago, many more psychologists are gathering fMRI [data]. They gather fMRI data and

MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


some verbal evidence — that’s better than gathering one measure. But often psychologists and neuroscientists invest a great deal of time and money gathering the brain data and then they relate this evidence to the replies on a 15-minute questionnaire, or the answer to one question, “How are you feeling?” This strategy is unlikely to make a major discovery. So, I think we have to get a little more complicated in the verbal reports that we get. We also have to look at patterns of data. Too often, psychological studies look at one dependent variable. For example, the answers to a personality questionnaire are only one measure. So, too, is cortisol concentration in the saliva or an event-related potential. Nature does not work that way. Natural phenomena consist of patterns of features. A single measure can be the product of more than one condition. Therefore, one cannot know the meaning of any single measure — it is necessary to combine it with other measures. That is what biologists do. If you look at my book “The Long Shadow of Temperament,” which I wrote with Nancy Snidman, it was the patterns that helped us understand our data. We examined the responses of many infants to a series of unfamiliar stimuli. When we began the work, we didn’t know that there were highreactive infants. But when we examined videotapes of the responses of many infants to a series of unfamiliar stimuli, we found that some infants combined a pattern of three responses: vigorous limb movement, arches of the back and crying. This pattern defines a highreactive infant. If we had only used one of these

measures, Nancy and I would not have made the discoveries we did. Only the infants who combined limb activity, arches and crying became timid, shy

children and adolescents with social anxiety. I couldn’t ask for a better example of the utility of looking for patterns of evidence. n

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Preparing for the

‘silver tsunami’

S

ome are calling it the “silver tsunami” — the wave of Americans living longer than previous generations. It’s great news on the longevity front, but not for a health-care system that is unprepared for the repercussions of an aging population. Alzheimer’s disease is one of the challenges for which the nation is not ready. Today, one in eight older Americans has Alzheimer’s, and the risk of developing the brain disorder doubles every five years after age 65. Although most people will not develop Alzheimer’s, 6.7 million are expected to have the disease by 2025 — 30 percent more than today. Without more effective planning and programs in place, the costs and burdens of Alzheimer’s care could overwhelm the health-care system and families of people with this disease. To address a possible crisis, President Obama signed into law the National Alzheimer’s Project Act in 2011. To implement the law, the secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Kathleen Sebelius, established the National Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care, and Services. This public-private advisory council makes recommendations to the secretary related to ways that federal programs could improve care and services for people with Alzheimer’s and their families. The council also makes recommendations for research and setting funding priorities for prevention, education, diagnosis and treatment strategies. The result — the National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease — was unveiled by DHHS in May. 32

MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


Digital Vision

APA’s input shaped behavioral health recommendations for the national plan for Alzheimer’s disease. B Y EV E GL I C K S MAN

OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

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APA committees and divisions reviewed and commented on preliminary drafts of the Alzheimer’s plan. Deborah DiGilio, director of APA’s Office on Aging, and Patricia Kobor, APA’s senior science policy analyst, managed APA’s input during the planning. While the first draft included no mention of the word psychology, the final plan is more inclusive. The result, say those involved, will lead to better care for people with Alzheimer’s disease and their caregivers, plus more opportunities for psychologists. The plan has gotten Congress’s attention, says Denise C. Park, PhD, who co-directs the Center for Vital Longevity and is the distinguished university chair in behavioral and brain sciences at the University of Texas at Dallas. “It brings enormous recognition that funding has been woefully inadequate for research on the aging mind and brain.”

team providing assessment or treatment services. Psychologists are explicitly mentioned as a government resource for evidencebased dementia guidelines to be disseminated. (See APA Guidelines on Dementia and Age-related Cognitive Change, www.apa.org/pi/aging/resources/dementia-guidelines.pdf.) • Risk factor prevention. The final plan includes a stronger statement on the need for clinical trials on non-pharmacologic ways to prevent and manage Alzheimer’s disease. A specific objective was added to continue clinical trials on promising lifestyle interventions that address known Alzheimer’s risk factors such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension, smoking, depression, and mental and physical inactivity. A separate research summit convened to address the plan’s first goal of establishing research priorities. It called for additional funding for behavioral and cognitive research, as well as more research on neuropsychological markers of Alzheimer’s disease.

“With behavioral interventions to manage diet and exercise, we may see improvements in cognitive health and reduction in Alzheimer’s prevalence.”

A greater focus on prevention The National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease now provides a framework Opportunities for through 2025 for driving psychologists and tracking progress on One of the plan’s Alzheimer’s initiatives. The recommendations is to expand Obama administration funding and incentives for JENNIFER MANLY dedicated additional funds of health-care providers to Columbia University Medical Center $130 million for Alzheimer’s pursue careers in geriatric research in fiscal years 2012 specialties. As the population and 2013, plus $26 million for Alzheimer’s programs, services, ages, psychologists will have to incorporate expertise on aging professional training and public education. and caregiving into their general practice, too, says Peter A. The plan’s focus on prevention reflects a major shift Lichtenberg, PhD, professor and director of the Institute of from 10 years ago, says Glenn E. Smith, PhD, consultant on Gerontology and Merrill Palmer Skillman Institute at Wayne neurocognitive disorders at the Mayo Clinic and clinical State University in Michigan. “They’ll need to recognize director of Alzheimer’s disease resources on MayoClinic.com. cognitive decline and know when it’s Alzheimer’s and not “We now conceive of Alzheimer’s disease developing over 20 to delirium or frailty,” Lichtenberg says. (See the APA webinar: New 30 years or longer,” he explains. “We are developing methods guidelines for the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, www.apa.org/ that offer windows of opportunity for prevention strategies.” science/about/psa/2011/10/alzheimers-webinar.aspx.) In particular, research has revealed that such chronic Psychologists also are well-positioned to educate people disorders as hypertension and diabetes are putting people at risk about Alzheimer’s and to refer them to resources. According for Alzheimer’s, says neuropsychologist Jennifer Manly, PhD, an to the most recent “Facts and Figures” from the Alzheimer’s associate professor at Columbia University Medical Center who Association (www.alz.org/downloads/facts_figures_2012.pdf), serves on the National Advisory Council and chairs its research only about half of Caucasians and 30 percent of minorities with subcommittee. “With behavioral interventions to manage diet Alzheimer’s are ever formally diagnosed. The national plan and exercise, we may see improvements in cognitive health and proposes more research and activities to aid outreach to highreduction in Alzheimer’s prevalence,” she says. risk populations and minorities. Among the plan’s final provisions that APA recommended: Using neuropsychological assessments to diagnose the early • Interdisciplinary teams. The text was broadened so stages of Alzheimer’s also requires psychological expertise. psychologists and other health-care providers — in addition “Psychology is better than any other discipline at assessing to physicians — are recognized as part of a skilled Alzheimer’s thinking challenges and subtle memory decline,” says Smith. 34

MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


These evaluations can also provide useful information about disease progression and the possible impact of intervention. Manly cites the need for more research to fully understand how biomarkers relate to cognition and behavior, hallmarks of Alzheimer’s. “We have technology for amyloid imaging, but we don’t know how to use it. We need to do work to standardize this information. What are the best protocols to use?” Behavioral experts are being tapped as well to develop prevention models for lowering Alzheimer’s incidence. Behavioral intervention programs designed to help people lose weight, exercise more, manage diabetes, cope with depression or stop smoking would all be helpful in reducing risk factors. Deborah E. Barnes, PhD, and Kristine Yaffe, MD, of the University of California, San Francisco, suggest that 25 percent improvement in these conditions in Americans would prevent as many as 16.5 percent of Alzheimer’s disease cases in the United States (Lancet Neurology, 2011). Psychologists are also at the forefront of developing behavioral and environmental interventions that can help family caregivers and nursing home staff to manage disruptive behavior that is often associated with dementia. These interventions can help to reduce the use of antipsychotic medications, which can cause serious side effects. Lichtenberg raises the need for psychologists to understand

the necessary balance between an Alzheimer’s patient’s need for both autonomy and care. “Families make a huge mistake when they rush in and take away the rights and decisions of the person with early signs of memory loss,” he says. “This is not ethical or helpful.” (Related: APA’s Assessment of Older Adults with Diminished Capacity: A Handbook for Psychologists, www.apa.org/pi/aging/resources/guides/diminished-capacity. pdf.) Instead, he proposes that guidelines be drawn that support the older adult’s decision-making abilities until he or she truly requires protection. Otherwise, families may encounter strong resistance and risk being cut off from all communication with the older adult. APA staff will continue to track and contribute to Alzheimer’s policy development. Meanwhile, aging experts in psychology are calling on their colleagues to be better advocates in preventing and managing the disease. “The emphasis in Alzheimer’s work has been on biomarkers and the search for a magic cure through pharmacology,” says Adam Brickman, PhD, an assistant neuropsychology professor at Columbia University Medical Center. Since scientists have yet to find an effective medication, though, psychologists need to step in, he says. “This is not just about finding a pill.” n Eve Glicksman is a writer in the Philadelphia area.

Announcing The 2012–2013

aPa Psychology DeParTmenT Program APA is pleased to announce a program for universities and colleges—the Psychology Department Program (PDP). This program offers valuable information and useful resources to enhance teaching and learning in psychology. The benefiTs of enrollmenT in The PDP incluDe: These PublicaTions

These resources

• Teaching Ethically: Challenges and Opportunities

• Principles for Quality Undergraduate Education in Psychology

• Evidence-Based Teaching for Higher Education

• Guidelines for the Undergraduate Psychology Major

These annual subscriPTions • American Psychologist • Monitor on Psychology • gradPSYCH • Psychology Teacher Network

• Careers in Psychology—DVD and guide • Student affiliations—Free student affiliate memberships for three of your students • List of participating programs on the APA website • PDP-NEWS listserv

• The Educator

cost of enrollment in the PDP: $300 To enroll or for more information, please visit www.apa.org/ed/precollege/department/index.aspx 12-126.indd 1

OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

6/4/12 9:06 AM

35


Steve Mason

Psychologists helping psychologists

36

5761<7:768;A+0747/AÂ&#x152;7+<7*-:


Determining your responsibilities when you believe a colleague may have behaved unethically. BY REBECCA A. CLAY

I

f you saw another psychologist do something that appeared unethical, would you know how to respond? Many psychologists don’t, says Beth Kaplan Westbrook, PsyD, co-chair of APA’s Advisory Committee on Colleague Assistance (ACCA) and a private practitioner in Portland, Ore. They may be unsure about laws in their state and how those laws interact with APA’s Ethics Code. They may lack the information they need. Or they may be nervous about the liability issues that could arise, either from reporting a colleague or failing to do so. ACCA is working to make sure psychologists are clear about how to react when a colleague needs help. In addition to creating a series of online resources, the group is urging state, provincial and territorial psychological associations (SPTAs) to create colleague assistance programs that can stop problems before they become crises. “Health professionals aren’t immune from the same problems that affect the general public,” says Westbrook, citing as examples substance abuse and mental health disorders. “ACCA’s main purpose is not only to help people get the treatment they need, but also to focus on prevention — to have programs in place so that psychologists can seek help or refer colleagues as problems arise.” A state-by-state basis According to APA’s Ethics Code, psychologists who believe another psychologist may have committed an ethical violation should first try an informal resolution. As long as it seems appropriate and intervening doesn’t violate confidentiality rights, they should bring the issue to the other psychologist’s attention and try to resolve the matter one-on-one. If that doesn’t work or the apparent violation is serious, says the Ethics Code, the psychologist should take further action appropriate to the situation. That might mean

7+<7*-:Œ5761<7:768;A+0747/A

reporting the individual to a state or national committee on professional ethics, the state licensing board or institutional authorities. One caveat: The standard doesn’t apply if intervening would violate confidentiality rights or if you’ve been retained to review the psychologist’s conduct. According to Stephen Behnke, JD, PhD, director of APA’s Ethics Office, state laws governing confidentiality, privilege and mandatory reporting vary considerably. Psychologists, he says, should be familiar with the rules in their own jurisdiction governing the disclosure of confidential information. “Consulting an expert on your jurisdiction’s mental health law can be enormously helpful,” says Behnke. But many psychologists don’t know the law in their states, says Westbrook. Oregon, for example, has a law requiring psychologists to report unethical behavior. But when the Oregon Colleague Assistance Committee surveyed Oregon Psychological Association members, the group found that nearly three-quarters erroneously thought that they were required to report unethical behavior revealed in the context of a therapeutic relationship, whether psychotherapy or a peer review group. Instead, says Westbrook, privilege trumps the duty to report unethical behavior. Plus, many psychologists weren’t aware that Oregon has a law protecting people from civil actions if they report health professionals to regulatory boards in good faith. New resources Because the issues are so tricky, ACCA suggests that every SPTA create a colleague assistance program or at the very least appoint an individual or task force to review state laws related to the duty to report unethical behavior, privilege and peer review issues, and consult with a mental health attorney familiar with the state’s laws. Only 26 of

37


“Try to look at it as a win/win situation: You are helping a colleague avoid a potentially difficult and embarrassing situation and helping the profession maintain its reputation.”

the 60 SPTAs have colleague infractions — or who are at assistance programs or more risk of doing so — get the help informal services, according to they need rather than simply ACCA’s latest research. punishing them. These larger To help SPTAs, ACCA programs may also go beyond has created several resources educating psychologists about on such topics as how to laws to engaging in advocacy create colleague assistance designed to improve those laws. programs, confidentiality and “But don’t feel intimidated by liability issues, and prevention feeling that you have to do it GLEN A. MARTIN strategies. (To access the all,” says Plante. North Carolina Psychological Association’s materials, visit http://psyclink. For colleagues who have colleague assistance program apa.org and log in under observed unethical behavior, the upper right log in, then says Plante, a colleague select PsycLINK. Or log on to assistance program can help MyAPA and click on the link at left.) you work through what to do. A colleague assistance program doesn’t have to be elaborate, “We try not to provide advice,” she says. “Our goal is just to says ACCA member Wendy A. Plante, PhD, a member of be educational.” the Rhode Island Psychological Association’s new colleague Psychologists handling such calls might review APA’s assistance committee. Ethics Code or relevant clinical issues with callers. They might “We’re a small state so one of the challenges is that there are review legal and risk management issues. They might suggest only so many resources to go around,” says Plante, a clinical resources, such as expert consultation with a mental health associate professor of psychiatry and human behavior at Brown attorney, university or hospital ethics committee or treatment University’s Alpert Medical School. “We’ve learned that you can resources for psychologists in need. start a colleague assistance program on a really small scale and Confronting a colleague can be difficult, says ACCA member get a good response.” Glen A. Martin, PhD, chair of the North Carolina Psychological Established in 2011, Rhode Island’s program focuses on Association’s colleague assistance program. And graduate prevention and education, offering workshops on wellness and programs typically explain psychologists’ obligations but not similar topics plus a consultation line. Psychologists can call for the mechanics of confronting someone and dealing with the help if they have a problem or think someone else does, whether aftermath. it’s coping with the impact of personal illness on practice or “It’s a difficult thing to do, but important,” says Martin. addressing such direct ethical concerns as practicing within “My advice is to try to look at it as a win/win situation: one’s competence or preventing boundary violations. You are helping a colleague avoid a potentially difficult and In larger states, says Plante, colleague assistance programs embarrassing situation and helping the profession maintain its may do much more. In addition to prevention-oriented reputation.” n workshops and consultation lines, they may run diversion programs that provide treatment so psychologists who have had Rebecca A. Clay is a writer in Washington, D.C. 38

MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


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AD2018


Bringing books to life

Psychologists’ research points to new ways to nurture young readers.

B Y JA MI E C HAMBE RLIN Monitor staff

M

ost parents know that reading bedtime stories to preschoolers is key to developing early literacy. But new research with low-income children by psychologists suggests it takes more than nightly reading to foster a child’s future reading success. Parents, teachers and others who read to children must also engage young children with lively, enthusiastic recitations that bring characters and plots to life, and pose open-ended questions that spark children’s comprehension, vocabulary and interest. Such reading-aloud extras, say researchers, are as important as regular teeth-brushing for children ages 4 and 5 because they can be the difference between a child who picks up reading easily and one who struggles when he or she reaches kindergarten. “Everyone feels like they know how to read a book to 40

children,” says Karen Stoiber, PhD, of the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, who directs the EMERGE project, a reading intervention she’s conducting with Milwaukee’s Head Start program. But in reality, many parents and teachers need coaching on how to ask questions as they go along to emphasize rhyming and to teach children how to follow words on the page. Numerous studies over the last decade show that such MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


Digital Vision

strategies are vital for boosting low-income children’s vocabularies, language development, sound awareness and letter recognition abilities — all building blocks for early literacy. According to National Center for Education Statistics data, only 20 percent of 4-year-olds in poverty can recognize all 26 letters, compared with 37 percent of their peers at or above the poverty level. OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

Stoiber and other psychologists are including such coaching as part of interventions proven to improve pre-reading skills among low-income preschoolers. One of the best ways to boost these children’s literacy is by helping teachers and parents maximize the time they spend reading with their children, says Jorge E. Gonzalez, PhD, of Texas A&M University, a U.S. Department of Education-funded researcher who studies oral 41


language and literacy development. “Children who start school with a poor vocabulary rarely catch up,” says Gonzalez. “The bottom line is there is not a lot of room for error on this issue.” Working with teachers One way Stoiber and Gonzalez are helping preschool teachers enrich their reading techniques is by using a tactic long used by sports coaches — videotaping. Stoiber records a teacher reading to a group of children and critiques the session, pointing out ways that he or she might improve, such as beginning a book by introducing the plot, announcing the title, or by asking the children to find a specific letter or listen for a certain letter sound. In an intervention he’s conducting in preschools in southern Texas, Gonzalez and colleagues have found that teachers often rely solely on labeling objects to engage children — asking them to point to the apple or the brown bear, for example. While that strategy isn’t harmful, it doesn’t boost children’s vocabularies as much as asking cognitively demanding open-ended questions. He and fellow researchers guide teachers on how and when to ask such questions as, “What do you think is going to happen next?” Through their curriculum, Gonzalez and his colleagues also prompt teachers to ask questions that connect words and concepts to the children’s surroundings, such as “Where have you seen a sunset before?” At first, the teachers were uncomfortable getting feedback, says Gonzalez, but they got used to it and refined their strategies. And, he points out, “These lessons really stick with them.” The lessons are also sticking with the children. In a study published in Exceptional Children in 2010, Gonzalez and colleagues found that when teachers asked their budding readers open-ended questions as they read and emphasized how words from the book connected to their lives, children expanded their vocabularies significantly more than when

teachers read as usual. And, in as-yet-unpublished research, he has found that children make more vocabulary gains when teachers ask association-level questions as they read, such as, “Who takes you to the grocery store?” and “Where have you seen a cow?” Likewise, Stoiber and her EMERGE staff videotape and critique teachers and offer page-by-page pointers on how to emphasize letters, clap out syllables and rhymes, and pose questions about specific words. The EMERGE intervention, funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education, also includes differentiated small-group instruction for children. All EMERGE lessons are grouped around specific themes, such as family celebrations or transportation, to help children unite the material and make personal connections to the stories. Early results of the EMERGE intervention are promising. In a study published in Reading Psychology in February, Stoiber and Maribeth Gettinger, PhD, of the University of Wisconsin– Madison, reported that children who participated in the EMERGE curriculum made higher gains in letter naming, vocabulary word knowledge, print recognition and book comprehension than students in no-treatment control classrooms. Teachers using EMERGE say the children are graduating from their Head Start classes knowing 20 letters on average, twice the amount children in previous classes knew upon graduation. “You can really see the progress from the beginning of the year to the end,” says Kathleen Wittig, a 22-year veteran preschool teacher with the Milwaukee Head Start program. “We’ll read a book with the word ‘breeze’ in it, and by the next week they are outside saying, ‘Miss Kathie, we feel the breeze!’ It’s a great feeling, knowing that they are comprehending the material outside the classroom.”

Parents and teachers should also choose books with “print-rich” details — features that draw children’s eyes to words and letters, such as dialogue bubbles, words written in crayon or large font, or words that whoosh up and down the page.

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Picking books Psychologists are also helping low-income parents improve MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


their techniques in reading to their children. Drawing on bubbles, words written in crayon or large font, or words that research that links language learning to reading readiness, whoosh up and down the page, says Laura Justice, PhD, an University of Nebraska educational psychology professor Susan educational researcher at Ohio State University and author M. Sheridan, PhD, and her colleagues work with teachers to of the 2010 book “Engaging Children with Print: Building promote parent engagement in early literacy in rural Nebraska Early Literacy Skills with Quality Read-Aloud Books.” In her and Kansas City Head Start preschool classrooms. studies using eye-tracking technology, Justice has found that Using an intervention called Pre-3T, the teachers Sheridan children look at letters and words more frequently in books works with help parents learn strategies to increase children’s that have print-rich details. She’s also found that preschool exposure to language and build verbal expression skills. For children whose teachers accentuate print details as they read example, parents learn to prompt children to share about their — by talking about how the print moves left to right and day, by replacing yes or no questions like, “Did you have a good pointing out when letters reappear, for example — are better day?” with open-ended inquiries like, “Tell me about all the readers and spellers by the end of first grade. books you read today.” Connecting with the type primes these children for that “Children who are given opportunities to converse and have thrilling moment when a string of letters pops off the page a rich language discourse across their natural environment are as a word, Justice says. “Knowing about print is an important then primed to pick up on the tasks necessary to learn to read,” foundation for developing word reading skills down the road.” n she says. Enlisting parents is also a key component of Stoiber and Gettinger’s EMERGE program, which offers family library sessions once a week in Milwaukee’s Head Start classrooms, at which parents can see a video offering tips on reading to children. Stoiber’s graduate students are there to help parents select developmentally appropriate titles, a task that often confounds many parents and teachers. “Often preschool-age books don’t come with the right vocabulary words and many are too dense,” Gonzalez says. In fact, some of the most beautifully written and illustrated books for children don’t introduce many words and concepts that children can connect to their lives, he says. Yet others, like the book “The Snowy Day,” feature complex words like “melt” that parents and teachers can use to ask children to discuss their own experiences and knowledge about things that melt, he says. Parents and teachers should Watch a teacher use psychologists’ techniques that make learning to also choose books with “printread more fun and engaging for young students. rich” details — features that draw children’s eyes to words and letters, such as dialogue Digital Vision

Psychologist-designed reading intervention in action

OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

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Parenting that works

Seven research-backed

ways to improve parenting. BY AMY NOVOTNEY

S

earch for parenting books on Amazon.com, and you get tens of thousands of titles, leaving new parents awash in a sea of often conflicting information. But thanks to the accumulated results of decades of empirical research, psychologists know more than ever before about what successful parenting really is. The Monitor asked leaders in child psychology for their best empirically tested insights for managing children’s behavior. Here’s what they said.

1.

Embrace praise

Simply put, giving attention to undesired behaviors increases undesired behaviors, while giving attention to good behaviors increases good behaviors, says Alan E. Kazdin, PhD, a Yale University psychology professor and director of the Yale Parenting Center and Child Conduct Clinic. “When it comes to nagging, reprimand and other forms of 44

punishment, the more you do it, the more likely you are not going to get the behavior you want,” says Kazdin, APA’s 2008 president. “A better way to get children to clean their room or do their homework, for example, is to model the behavior yourself, encourage it and praise it when you see it.” But parents shouldn’t offer that praise indiscriminately, says Sheila Eyberg, PhD, a psychology professor at the University of Florida who conducts research on parent-child relationships. Eyberg recommends parents provide their children with a lot of “labeled praise” — specific feedback that tells the child exactly what he or she did that the parent liked. By giving labeled praise MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


to the child, such as, “I really like how quietly you’re sitting in your chair,” when a child is having trouble calming down. The parent is focusing on what’s relevant to the behavior problem, Eyberg says. Several studies back her up: Psychologist Karen Budd, PhD, found that training preschool teachers to use labeled praise improves the teacher-child relationship and helps teachers better manage behavior in the classroom (Education and Treatment of Children, 2010). Kazdin also recommends reinforcing the praise with a smile or a friendly touch. And feedback should be honest, says David J. Palmiter Jr., PhD, a practitioner in Clarks Summit, Pa., and OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

author of the 2011 book, “Working Parents, Thriving Families.” “I was at a girls’ softball game recently and I started to get a headache from all the praising going on for poor performance,” he says. “This can often deprive a child of the wonderful learning that comes from failure.”

2.

Look the other way

Research also suggests that parents should learn to ignore minor misbehaviors that aren’t dangerous, such as whining about a sibling not sharing or a toddler throwing food on the floor. 45


Parents who know what a child is capable of understanding, feeling and doing at different ages and stages of development can be more realistic about what behaviors to expect, leading to less frustration and aggression.

In several studies, Kazdin and his team found that when parents changed their responses to behaviors — for example, they ignored screams but gave a lot of attention to their children when they asked nicely for something — the child learned that asking nicely is the better, more reliable way to get attention (“The Kazdin Method for Parenting the Defiant Child,” 2008).

3.

Learn about child development

Parents are also more effective when they read up on child development to understand the misbehaviors that are common for each developmental stage, says Eyberg. Often, when a child displays a behavior that a parent doesn’t like, such as making a mess while eating, it’s because the child is simply learning a new skill, she says. “If parents understand that the child isn’t making a mess on purpose, but instead learning how to use their developing motor skills in a new way, they’re more likely to think about praising every step the child takes toward the ultimate goal,” she says. Parents who know what a child is capable of understanding, feeling and doing at different ages and stages of development can be more realistic about what behaviors to expect, leading to less frustration and aggression.

4.

Do time-out right

Three decades of research on time-outs show that they work best when they are brief and immediate, Kazdin says. “A way to get time-out to work depends on ‘timein’ — that is, what the parents are praising and modeling when the child is not being punished,” Kazdin says. APA’s Violence Prevention Office offers the ACT Raising Safe Kids program, which provides parenting skills classes nationwide through a research-based curriculum delivered by trained professionals. The program teaches parents and caregivers how to raise children without violence through anger management, positive child discipline and conflict resolution. For more information on ACT, visit http:// actagainstviolence.apa.org or the ACT Facebook page or contact Julia da Silva, the program’s national director, at jsilva@apa.org.

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Research also suggests that parents need to remain calm when administering time-outs — often a difficult feat in the heat of the misbehavior — and praise compliance once the child completes it. In addition, he says, parents shouldn’t have to restrain a child to get him or her to take a time-out because the point of this disciplinary strategy is to give the child time away from all reinforcement. “If what is happening seems more like a fight in a bar, the parent is reinforcing inappropriate behaviors,” Kazdin says.

5.

Prevent misbehavior

John Lutzker, PhD, who directs the Center for Healthy Development at Georgia State University, has even stopped advising parents to use time-outs. Instead, he teaches parents to plan and structure activities to prevent a child’s challenging behaviors, based on previous research: • Plan ahead to prevent problems from arising. • Teach children how to cope effectively with the demands of the situation. • Find ways to help children stay engaged, busy and active when they might otherwise become bored or disruptive. “We’ve found in our work over the past 20 years that if you do a good job teaching parents planned activities training, there’s no need for time-outs,” Lutzker says.

6.

Take care of yourself first

Parents receive some of the best parenting advice every time they take off on an airplane, says Palmiter: If the cabin loses pressure and you must put on an oxygen mask, put one on yourself first before you help your child. “I see households all across America where the oxygen masks have long since dropped and all of the oxygen is going to the children,” says Palmiter. Yet the research makes it clear that children are negatively affected by their parents’ stress. According to APA’s 2010 Stress in America survey, 69 percent of respondents recognized that their personal stress affects their children, and only 14 percent of children said their parents’ stress didn’t bother them. In addition, 25 percent to 47 percent of tweens reported feeling sad, worried or frustrated about their parents’ stress. Another study published last year in Child Development found that parents’ stress imprints on children’s genes — and the effects last a very long time. That’s why modeling good stress management can make a MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


very positive difference in children’s behavior, as well as how they themselves cope with stress, psychologists say. Palmiter recommends that parents make time for exercise, hobbies, maintaining their friendships and connecting with their partners. That may mean committing to spending regular time at the gym or making date night a priority. “Investing in the relationship with their partner is one of the most giving things a parent can do,” Palmiter says. Single parents should establish and nurture meaningful connections in other contexts. A satisfying relationship with a colleague, neighbor, family member or friend can help to replenish one’s energy for parenting challenges.

Too often, Palmiter says, the one-on-one time parents Amy Novotney is a writer in Chicago. offer their children each week is the time that’s left over after life’s obligations, such as housework and billpaying, have been met. “We often treat our relationships — which are like orchids — like a cactus, and then when inevitably the orchid wilts or has problems, we tend to think that there’s something wrong with the orchid,” he says. To combat this issue, Palmiter recommends that each parent spend at least one hour a week — all at once or in segments — of one-on-one time with each child, spent doing nothing but paying attention to and expressing positive thoughts and feelings toward him or her. “It literally works out to about .5 percent of the time in a week,” he says. The most effective time for a parent to create those special moments is when the child is doing something that she or he can be praised for, such as building with Legos or shooting baskets. During that time, parents should avoid teaching, Dr. Alan E. Kazdin, director of the Yale Parenting Center, describes inquiring, sharing alternative his research-based intervention on how to prompt good behavior in perspectives or offering children. corrections. Palmiter says many families he’s recommended the strategy to over the years have told him

How to prompt good behavior

OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

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7.

Make time

that adding an hour of special time in addition to the quality time they spend with their children — such as attending a baseball game together — has significantly improved the parentchild relationship. In addition, a study published in January in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that, particularly among younger children, a parent’s demonstration of love, shown through nurturing behavior and expressions of support, can improve a child’s brain development and lead to a significantly larger hippocampus, a brain component that plays a key role in cognition. “The metaphor I use is, what an apple is to the physician — ‘an apple a day keeps the doctor away’ — special time is to the child psychologist,” Palmiter says. n

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EARLY CAREER PSYCHOLOGY

Money matters Psychologists are helping young couples stay afloat financially in increasingly turbulent economic waters. BY REBECCA VOELKER

T

roubled young couples who see Brad Klontz, PsyD, in his Kapaa, Hawaii, psychology practice often end up talking about more than their relationship with each other: They find themselves discussing their relationship with money, too. “Some of the symptoms bringing them in — feeling depressed, feeling anxious, having panic attacks — they may not know how much the role of money is playing in those symptoms,” says Klontz, a clinical psychologist and certified financial planner. Unprecedented levels of student debt, high credit card debt and a dismal job outlook have presented some young couples with financial challenges their parents and grandparents didn’t have to face. These days, more psychologists are stepping in to help couples tackle their financial burdens. Money stresses are nothing new for couples just starting out, but trying to resolve them in therapy is. 48

“There is a much greater awareness now among general psychologists that this is a very important issue to explore,” says Philadelphia psychologist Maggie Baker, PhD, also an expert in financial issues. To respond to the growing need for psychologists to talk to their clients about money management, Atlanta financial psychologist Mary Gresham, PhD, is spearheading an effort to launch an APA division of financial psychology. She’s circulating a petition supporting its creation, and financial planners welcome her efforts. “A trained, educated psychologist is a necessary component in certain financial planning relationships,” says Paul Auslander, president of the Financial Planning Association. Some couples can benefit from behavior modification techniques to curb runaway spending or make spending compromises, he says. “But I suspect that there aren’t enough financially trained psychologists to help couples coping with recession repercussions.” MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


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OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

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Combining households, combining money A common scenario that brings on financial turmoil for newlyweds is that although they may have lived together before marriage, they failed to discuss their financial union before they said “I do,” says Gresham. “They had operated under the roommate plan, where each one pays half of the expenses or one pays one set of bills and the other pays another set,” she explains. But as they settled into married life, neither spouse knew what was going on with their partners’ money. “Then they can’t figure out how to collaborate, how

to mix the money together.” Gresham looks at four issues with every couple: “math,” values, emotions and process. To begin helping couples work through these issues, Gresham asks the couple to take an objective look at how they spend their money, using tracking software so they can see how their income is distributed among rent or a mortgage and other commitments. Baker takes a similar approach in beginning her work with couples. “It’s important to get facts into the room,” she says. Seeing how much cash disappears in a $4 latte or a meal out

Young psychologists face a new bottom line Like their peers in other fields, many young psychologists face unprecedented financial pressures as they begin their careers. Student debt is rising, as are the costs of setting up a private practice. A survey by APA’s Center for Workforce Studies shows that graduates with a PsyD in clinical psychology reported median debt of $120,000 in 2009, more than double the $53,000 reported in 1997. For clinical PhD recipients, median debt was $68,000 in 2009, up from $55,000 in 2007. Practice costs can vary greatly, depending on whether a psychologist rents a luxury suite or a no-frills space. Those working in big cities also encounter high living expenses that take a big bite out of what can be a modest paycheck. There’s the cost of benefits, too. “Health insurance has skyrocketed, and that is one contributor to the increased cost of practice,” says Atlanta financial psychologist Mary Gresham, PhD. Among those just starting out is Alec Baker, PsyD, who completed his degree last August and is launching a private practice in Denver. “It’s going pretty well,” he says. He shares office space in a small group practice and has eight weekly clients. But he faces $155,000 in student loans, which would have meant monthly payments of $2,000 if he hadn’t deferred the debt and rescheduled payments that will be contingent upon his income. He expects monthly payments of about $300. Baker keeps his overhead low. He pays office rent by the hour, only when he uses the space. He uses the same computer he had in school, set up his own website for $75 and had a friend take his photo for the site. He doesn’t have billing software and uses a cellphone app that accepts clients’ credit cards for a 2.75 percent

50

charge per transaction. “I’ve invested a little more in networking and marketing costs,” says Baker, reporting that he spent $1,000 on a oneyear membership in a professional group that sponsors networking events. But despite Baker’s success, money management often isn’t easy for psychologists, says Gresham. Professional training doesn’t cover financial literacy. Some psychologists — particularly women — find it difficult to negotiate fees and salaries. Data from APA’s Center for Workforce Studies show that in 2009, male psychologists with doctoral-level degrees earned a median $65,000 working full time in their first year of practice, compared with $58,300 for women. The resulting income setback can have career-long repercussions. After 20 to 24 years in practice, women earned a median of $88,000 compared with $107,000 for men. Young psychologists can also find it difficult or uncomfortable to discuss payment with their patients. “We’re taught to be helpers,” Gresham says. “We don’t want to punish people, and some might perceive charging for a missed appointment as punishment. But it’s not.” It’s part of keeping a business afloat, she says, and it’s best to have a matter-of-fact talk about fees and cancellation policies with new clients up front. Besides negotiating fees or salaries, Gresham says psychologists who specialize in cost-saving interventions or have in-demand skills might have a little leeway to negotiate reimbursements with insurance companies. “It is possible, but I’m not saying it’s easy,” she adds. There’s always a bottom line, and Klontz says it is this: “You need to take care of yourself financially, or you’re not going to be able to take care of your clients.” n

MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


CAREER DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY can be a sobering experience. “The emotions start to come in all through this process,” says Gresham. That’s when she probes more deeply, asking couples about how their perceptions of money growing up affects them as adults. For example, children of cash-careful families may hoard their money as adults, while free-spending families may have kids who later on can’t hang on to a paycheck. The reverse can happen, too. “If a spender marries a hoarder, over time there’s bound to be conflict,” says Baker. “The spender loves the immediate gratification of spending, but for a hoarder it’s almost painful to spend money.” A generational change In Hawaii, Klontz is conducting research to understand couples and their finances, surveying 422 adults ages 18 to 80, with varying levels of income, education and net worth. His research, published last year in the Journal of the Financial Therapy Association, shows that younger adults are more likely than their parents or grandparents to have potentially damaging “money scripts” — subconscious beliefs that drive their financial behaviors. He found that adults 30 years old and younger were most likely to be “money avoiders” who become anxious, fearful or even disgusted when the conversation turns to money. Younger adults also were more likely to equate net worth with selfworth and to believe that the more money they have, the happier they will be. These beliefs, Klontz says, are linked with lower income and net worth. People with these views may set themselves up for financial failure by simply ignoring money issues, giving assets away, gambling excessively or compulsively buying things they want but can’t afford. “Very often in my work with couples, conflicts over money are really the result of conflicting money scripts,” he says. He uses a psychodynamic approach to examine clients’ experiences with money in childhood. Living with a workaholic parent who pursued an ever-bigger paycheck but never was at home or being in a family that neglected life’s necessities because parents hoarded cash could trigger present-day money troubles. “The more emotional the experience, the more rigidly these beliefs become locked in place,” Klontz says. Healing begins, he says, when a couple can open up to each other and be empathetic. “They may have very different attitudes about money, but if they can hear each other and respect each other, then they can come to a compromise” about sound money management. “They become a money team instead of money adversaries,” Gresham adds. Q Rebecca Voelker is a writer in Chicago. 7+<7*-:Œ5761<7:768;A+0747/A

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Jupiterimages

Overcoming temptation

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5761<7:768;A+0747/AÂ&#x152;7+<7*-:


SCIENCE WATCH

A twist on Pavlov’s famous conditioning experiment could point the way to new treatments for drug addiction and overeating. BY KIRSTEN WEIR

A

lcoholism, drug abuse, overeating: Psychologists have long sought to understand why we succumb to our temptations, and for good reason. Even those of us who don’t have hard-core addictions have trouble curbing our cravings from time to time, whether temptation comes in the form of a cigarette or an ice-cream sundae. Recently, scientists have inched closer to understanding temptation with the discovery that two distinct motivational behaviors exist in rats — and perhaps in people. Among the rodents, at least, some animals become powerfully attracted to cues that signal an imminent reward, while for others, the cue itself holds no special influence. Researchers are only just beginning to translate the findings to humans. But if their hunch is correct, the research could open up new avenues for preventing and treating addiction. “This research highlights the motivational power of cues associated with rewards, such as food or drugs, to instigate maladaptive behavior even in the face of a conscious desire to resist temptation,” says Terry Robinson, 7+<7*-:Œ5761<7:768;A+0747/A

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PhD, professor of psychology and neuroscience at the University of Michigan. “One important target for therapeutic intervention may be the development of effective strategies to cope with the insidious effects of reward-associated stimuli.”

“One hypothesis is that, for whatever reason, these animals have different brains. In sign-trackers, you have this dopamine-dependant motivational process. In the goal-trackers, something else is going on psychologically.”

or TV commercial) often have the power to tempt people even when they aren’t hungry. Studies have shown that obese people are more attracted to food signals than people of healthy weights, Robinson notes. And drug addicts are more likely than non-addicts to be drawn to signals they associate with their habit. “A lot of behavior, be it human or animal, is really controlled by cues in the environment that predict rewards,” he says. Yet it’s not clear why some people might be more focused on cues than others, nor how that difference might contribute to addictions or overeating. That’s where the rodents can help, Robinson believes. Over the last several years, he has used a rat model similar to Tomie’s to explore why some animals are so easily tempted by signals in their environments.

Stuck on signals Years ago, when Rutgers University psychologist Arthur Tomie, PhD, was studying classical conditioning in his lab rats, he noticed something strange. Just as in Ivan Pavlov’s famous conditioning experiments, Tomie’s model involved a first stimulus that signaled the occurrence of a second stimulus — in this case, a metal lever dropped into the rats’ cages, signaling that a food treat was about to appear. The animals quickly learned to connect the signal with the reward, and when the metal lever appeared, many of the rats darted to the corner of TERRY ROBINSON the cage where food would be University of Michigan delivered. Some of the rats, however, were drawn to the lever itself. Different brains Rather than run to the food Robinson has identified drop, the rats licked and gnawed the inedible metal lever as two distinct behaviors among the rodents. For some rats (the though it were rat kibble (Clinical Psychology Reviews, 1995). “goal-trackers”) the final reward is most important. They run This action wasn’t totally unfamiliar, says Tomie. Researchers for the food cup as soon as they spot the signaling lever. For had noted similar behavior in pigeons back in the 1960s others (the “sign-trackers”) the cue itself holds the most sway. (Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 1968). But These are the animals that Tomie saw licking and gnawing on watching the rats, Tomie was reminded of drug addiction in the lever. people. “What intrigued me is that the animals didn’t appear The sign trackers seem to be particularly prone to addiction to be able to control themselves,” Tomie says. He even tried or other maladaptive behaviors, Robinson says. Rodents that withholding the food reward from those rats that contacted keep their eyes on the lever are much more likely to seek drugs the lever first. Still, a handful of rats couldn’t resist the lever’s or swallow alcohol from a sipper. lure. “The animals are unable to stop themselves, to their A compulsion for cues seems to extend across many types detriment,” he says. of behaviors. Sign-tracking rats have trouble resisting cues in Addiction therapists frequently encounter patients who general, whether they’re associated with food or with drugs, desperately want to quit drug or alcohol consumption but such as cocaine. In fact, by identifying sign-trackers using the experience a triggered relapse, Tomie says. For an alcoholic, food-pellet model, Robinson can take rats that have never been for example, the trigger may be the sight of a cocktail glass exposed to drugs and correctly predict which animals are likely or the flickering neon sign in front of a favored watering to exhibit drug-seeking behaviors when introduced to cocaine hole. Similarly, food-related signals (such as a fast-food sign (Biological Psychiatry, 2010). 54

MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


This dark side of sign tracking may be especially worrisome given that the behavior isn’t all that unusual. Over the years, Robinson has amassed data on close to 2,000 rats. About a third of them exhibit sign-tracking behavior, while a third engage in goal tracking. (The remaining third vacillate back and forth, and aren’t easily classified as members of either group.) In other words, sign tracking — and the potentially problematic behaviors associated with it — appear to be quite common in the rat world. “We’re not talking about a few extremes,” he says. “We’re actually talking about a large proportion of the population.” What makes signs and symbols so powerful for this group of animals? To answer that question, Robinson has begun looking more deeply into the brain’s reward system. In a study last year, he and his colleagues discovered that when sign-trackers glimpse a cue, they experience a rapid spike in dopamine, the neurotransmitter that helps control the brain’s reward center. Goal-trackers don’t show that spike (Nature, 2011). “One hypothesis is that, for whatever reason, these animals have different brains,” he says. “The behavior of sign-trackers is strongly controlled by dopamine-dependent motivational processes. But in the goal trackers, something else is going on psychologically.” So far, it’s not clear what that something might be. Robinson’s hypothesis is that for goal-trackers, the cue evokes a more cognitive expectation process that does not require dopamine and that leads the animal to the expected reward. There’s some evidence that the tendency to become a sign-tracker or a goal-tracker is heritable, Robinson says (Neuropsychopharmacology, 2010). But, he adds, “we know almost nothing about the genetic basis.” However, there’s also evidence that early environmental experiences can predispose a rat pup to a future of sign- or goal-tracking. Pups reared in stressful environments without their mothers are more likely to become sign-trackers as adults (Behavioural Brain Research, 2011). “As you’d expect with any complex psychological trait, it’s influenced by the interaction between environmental and genetic factors,” he says. Air-popped rewards To date, most of the work on sign-tracking has been done in rats. But there are some emerging hints that the same patterns may show up in people. In a small study of 15 adult smokers, Stephen Mahler, PhD, at the Medical University of South Carolina, and Harriet de Wit, PhD, at the University of Chicago, found that participants who experienced potent cueinduced cravings for cigarettes also reacted more strongly to food-related images than those who didn’t experience such cravings (PLoS One, 2010). In humans as in rats, some people may be highly sensitive to conditioned stimuli. Margaret Wardle, PhD, a postdoctoral researcher in DeWit’s lab, is looking further into sign-tracking by conditioning people with food rewards. In her experiment, she is presenting OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

hungry volunteers with neutral images, such as nature scenes, on a computer screen. That cue is paired with a reward of popcorn delivered through plastic tubes. Later, Wardle shows volunteers a series of images and measures their affinity for pictures that were previously paired with popcorn. The research isn’t without its difficulties. “There are some challenges in moving this over to people,” Wardle says. “People don’t usually approach or lick or bite things that they’re attracted to.” Instead, she gauges interest in cues in more subtle ways. Using sensors attached to the volunteers’ faces, she measures the activity of barely detectible facial movements. (The zygomatic muscle involved with smiling, for instance, activates slightly when you’re looking at something you desire.) Wardle is also tracking reaction time and eye gaze. “The idea is that sign-trackers will maintain their attention on the [images paired with food], whereas goal-trackers will not,” she says. This study is just a first pass — “a real rough cut,” Wardle says — to see whether human sign-trackers can be reliably identified in lab studies. If she’s successful, it could lead to a lifetime’s worth of follow-up studies. “My hope is that if we can identify this trait in a lab, we can start to build a picture of what a sign-tracking human looks like out in the real world. How does this relate to vulnerability to drug use?” she says. Understanding these behaviors outside the lab will be challenging, since cues and rewards are often so closely linked in human life; out in the real world, it’s hard to separate the cocktail glass from the martini it holds. Still, Wardle is hopeful. “In the future we’d like to do things like look at adolescents, who have comparatively little drug exposure, to see if we can predict going forward who is going to have what kind of behavior,” she says. That’s precisely where Robinson hopes his animal studies will lead. “We’re interested in predicting who is going to be prone to obesity or prone to addiction,” he says. That predictive power might one day lead to interventions that help prevent people from developing the maladaptive behaviors in the first place. The work could also lead to new treatments. Signtrackers dealing with addiction, for example, might benefit from therapies that emphasize avoiding cues. “A better understanding of the neurobiological processes by which cues gain control over behavior may reveal other treatment strategies,” Robinson says. Plenty of dots remain to be connected between levergnawing rats and people addicted to food, drugs, alcohol or tobacco. But the research is really taking off, Tomie says. “There’s a lot of interest right now in the addiction world about sign-tracking,” he says. “It’s starting to move from the background to the foreground.” n Kirsten Weir is a writer in Minneapolis.

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MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


Catching

autism earlier A flood of new research is advancing our

understanding of autism and highlighting the need for earlier interventions. BY EVE G LI CKSMAN

O

ne in 88 children. That was the jarring statistic released in March when the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported the number of U.S. children with autism. If that number didn’t get your attention, the report also announced a 23 percent jump in autism rates from 2006 to 2008, and a 78 percent increase since 2002. Some researchers say the dramatic data are due to broader definitions of autism and earlier identification, but CDC’s higher-than-expected statistics are a call to action with implications for psychologists. “Many psychologists have little or no training in working with autistic adults. Twenty years ago, adult psychologists might have gone through an entire career without really needing this information,” says Judith Miller, PhD, training director at the Center for Autism Research, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. “Today, however, it’s important for the general psychologist to understand how mental disorders manifest in people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). There will be opportunities to incorporate clients with ASD OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

into a more general practice and also to develop specialty services for these unique and interesting individuals.” With the increased attention on ASD, federal agencies, advocacy groups and others have raised or targeted millions of dollars for research to tease out the causes of ASD and identify how best to treat it. The flurry of research began around 2006, with the Combating Autism Act. The federal Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee also spearheaded much of the recent activity. The latest findings are changing what we know about autism and, in particular, stress the need for diagnosis and treatment before age 6 when treatment is known to be the most effective. The newest research suggests it’s even possible to reverse autism symptoms in some infants and toddlers or, more commonly, decrease the severity of the symptoms. “The hope is that if we can improve intervention with infants and toddlers, many of them will be able to leave their disabilities behind by age 5,” says Sally J. Rogers, PhD, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the M.I.N.D. Institute at University of California Davis Medical Center. 57


Diagnosis and assessment Experts are finding they can now reliably diagnose ASD in children from 12 to 18 months old by looking at their social deficits or repetitive actions. But the trajectory of the disorder is unpredictable, says Catherine Lord, PhD, who has studied high-risk ASD babies from 18 months to 36 months (Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Lord, et al. 2012). “In young children — especially under 2-and-a-half years — we shouldn’t treat it as a lifetime diagnosis. We can offer parents some hope that a very young child will move out of the autism spectrum or improve,” says Lord, who directs the Center for Autism and the Developing Brain at the Weill Cornell Medical College/New York Presbyterian Hospital. At the same time, she adds, other children with ASD regress — and this can happen whether or not the child receives treatment. The reasons are unknown, but Lord’s study highlights the need to frequently monitor and reevaluate the child throughout the preschool years. Psychologists need to advise parents that the “wait-and-see” approach is not appropriate when autism is suspected, says Laura Schreibman, PhD, a professor at the University of California, San Diego, who directs the university’s Autism Intervention Research Program. Delaying a diagnosis can mean giving up the significant gains of intervention that have been demonstrated before age 6. Early intervention can even prevent regression of communication and social skills in some cases, she says. Rogers explains that it’s easier to develop comprehensive treatment approaches for infants and toddlers than for older children. “This is because they are not as diverse a group as 10-year-olds,” she says. “We haven’t yet isolated the key ingredients and variables affecting treatment outcome in older children who need a more individual approach,” she says.

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, notes that not all children will respond to the same treatment, though. Additional studies have underscored that it’s the earliness of the intervention — not the method itself — that leads to the positive outcomes. “There is more than one way to get good outcomes, and different therapists will gravitate to different methods,” she stresses. LEAP (Learning Experiences and Alternative Program for Preschoolers and Their Parents) is another successful intervention for young children. This treatment model mixes children with ASD with typically developing preschool kids in the classroom. In this way, the ASD child has the opportunity to learn appropriate language and behavior from other kids who are taught how to interact with them. The learning program is designed so kids become engaged with activities “organically” — not through the direction of a teacher. One study found that the best LEAP outcomes were linked to how well the teacher complied with the protocol (Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, Strain, et al. 2011). Teachers who received intensive training and coaching over the two-year study adhered to the LEAP practices 90 percent of the time. Their students with ASD showed significantly greater improvements on behavioral measures and symptoms than the ASD students whose teachers were simply given the LEAP manual to follow. Properly trained parents can also help infants and toddlers with autism make gains in areas such as “joint attention,” says Dawson. Joint attention skills involve sharing through pointing or coordinating looks, for instance, or sustaining attention with a parent or an activity. In one study (Journal of Autism Development Disorder, Kasari, et al. 2010), parents were trained from once a month to several times a week on how to expand their children’s interest in play. The quality of the parents’ participation — not the number of training sessions — was linked to how much progress was made.

Psychologists need to stress to parents that the “wait-and-see” approach is not appropriate when autism is suspected.

Intervention for young children One research-proven intervention for very young children with ASD is the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM), a structured teaching and relationship-based approach in the child’s home that uses play as a learning tool. A randomized, controlled trial over two years found that children age 18 to 30 months participating in ESDM significantly improved their IQs, social interaction and language abilities (Pediatrics, Dawson, et al. 2010). The children received 20 hours per week of ESDM intervention plus five or more hours of guided care from parents. Rogers, who co-authored the study and developed the ESDM approach with Geraldine Dawson, PhD, chief science officer for Autism Speaks and professor of psychiatry at 58

Causes: prenatal development factors Researchers have not yet been able to pinpoint the exact causes of ASD, but they are closer. They do know that autism results from a genetic mutation in 15 percent to 20 percent of cases. But environmental factors can combine with and increase a genetic susceptibility, says Dawson. Risk factors identified to date include: • Advanced age of fathers (Nature, Stefánsson, et al. 2012). • Low birth weight or small for gestational age (Journal of Pediatrics, Lampi, 2012, and Pediatrics, Pinto-Martin, 2011). MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


• Deficiency in folic acid intake before conception (American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Schmidt, et al. 2012). • Mother’s exposure to pesticide (Environmental Health Perspective, Shelton, et al. 2012). • Mother’s exposure to air pollution (Environmental Health Perspective, Volk, et al. 2011). • Obesity in the mother (Pediatrics, Krakowiak, et al. 2012). Another risk is having a sibling with the condition. Scientists have long documented that autism can run in families: estimates are that a sibling of an ASD child has an increased risk of 3 percent to 10 percent of having the disorder. But last year, a larger sample and more thorough study in Pediatrics (Ozonoff, et al.) determined that the sibling recurrence rate is much higher, with nearly one in five siblings likely to develop autism. This finding again underscores the need for increased vigilance in monitoring and screening at-risk infants as early as possible, when their brains are more malleable, says study co-author Wendy Stone, PhD, professor of psychology who directs the University of Washington Autism Center. “If we can begin intervention for high-risk children in the first or second years of life, we may find the effects are much more powerful,” Stone says. Another study (Molecular Psychiatry, Constantino, et al. 2012) showed that half-siblings are also at risk. By examining halfsiblings, researchers were able to show that mothers and fathers appear to transmit genetic risk equally in families where autism recurs. Researchers compared the genetic structure of the maternal half-siblings with autism with that of the full siblings with autism. The risk was about half of what they saw in full siblings. Psychologists can help parents identify ASD early on by teaching them how to observe and look for behavioral signs of the condition, says Rogers, who also co-authored the Pediatrics study. These signs typically involve lack of interaction — not initiating or responding to cuddling, for instance, or not responding to his or her name or not smiling by 9 months of age. Knowing about the elevated risk for siblings of children with ASD also raises the issue of genetic counseling, she adds. Psychologists may want to suggest this option to families who are concerned. Early brain development Could ASD be diagnosed even earlier? The answer appears to be yes. More sophisticated brain imaging technology such as functional MRI has enabled scientists to trace infants’ neurodevelopment. In one study (American Journal of Psychiatry, Wolff, et al. 2012), also co-authored by Dawson and Joseph Piven, research professor of psychiatry at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, researchers compared the brains of infants who had siblings with autism with those of infants who did not have that high-risk factor. The study, employing diffusion tensor imaging, identified marked differences in the white matter (fibers that surround neurons and support transmission of neural signals) among high-risk six-monthOCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

Autism prevalence and the DSM Are autism spectrum disorders (ASD) really more prevalent or are we just better at collecting the data and identifying the disorder at younger ages? “It’s likely both,” says Judith Miller, PhD, training director at the Center for Autism Research, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Also contributing to the increased number of diagnoses is heightened awareness of subtle forms of ASD and broader application of the diagnostic criteria, she adds. Then factor in new data suggesting that 15 percent to 30 percent of autism cases may be due to the increasing average age of new fathers (see main story). When it is released next year, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 is expected to combine the subgroups of Asperger’s syndrome, pervasive developmental delay (PDD) and autistic disorder into one broad category — autism spectrum disorder, or ASD. While some wondered if combining the criteria for these subgroups in DSM-5 would lead to fewer people being diagnosed with autism, a study this year in the Archives of General Psychiatry (Lord) suggested it will have little effect in that regard. Further, the data collected from 12 universitybased sites suggests that removing these subtypes will make it easier to make accurate, consistent ASD diagnoses, says study co-author Ellen Hanson, PhD, a psychologist and research lab director at Boston Children’s Hospital. On a practical level, having one overarching diagnosis in DSM-5 may help some people with ASD access additional treatment and support, Hanson notes. People with diagnoses such as Asperger’s have not always been eligible for certain services. —EVE GLICKSMAN

olds who would later develop ASD. These changes were seen six months to a year before affected children typically show the full range of outward signs of autism. Stone hopes such findings will herald a new ASD riskprevention model. “By developing new ways of working with very young children, we hope to change their brain architecture and improve their developmental course,” she says. In other work, researchers are learning more about interactive strategies parents can use to help at-risk infants in the first year of life. “A child of 11 months is too young to participate in structured behavioral therapy, but parents are in a position to 59


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help in other ways to improve emotional engagement and promote eye contact or language development through play with toys, early babbling and nonverbal gestures,” says Dawson. Interventions for older children When ASD is diagnosed in schoolage children or teens, it is a lifelong condition. At this stage, the brain is more developed and intervention becomes more complex. There are far fewer studies of ASD in schoolage children and teens, but a roundup of the latest findings showed that intervention could improve an older child’s social competence and peer relationships, too.(Current Opinion in Pediatrics, Dawson, et al. 2011). In particular, “friendship training” enhanced the emotional development of children age 7 to 12 and their ability to have empathy. Older children with ASD also can make strides in communication, adaptive behavior and cognitive abilities, although the improvements have not been as dramatic as in preschoolers with ASD who received interventions. Cognitive behavioral therapy combined with social skills instruction has proven successful in reducing anxiety (a common co-morbidity in ASD) and aggression in some high-functioning teens and adults with autism. For autistic children with intellectual disabilities, systematic desensitization was the more effective therapy for anxiety (Developmental Neurorehabilitation, Lang, et al. 2010). For treating aggressive behavior, one study (Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, Frazier, et al. 2010) found that combining behavioral interventions with antipsychotic medication is more effective than using medication alone. Future research needs to compare a variety of treatments for older children with ASD, Dawson says. In addition, there needs to be long-term follow-up to determine what may be needed to sustain any gains throughout the person’s life. Perhaps the largest gap in autism

research, programs and services pertains to adults with the condition. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, in association with The National Health Service in England and Wales, took the step of issuing clinical guidelines this year on the referral, diagnosis and management of autism in adults. The document for physicians and other health-care professionals provides a clinical pathway of care for adults with ASD, including when a diagnostic assessment is warranted. Many more new studies on autism are likely as funding for ASD research increases. The Interactive Autism Network (IAN) created by the Kennedy Krieger Institute is facilitating the collection of autism data with an online registry (http://ianproject.org) that includes information from 43,000 people with ASD or their family members. Earlier this year, a study in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders (Daniels) authenticated the IAN database participants and validated their responses on questionnaires. This means researchers can use the network with confidence, says Ericka Wodka, PhD, a pediatric neuropsychologist at the Kennedy Krieger Institute’s Center for Autism and Related Disorders. She believes the data can accelerate autism breakthroughs and make research more cost-effective and efficient. More than 500 studies have already drawn data from the network or used it to recruit families for their own studies. “Onlinebased research is good for families, too, because they can participate in their own homes and on their own time,” says Wodka. Meanwhile, other psychologists are excited by research focused on determining which treatments are best for children at different developmental stages. “Brain research will help us learn how to individualize treatment so we can tailor it to each child,” UCSD’s Schreibman says. n Eve Glicksman is a writer in the Philadelphia area.

MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


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PSYCHOLOGIST PROFILE

Grassroots

go-getter Jennifer Kelly has a knack for communicating with politicians — a talent that is benefiting psychologists and those they serve. BY TORI D e ANGE L IS

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A

s a teenager in Gulfport, Miss., in the early 1970s, Jennifer F. Kelly wasn’t just practicing the typical rites of adolescence. At her parents’ insistence, she was also working the polls, making sure voters stood in the right lines and met the voting requirements. Her parents had their reasons for getting her involved: As community activists, Corine Kelly, a hairdresser who had been raised as a sharecropper, and Richard Kelly, a courier at Phillips Milk of Magnesia, understood that African Americans needed to exercise the vote if they were to achieve equality. “I saw how much the African American voters believed in the role of the political process in impacting a change in society,” Kelly says. “I couldn’t wait to come of voting age so I could vote.” Kelly’s parents also impressed on her the need to further her education and work for her community. Over the years, those values produced results. Kelly earned her PhD in 1987 from Florida State University. After working at a community mental health center treating underserved clients with a range of health problems and at a pain-management facility at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston, she launched a successful clinical health psychology practice, the Atlanta Center for Behavioral Medicine (www.drjenniferkelly.com). There, she uses empirically based interventions including cognitive behavioral therapy to help people with obesity, chronic pain, fibromyalgia and other health issues set and meet goals to improve their health and well-being. “It’s all about helping people find a true quality of life and a healthy lifestyle,” she says. She also picked up on her parents’ grassroots political involvement. That led to a range of leadership positions, including president of the Georgia Psychological Association (GPA) and of APA’s Div. 31 (State, Provincial and Territorial Psychological Association Affairs); a trainer for Leadership Atlanta, the country’s oldest community leadership program; recording secretary of APA’s MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


Scott Jolliff

Throughout her career, Dr. Jennifer Kelly says, her advocacy skills — which she often applies to helping underserved clients gain better access to care — have been key to her success.

OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

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Board of Directors; and a consultant to the YMCA’s national African American and Hispanic/Latino Health and Well-Being Collaborative, designed to address specific health issues facing African American and Latino communities, to name a few. In all of these roles, her advocacy skills — which she often applies to helping underserved clients gain better access to care — have been key to her success. She’s so adept at it, in fact, that when she finished her term as GPA president in 2000, association leaders asked her to stay on as its grassroots and federal advocacy coordinator, and she’s remained in the federal aspect of that role ever since. “If I can get policymakers to listen to and understand my points, then perhaps they’ll take action in areas that will truly make a difference in people’s lives,” says Kelly, who has spoken with legislators about mental health parity, eliminating healthcare disparities and ensuring psychologists are appropriately compensated by Medicare. Soon after becoming GPA president, she was nominated for Leadership Atlanta. Each year, the group selects 75 community leaders from diverse disciplines and political bents to explore key issues in the Atlanta community and examine what it means to be a leader. They also connect with Georgia legislators, which has given Kelly the opportunity to spread the word about psychology, sometimes in informal, collegial settings. Last year, two state legislators called her unexpectedly to have dinner so

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they could chat about topics of importance to psychologists, and she has a strong working relationship with the office of U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.), for example. “Advocacy is about building relationships with people you know can make a difference,” says Kelly, who chaired Leadership Atlanta’s Health Program Day for three years. That takes time and getting beyond the superficial, she says. “My feeling is, ‘I want to sit down and get to know you because I want to talk about what’s happening in our community, in our country, in the world.’ Then I want to break it down to what it is that I am trying to do, which is to make sure that people who need mental health services have access to good care.” Kelly succeeds with legislators not only because she spends time with them, but also because of her warm, funny, down-toearth personality, colleagues say. Georgia state Rep. Pat Gardner, who was executive director of GPA when Kelly first joined the organization as a member, says it didn’t take much effort to see that Kelly was a natural leader. “I’d introduce her to people and her energy and enthusiasm were infectious,” she says. Her motives are altruistic and people sense that, adds University of Georgia professor Linda Campbell, PhD, who was president of GPA when Kelly was secretary. “Jennifer consistently contributes to and cares about things that are above and beyond her own self-interest,” Campbell says. She is also famously tenacious about her agenda. “It’s said

MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


that when Jennifer is transporting a legislator to an event, she locks the doors of her car, drives fast and makes them say they’ll back our legislation before she lets them out,” laughs Campbell. Among the many topics Kelly has championed, probably the greatest success has been the passage of the federal Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act in 2008, which closes several loopholes in 1996 parity legislation and requires insurance companies to cover mental health services at the same level as medical services. “It means that more people who need care will be able to get it,” says Kelly, adding that she and hundreds of GPA colleagues spent countless hours responding to action alerts from the APA Practice Organization, meeting with legislators and calling legislative staff to help make it happen. But as a good advocate, she knows her work isn’t over yet. “Now, the task is to make sure it is successfully implemented,” she says. Spreading the wealth These days, Kelly’s many talents are coming together in a project close to her heart, the Diversity Leadership Development Workshop. She launched the event in 2009 when she kept noticing that ethnic-minority psychologists attending APA’s State Leadership Conference weren’t becoming involved as leaders in their state, provincial and territorial associations. Held every two years, the program provides full stipends for ethnic-minority psychologists to attend a daylong workshop where they learn from experts about leadership skills, styles and development. “These are colleagues who are highly accomplished in their own careers, but becoming leaders in their associations was intimidating to them,” she says. Many also said they didn’t get enough support from their association leaders to try for these positions, she adds. Kelly deliberately chose the APA board room as the setting: It is lined with portraits of past APA presidents, including several women, three ethnic-minority men and immediate Past-president Melba J.T. Vasquez, PhD, who is Latina. “It sends the message, ‘You can be a part of this,’” Kelly says. So far, the program has graduated 16 participants, and the next round, to take place in 2013, will probably take 12 participants (details will appear on relevant APA listservs). It’s telling that her leadership skills — the very skills the workshop aims to instill — were what helped her lobby successfully for funding, she says.  “I want other ethnic-minority psychologists, and for that matter, any psychologists who might be afraid to pursue leadership roles, to develop those same skills, “ she says. “The more effective leaders we have, the more we can move the psychology agenda forward, whether in our states, APA or the world. Ultimately, that will benefit our profession and the people who need our services.” n

APA PRACTICE ORGANIZATION COLLEGE OF PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

Psychopharmacology Examination for Psychologists (PEP) • An examination designed for use by psychology licensing authorities to implement laws permitting the prescribing of psychotropic medications by qualified psychologists • Secure and confidential banking of PEP scores for qualified graduates of postdoctoral psychopharmacology educational programs • Psychopharmacology training programs may use the PEP to fulfill exit requirements

750 First Street, NE, Washington, DC 20002-4242 Phone: (202) 336-6100 • Fax: (202) 336-5797 E-mail: apapocollege@apa.org Website: apapracticecentral.org

Tori DeAngelis a writer in Syracuse, N.Y. OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

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Innovative education A

dvocating for clients is a large part of counseling psychologists’ jobs, yet graduate school training rarely focuses on advocacy skills, particularly in the public sphere. The counseling psychology program at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, is trying to change that. In 2007, the program developed a “Scientist-PractitionerAdvocate” model of training that adds a new twist: On top of traditional training in research and counseling, the model teaches students to advocate for policy change — a component that enables students to help people beyond the therapy room. “Our innovation was to train students in elements of sociology, political science and law, culminating in the social justice practicum,” says Brent Mallenckrodt, PhD, professor and the director of the program. APA reaccredited the program in 2009. The program’s coursework includes 15 credit hours of advocacy training and a social justice practicum the year before internship. Students’ coursework teaches them the practical aspects of advocacy, such as how a bill becomes law and how to effectively lobby for legislative change. Students also consider how research initiatives and methodologies can be influenced by an awareness of social justice — students, for example, investigate issues of privilege as part of their studies. During the practicum, students work with underserved and underrepresented communities. In recognition of UT-Knoxville’s creative approach, APA’s Board of Educational Affairs, in partnership with the Council of Graduate Departments of Psychology, gave the program its 2011 APA Award for Innovative Practices in Graduate Education. The award recognizes pioneering practices that improve a graduate program’s overall quality and can be emulated by other programs, says Cathi Grus, PhD, of the APA Education Directorate. UT counseling student Kyle Bandermann says the program helped him become a better advocate for any population. His practicum enabled him to work with LGBTQ youth in east Tennessee. He is now looking for an internship in integrated care and behavioral health, ideally at a hospital or veterans’ center. “The advocacy model has really helped me become a great practitioner in those settings,” he says. “Being able to help people 66

APA recognizes the counseling psychology program at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, for its Science-PractitionerAdvocate model. BY EMILY WOJCIK

advocate for themselves on a case-by-case basis, as well as in the greater community, is a big piece of any work I might do.” Interest in UT’s counseling program has skyrocketed since it adopted its advocacy component — program applications are up 250 percent since the changes were made. Adapting the existing model was less disruptive than one might think, says Jacob Levy, PhD, associate professor within the program. Rather than overhauling the entire program, Levy and other faculty looked at what they were already doing and how to expand on it. “We still train very good sciencepractitioners,” Levy says. “But we’ve added something new.” Q For more on the program, go to http://psychology.utk.edu/ gradstudy/counseling/spa_model.shtml. Emily Wojcik is a writer in Northhampton, Mass. 5761<7:768;A+0747/AŒ7+<7*-:


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A view from

Capitol Hill APA congressional fellows shape — and are shaped by — the policymaking process. BY D R. NIDA C ORRY AND MI CAH HASKELL-HOEHL

W

hen this year’s farm bill was being drafted in the Senate, psychologist Tiffany M. Griffin, PhD, drew from her knowledge of social disparities and intergroup dynamics to evaluate how the bill’s nutritionrelated provisions might impact lower-income communities. In another congressional office, psychologist Valarie Molaison, PhD, weighed in on bills related to Food and Drug Administration (FDA) safety and domestic violence. These are only a few of the policy issues that Griffin and Molaison focused on during their APA congressional fellowships. For more than 38 years, the APA Congressional Fellowship Program has offered psychologists an opportunity to work in congressional offices or as committee staff for one year. In these placements, fellows learn about federal policymaking and congressional operations and, in turn, empower legislators to utilize psychological expertise that may improve public policy. “APA congressional fellows have participated in the development of key health and social policies, ranging from funding psychological research and training programs to improving access to quality mental health care for America’s most vulnerable populations,” says Diane Elmore, PhD, MPH, who co-directs the APA Congressional Fellowship Program and served as a 2004–05 APA congressional fellow. The 2011–12 APA congressional fellows share their experiences on Capitol Hill: 68

In the office of Sen. Jeff Bingaman (D-N.M.) Griffin obtained her PhD in social psychology from the University of Michigan and, before moving to Washington, served as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She came to the APA fellowship with award-winning research experience in the areas of health and educational disparities and policy experience at the National Poverty Center. “In ways that I could not have imagined, my social psychology training has been a major asset in my role as a fellow,” Griffin says. In addition to preparing her to work on bills related to agriculture, welfare and the FDA, she says, her training equipped her with great negotiation skills and an ability to connect with different types of people — “an invaluable skill in the policy world, where so much of ‘success’ rests on interpersonal aptitude,” she says. Griffin calls her Capitol Hill experience “nothing short of spectacular. I learned how policy works in a way that Civics 101 never could have taught,” she says. The experience also convinced her to be an advocate for integrating policy into graduate coursework. “If students and faculty had a better understanding of the impact of policy, they would be more motivated and strategic in using their research to address social problems,” she says. When her fellowship ended in August, Griffin accepted the position of monitoring and evaluation advisor at the U.S. MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


Drs. Tiffany Griffin (left) and Valarie Molaison are the latest alumnae from APA’s Congressional Fellowship Program.

Agency for International Development, where she supports President Obama’s Feed the Future Initiative, a program that seeks to address challenges facing the global food supply. Long term, she hopes to continue working on domestic and international food security and to demonstrate to others that you don’t have to be a politician to appreciate the impact of policy. “I would like to create a space where I disseminate how policy works to community leaders,” she says. In the Office of Sen. Jon Tester (D-Mont.) Molaison is the Jacquelin Goldman congressional fellow, a position funded by the American Psychological Foundation through a bequest by Jacquelin Goldman, PhD, to support psychologists with backgrounds in child clinical and developmental psychology. Molaison received her doctorate in applied developmental psychology at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. Earlier in her career, she worked as a journalist, reporting on policymaking bodies, such as the Louisiana state legislature. As a psychologist, she has worked in pediatric psychology and private practice and developed a nonprofit family bereavement center in Delaware. Her professional experiences helped her adapt quickly to Capitol Hill, where she found a culture defined by “constantly changing priorities, a fast pace, a demand to gather information 7+<7*-:Œ5761<7:768;A+0747/A

and write succinctly, a competitive environment and a unique lexicon,” she says. Molaison’s background also helped her to “monitor many moving parts, create coalitions, convincingly advocate for an idea or point of view and decide how and when to discuss challenging issues,” she says. “It was a joy to work for a public servant who is ethical and transparent, advocates strongly for his constituents, and treats people with the utmost respect,” Molaison says. In Tester’s office, she worked on policy related to rural concerns, health and mental health, illness prevention and women’s health. She was impressed by how “innovative and bold” the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is and yet was discouraged that “prevention programs and services can be difficult to move forward because Congress is not allowed to consider potential savings when calculating what a new law might cost.” Molaison currently serves as a health advisor in Sen. Sherrod Brown’s (D-Ohio) office. “There is still so much for me to learn and contribute,” she says. “I imagine, in the long run, I will continue to be an advocate for people, especially those who may not have the resources or lobbying power to be heard.” Q Nida Corry, PhD, is a senior legislative and federal affairs officer in APA’s Public Interest Government Relations Office (PI-GRO) and co-director of APA’s Congressional Fellowship Program. Micah Haskell-Hoehl is senior policy associate in PI-GRO. 69


APA members to vote on bylaws amendments Proposed changes involve Council seats for ethnic-minority psychology associations, presidential candidates and the composition of the Board of Education Affairs. APA’s Council of Representatives has approved amendments to the association’s bylaws that members will vote on this fall. APA will send the ballot to the membership with the Apportionment Ballot in early November. Below are the proposed bylaws amendments; bracketed text is to be deleted and underlined text is to be added. SEATING THE FOUR NATIONAL ETHNIC MINORITY PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATIONS ON COUNCIL Article V. Composition of the Council of Representatives Council voted to approve the proposed bylaws change by a vote of 127 for, 24 against and 3 abstentions. As per the Association’s bylaws, because an amendment to the bylaws is required to implement this change, the full membership will need to approve the amendment. An amendments ballot will be sent to all voting members this fall accompanied by a pro/con statement. The APA bylaws require that a pro/con statement be included in the ballot document unless two-thirds of Council votes not to include one. 1. Council shall be composed of Representatives of Divisions, Representatives of State, Provincial and Territorial Psychological Associations, members of the Board of Directors, the Officers of the Association (the chief staff officer shall serve without vote), [and] the APAGS Representative and one Representative from each National Ethnic Minority Psychological Association (the Asian American Psychological Association, the Association of Black Psychologists, the National Latina/o Psychological Association, and the Society of Indian Psychologists). 5. Council Representatives of a Division or State/Provincial/ Territorial Association shall be members of the Division or State/Provincial/Territorial Association, and Members of the American Psychological Association, and shall be elected for a period not to exceed three years. If during that threeyear period the Division or State/Provincial/Territorial Association is allocated fewer seats, the Division or State/ Provincial/Territorial Association shall recall the appropriate number of Representatives. The term of office of the recalled member is thereby terminated. Council members from the National Ethnic Minority Associations shall be members of their respective constituencies and members of the American Psychological Association and shall be selected for a period not to exceed three years. 6. Each APA Fellow, Member, and voting Associate member shall choose the Division(s) or State/Provincial/Territorial Association(s) through which he/she elected to have his/ her interest represented on Council by allocating, at the time of the annual dues statement, a total of ten (10) votes to the Division(s) and/or State/Provincial/Territorial Association(s) 70

through which he/she wishes to be represented the following year. However, only Fellows, Members (or voting Associate members) of the Divisions or State/Provincial/Territorial Associations so designated will be allowed to [nominate and] elect their Council Representatives. The Representatives of each of the National Ethnic Minority Psychological Associations shall be designated by their respective Association. 8. A Council member who has served for six consecutive years shall not be eligible for election or appointment for a period of one year as a Representative from any Division, State/ Provincial/Territorial Association, or [coalition] National Ethnic Minority Psychological Association. ARTICLE XVI. NATIONAL ETHNIC MINORITY PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATIONS 1. As provided in Article V.1, the Asian American Psychological Association, Association of Black Psychologists, National Latina/o Psychological Association, and the Society of Indian Psychologists shall each have one voting representative serving on the Council of Representatives of the American Psychological Association. 2. Each of these National Ethnic Minority Psychological Associations shall exercise such control over its members so that membership in such Association shall not imply membership in the American Psychological Association. 3. The American Psychological Association shall not be responsible for the acts or omissions of these National Ethnic Minority Psychological Associations, except as specifically authorized by these Bylaws or other duly promulgated rule of Council. Note: Subsequent articles to the Bylaws will be renumbered. Explanation: Note that adding these seats would be outside the regular Council representation apportionment process; no current or future division or state/provincial/territorial associations would be at risk for losing their seat(s) due to the addition of these new seats. MODIFYING THE COMPOSITION OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATIONAL AFFAIRS (BEA) Article XI: Boards and Committees Council voted to approve the proposed bylaws change by a vote of 147 for, 4 against and 0 abstentions. As per the Association’s bylaws, because an amendment to the bylaws is required to implement this change, the full membership will need to approve the amendment. An amendments ballot will be sent to all voting members this fall accompanied by a pro/con statement. The APA bylaws require that a pro/con statement be included in the ballot document unless two-thirds of Council votes not to include one. 9. The Board of Educational Affairs shall consist of not fewer MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


than twelve Members of the Association, one of which may be an APA Teacher Affiliate member, who shall serve for terms of not less than three years each. It shall have general concern for all educational and training affairs which transcend more than one Division or group of psychologists. Members of the Board of Educational Affairs shall be selected to represent the range of interests characteristic of psychology in all its aspects. %,)')"),)49/&&/2-%202%3)$%.4325..).'&/2 02%3)$%.4 !RTICLE6)))/FlCERS Council voted to approve the proposed bylaws change by a vote of 104 for, 54 against and 0 abstentions. As per the Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

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bylaws, because an amendment to the bylaws is required to implement this change, the full membership will need to approve the amendment. An amendments ballot will be sent to all voting members this fall accompanied by a pro/con statement. The APA bylaws require that a pro/con statement be included in the ballot document unless two-thirds of Council votes not to include one. 6. The Past President shall be the most recently retired President and shall chair the Election Committee. [The Past President] A member who has served as President shall not be eligible to appear as a candidate on the President-elect election ballot [.] nor serve as President-elect for a period of ten years beginning immediately after the Past Presidential year. Q

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Continuing Education From Your Association

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Division

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SPOTLIGHT

Div. 2 offers e-books on iTunes Div. 2 (Society for the Teaching of Psychology) has released two new e-books on iTunes: “Effective Evaluation of Teaching: A Guide for Faculty and Administration” and “Faculty Virtues and Character Strengths: Reflective Exercises for Sustained Renewal.” Download the books for free on iTunes or from the division website at www.teachpsych.org. Psychologists who subscribe with the Div. 2 e-books via iTunes are automatically sent Div. 2 e-books as they are published. Div. 12 to focus on evidencebased treatments Div. 12 (Society of Clinical Psychology) President-elect Mark Sobell, PhD, encourages members to share ideas for APA’s 2013 Annual Convention programming under his presidential theme “Transferring Evidence-Based Treatments to the Practice Community: How Can Practitioners and Researchers Make it Work?” The theme encourages collaboration among members that promote making research relevant for practice, he says. “The division also hopes to collaborate with other divisions to initiate innovative ways for practitioners and researchers to come together,” says Sobell. Contact Sobell at sobellm@nova. edu.

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Div. 37 to offer child advocacy workshop Div. 37 (Society for Child and Family Policy and Practice) is hosting a free workshop, “Becoming a Strong Advocate for Children,” during the National Conference in Clinical and Child Adolescent Psychology, to be held Oct. 18–20 in Lawrence, Kan. Led by Nina G. Levitt, PhD, of APA’s Government Relations Office, and Brian Wilcox, PhD, who directs the Center on Children, Families and the Law at the University of Nebraska, the workshop will cover how to advocate on behalf of children and youth, particularly at the state level in the areas of child mental health, child welfare and juvenile justice policy issues. To register for the workshop or conference, go to www. continuinged.ku.edu/programs/clinicalchild.

Div. 15 offers dissertation prize Div. 15 (Educational) welcomes applications for its Paul R. Pintrich Outstanding Dissertation Award. The award includes a $500 prize,

a plaque, an invitation to present at APA’s 2014 Annual Convention in Washington, D.C., and up to $1,000 for travel to and from the meeting. Applicants must be Div.

MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


15 members whose dissertations were approved by the doctoral committee between Jan. 1, 2010, and Dec. 31, 2011. Application information is available on the APA Div. 15 website at www. apadiv15.org. Applications are due Dec. 31.  Early career psychologists: Apply for a Div. 29 psychotherapy prize Div. 29 (Psychotherapy) and the American Psychological Foundation welcome applications for the $2,500 Div. 29/APF Early Career Award, which recognizes division members who have demonstrated outstanding promise in psychotherapy early in their careers. To apply, submit an application by Jan. 1 at www.apa.org/apf/ funding/div-29.aspx. Divs. 31 and 42 to offer guidance on electronic record-keeping Div. 31 (State, Provincial and Territorial Psychological Association Affairs) and Div. 42 (Psychologists in Independent Practice) are creating statespecific electronic psychological record templates to guide members in the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The project is funded by APA’s interdivisional grant program. The templates will be available next year on the Div. 31 and the Div. 42 websites. For more information about the project, see the July/ August Monitor or go to www. apadivisions.org/division-31/ news-events/grant-funding.aspx.

Team up with Div. 34 Div. 34 (Society for Environmental, Population and Conservation Psychology) wants to develop relationships with members of other divisions who are interested in using knowledge of place design and conservation to enrich their own work. “Environmental psychology is relevant to clinicians, who can apply this material to redesign their offices and to evaluate how the form of their patients’ homes and workplaces influences their life experiences,” says Div. 34 President Sally Augustin, PhD. Clinicians can learn more about ecotherapy tools through Div. 34, and health psychologists can benefit from connecting with Div. 34 since design elements can be linked to mood, motivation and the functioning of the immune system, she adds. Psychologists focused on consumer, worker and student behavior will benefit from discussions of how store, workplace and school design influence shoppers, employees and learners. Interested in collaborating? Contact Augustin at sallyaugustin@ designwithscience.com. Div. 35 members: Serve on feminist psychology task force Div. 35 (Society for the Psychology of Women) seeks new members for its Task Force on Academic Feminist Psychology to implement ideas that came out of the Institute for Academic Feminist Psychologists, held Jan.

OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

27–28 in San Antonio, such as creating an online resource for academic feminist psychologists. The division is also interested in ideas to support the continuation of the institute, which brings together academic psychologists who take a feminist approach to their research, teaching and service. For more information, contact Isis Settles, PhD, at settles@msu. edu or Kate Richmond, PhD, at krichmond@muhlenberg.edu. Div. 35 honors its talent Div. 35 (Society for the Psychology of Women) honored outstanding members at APA’s Annual Convention in Orlando, Aug. 2–5. The awards and winners are: • Bonnie R. Stickland and Jessica Henderson Daniel Award for Distinguished Mentoring: Ruth E. Fassinger, PhD • Corann Okorodudu International Women’s Advocacy Award: Mary M. Brabeck, PhD • Carolyn Payton Early Career Award: Scyatta Wallace, PhD • Carolyn Wood Sherif Award: Karen Wyche, PhD • Div 35/AWP Annual Prize for Psychological Research on Women and Gender: Sarah J. Ree; honorable mention: Megan R. Greeson • Geis Memorial Award for Dissertation Research: Sanne Nauts; honorable mentions: Jessica L. Cundiff, Erin Thomas • Hyde Graduate Student Research Grant Award: Jioni A. Lewis 73


are the many new training opportunities offered by the Department of Veterans Affairs, which has expanded to help meet the health-care needs of veterans returning from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Training in clinical psychology at VA facilities has grown to 501 internship positions and 221 postdoctoral fellowship positions across the country. Div. 40 members have been significantly involved in this growth, resulting in new internship and postdoctoral fellowship positions as well as expanding training opportunities in state-of-the-art approaches to, for instance, telemedicine and neurocognitive rehabilitation. For more information about these training opportunities and on how to become a Div. 40 member, go to www.div40.org.

Members discuss the creation of two new divisions Interested in supporting an implementation science division? How about one focusing on entertainment? An implementation science division would bring together members from all areas of psychology to bridge the gap between science and practice. For more information, go to www. seattleimplementation.org/apa-division. To sign the petition, go to http://forms.apa.org/division/petition/implementscience. An APA division on entertainment psychology would be a home for psychologists who study and provide therapy for the entertainment industry. For more information, contact Mimi Amaral at ciis.mimi@gmail.com. To sign the petition, go to www.apa.org/ about/division/index.aspx.

Woman/Latina Award: Alicia Elizabeth Enciso Div. 40 training directory includes expanded VA opportunities Psychology trainees can find a comprehensive list of graduate, internship and postdoctoral fellowship programs offering specialty training in clinical neuropsychology at the Div. 40 (Clinical Neuropsychology) website at www.div40.org. Included in the directory Thinkstock

• Mary Roth Walsh Teaching the Psychology of Women Award: Breanne Fahs, PhD • Psychology of Black Women Graduate Student Award: Nkiru Nnawulezi • Psychotherapy with Women Award: Cirleen DeBlare (first author); co-authors: Melanie Brewster, Kristin Bertsch, Aubrey DeCarlo, Karen Kegal and Candice Presseau • Student Scholar Hispanic

APA’s 2013 Annual Convention is in Honolulu, July 31–Aug. 4. 74

Div. 50 to spotlight brain research in Honolulu The Div. 50 (Society of Addiction Psychology) theme for APA’s 2013 Annual Convention in Honolulu, July 31-Aug. 4, is “Applying Clinical Neuroscience to Addiction Psychology.” The programming will focus on how advances in brain research can support diagnosis, intervention and treatment in clinical settings. Sessions and speakers will address how brain function or dysfunction can promote or impede successful behavior change, and what it means for the therapy psychologists provide. The division offers more than 25 merit-based travel awards for psychologists at all career stages. The division will give priority to submissions that enhance the dialogue between researchers and clinicians. For more information, contact Div. 50 at societyofaddictionpsychology@ gmail.com. n

MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


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Better school-based care

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APF Pearson Early Career grantee Aaron Lyon is working to bring more evidence-based mental health interventions to school children. BY JAMIE CHAMBERLIN Monitor staff

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sychologists have developed a wide array of research-tested interventions to treat children’s anxiety, depression and other mental health challenges. Yet often children go without such services for many reasons, such as a lack of training for school-based mental health counselors. Aaron Lyon, PhD, of the University of Washington, is working to change that. With a $12,000 Pearson Early Career Grant from the American Psychological Foundation, Lyon is conducting a pilot study in three Seattle secondary schools to determine the barriers the schools’ counselors face in providing evidencebased interventions. “The goal is to develop an intervention that fits with how school counselors practice,” says Lyon, an acting assistant professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the university’s School of Medicine. Building on interventions that have been successful elsewhere, Lyon will tailor new versions for the school context, taking into account such factors as how many counselors are on staff, how much access they have to students during the school day and how many referrals they get in a typical day. “Public school counselors are a dedicated, competent group and we want to figure out the best ways to support them,” he says. OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

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Lyon is asking counselors to describe the mental health problems they see, the resources they lack and how much time they have for professional development. He is also asking such time-management and triage questions as, “If you have more referrals than space on your caseload, how do you decide whom to see?” and “What therapy factors do you believe are most important or likely to result in client improvement?” He will also lay the foundation for the development of a digital monitoring system to help counselors track their students’ progress. Lyon hopes his findings will inform other providers who triage children’s mental health problems, such as pediatricians. Once he has completed the pilot study, Lyon plans to apply for National Institute of Mental Health funding to expand his research into other schools. “I am driven to make sure that kids and families get services they need and that they are evidence-based and likely to be effective,” says Lyon. Q Read more about the Pearson Early Career Grant at www.apa.org/apf/ funding/pearson.aspx. The deadline for the 2013 grant is Dec. 31. Gerson grant will explore ‘low differentiation of self’ APF has presented a $6,000 Randy Gerson Memorial Grant to Christine Paprocki for her research on people with “low differentiation of self,” or difficulty separating their Paprocki 76

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Grantee spotlight: The mystery of ‘twice exceptionality’ “Twice exceptional children” — those who are gifted and struggle with a learning disability — often have trouble learning in traditional classrooms. But there’s scant research on how to improve their learning. With a $75,000 Esther Katz Rosen Grant from the American Psychological Foundation, Jeffrey Gilger, PhD, is working to fill that research gap by using fMRI to look more closely at how these children process information. In one study, Gilger, a psychology professor at the University of California, Merced, compared the spatial visualization processing skills of twice exceptional children with those of children who are either gifted or have reading disabilities. He found that twice exceptional children are not a mix of reading disabled and gifted brains; rather, they process spatial visualization problems differently than either group. He also found that the brains of reading disabled children are similar to those of twice exceptional children when they perform verbal and spatial tasks. “The neurodevelopmental processes that make a child reading disabled might make a child [gifted] as well, given the right context and factors,” he says. Gilger’s APF-funded research has led to further studies on how children with reading disabilities learn spatial problem-solving and on whether teaching these children spatial problem-solving would be more successful when they are very young. The Esther Katz Rosen Fund offers annual grants to early career researchers who study gifted children. The application deadline for the 2013 fellowship is March 1. For more information, visit www.apa.org/apf/funding/rosen.aspx.

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thoughts and feelings from those of their partners. Paprocki, a clinical psychology doctoral student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is using the prize to pilot an intervention that seeks to improve the relationships of people with this tendency and inform therapists about its behavior patterns, such as excessive reassurance-seeking. The Randy Gerson Memorial Grant program awards annual grants for graduate student projects on family dynamics, couple dynamics or multigenerational concerns. The program is funded by a donation from Gersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s widow, Sylvia Shellenberger, PhD. The 2013 Gerson grant deadline is Feb. 1. For more information, visit www. apa.org/apf/funding/gerson.aspx. Apply for Scrivner grant for LGBT research APF welcomes submissions for the $12,000 Roy Scrivner Memorial Research Grant, which funds early career research on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender family psychology and therapy.

Upcoming APF deadlines Nov. 1: Roy Scrivner Memorial Grants Nov. 1: Theodore Blau Early Career Award Nov. 1: Theodore Millon Award Nov. 15: Elizabeth Munsterberg Koppitz Fellowships Dec. 1: Charles Brewer Distinguished Teaching Award Dec. 1: Gold Medal Awards for Life Achievement Dec. 31: Pearson Early Career Grant Jan. 1: Div. 29 Award Jan. 31: Div. 37 Diane J. Willis Early Career Award For more information regarding APFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grants and scholarships, contact Parie Kadir, program officer, at pkadir@apa.org or (202) 336-5984.

APF encourages researchers from all fields of the behavioral and social sciences to apply. Applicants must be advanced graduate students in good standing, have an endorsement from a supervising professor and have institutional review board approval from their institution if the research involves

Donor Spotlight:

human participants. 4HEAPPLICATIONDEADLINEIS.OV For information on how to apply, visit www.apa.org/apf/funding/scrivner. aspx. Q

gradPSYCH

Dr. Norman Abeles: Why I support the American Psychological Foundation â&#x20AC;&#x153;I support APF because it is the premier organization for the development of psychological talent.â&#x20AC;?

Abeles

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APA honors outstanding teachers of high school psychology A

cross the country, high school psychology students are engaging with animals, competing in psychology bowls and participating in other activities that are a far cry from the old textbook-and-lecture routine. Each year, APA’s Teachers of Psychology in Secondary Schools (TOPSS) committee recognizes the high school teachers at the front of such exciting classrooms with its Excellence in Teaching Award. TOPSS honors the awardees with a certificate, an engraved silver cup, $500, a DVD video toolkit donated by Worth Publishers and a yearlong TOPSS membership or renewal. “We hope [the award] will inspire them to keep learning and trying to improve teaching,” says TOPSS Chair Jann Longman, a high school psychology teacher in Washington state. Laura Brandt, Grayslake Central High School, Grayslake, Ill. Understanding psychology can make you a more empathetic friend, a sharper student and a stronger leader, believes Laura Brandt, who’s been teaching the subject in northern Illinois for 19 years. That’s why her goal is to impart psychological principles to all students, Brandt whether or not they want to study psychology in college or become psychologists. “If they can understand how this affects their lives, behavior and the people around them, I’m happy,” she says. Brandt has organized a psychology quiz bowl and hosted regional conferences with her colleagues in the area. Although she’s recognized as an “all-around school leader,” according to Longman, Brandt’s not interested in a position in administration. “I can’t imagine coming to school every day and not spending the majority of my time with the kids,” she says. “It never gets stale.” Kimberly Patterson, Cypress Bay High School, Weston, Fla. Whether her students are splitting into competing teams to learn about social psychology or asked to dance like neurons 78

to better understand neuroscience, every activity in Kimberly Patterson’s AP psychology class has a purpose — even though it may at first seem like it’s just for fun. Patterson, who is trained to teach medical skills to students in the health professions, was switched to psychology because she didn’t have a nursing Patterson degree. “It was meant to be,” she says. She’s launched a county-wide psychology bowl — expected to include up to eight schools next year — and instituted her school’s psychology honor society, a national pilot that involves community service, guest lectures and field trips to mental hospitals and sleep clinics. “I love everything I do,” she says. Maria Vita, Penn Manor High School, Millersville, Pa. As a native of New York City, Maria Vita might have felt out of place in Millersville, Pa., a small farming community with a large Amish population. But Vita, who’s taught psychology there for nine years, isn’t predictable — and neither are her Vita classes. She is U.S. history buff who has taught on a Native American reservation in New Mexico and never thought she’d teach psychology, but now says the subject exemplifies why she went into teaching in the first place. “I like when students are able to think critically and demonstrate their learning in a creative way,” like when their work in her rat lab makes classical and operant conditioning come to life, she says. In the lab, students use principles like the cognitive map, positive punishment and generalization to train rats to respond to clickers, push marbles, navigate mazes and even play the piano. “The rats aren’t the only ones learning,” Vita says. Q —ANNA MILLER

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APA DICTIONARY OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY Editor-in-Chief Gary R. VandenBos

APA proudly offers this focused abridgment of its landmark, critically acclaimed APA Dictionary of Psychology, specifically tailored for clinicians and cliniciansin-training. The APA Dictionary of Clinical Psychology maintains all the best features of the parent dictionary, including t 11,000 entries offering clear and authoritative definitions—including a number of entirely new entries t Balanced coverage from across such core areas as assessment, evaluation, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of emotional and behavioral disorders; training and supervision; as well as terms more generally relevant to various biological, cognitive, developmental, and personality/social psychological underpinnings of mental health t Hundreds of incisive cross-references that deepen the user’s understanding of related topics t A Quick Guide to Use that explains stylistic and formal features at a glance t Appendixes listing major figures relevant in the history of clinical psychology and psychological therapies and psychotherapeutic approaches An invaluable resource, the APA Dictionary of Clinical Psychology answers the needs of clinical psychologists, whether they work in health or mental health clinics; in independent or group practices; or as consultants to professionals in such fields as medicine, law, social work, and consumer relations. 2013. 648 pages. Hardcover. List: $39.95 | APA Member/Affiliate: $29.95 | ISBN 978-1-4338-1207-1 | Item # 4311016

Contents

Preface | Editorial Staff | Quick Guide to Format | APA Dictionary of Clinical Psychology [A to Z Entries] | ««i˜`ˆÝià Biographical Entries | Psychotherapy and Psychotherapeutic Approaches Entries

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Personalities

Q Ruth Baxter, PhD, was named a scholar ambassador at the 2012 World Forum in Oxford, England, Aug. 28–Sept. 2. The forum, co-organized by the American Biographical Institute and the International Biographical Baxter Center, brought together delegates from a variety of professions whose contributions have broadened society and communities around the world. Baxter, an education expert, presented on the effect of group homes on mental health clients. Q The Council of Counseling Psychology Training Programs presented Arthur M. Horne, PhD, with its 2012 Lifetime Contributions Award during APA’s Annual Convention, Aug. 2–5 in Orlando, Fla. Horne is dean of the University of Georgia College of Education and a distinguished research professor who is widely recognized for his work on dysfunctional families and ways to prevent and address bullying and aggressive behavior among males. In 2011, he received APA’s Award for Lifetime Contributions to Prevention Psychology and is the current president of Div. 17 (Society of Counseling Psychology). Q Mike Sullivan, PhD, was first runner-up in the Meals on Wheels 80

Association of America’s Annual American Volunteer contest. Sullivan, who was APA’s assistant Sullivan executive director for state advocacy from 1992–2005, has volunteered for the Columbia, S.C., branch of Meals on Wheels for four years. He delivers 50 meals each week to older homebound adults. Sullivan also volunteers at the Howlmore Animal Sanctuary in Columbia, where he works with specialneeds animals. Before he became a psychologist, Sullivan served in the Peace Corps in Korea where

he developed a high regard for how Asian cultures respect the elderly. His experience inspired him to volunteer for Meals on Wheels during his retirement. Sullivan won $750 for his Meals on Wheels branch. View his nomination video at seniorresourcesinc.org. Q Colorado State University psychology professor George Thornton III, PhD, may become the oldest man to swim across the English Channel next summer. Thornton, 72, trained and traveled to Dover, England, to swim the channel last July, but was unable to swim because of two weeks of bad weather. Thornton, an industrialorganizational psychologist, has completed more than 90 triathlons, including 12 Ironmen. Q

Workshops for high school teachers of psychology Twenty-five high school teachers from around the country participated in the eighth annual APA–Clark University Workshop for High School Teachers on the Clark campus, July 16–18. The event is also supported by the American Psychological Foundation. APA’s Teachers of Psychology in Secondary Schools collaborated with the university to develop the workshop, which featured lectures on sensation and perception, the learning sciences and adolescent sleep patterns. The workshop offered working sessions with seasoned high school teachers on how best to engage students. The high school teacher participants were: Nicole Bardoulas, Cindy Briggs, Emily Burnam, Elizabeth Chuba, Jill Cooper, Jessica Duco, Jon Dugan-Henriksen, Simone Duven, Kay Fenn, Nancy Gagnon, Gerri Garofalo, Pamela Hornung, Stephanie Kenney, Matthew Marino, Michael McLane, Julie Muskopf, Jaclyn Parslow, Aaron Portenga, Emily Ries, Kerri Romanino, Michael Schirtzer, Lily Shine, Kirk Svendsen, Estefania Torres and Peter Warren.

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Advertising: The following are guidelines for use in composing and responding to advertisements to be placed in the Career Opportunities section of the Monitor on Psychology. By vote of the Council, 1974, listings will be accepted from academic institutions under censure by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP). However, these listings are identified in this publication by the placement of the symbol (•) preceding line classified career opportunities (and by an editor’s note located in these guidelines for classified display ads) in order to advise applicants that the employing institution, or its administration, which includes the administrative officers and the governing board of the institution, has been censured by the AAUP, and that further information may be obtained from the relevant AAUP Bulletin. Department of Defense Advertisements for positions requiring military service must include the following disclaimer: Eligibility for military service requires certain physical abilities and attributes including age, height, weight, and physical ability requirements. APA policy on the use of the title “psychologist” is contained in the General Guidelines for Providers of Psychological Services, which defines the term “Professional Psychologist” as follows: “Psychologists have a doctoral degree in psychology from an organized, sequential program in a regionally accredited university or professional school.” APA is not responsible for the specific title or wording of any particular career opportunities, but it is general pattern to refer to master’s-level positions as counselors, specialists, clinicians, and so forth (rather than as “psychologists”). In addition, it is general practice to refer to APA-accredited programs as “APAaccredited” rather than “APA-approved.” The position as described must be in conformity with the statute regulating the use of the title psychologist and the practice of psychology in the state in which the job is available. Employers are required to include any limits or restrictions on career opportunities advertisements, including any restrictions on the basis of geographical, age, and/or religious factors. Advertisements should be written to convey the following information: • Job title with area of specialization required. • Name of employer. (Blind or box ads cannot be accepted.) • Description of position, responsibilities involved, permanent or temporary, tenure-track or not, etc. • Minimum qualifications required, including any restrictions on the basis of geographical, age, and/or religious factors.

Advertising Guidelines MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY CLASSIFIED ADS

• Salary range and period covered. • Closing date for applications and date position will commence. • Indication if interview expenses are not to be fully paid. • List of documents to accompany initial letter of application, e.g., vitae, names of references, etc. • Name and address of person to whom application should be directed. Placement of an advertisement implies that: • Jobs exist as described. • There is/are no prescribed candidate(s). • Employer will acknowledge receipt of applicant’s material. • It is recommended that advertisers inform an applicant when (s)he is eliminated from consideration or when the position is filled. Responding to an advertisement implies that: • Training experience and interests are accurately represented by letter of application and supporting material and are consonant with those specified in the advertisement. • Applicant should notify prospective employer if (s)he no longer wishes to be considered for the position. Equal Employment Opportunity The American Psychological Association endorses equal employment opportunity practices and accepts only ads that are not discriminatory on the basis of race, color, gender identity and expression, religion, age, national origin, veteran status, sexual orientation, or physical disability. In keeping with this policy, the use of “recent Ph.D.” in APA advertising is not allowed on the basis that it is potentially age-discriminatory (see U.S. Department of Labor prohibition on use of “recent graduate”). The term “beginning-level salary” may be used. Positions may also be defined in terms of teaching load, specified number of years away from a tenure decision, or requirements of certain skills. We reserve the right to edit all copy and to refuse ads that are not in consonance with the principles of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, the Veterans’ Reemployment Rights Act Handicap Bias, the Vietnam Era Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. The Equal Employment Opportunity Act, in addition to Public Law 100-238, makes specific legally permissible exceptions to discrimination in hiring by religious institutions, Indian tribes, and federal correctional facilities. For this reason, certain position opening advertisements will include job opening restrictions on the basis of religious, racial, and age factors. Without limiting PsycCareers’s terms, conditions, and policies, PsycCareers in accordance with Department of Justice guidelines: 1) Prohibits any job posting that requires U.S. citizenship or

OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

lawful permanent residence in the U.S. as a condition of employment, unless otherwise required in order to comply with law, regulation, executive order, or government contract. 2) Prohibits any job requirement or criterion in connection with a job posting that discriminates on the basis of citizenship status or national origin. You can review more information at http://www.justice.gov/ crt/about/osc/htm/best_practices.php. For complete EEO guidelines please refer to the following resource: http://www. justice.gov/crt/osc/. Policy concerning advertisements appearing in APA publications: The publication of any advertisement by the American Psychological Association (APA) is not an endorsement of the advertiser or of the products or services advertised. APA is not responsible for any claims made in an advertisement. Advertisers may not, without prior consent, incorporate in a subsequent advertisement or promotional piece the fact that a product or service has been advertised in an APA publication. The Monitor on Psychology is received mid-month by readers. APA recommends that response deadlines in advertisements be no earlier than the 15th of the month following the month of publication. The acceptability of an ad for publication in APA publications is based upon legal, social, professional, and ethical considerations. All advertising must be in keeping with the generally scholarly and professional nature of the publication. In addition, the association reserves the right to refuse advertising submitted for the purpose of airing any side of controversial, social, or professional issues. The general policy is stated as follows: “The publications of the APA are published for and on behalf of the membership to advance psychology as a science, as a profession, and as a means of promoting human welfare. The Association, therefore, reserves the right to unilaterally REJECT, OMIT, OR CANCEL advertising which it deems to be not in the best interest of these objectives, or which by its tone, content, or appearance is not in keeping with the essentially scientific, scholarly, and professional nature of its publications. Conditions, printed or otherwise, which conflict with this policy will not be binding on the publisher.” Classified Rates/Payment Terms 2012/2013 Rates: $12.00 per line for Career Opportunities and Availability Notices; $13.75 per line for all other advertising. Minimum order is six lines. Each line contains approximately 32 characters, including spaces and punctuation. Purchase Orders should accompany advertisements from colleges, universities, or government agencies. All other classified advertising orders must be prepaid prior to publishing with the exception of either member advertising agencies of the American Association of Advertising Agencies (A.A.A.A.) or agencies listed in the Standard Directory of Advertising Agencies. Line classified advertisements are not subject to frequency or agency discounts.

Deadlines: All new ads, ad cancellations, and corrections, as well as instructions to rerun a previous advertisement, must be received in writing. Classified advertisements can be submitted online at www.PsycCareers. com. Non-recruitment advertising can be submitted by e-mail to adodson@apa.org. Closing dates are as follows: November September 25 December October 25 January 2013 November 26 February 2013 December 27 American Psychological Association classified ads on APA’s Online Career Center Line-for-line and display classified advertisements published in the Monitor on Psychology also appear on PsycCareers. This service is provided at no additional cost to the reader or the advertiser. The advertisements are easily located. They are arranged by category—e.g., by the state in which the position is available, specialty area, and also under other topical headings such as conferences and workshops. Updated advertisements are released on PsycCareers approximately the first of the month of issue. Early online postings now available for $10.00 per day up to publication date. Select this option when submitting a line ad at www.PsycCareers. com, or include a request when placing a display ad. Online-only ads on PsycCareers Those classified advertisers who miss the current deadline for publication in the Monitor on Psychology, or who wish to run an online-only ad can submit their classified advertisement for release on PsycCareers. 30-day postings are $550, 60-day postings are $925, and 90-day postings are $1,122. Visit www.PsycCareers.com. For recruitments and classified advertising, contact: Amelia Dodson Advertising Sales Department American Psychological Association Phone: (202) 336-5564 Fax: (202) 216-7610 E-mail: adodson@apa.org Corey Bockhaus Advertising Sales Department American Psychological Association Phone: (202) 336-5567 Fax: (202) 216-7610 E-mail: cbockhaus@apa.org Classified Advertising Index: Career Opportunities Practice Opportunities Billing Services Directories Office Space Available Practice for Sale Publications & Other Call for Presentations Dissertation Consulting Conferences & Workshops Continuing Education Advertiser Index

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PsycCareers.com

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

US OPENINGS

ALABAMA

DOCTORAL-LEVEL PSYCHOLOGISTS: Deer Oaks is a leading provider of geropsychology services and has openings in the following states: Arkansas, Idaho, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Missouri, New Hampshire, South Dakota, Texas, Vermont, and Wyoming. Full-time or part-time doctoral level psychologists are needed to provide therapy and assessment services to senior adults in nursing homes and assisted living communities in their local areas. Salaries commensurate with experience and excellent benefits. Send resume and letter of interest to: Jennifer Wilson, Employee Recruiting, at: hr1@deeroaks.com or fax to (210) 569-8107; or mail 7272 Wurzbach Rd., Suite 601, San Antonio, TX 78240. For more details call (210) 378-1926. Visit our website, www.deeroaks.com, for more information.

FACULTY POSITIONS—OPEN RANK: Two faculty positions at the associate or professor levels with a 12-month appointment are being sought by the Department of Health Behavior, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). An established record of research and publications in the modification of health-related behavior risk factors is required. The department has established research programs in substance misuse and behavioral economics; tobacco control; obesity and physical activity; STI/HIV prevention; child health; family care-giving; and risk and resilience in emerging adults. Candidates with theoretical frameworks relevant to health behaviors such as behavioral economics, experience with multidisciplinary collaboration, and strong quantitative skills are encouraged to apply. The applicant must have a Ph.D., Dr.P.H., or

Sc.D. in the social, behavioral, or related sciences. A record of publications, extramural funding, and excellence in teaching are required for the associate professor or professor ranks. Successful candidates are expected to pursue independent research, participate in collaborative research programs as appropriate to her/his interests, and teach in the department’s M.P.H. and Ph.D. degree programs. Rank, tenure status, and salary will be commensurate with candidate qualifications. The positions will remain open until filled. UAB is an urban, dynamic research university with over 17,500 students enrolled in 10 schools and the College of Arts & Sciences. UAB ranks among the top 25 universities receiving NIH funding, 10th among public universities. UAB has over 20 University-wide interdisciplinary research centers and is nationally recognized for its high quality medical center and research and train-

PSyCHOlOgy ReSidenCy diReCtOR OPPORtUnity Geisinger Health System (GHS) is seeking a Psychology Residency Director to join a well-established, collegial practice. the ideal candidate will direct and manage an accredited Predoctoral internship in clinical Psychology, and Postdoctoral fellowship Programs in adult behavioral medicine, Pediatric Psychology, and neuropsychology. the Predoctoral internship Program accepts 5 interns per year. the Postdoctoral fellowship Programs currently accepts 4 fellows in Pediatric Psychology, 2 fellows in adult behavioral medicine and 2 fellows in neuropsychology. the ideal candidate will guide the Postdoctoral fellowship Programs through the accreditation process. the ideal candidate will also be an active member of the Geisinger Graduate medical education committee and work with Program assistant directors in adult behavioral medicine, Pediatric Psychology and neuropsychology. approximately 30% of the candidate’s time will be in residency program management and 70% will be in clinical practice. the clinical staff includes 11 psychologists in the Psychiatry division. We have a commitment to integrating behavioral health with medical care, evidence-based practice, evaluating outcomes and innovation. clinical faculty appointment at temple university school of medicine is possible. Job Requirements: • Phd or Psyd from an aPa accredited program and internship • License eligible in Pennsylvania • established competency as a clinician in either adult behavioral medicine or Pediatric/child clinical Psychology • 3 Years experience in a medical setting preferred • experience in clinical supervision and curriculum or program development

Discover for yourself why Geisinger has been nationally recognized as a visionary model of integrated healthcare. For more information, please visit Join-Geisinger.org or contact: Jocelyn Heid, Manager, Professional Staffing, at 1-800-845-7112 or jheid1@geisinger.edu.

H e a lt H S y S t e m Redefining the boundaries of medicine

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ing programs in health sciences. UAB is dedicated to broadening the diversity of its faculty, staff, and students. We serve a multicultural student body. Students enroll from every region of the nation and from some 100 countries worldwide. Established in 1981, the UAB School of Public Health has about 90 fulltime faculty members and 350 students. In recent years the School has consistently ranked second among UAB schools in successfully competing for extramural funding. Interested applicants should submit current curriculum vitae, a sample of recent publications, a cover letter that discusses qualifications and reasons for interest in a position, and four letters of support to: Dr. Susan Davies, Ph.D., Search Committee Chair, RPHB 227, 1530 3rd Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 352940022, (205) 934-6020, or by e-mail to cstrahan@uab.edu. UAB is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer committed to fostering a diverse, equitable and familyfriendly environment in which all faculty and staff can excel and achieve work/life balance irrespective of ethnicity, gender, faith, gender identity and expression as well as sexual orientation. UAB also encourages applications from individuals with disabilities and veterans. A pre-employment background investigation is performed on candidates selected for employment. PRIVATE PRACTICE OPPORTUNITY: Seeking licensed clinical psychologists to join a multidisciplinary practice: one child psychologist and one adult (generalist). Send curriculum vitae and cover letter to: Dr. Storey at parker.storey@grayson mentalhealth.com. TENURE-TRACK ASSISTANT PROFESSOR/AUBURN UNIVERSITY AT MONTGOMERY: Auburn University at Montgomery, is searching for a doctoral level assistant professor who can contribute to our scientifically-oriented undergraduate program and to our clinical master’s program. Any specialization in psychology will be considered. Applicants with a clinical or counseling degree must have a degree from an accredited program and have completed an APA-accredited internship. In addition to being a dedicated teacher, applicants should have a developing program of research and publication record. AUM has a diverse student body. We especially welcome applicants who will enrich the diversity of the department. We will begin reviewing applications in January 2013 and continue until the position is filled. To receive full consideration, please complete an online application at http://www.jobs.aum, and send an application letter detailing your teaching and research interests, a curriculum vitae, sample publications, graduate transcripts and three letters of recommendation to: Dr. Glen E. Ray, Chair Department of

MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


PsycCareers.com CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Position Announcements Personalized Digital Learning Learning Scientist/Assistant Professor or Senior Learning Scientist/Associate Professor

Educational Measurement & Assessment Learning Scientist/Assistant Professor or Senior Learning Scientist/Associate Professor

The Learning Sciences Institute (LSI) at Arizona State University (ASU) invites applications for a Learning Scientist or Senior Learning Scientist, depending on qualifications and experience, who will be a key faculty researcher in the LSI’s new Personalized Digital Learning Research Initiative Center. The position is intended to support the advancement of interdisciplinary research in the learning sciences. Appointment, as either Assistant or Associate Professor, and tenure home will depend on the professional background of the successful candidate. Teaching and mentoring of students are required.

The Learning Sciences Institute (LSI) at Arizona State University (ASU) invites applications for two positions as either a Learning Scientist or Senior Learning Scientist, depending on qualifications and experience, who will be key faculty researchers in the LSI’s new Psychometrics & Learning Analytics Research Initiative Center. Each position is intended to support the advancement of interdisciplinary research in the learning sciences. Appointment, as either Assistant or Associate Professor, and tenure home, will depend on the professional background of the successful candidate. Teaching and mentoring of students are required.

Applicants must have an earned doctorate, a record of research publication with high impact, external funding, and a strong record of mentoring graduate students or postdoctoral researchers, appropriate to rank. We value candidates with deep knowledge of Personalized Digital Learning. Consistent with ASU’s Vision and Goals, we value research that is use-inspired, socially embedded, and impactful. Preference will be given to candidates with clear ability for leading and conducting research that leverages existing faculty strengths and addresses a critical challenge for education or one or more of the LSI’s primary research initiative centers (i.e., Early Learning, Personalized Digital Learning, Psychometrics & Learning Analytics, and New Learners/New Teachers). Ability to consult with and support fellow investigators is also a highly valued attribute for the position. Interdisciplinary research and collaboration are highly valued at ASU. The Personalized Digital Learning Research Initiative Center includes an interdisciplinary team that focuses on learning with personalized digital media (e.g., games, simulations, intelligent tutoring systems, mobile, mixed reality). This includes digital media capable of developing complex, dynamic models of students’ knowledge and using this information to meet the students’ unique learning needs at a given moment. A goal of the LSI is to help realize the transformational potential of these systems by supporting interdisciplinary teams engaged in research around this personalized education challenge. Currently, ASU researchers from a number of disciplines— education, computer sciences, media, cognitive psychology, and engineering—support this research initiative center in collaboration with digital business partners and preK-20 educators. Applications will be reviewed beginning November 1, 2012; reviews will occur every two weeks thereafter until search is closed. Interested applicants should submit (1) a letter of interest that describes his/her research program, (2) a vita, (3) three representative research publications, and (4) the names and contact information for three references. These materials should be sent electronically as either Word or PDF documents to Robert K. Atkinson, [LSIjobs@asu.edu], Director of Personalized Digital Learning Research Initiative Center, Learning Sciences Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-2111.

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Applicants must have an earned doctorate, a record of research publication with high potential for impact, external funding, and a strong record of mentoring of students and other researchers, appropriate to rank. Interdisciplinary research and collaboration are highly valued at ASU. Candidates’ areas of research interest are open; examples include measurement and psychometric theory, design and validation of tests/assessments, research on assessment of effective teaching and learning, and educational data visualization practices and use. Preference will be given to candidates with clear ability for leading and conducting research that leverages existing faculty strengths and addresses a critical challenge for education or one or more of the LSI’s primary research initiative centers (i.e., Early Learning, Personalized Digital Learning, Psychometrics & Learning Analytics, and New Learners/New Teachers). Ability to consult with and support junior investigators are also desired characteristics for an appointment at the Associate Professor level. Applications will be reviewed beginning November 1, 2012; reviews will occur every two weeks thereafter until search is closed. Interested applicants should submit (1) a letter of interest that describes his/her research program and teaching interests, (2) a vita, (3) three representative research publications, and (4) the names and contact information for three references. These materials should be sent electronically as either Word or PDF documents to Stephen N. Elliott, [LSIjobs@asu.edu], Director, Learning Sciences Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-2111. The Learning Sciences Institute is a new, university-wide enterprise at ASU with the mission to conduct and disseminate research that advances theory, methods, polices, and practices that improve human learning. The LSI is staffed to support faculty research and graduate training in several colleges at ASU, including the Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, College of Technology & Innovation, and Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering. Senior Learning Scientists may also explore entrepreneurial opportunities at ASU SkySong (http://skysong.asu.edu). Visit http://lsi.asu.edu to learn more about the Learning Sciences Institute. Arizona State University is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer. Minorities, women and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Please see ASU’s complete nondiscrimination statement at https://www.asu.edu/titleIX/.




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CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Psychology Auburn University at Montgomery PO Box 244023 Montgomery, AL 36124-4023. AUM is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer committed to achieving excellence through diversity; therefore, we encourage applications from historically underrepresented groups. FACULTY POSITION, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY—AUBURN UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY: Auburn University’s Department of Psychology, is seeking candidates for one tenure track position at the assistant professor level in pediatric/ clinical child and adolescent psy-

chology. The successful applicant will clearly demonstrate the ability to: 1) foster the scientistpractitioner orientation of the clinical program, 2) maintain a productive, ongoing program of fundable research and publication, 3) mentor students, 4) provide exceptional instruction, and 5) supervise practicum students through our in-house training clinic. Strong preference will be given to those who will complement existing strengths and our growing nexus in health psychology, including pediatric psychology, child health promotion/prevention, and community-based research; as well as specialists in child internalizing disorders and child mal-

Life Sciences Open Rank Tenure Track Faculty Position JOB ANNOUNCEMENT

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LOS ANGELES The Division of Life Sciences in the UCLA College of Letters and Sciences announces the continuance of its special initiative to recruit excellent research scientists with a history and commitment to the mentorship of students from underrepresented and underserved populations. Candidates should have outstanding records of scholarly publications, research support, and teaching and be eligible for Academic Senate appointment in any of our departments of Life Sciences (www. lifesciences.ucla.edu), including psychology. The successful candidate will be expected to mentor undergraduates and to participate in campus-wide and departmental programs that provide research and professional development opportunities for our diverse student body, including MARC, (Minority Access to Research Careers), PEERS (Program for Excellence in Education & Research in Sciences), and the Biomedical Research Minor. Teaching assignments will take into account mentorship activities associated with the position. Faculty appointment will be made at a professorial rank commensurate with current academic standing and achievement. UCLA offers competitive salaries, research set-up funds, and recruitment allowances. Nominations and questions should be sent to: Professor Paul Barber (paulbarber@ucla.edu) or Professor Anna Lau (alau@psych.ucla. edu). Application packages should be submitted online through [www.ibp.ucla.edu/mentorship] and include the following: 1) curriculum vita; 2) statement of research interests; 3) statement of teaching interests that includes information on formal and informal mentorship activities targeting underrepresented and underserved populations; and 4) cover letter that includes names of referees that can be contacted for letters. Review of applications will begin on 1 November 2012, and continue until positions are filled. Please use position number 0845-1213-01 in all correspondence. UCLA is California’s largest university, with an enrollment of nearly 38,000 undergraduate and graduate students. The UCLA College of Letters and Science and the university’s 11 professional schools feature renowned faculty and offer more than 323 degree programs and majors. The Biosciences area at UCLA has more than 300 faculty members, includes many top ten ranked departments, and is consistently in the top ten in NIH funding. The UCLA College has a tradition of outstanding teaching and mentorship of undergraduates that the Division of Life Sciences will enhance through this special initiative. As a campus with a diverse student body, we encourage applications from women, minorities, and individuals with a history of mentoring underrepresented minorities in the sciences. UCLA is an affirmative action/ equal opportunity employer with a strong institutional commitment to the achievement of faculty and staff diversity.

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treatment. For information on the department of psychology, see www.cla.auburn.edu/psychology. The clinical program has diverse research receptive practicum placements, a state-of-the-art training clinic, and an available MRI/fMRI facility (3T and 7T), among other resources to promote the careers of junior faculty. Start date for this position is August 16, 2013, but could be as early as January 1, 2013. Minorities and women are encouraged to apply. All applicants are welcome to contact the Director of Clinical Training and Chair to discuss the position and their candidacy. Review of applications will begin October 15, 2012 and will continue until the position is filled. The candidate selected for this position must be able to meet eligibility requirements to work in the United States at the time appointment is scheduled to begin and continue working legally for the proposed term of employment; excellent communication skills required. Applicants are expected to have a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from an APA- or CPA-accredited clinical program (with an accredited clinical internship) and be licensed or license-eligible. To apply for this position: https://aufacultypositions.peopleadmin.com /. Applicants will be required to attach cover letter, vita, statement of research and teaching interests, reprints of recent publications or preprints, evidence of teaching effectiveness if available, current transcript and names and e-mail address of three references. Auburn University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.

ARIZONA PSYCHOLOGIST (CONTRACT): Sierra Tucson, an internationally known inpatient facility for treatment of chemical addiction and behavioral health issues, located near Tucson, Arizona, is adding a contract psychologist. Our internationally renowned dual-disorder behavioral health treatment facility is seeking an experienced licensed psychologist to join our contract staff. This individual must have strength in psychological testing to administer, score and interpret psychological tests. Will perform evaluations of personality functioning, cognitive functioning, and will advise other health care providers on characteristics and appropriateness of psychological testing in patient care. Hours will include Saturday and Sunday, excellent opportunity for working psychologist to gain supplemental hours and experience. Requirements: Qualified applicants will possess Ph.D., Psy.D., or Ed.D. in psychology from an American Psychological Association (APA-accredited) program; minimum of two years’ experience in the field at the doctoral level. Must be licensed as a psychologist by the Arizona Board

of Psychologist Examiners, or working toward licensure. The successful candidate will have excellent psycho­metric skills and the ability to work in a multidisciplinary setting. In addition, must have excellent communication, interpersonal, and teamwork skills, and strong clinical ability. Must maintain complete confidentiality in all patient/ program matters, in accordance with facility policy. Send curriculum vitae or resume to careers@ sierratucson.com.

ARKANSAS ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: The Department of Psychology and Counseling at the University of Central Arkansas (UCA) invites applications for an assistant professor, tenure-track position to begin August 15, 2013. A Ph.D. in psychology with an emphasis in pediatrics/child-adolescent development and license eligibility are required. UCA has a large undergraduate program and graduate programs in school psychology, counseling psychology and community counseling. The school psychology program is APA-accredited. More information about the department can be found at: http://www.uca.edu/psychology. Review of applications will begin October 15, 2012, and continue until filled. Submit letter of application, curriculum vitae, official graduate transcripts, and three letters of recommendation via e-mail to: Dr. J. Arthur Gillaspy, Jr., Chairperson, Department of Psychology and Counseling, at artg@uca.edu. UCA is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR—COGNITIVE, DEVELOPMENTAL, OR SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGIST WITH AN EMPHASIS IN NEUROSCIENCE: The Department of Psychology at the University of Arkansas invites applications for a tenuretrack appointment at the rank of assistant professor, beginning August 12, 2013. We seek candidates with a Ph.D. in psychology (or related field) whose research and teaching interests focus on the intersection of neuroscience and cognitive, developmental, or social psychology. See links for details http://hr.uark.edu/ jobdetails.asp?ListingID=6608.

CALIFORNIA ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, BIOPSYCHOLOGY: The Department of Psychology at California State University, East Bay invites applications for an assistant professor, tenure-track position in biopsychology to begin in fall 2013. Applicants should have a Ph.D. in psychology and a record of peerreviewed scholarship. Outstanding candidates in all specialty areas of biopsychology are encouraged

MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


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CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

to apply. Duties include: teaching undergra­duate courses such as physiological psychology or comparative psychology and other lecture and laboratory courses in the candidate’s area of expertise. Candidates should have outstanding teaching skills, be enthusiastic about working with a diverse student body, and have a systematic program of research. Laboratory space is available and faculty development funds for research are awarded on a competitive basis. The potential for outside funding is desired. Teaching assignments will be at our main campus and our satellite campus in Contra Costa County. For additional information, visit our department’s website (http://www. sci.csueastbay.edu /psychology). Review of applications will begin October 1, 2012. Send a letter of application, teaching and research statements, curriculum vitae, graduate transcripts, copies of major publications or preprints, and three letters of recommendation to: Biopsychology Search Committee, Position No. 12-13 PSYCBIOPSYCHOLOGY-TT, Department of Psychology, California State University, East Bay, 25800 Carlos Bee Blvd, Hayward, CA 94542. CSUEB, situated in the hills overlooking San Francisco Bay, is an Equal Opportunity Employer. (•) ASSISTANT PROFESSOR— CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY: The Department of Psychology at Loma Linda University invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position at the rank of assistant professor (other ranks considered) in the area of clinical neuropsychology. All applicants must hold a Ph.D. or Psy.D. from an APA-accredited program, have completed an APAaccredited internship, and hold a California psychology license or be license-eligible. Candidates would be primarily responsible for research mentoring, teaching, and clinical supervision. The department is particularly interested in individuals who have the training and skills necessary to teach courses on intellectual/ cognitive assessment and neuropsychological assessment, provide assessment supervision, and contribute to the department’s professional concentration in neuroscience and neuropsychology. Individuals with additional expertise in clinical child psychology are particularly encouraged to apply. Ideally, applicants will have an active research program, publication track record, and prior experience teaching/supervising graduate students. A demonstrated ability/potential to pursue extramural research funding is also desirable. Loma Linda University is a health sciences university and its medical center, one of the main health-care institutions in Southern California, is the flagship of a system of hundreds of health care institutions around the world. The university is centered on a biopsychosocial-spiritual model of

wholeness. The Department of Psychology is housed within the School of Behavioral Health and includes APA-accredited Ph.D. and Psy.D. programs in clinical psychology.

Loma Linda is conveniently situated in the foothills of the San Bernardino and San Gabriel mountain ranges and is in driving range of San Diego/Orange County beaches, Palm

Springs, downtown Los Angeles, and Las Vegas. The Faculty Search Committee may request supplemental application materials from applicants. Review of applications will be-

The University of La Verne’s Department of Psychology invites applications for two full-time, ten-month, Tenure track faculty positions. Both positions will begin with the 2013/2014 Academic year:

Associate/Full Professor of Psychology and Program Chair, Master’s Counseling Programs – #3220 Assistant Professor, Clinical Psychology – #3221 #3220 is at the associate/full professor level and Program Chair of the Master’s Counseling Programs. Candidates with any areas of clinical or counseling expertise will be considered. # 3221 is at the assistant professor level in Clinical Psychology. Candidates of any areas of clinical expertise will be considered. The University of La Verne is a comprehensive private university founded in 1891 and located in the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains about 35 miles east of Los Angeles. The University is designated as a Hispanic Serving Institution. The Psychology Department, with a current faculty of 12, is committed to teaching and scholarly excellence, values a multicultural psychology perspective, fosters a collegial learning community for students and faculty, and actively strives to incorporate cultural diversity and multiculturalism into their work. Members from underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply. Learn more about the university at: http://laverne.edu/. The Psychology department includes an APA accredited Clinical Psychology Psy.D program, a MS in Marriage & Family Therapy program, and an undergraduate psychology program. #3220 Associate/Full Professor of Psychology and Program Chair of the Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) Program. The MFT Program in the Psychology Department at the University of La Verne has a 35-year history, strong network of alumni, and is well known and regarded in the Southern California area. The responsibilities include: Overall management and implementation of the academic and administrative aspects of the MFT Program on a year round basis; work closely with the department chair on most aspects of the programs; teach four courses a year (equivalent of two-thirds of a normal annual load of no less than 18 semester hours) all within the MFT program; provide leadership in possible new directions for the MFT program. Applicants are also expected to maintain an independent research program and advise and mentor master’s students. Position #3220 qualifications include: a Ph.D in Clinical or Counseling Psychology (from an APA-Accredited doctoral program); completion of an APA-accredited internship; licensure as an MFT, Counseling or Clinical psychologist, or be immediately license-eligible in CA; have a record of excellence in teaching, program administration, interpersonal management skills, and scholarly/professional research and development. Applicants with a Ph.D. in Marriage & Family Therapy (from a COAMFTE accredited doctoral program) will also be considered. The ideal candidate will be knowledgeable about family systems and recovery models; infuse multicultural issues within the curriculum; possess relevant experience within a liberal arts institution; possess teaching and clinical training experience with multicultural and diverse populations; and have excellent organizational skills. #3221 – Assistant Professor, Clinical Psychology responsibilities include: teaching six courses a year (equivalent to no less than 18 semester hours) of which at least fifty percent will be in the APA-accredited Clinical Psychology Program. Applicants are also expected to maintain an independent research program and to advise and mentor undergraduate and graduate students. Position #3221 qualifications include: a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from an APA-accredited doctoral program; completion of an APA-accredited internship; licensure in CA or the ability to be licensed within 3 years of initial employment; record of excellence or potential in teaching; a demonstrated history of scholarly research and the potential to continue such work; and a commitment to quality teaching and scholarship in a comprehensive liberal arts university with a commitment to multiculturalism and a very diverse student body. The hiring range for both positions is dependent upon qualifications and departmental equity. Benefits of employment include a comprehensive health and welfare plan, tuition remission program for employee, spouse and dependent children, and a generous 10% contribution to the university’s 403-B retirement plan. Review of applicants for both positions will begin November 1, 2012 and will continue until position is filled. To apply, please send a cover letter of interest describing your teaching philosophy and research experience, curriculum vita, representative publications, evidence of teaching effectiveness (including several recent course evaluations and course syllabi), and letters from three professional references in Word or PDF format to: jobs@laverne.edu, or mail to Human Resources, University of La Verne, 1950 Third Street, La Verne CA 91750. Reference positions #3220 or #3221.

OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

The University of La Verne is an Equal Opportunity Employer 85


PsycCareers.com CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

gin October 1, 2012, and continue until the position is filled. Applicants should send a letter of interest, curriculum vitae, representative reprints/preprints, and names/contact information for at least three referENCESTO#HAIR &ACULTY3EARCH#OMMITTEE ,OMA ,INDA 5NIVERSITY $EPARTMENT OF 0SYCHOLOGY  !NDERSON 3T ,OMA ,INDA #!  Applicants may also send their materials via e-mail to: Dr. David Vermeersch at dvermeersch@llu.edu. ,OMA ,INDA 5NIVERSITY IS AN %QUAL Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Women and individuals from diverse backgrounds are particularLYENCOURAGEDTOAPPLY,OMA,INDA University is a religiously sponsored institution and employer. AppliCANTSMUSTBESUPPORTIVEOFTHE,,5 mission statement. http://www.llu. edu/central/mission.page. For more information, visit: http://llu.edu/ science-technology/grad/psychology/ INDEXPAGE

MENTAL HEALTH SETTING 3UB SPEcialties will be open and might include interests in 1) recovery orienTATION AND MODELS  hAT RISKv POPulations such as children at risk for mental disorders and/or juvenile jusTICE OUTCOMES  DRUG ADDICTION  psychopharmacology, or 5) treatment (e.g., couples counseling, maternal-child mental health, severe mental disorders). Candidates must DEMONSTRATE EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING An important component of this position will be the research mentoring of undergraduate and graduate STUDENTS!0H$ISEXPECTEDATAPpointment as well as licensure in the state of California or a commitment to obtaining state licensure. Review of applications will begin December 1, 2012 and continue until position is filled. Hiring for this position is dependent on budgetary approval. 3UBMITCURRICULUMVITAEANDALETTER of application that includes a statement on teaching philosophy and strategies as well as research/proASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN fessional accomplishments and CLINICAL/COUNSELING PSY- goals. Have three letters of recomCHOLOGY: We seek an assistant mendation sent to the address beprofessor with a Ph.D. in clinical low; an electronic version of a letpsychology, counseling psychol- ter of recommendation is acceptogy, or marriage and family ther- able provided it is on appropriate apy, and with a specialty in pub- letterhead. Also submit the names, lic or community mental health. TELEPHONE AND FAX NUMBERS AND The ideal candidate would be fully e-mail addresses of your referees, committed to clinical practice and and an official copy of your doctortraining as well as engaging in ALTRANSCRIPTS3ENDTO2OBERT2ICCO publishable research and apply- Ph.D., Professor and Chair, DepartING FOR EXTRAMURAL FUNDING IN THE MENTOF0SYCHOLOGY #ALIFORNIA3TATE area of public or community men- 5NIVERSITY 3AN "ERNARDINO  tal health. In addition, they would 5NIVERSITY0ARKWAY 3AN"ERNARDINO HAVE EXPERIENCE IN PRACTICE AND RE- #!   4ELEPHONE  search in a public or community  % MAILRRICCO CSUSBEDU EOE

Assistant Professor, Developmental Psychology The Psychology Department at the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professor position in developmental psychology. We wish to hire a junior scholar whose research focuses on infant and/or child development and whose work integrates individual, interpersonal, and/or cultural aspects of development. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: Applicants must have a Ph.D. or equivalent in Psychology or related field completed by September, 2013. POSITION AVAILABLE: July 1, 2013, with academic year beginning September 2013. This position is contingent upon final budgetary approval. Apply at http://apptrkr.com/270946 Refer to Position #JPF00010-13 in all correspondence. CLOSING DATE: Review of applications will begin on November 15, 2012. To ensure full consideration, applications must be complete and letters received, by this date. The position will remain open until filled, but not later than 6/30/2013. EOE 

STAGLIN FAMILY CHAIR IN MAJOR MENTAL DISORDERS: The Department of Psychology AT 5#,! SEEKS NOMINATIONS AND applications for a full-time tenured position at the level of professor, in clinical psychology, to lLL AN ENDOWED CHAIR THE 3TAGLIN &AMILY#HAIRIN-AJOR-ENTAL$ISorders. The ideal candidate should have a Ph.D. in clinical psychology, a continuous record of intellectual visionary leadership, and innovative and creative research related to mental health disorders, including schizophrenia. Preference will be given to someone with an active research program in the biological bases of the disorder, which might include neurodevelopmental, neuroimaging, or behavior genetic approaches. The individual must ALSO POSSESS A RECORD OF EXCELLENCE in mentoring and teaching, and must be able to contribute to the graduate and undergraduate teaching mission of the clinical psychology program. To request further information about this position, contact: Committee Chair, Constance Hammen (hammen@psych.ucla.edu). Review of applications will begin November 1, 2012 and will continue until a candidate is selected. Appointment of a successful CANDIDATE TO START *ULY   IS desired. Applicants should send a letter, curriculum vitae, statement of research interests, relevant publications, and the names and addressESOFTHREEREFERENCESTOTHE3TAGLIN &AMILY #HAIR 3EARCH #OMMITTEE *OB    $EPARTMENT OF0SYCHOLOGY "OX 5#,! ,OS !NGELES #!   OR e-mail materials as attachments to facultysearch@psych.ucla.edu. We encourage applications from women, minorities, and individuals with a history of mentoring underREPRESENTEDMINORITIES5#,!ISAN Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer with a strong institutional commitment to achieving diversity among its faculty, students and staff.

filled, but first consideration will be given to completed applications uploaded no later than November 15, 2012. An online submission proCESS WILL BE USED SO FOR EXPANDED position description and application, see https://class.csupomona.edu/ apply-psysoc. You may also contact THE 0SYCHOLOGY 3EARCH #OMMITTEE 0SYCHOLOGY  3OCIOLOGY $EPARTMENT #ALIFORNIA 3TATE 0OLYTECHNIC 5NIVERSITY 0OMONA #!    &AX   e-mail: leticiak@csupomona.edu. An Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. FACULTY TENURE-TRACK CLINICAL/COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGYâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;POSITION STARTING AUGUST 2013 (PSYCHOLOGY/JOB #7550): (UMBOLDT 3TATE 5NIVERSIty, is inviting applications for one full-time tenure-track position in clinical/counseling psychology. A Ph.D., Psy.D., or equivalent in clinical or counseling psychology from an APA-accredited college or university is required at the time of appointment. The successful candidate must have a California license or be license-eligible. For complete vacancy announcement and to apply, visit http://apptrkr.com/ First consideration will be given to completed applications received no later than December 1, 2012. Open until filled. Early response is encouraged. Humboldt 3TATE5NIVERSITYISAN%QUAL/PPORtunity/Title/IX/ADA/Employer.

DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGYâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;OPEN RANK PROFESSOR: University of California, -ERCED HASONEPOSITIONOPENATEIther the assistant (tenure-track) or associate/full professor (tenured) level in developmental psychology. Research focus within this area is open. This is a unique opportunity to join a growing psychology faculty at a new UC campus, and to contribute to program development. Psychology is housed within a new building with lab space and collaborative faculty. We are curASSISTANT PROFESSOR, MAR- rently focusing on building departRIAGE AND FAMILY PSYCHO- MENTAL EXCELLENCE IN HEALTH PSYLOGYâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;CAL POLY POMONA: chology, quantitative methods and 4HE0SYCHOLOGYAND3OCIOLOGY$E- developmental psychology. We seek partment invites applications for outstanding scholars who will esthe position of assistant professor tablish and fund creative research of marriage and family psychology programs, contribute to the building TO BEGIN FALL  4HE SUCCESSFUL of a specialization in developmental candidate will have a specialization psychology, participate in innovain marriage and family psychology tive, interdisciplinary research proand will have the ability to teach grams, and teach effectively at the courses such as graduate courses in undergraduate and graduate levcouples and family therapy, under- els. The successful candidate will graduate and graduate courses in have a doctorate in developmenHUMAN SEXUALITY AND UNDERGRADU- tal psychology or a related field; a ate courses in introductory psychol- strong publication record; interogy, abnormal psychology, theories ests in program-building; a comof counseling, and developmental MITMENT TO EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING psychology. Ph.D. or ABD status in and at the associate/full professor clinical or counseling psychology or levels, a strong record of leadership marriage and family therapy, with and a successful research program. the Ph.D. being completed no later #ONTACT 0ROFESSOR *EFF 'ILGER

THAN 3EPTEMBER   %VIDENCE (jgilger@ucmerced.edu) for more of teaching and research ability re- information. Applications must be quired. The position is open until received no later than December -/.)4/2/.039#(/,/'9s/#4/"%2


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3, 2012, in order to be considered. Submit application online at (http:// jobs.ucmerced.edu /n /academic / position.jsf?positionId=4158). For ssha.ref.psych12-13@ucmerced. edu. UC Merced is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer with a strong commitment to the achievement of diversity among its faculty, staff, and students. DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHO­ LOGY ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: California State University, Fresno, Department of Psychology invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professor position beginning fall 2013. Candidates must have or be near completion of a Ph.D. in psychology or human development with a strong academic and research background in developmental psychology; expertise in developmental psychopathology preferred. Opportunities are available to collaborate with established programs in applied behavior analysis, school psychology and the department’s Autism Center. Responsibilities include: teaching undergraduate and graduate developmental psychology and specialty area courses, developing and maintaining an active research program that involves both undergraduate and master’s level students, and working effectively with faculty, staff, and students from diverse ethnic, cultural, and socioeconomic backgrounds. Review of applications will begin on November 30, 2012. Additional position information and online application instructions are available at http:// apptrkr.com/267799. For more information, contact: Dr. Jean Ritter, search committee chair at jeanr@ csufresno.edu or (559) 278-2691. California State University, Fresno is an Equal Opportunity Employer. RESEARCH TRAINING FELLOWSHIPS IN CLINICAL PSYCHIATRY AND PSYCHOLOGY: Stanford University Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences anticipates openings for postdoctoral fellows to begin July, 2013 and September 2013 of the 2013– 2014 academic year. NIMH-funded training fellowships are designed for those who plan to pursue careers in clinical research with a specialization in adult disorders including mood, anxiety, eating disorders, insomnia, or related areas. These are one- to three-year positions contingent upon funding. Fellows will participate in research projects with faculty mentors and are also expected to develop their own investigations. Candidates should have a clearly identified area of interest and demonstrated capability in scholarly research. Stipends for NIMH training fellowships are approximately $50,000 plus benefits, depending on previous training. These positions are open to MD.s and Ph.D.s. Candidates must .contact faculty in their area of interest before applying (http:// psychiatry.stanford.edu). Require-

ments: M.D. applicants must have completed an approved psychiatry residency program. Ph.D. applicants must have completed: 1) an APA-accredited graduate program; 2) an APA-accredited internship; and 3) all requirements for their Ph.D. prior to beginning their appointment. Applicants must be U.S. citizens. Application deadline is January 4, 2013. To apply, go to http://psychiatry. stanford.edu/education/ and click on T32 Research Fellowships. Minorities and those with disabilities or disadvantaged backgrounds are strongly encouraged to apply. RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT: ATP publishes and revises norm-referenced assessments. We are looking to add a position for research and development, which involves building and revising assessments used by testing professionals in schools, and also with older populations. Anyone from recent graduates on up is encouraged to apply. It is preferred that applicants have familiarity with diagnostic assessments, and knowledge of Classical and IRT psychometric analysis. Also preferred is experience with statistical concepts, development and analysis of surveys, cleaning raw data sets, use of Excel and Systat. Contact: atp-jim@academictherapy.com. POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS IN CHILD CLINICAL PSYCHO­ LOGY: Stanford University Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences anticipates three openings for postdoctoral fellows in child clinical psychology for the 2013–2014 academic year. Clinic-funded fellowships are designed for those seeking careers in clinical practice settings. Two openings are projected in the Child Psychiatry Clinic, which specializes in treatments of anxiety and mood disorders, PDD, and eating disorders for children and adolescents. The fellowships will have major concentrations working with patients in the anxiety and mood disorder clinics and minor concentrations working with patients in the PDD and eating disorders clinics. One opening is projected in the Pediatric Psychology Program, which specializes in treatment of children with medical illnesses including those treated for cancer, solid organ transplant, bone marrow transplant, craniofacial anomalies and dermatologic conditions. Fellows will receive training in assessment, individual, group, and family therapy, depending upon specific position. Stipends are $50,000 plus benefits. Start date is September 1, 2013. Requirements: All applicants must have completed: 1) APA- or CPA-accredited graduate programs in clinical or counseling psychology; 2) APA- or CPA-accredited internships; and 3) all requirements for their Ph.D. or Psy.D. prior to beginning their appointment. Appointments are for one year, with possible renewal for a second year. Positions are contin-

OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

gent upon funding. Applications received before December 3, 2012, will be given priority. However, applications received before January 4, 2013 will be considered. Minority candidates are strongly encouraged to apply. To apply for detailed application information, go to: http://psychiatry.stanford.edu/ education/post-doc-fellow/. An application has been submitted to the APA Commission on Accreditation and is currently under review, 750 First St. NE, Washington, DC 20002-4242, (202) 336-5979. TWO POSITIONS—PETER BENSON CHAIR OF APPLIED DEVELOPMENTAL SCIENCE AND ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY: Fuller School of Psychology invites applications for two faculty positions— full professor to the Peter L. Benson Chair of Applied Developmental Science and Assistant Professor of Applied Psychology. For both positions we are seeking someone who has demonstrated excellence in teaching and research in applied psychology with an area of specialization related to the mission and purpose of the Thrive Center for Human Development such as positive youth development, virtue and character strengths, and religious and spiritual development. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled. Candidates should submit a letter of interest, curriculum vitae and representative reprints to: Ginger Eppinette, at: gingereppinette@fuller.edu. CLINICAL POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM—VA PALO ALTO: The VA Palo Alto Health Care System, is accepting applications for the clinical psychology postdoctoral fellowship program for the 2013–2014 training year. The fellowship includes training in general advanced clinical competencies, with a choice of seven emphasis areas (geropsychology, behavioral medicine, palliative care, neuropsychology, psychosocial reha­ bilitation, PTSD, substance abuse/ homeless rehabilitation). Application deadline is January 2, 2013.

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See website http://www.paloalto. va.gov/MentalHealth/Psychology Training.asp for program description and application requirements. Send application materials to: Bill Faustman, Ph.D., at William. Faustman@va.gov. POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP OPPORTUNITY IN HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH: The Center for Health Care Evaluation (http:// www.chce.research.va.gov) has postdoctoral fellowship positions for the 2013–2014 academic year. Research areas with multidisciplinary research programs include health policy, substance abuse and psychiatric disorders (PTSD, depression, dual diagnosis), HIV/ HCV, program evaluation, self-help organizations, performance measures, women’s health, quality of care, continuity of care, implementation research, disease prevention, and health information technologies. Fellows will also be affiliated with Stanford University. A Ph.D. in a field relevant to health services research, evidence of promise as an independent researcher, and U.S. citizenship are required. Applications are due January 7, 2013. Interested applicants should contact: Ruth Cronkite, Ph.D., Ruth.Cronkite@va.gov. CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY FELLOWSHIP—SIERRA PACIFIC MIRECC, VA PALO ALTO HEALTH CARE SYSTEM: The Sierra Pacific Mental Illness, Research, Education and Clinical Center (MIRECC) of the VA Palo Alto Health Care System is accepting applications for our two-year postdoctoral fellowship in advanced psychology. The fellowship offers intensive training in clinical research, education and practice in two primary areas of emphasis: traumatic stress disorders (PTSD) and aging/dementia. This year, applicants with research interest and experience in either emphasis area (aging/dementia or traumatic stress disorders) are encouraged to apply. Fellows are offered intensive mentoring to help them develop advanced expertise in clinical

P SYC H O LO G I S T S

Money matters Psychologists are helping young couples keep afloat financially in increasingly turbulent economic waters—page 48.

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research methodologies and content areas most pertinent to the mental health needs of todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s veterans. Applications are due by January 7, 2013. #ONTACT *ULIE 7EITLAUF 0H$ *ULIE7EITLAUF VAGOV   EXT for program information and application materials. POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF PSYCHIATRY, LAW AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE: Accepting applicants for postdoctoral fellowship beGINNING*ULY &ELLOWSHIPISA full-time, one-year training program in forensic psychology that develops skills in application of clinical psychology to various legal issues for legal ends. Didactic program includes: specially designed seminars in criminal, civil, juvenile, family, personal injury, workerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s compensation, landmark mental health cases, legal regulation of psychology, and law, correctional psychology, and special issues in forensic psychology. Interdisciplinary faculty. Intensive supervision of clinical evalUATIONS AND EXPERIENCES 0ATIENTS from wide variety of legal agencies. Ph.D. in clinical psychology from an APA-accredited school required. 3TIPEND WILL BE   The application deadline is January 1, 2013. For further information, go to: http://keck.usc.edu/Education/

Academ ic_ Depa r tment _ a nd _ Divisions/Department_of_Psychiatry/ Education_and_Training/Forensic_ Psychology_Postdoctoral_Fellowship_ 0ROGRAMASPX )NTERESTED APPLICANTS should send curriculum vitae and APPLICATIONLETTERTO,INDA%7EINBERGER 0H$ 53#)NSTITUTEOF0SYCHIATRY ,AW AND "EHAVIORAL 3CIENCE 0/"OX ,OS!NGELES #!   4EL    &AX   POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS IN ADULT CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY:3TANFORD5NIVERSITY$EPARTment of Psychiatry and Behavioral 3CIENCES ANTICIPATES lVE OPENINGS for postdoctoral fellows in adult CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY FOR THE n ACADEMICYEAR#LINIC FUNDED fellowships are designed for those seeking careers in clinical practice settings. Three of these openings are projected in the psychosocial treatment clinic, which provides training in evidence-based treatment for adults with a wide range of MOOD ANXIETY EATING AND !XIS )) disorders. Opportunities are available for minor concentrations in:  TREATMENTOFANXIETYANDDEPRESSION DIALECTICALBEHAVIORTHERAPY FOR !XIS )) DISORDERS  TREATMENT of eating disorders; 4) psychosocial treatment for patients with bipolar disorder; 5) family and couples treatment; and 6) psychosocial treatment of high performance ath-

School of Public Health School of Medicine Tenure-Track Faculty Positions in Social and Behavioral Sciences The Social and Behavioral Sciences Division seeks to hire two outstanding faculty at the Assistant or non-tenured Associate Professor level. We are particularly interested in candidates with expertise in one or more of the following areas: social determinants of physical and/ or mental health, psychosocial factors in ethnic minority health with an emphasis on health disparities, health psychology, social epidemiology, multi-level modeling, and/ or social and behavioral issues related to health at different stages across the lifespan. Opportunities exist to collaborate with investigators both in the Yale School of Public Health and Yale departments, such as psychology, sociology, anthropology, and psychiatry. The successful candidate can take advantage of resources at Yale, such as the Center for Research on Inequalities and the Life Course, Community Alliance for Research and Engagement, Institute of Social and Policy Studies, Program on Aging, and Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity. Applicants should have a doctoral degree in psychology, sociology, anthropology, epidemiology, or a related field, by the start of the appointment. In addition, successful candidates should have a record of scholarly accomplishments, and will be expected to teach MPH/PhD-level students and develop an externally funded research program. Applicants should submit a CV, statement of research interests, three reprints or manuscripts, and three reference letters by December 10, 2012. Applications will be considered on an ongoing basis, and should be submitted electronically to: Dana Greene, sbs.search@yale.edu Yale University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer that values and actively seeks diversity in the work force. Minorities and women are strongly encouraged to apply.



letes. One opening is projected in the insomnia and behavioral sleep medicine program, which specializes in non-pharmacologic treatments of insomnia and other sleep disorders. One opening is projectED IN THE 3TANFORD 0AIN -ANAGEment Division, which specializes IN PAIN PSYCHOLOGY 3TIPENDS ARE  PLUSBENElTS3TARTDATEIS *ANUARY Requirements: All applicants must have completed: 1) APA- or CPA-accredited graduate programs in clinical or counseling PSYCHOLOGY  !0! OR #0! ACCREDITED INTERNSHIPS AND  ALL REquirements for their Ph.D. or Psy.D. prior to beginning their appointment. Appointments are for one year, with possible renewal for a second year. Positions are contingent upon funding. Applications received before December 3, 2012 will be given priority. However, applications received before January 4, 2013 will be considered. To apply for detailed application information, go to: http://psychiatry. stanford.edu/education/post-docFELLOW -INORITY CANDIDATES ARE strongly encouraged to apply. An application has been submitted to the APA Commission on Accreditation and is currently under reVIEW &IRST3T.% 7ASHINGTON $#    

COLORADO UNIVERSITY OF DENVERâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;TWO ASSISTANT-LEVEL TENURELINE FACULTY POSITIONS IN PSYCHOLOGY: We seek processoriented candidates who will contribute to a growing program in affective science. One position is focused on social psychological approaches to affective science; the other position can involve social, cognitive, or other approaches to affective science. We are a highly collaborative, research-oriented department that values interdisciplinary perspectives. For all positions, successful applicants should have an outstanding record of research achievement. All candidates should have a strong commitment to both undergraduate and graduate education. We will give priority to applications received by October 1, 2012, but will consider applications until the positions are filled. Candidates must complete an online application afTER !UGUST   AT WWWDUEDU hr/employment/jobs.html; this will include a letter of interest, research and teaching statements, curriculum vitae, and reprints/preprints. In addition at least three recommenders should email letters of reference to: PSYCH REC DUEDU 3EE OUR WEBSITE for further information about the department: www.du.edu/psychology. The department and university are committed to enhancing the diversity of our faculty and particularly encourage applications from members of traditionally underrepresented groups. DU is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

DEVELOPMENTAL PRIVATE PRACTICE IN COLORADOâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; SALARY AND BENEFITS: .EUroDevelopment Center of Colorado seeks licensed or license-eligible PSYCHOLOGIST .EUROPSYCH OR SCHOOL BACKGROUND HELPFUL #LINICAL EXCELlence and high quality of life. www. ncchelp.com. THE ROBERT J. HARMON POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS IN INFANT MENTAL HEALTH: Oneyear clinical and didactic training in infant development, parent-child therapy, and early childhood psychopathology and treatment, beGINNING 3EPTEMBER  #LINICAL sites include integration into pediatric practices, substance abuse treatment, and outpatient and homebased services in underserved populations with high proportion of 3PANISH SPEAKING FAMILIES 0H$ Psy.D. in clinical psychology and APA-accredited internship required (degree must be completed BY !UGUST    DEMONSTRATEDINTERESTEXPERIENCEWITHINFANTS young children preferred. AppliCANTSMUSTBEA53CITIZEN3TIPEND   &4 PLUS BENElTS Application deadline December 19, 2012. -OREINFOABOUTTHEFELLOWSHIP AND application procedures to: www. medschool.ucdenver.edu/psychiatry/ harrisprogram. University of Colorado is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA ­U) ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA: The Catholic University of America, Department of Psychology invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professor in clinical psychology FORFALL!PPLICANTSSHOULDHAVE an ongoing research program with DEMONSTRATEDPOTENTIALTOATTRACTEXtramural funding and be committed TO EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING MENTORship, and clinical training. Although a range of content areas within clinical psychology will be considered, the department is especially interested in considering candidates with research programs in adult clinical interventions and/or behavioral medicine/health psychology. Possible areas of interest include: clinical interventions for promoting physical or mental health or for treatment of health or mental health disorders, and research on behavioral, psychosocial, cultural, and biological factors influencing health promotion or prevention of health problems. The psyCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT HAS  FACULTY ANDOFFERS"! -!AND0H$PROgrams including an APA-accredited program in clinical psychology. Faculty have active research programs in a range of areas that attract subSTANTIALEXTERNALFUNDINGANDINVOLVE national and international collaborations. Catholic University is located ON A  ACRE PARK LIKE CAMPUS IN

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Northeast Washington convenient to neighboring medical centers, universities, and laboratories (including the NIH). Additional information may be found on our website (http:// psychology.cua.edu). Review of files will begin in October 2012, and will continue until the position is filled. To apply, submit a research statement, teaching statement with evidence of teaching effectiveness, curriculum vitae, three representative publications, and three letters of recommendation (sent directly by recommender) to cua-clinpsy@ cua.edu; if necessary materials may be mailed to: Clinical Faculty Search Committee, Department of Psychology, The Catholic University of America, 4001 Harewood Rd, N.E., Washington, DC 20064. The Catholic University of America is the national university of the Catholic Church and was founded as a center of research and scholarship. We seek candidates who, regardless of their religious affiliation, understand and will make a signi­ficant contribution to the university’s mission and goals. CUA is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.

FLORIDA ASSISTANT/ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR — NEUROSCIENCE: University of Miami, Department of Psychology is seeking to fill a tenure-track faculty position in neuroscience, starting in August 2013. It is anticipated that this position will be filled at the assistant or beginning associate professor level. This search is emphasizing research interests in human cognitive neuroscience (e.g., using functional MRI). Individuals with clinical or nonclinical interests in neuroscience (cognitive or behavioral) are encouraged to apply. For clinical appointment, a Ph.D. in psychology from an APAaccredited program or equivalent is required. For non-clinical appointment, a Ph.D. in psychology, neuroscience or related area is required. Appointment at a rank higher than the assistant professor level requires experience and qualifications commensurate with rank. Faculty members in the department of psycholE A R LY

CAREER

ogy are expected to develop their own independent areas of research, teach courses at the graduate and undergraduate level and supervise doctoral students. For more information about the department go to www. psy.miami.edu. Review of applicants will begin immediately. Applicants should send curriculum vitae, reprints or preprints, a statement of research and teaching interests, and four letters of reference to: Neuroscience Search Committee, Department of Psychology, University of Miami, P.O. Box 248185, Coral Gables, FL 33124. The University of Miami is an Affirmative Action/ Equal Opportunity University that values diversity and has progressive work-life policies. Women, persons with disabilities, and members of other underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply. ASSISTANT/ASSOCIATE/FULL PROFESSOR: University of Miami, Department of Psychology, Health Psychology Division, is seeking a tenure-track assistant, associate or full professor, whose research interests are in cancer, cardiovascular disease, HIV/AIDS metabolic syndrome or Type 2 diabetes. Ph.D. from an APA-accredited clinical training program required and an interest in minority or health disparities research viewed favorably. Appointment at a rank higher than the assistant professor level requires experience and qualifications commensurate with rank. The division presently has a close affiliation with the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center and has NIH pre- and postdoctoral training grants in cardiovascular disease and in HIV/AIDS. Because much of the research conducted by division faculty is conducted in the Behavioral Medicine Research Center on the Medical School Campus, we are interested in recruiting a person who has established an independent research program, but would also benefit from conducting research in an interdisciplinary setting with ready access to ethnic/racial minority patients and community populations. For more information about the department go to www.psy.miami. edu. Review of applicants will beP SYC H O LO G I S T S

Money matters Psychologists are helping young couples keep afloat financially in increasingly turbulent economic waters—page 48.

OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

gin immediately. Applicants should send curriculum vitae, reprints and/ or preprints, a statement of research and teaching interests, and four letters of reference to: Health Psychology, Search Committee, Department of Psychology, University of Miami, P.O. Box 248185, Coral Gables, FL 33124. The University of Miami is an Affirmative Action/ Equal Opportunity University that values diversity and has progressive work-life policies. Women, persons with disabilities, and members of other underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY: The Department of Psychology at Rollins College invites applicants for a tenure-track assistant professor of psychology beginning August 2013. Applicants should have a doctorate in clinical psychology and show evidence of outstanding teaching and excellence in research; experience in clinical practice and the ability to mentor undergraduate research are also desirable. The successful candidate will join a collegial team of 11 faculty in psychology and be expected to teach undergraduate courses in clinical psychology, psychopathology, introductory courses in the major, and topical courses in his or her area of interest. Normal teaching load is six courses per year. Review of applications will begin fall 2012, and continue until the position is filled. Interested applicants

must apply online via the College’s employment website, http://www. rollinsjobs.com, and upload the following materials merged together as follows: 1) a cover letter describing teaching and research interests, adaptability of your program of research/practice to a liberal arts environment; 2) curriculum vitae; 3) a summary of teaching evaluations; 4) representative publications; and 5) three letters of recommendation. Through its mission, Rollins College is firmly committed to creating a just community that embraces multiculturalism; persons from historically under-represented minority groups are therefore encouraged to apply. Rollins College, one of the oldest institutions of higher learning in Florida, is a comprehensive, liberal arts college located on a beautiful lakeside campus in Winter Park, FL, a metro Orlando community. The college emphasizes innovative and quality teaching in small classes, and ranks number one among 121 Southern master’s-level universities in the annual rankings of “America’s Best Colleges,” released by U.S. News & World Report. Visit the College website www.rollinsjobs.com. LICENSED PSYCHOLOGIST: Florida Counseling and Evaluation Services, a group practice in Jacksonville, seeks licensed psychologist, experience with children, adolescents, families, psych testing to join our team. Duties in-

Clinical Psychology Assistant/ Associate Professor NOVA SOUTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY - The Center for Psychological Studies (CPS) invites applications for a faculty position in the doctoral programs in clinical psychology. Applicants will be reviewed for salary commensurate with experience and scholarship. The successful candidate is expected to be actively involved in research and will be expected to publish, supervise student research, and seek external funding to support research. A commitment to excellence in teaching and mentoring of students is also required. The faculty will teach doctoral program core courses such as adult psychopathology, assessment, and psychotherapy. Preference will be given to those applicants who bring interest and skills in areas such as long term mental illness, psychopharmacology, treatment of older adults, and/or forensic psychology. Faculty are expected to supervise psychology trainees in their clinical work. Applicants must be licensed or licensed-eligible as psychologists in the state of Florida. The Center for Psychological Studies is a graduate school that offers APA-accredited Ph.D. and Psy.D. programs in clinical psychology and a pre-doctoral internship program. Also, part of the center is a consortium internship program (APPIC member) master of science programs in counseling, general psychology, forensic psychology, a doctoral and a specialist program in school psychology, and a behavioral sciences track in the university’s criminal justice programs. The center trains students at its Psychology Services Center that serves a diverse population of children, adolescents, and adults through its general and faculty specialty clinical training programs. Applicants will be reviewed until the position is filled. Please apply on line to Position #997618 at www.nsujobs.com Nova Southeastern University is an independent, not for profit institution that is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

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PsycCareers.com CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

clude: participation in training and supervision. Position, contract/ fee-split. E-mail: information@ mCESCOM FAX    !TTENTION*UDY P S Y C H O L O G I S Tâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; P R I VAT E PRACTICE OPPORTUNITY: 3EEKing Florida licensed or license eligible psychologist to join a wellestablished group practice in Fort -YERS &, #HILDADOLESCENT AND adult positions available. Both therapy and assessment skills are required. Forward curriculum vitae to: Dr. 3TEVEN #OHEN AT CAREER THECENTER forpsychology.com. Visit our web-

site at www.thecenterforpsychology. COMORCALL   LICENSED PSYCHOLOGIST OPENINGSâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;VERICARE: Are you looking for rewarding and fulfilling employment? Vericare is a leader in geropsychology, providing multidisciplinary behavioral interventions in long-term care facilities. Our professionals provide a spectrum of therapies including individual psychotherapy, shortterm solution-focused therapy and behavior management. Vericare has opportunities throughout FlorIDA%XPERIENCEWITHMEDICALINPA-

FiveRuralHealthͲFocusedAssociaateProfessor/ProfessorPositions MultipleD Disciplines TheRuralHealthResearchInstituteeatGeorgiaSouthernUniversity invitesapplicationsforfive(5)tenureͲtrackpositionsattherankof AssociateProfessor/Professor.Thessepositionsrepresentacluster ofresearchͲintensivefacultytostreengthentheUniversityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interdisciplinaryruralhealthresear interdisciplinary rural health researchprogram.Facultywillbejoint ch program Faculty will be joint appointedbetweentheRuralHealtthResearchInstituteandthe academicdepartmentmostconsistentwiththeirbackgroundand researcharea.SalariesarehardͲfun nded,highlycompetitive,and commensuratewithqualificationsaandexperience. Applicationsaresoughtinthefollo owingfiveareas:1)Behavioral InterventionDevelopment/Testingg;2)IntegratedCare; 3)Telehealth;4)Aging/GeriatricCaare;and5)SubstanceAbuse. QuestionsregardingthepositionsccanbesenttoDr.BryantSmalley atbsmalley@georgiasouthern.edu. Toviewthefullannouncemen ntandlearnmoreaboutthe RuralHealthResearrchInstitute,visit http://www.georgiassouthern.edu/RHRI GeorgiaSouthernUniversittyisanAA/EOInstitution

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Money matters Psychologists are helping young couples keep afloat financially in increasingly turbulent economic watersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;page 48.



tient settings and multi-disciplinary teams preferred. For more information, apply online at www.vericare. COMORCONTACT3ANEL,EKICAT   EXT  6ERICARE IS OFfering a $500 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thank Youâ&#x20AC;? referral bonus for any colleagues you refer that get hired. Feel free to call us for details. PSYCHOLOGY OPENING ON THE BEAUTIFUL GULF COAST OF FLORIDA: Carter Psychology Center, a busy, wellestablished small group practice seeks three hard-working, self-motivated doctoral level psychologists to join our team. One position involves the general practice of psychotherAPY FOR TEENS AND ADULTS EXPERIence with children and assessment are desirable but not required. A second position is for a neuropsychologist able to work with a wide range of diagnoses both inpt and outpt. The third position is for an EATING DISORDERS SPECIALIST -UST be Florida licensed or license eligible. Full benefits and staff supPORT3ENDLETTEROFINTEREST CURRICulum vitae, and work samples to: Careers@carterpsych.com. POSTDOCTORAL TRAINING IN BEHAVIORAL ONCOLOGY: The (,EE-OFlTT#ANCER#ENTER2ESEARCH)NSTITUTE AN.#) DESIGNATED Comprehensive Cancer Center, invites applications to its postdoctoral training program in behavioral ONCOLOGY 4HIS .#) FUNDED INTERdisciplinary training program is designed to prepare fellows for careers as independent investigators engaged in research on behavioral aspects of cancer prevention, detection and control. The program combines a specialized curriculum (formal didactic training and one-onONE INTERACTIONS WITH EXPERIENCED MENTORS WITH RESEARCH EXPERIENCE (participation in funded studies unDERTHEGUIDANCEOFANEXPERIENCED investigator). Current funded areas of faculty research include: nicotine dependence and tobacco control, cervical cancer prevention, cultural and literacy issues in cancer prevention and control, disparities in cancer care, quality of life issues in cancer survivors, psychosocial and behavioral aspects of genetic counseling and testing for hereditary cancer, and health care provider practices in cancer prevention and control. Training faculty include: Thomas Brandon, Ph.D., Benjamin Craig, Ph.D., David Drobes, Ph.D., David Evans, Ph.D., Clement 'WEDE 0H$ 2. 0AUL *ACOBSEN 0H$ (EATHER *IM 0H$ #ATHY -EADE 0H$ 2. 3USAN -C-ILLAN 0H$ 2. "RIAN2IVers, Ph.D., Richard Roetzheim, -$ 'WENDOLYN 1UINN 0H$ 6ANI 3IMMONS 0H$ AND 3USAN Vadaparampil, Ph.D. Applicants must have a terminal degree (Ph.D., %D$ 3C$ $0( OR -$ IN A social science, a behavioral science, nursing, education, public health or medicine and be committed to a

career in behavioral oncology reSEARCH 3TIPENDS AND BENElTS ARE highly competitive. Review of applications will begin immediately and will continue until positions are filled.!PPLICANTSMUSTBE53 citizens or permanent residents. To apply, send completed application form (available at the website listed below), curriculum vitae and two letters of reference to: Christine ! -ARSELLA 2ESEARCH 0ROGRAM !SSOCIATE ( ,EE -OFlTT #ANCER Center & Research Institute, -AGNOLIA$RIVE -2# #!.#/.4 4AMPA &,  E MAIL christine.marsella@moffitt.org. For more information about the program, visit the following website: http://www.moffitt.org/behavioral ONCOLOGY -OFlTT #ANCER #ENTER provides a tobacco-free work environment. It is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer and a drug free workplace.

GEORGIA EMORY UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY: Emory University, Department of Psychology, Program in clinical psychology, invites applications for a tenure-track position at the assistant professor level. The clinical program at Emory is APA-accredited and a member of the Academy of PsychologiCAL#LINICAL3CIENCE7ESEEKACANdidate with an outstanding program of research that has a strong theoretical, translational and interdisciplinary focus. We are interested in candidates who might interface with other faculty in our department, which has a strong focus on cognition, development and neuroscience. Applicants should have a strong commitment to both graduate and undergraduate teaching and strong quantitative skills are highly desired. Ph.D. required. Preference will be given to licensed or licenseeligible applicants. We will begin reviewing applications November 1, 2012. Electronic submission of materials is preferred. Emory. #LINICAL3EARCH EMORYEDU OR send materials to: Chair, Clinical 3EARCH #OMMITTEE $EPARTMENT OF 0SYCHOLOGY  %AGLE 2OW %MORY 5NIVERSITY !TLANTA '!  Include curriculum vitae, research and teaching statements, reprints and three letters of recommendation. Women and minorities are especially encouraged to apply. We seek to further diversify our faculty. Emory is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. LICENSED PSYCHOLOGIST NEEDEDâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;GEORGIA: Private practice opportunity for Georgia licensed or license-eligible psychologist in a prosperous, well-established practice in a rapidly growing city. Child/adolescent, family specialty preferred but will consider GENERALISTOROTHERSPECIALTIES3UP-

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PORTIVE COLLEGIAL ENVIRONMENT %XCELLENT INCOME POTENTIAL -INIMAL administrative requirements allowINGGREATERFOCUSONDIRECTCARE&AX CURRICULUMVITAELETTERTO   #OLUMBUS 0SYCHOLOGICAL !SSOCIATES  "ROOKSTONE #ENTRE 0KWY #OLUMBUS '!

October 1, 2012, and will continue until the position is filled. To apply, visit The University of Chicago Academic Career Opportunities website at http://tinyurl.com/9hoy5d4, and submit a cover letter and curriculum vitae. The University of Chicago is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.

CANDIDATEWILLBEEXPECTEDTOTEACH especially encouraged to apply. An introductory and junior level neu- Equal Opportunity Employer. roscience courses (with labs), and other courses such as general psy- AS S I STA N T PRO F ES SO R , chology, drugs and behavior, statis- SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY: The DeTICS RESEARCHDESIGNANDEXPERIMEN- partment of Psychology at Illinois tation, or other courses in the can- 3TATE 5NIVERSITY .ORMAL"LOOMdidateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s specialty area. Applicants ington seeks applicants for a tenurewill have opportunities to contrib- track position at the assistant profesPOSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP ute to an interdisciplinary general sor level in school psychology. Area EMORY UNIVERSITY PSYCHI- ASSISTANT PROFESSOR education program. Review of ap- of specialization is open. This indiATRY TRAUMA AND ANXIETY SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGYâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;EAST- plications will begin on November vidual will work within the departRECOVERY PROGRAM: The Trau- ERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY: 5, 2012 and will continue until the mentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s APA-accredited Ph.D. and MA AND !NXIETY 2ECOVERY 0ROGRAM Assistant professor, tenure-track position is filled. Applicants should .!30 APPROVED SPECIALIST 330 at Emory University is seeking to fill school psychology faculty position submit a letter of application, cur- school psychology programs. The a two year postdoctoral fellowship. BEGINNING !UGUST  Respon- riculum vitae, a statement of teach- department has over 500 undergraFellow will serve as the therapist for a sibilities include: teaching grad- ing interests/philosophy, a statement duate majors, 170 graduate students, STUDYINVESTIGATINGEXPOSURETHERAPY uate (primary) and undergradu- of research interests and plans, re- AND  FULL TIME FACULTY MEMBERS in the emergency department fol- ate courses, maintaining an active prints/preprints of scholarly work, 3CHOOLPSYCHOLOGYFACULTYMEMBERS lowing trauma. Full-time position, research program, and supervis- unofficial photocopies of graduate ARE EXPECTED TO SUPERVISE DISSERTAoften working evenings and week- ing graduate student theses and transcripts, and arrange for three tions and theses in their area of speends. Required: Ph.D. in clinical PRACTICUM EXPERIENCES $OCTORATE letters of recommendation to be sent cialization, provide practicum supsychology. Preferred: %XPERIENCE in school psychology preferred, TO$R-ARY*EAN,YNCH .EUROSCI- pervision, and teach courses at all IN CLINICAL RESEARCH EXPOSURE THER- ABD considered. Review of ap- ENCE 3EARCH #OMMITTEE CO !CA- levels for both graduate and underAPY WORKING WITH 043$ 3END CUR- plications begins on December DEMIC !FFAIRS /FlCE .ORTH #EN- graduate students. Qualifications for riculum vitae, letter of interest, rep- 1, 2012, and will continue until TRAL#OLLEGE ."RAINARD3TREET the position include: Ph.D. (or ABD resentative publications, and four the position is filled. 3END APPLI- .APERVILLE ),  OR E MAIL with Ph.D. imminent) in school psyletters of recommendation to: Barba- cation materials (including curricu- your materials in PDF format to chology, openness to teaching at all ra O. Rothbaum, Ph.D., ABPP, Em- lum vitae and letters of recommen- FACULTYJOBS NOCTRLEDU.ORTH#EN- levels based on department needs, ORY 5NIVERSITY 3CHOOL OF -EDICINE DATION TO !SSEGE (AILE-ARIAM TRAL #OLLEGE FOUNDED IN  IS A and a record indicating the foun "RIARCLIFF 2OAD "LDG ! RD #HAIR 3CHOOL 0SYCHOLOGY 3EARCH selective, comprehensive liberal arts dation of a strong program of re&LOOR !TLANTA '! Committee; Psychology Depart- COLLEGEOFSTUDENTS LOCATED search. The position begins Aument; Eastern Illinois Universi- MILESWESTOF#HICAGOIN.APERVILLE GUST 3ALARYISCOMPETITIVE TY  ,INCOLN !VENUE #HARLES- and within walking distance of the Applicants must submit a cover TON ),  %LECTRONIC APPLICA- .APERVILLE-ETRASTATION3EEHTTP letter, curriculum vitae, statement of ILLINOIS tions (to ahailemariam@eiu.edu) www.northcentralcollege.edu/ for research interests, representative reCLINICAL ASSOCIATE: The De- ARE PREFERRED 3EE HTTPCASTLEEIU MOREINFORMATIONABOUT.ORTH#EN- print/preprints, evidence of teachpartment of Psychiatry and Behav- edu/psych/searches/school.php for tral College and the department. Ap- ing skills, and at least three letters of IORAL .EUROSCIENCE AT 4HE 5NIVER- additional information. An Equal plicants who would enrich the diver- recommendation by December 15, sity of Chicago is seeking a 50% Opportunity/Affirmative Action sity of the campus community are 2012.3UBMITDOSSIERSTO$R*EFFREY time, benefits eligible clinical asso- Employer. CIATE WITH EXPERTISE IN THE DIAGNOsis and treatment of child and ado- ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF lescent psychopathology, to support NEUROSCIENCE: .ORTH #ENTRAL psychotherapy services provided by College invites applications for a the section of child and adolescent tenure-track position in neurosciOSF Saint Francis Medical Center in Peoria, IL has a newly-created position psychiatry. Responsibilities will in- ENCE TO BEGIN 3EPTEMBER   for a full-time Clinical Psychologist specializing in Neuropsychology and clude: evaluation and treatment of The successful candidate will help Rehabilitation Psychology. In this role you will provide Neuropsychological childhood psychological and behav- to initiate and guide our new integraevaluations for a wide variety of neurological, neurorehabilitation and neuroioral disorders utilizing evidence TIVE .EUROSCIENCE PROGRAM HTTP surgical inpatients, as well as provide behavioral medicine consultation to based practices. The candidate may nor thcent ra lcollege.edu /major / other acute medical units. In addition, this person will provide outpatient also participate in the teaching and neuroscience), teaching courses in neuropsychological assessment and Medical Counseling services in our research missions of the depart- neuroscience and other courses that Outpatient Medical Psychology clinic. There may also be an opportunity to have ment; however, this position is pri- MATCHTHECANDIDATESEXPERTISE4HE some involvement in our outpatient Rehabilitation day treatment program, marily aimed at providing clini- specific neuroscience area is open. providing neuropsychological assessment as well as individual and group cal service. Candidates must have A Ph.D. is required and appointment patient and family therapy. Patients range in age from adolescent through a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from at the assistant professor level is angeriatric. Duties would include both assessment and treatment. Background an APA-accredited university-based ticipated, though higher ranks may and experience in Behavioral Medicine/Medical Psychology would be a plus. doctoral program, have completed be considered for suitably qualified OSF Saint Francis Medical Center is a 616-bed teaching hospital affiliated with an APA-accredited predoctoral in- APPLICANTS!PPLICANTSSHOULDEXHIBthe University of Illinois College of Medicine and home to the Illinois Neurological ternship, and preferably, a postdoc- ITAPOTENTIALFOREXCELLENCEINUNDERInstitute (INI), which houses a busy 26-bed CARF-accredited acute rehab unit toral fellowship in child or pediatric graduate teaching and mentoring, as and CARF-accredited outpatient medical rehab day treatment program. psychology. Applicants must hold well as a commitment to scholarship an Illinois license at time of hire. that includes collaborative research For speciďŹ c questions regarding this position, please contact Shelley Falkin Review of applications will begin with undergraduates. The successful Gregg, Ph.D., Clinical Director, Medical Psychology Services, at (309) 655-7378.

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Kahn, School Psychology Search Committee Chair, Department of Psychology, Illinois State University, Campus Box 4620, Normal, IL 61790-4620. Materials may also be sent electronically to psysearch@ ilstu.edu. Inquiries regarding the position can be directed to: Dr. Kahn at psysearch@ilstu.edu or (309) 4387939, Fax (309) 438-5789. For more information, visit www.psychology. illinoisstate.edu/school. An Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY: The Department of Psychology at Knox College seeks to fill two tenure-track positions beginning September 2013. Candidates should have expertise in one or more of the following areas: clinical, developmental, or health psychology. Applicants should have a Ph.D. or be near completion at the time of appointment. Successful candidates will have a sincere interest in quality undergraduate teaching coupled with a desire to maintain an active research program. Both positions require supervision of undergraduate research projects, teaching courses in areas of expertise, and contributing to either introductory psychology or statistics/research methods. The salary for the position is competitive and start-up funds and laboratory space will be available. The psychology department maintains a collegial environment and has academically strong students, many of whom pursue graduate study; see http://deptorg.knox.edu/ psychdept/ for more information. Founded in 1837, Knox enrolls 1400 students from 46 states and 43 countries. Review of applications will begin after December 1, 2012, and will continue until the positions are filled. Send curriculum vitae, no more than three reprints, statement on teaching, and three letters of reference to: Frank McAndrew, Department of Psychology, Knox College, Galesburg, IL 61401-4999 (fmcandre@ knox.edu). In keeping with a 175year commitment to equal rights, Knox College particularly welcomes applications from members of under-represented groups. PA R T-T I M E C O N S U LT I N G NEURO­PSYCHOLOGIST: Chicago based psychiatric practice is seeking a part-time consulting neuropsychologist to perform neuropsychological testing, establish testing protocols, to supervise administration of psychological testing by psychometricians, to perform literature review, record review, data scoring and report writing. Majority of the work may be performed from a home office with daily telephone availability for consultations with psychometricians and staff psychiatrist. Consultant must be available for on-site neuropsycholgical testing two-three times per month; must 92

have access to a secure computer; have strong writing, testing, and interpretative skills; must have a current Illinois license and have a Ph.D. or a Psy.D., must have at least two years of postdoctorate experience. Completion of neuropsychology internship or a board certification in neuropsychology is preferred. Ideal candidate will have experience evaluating patients with traumatic brain injury, cognitive deficits, motivational issues, and malingering/exaggeration issues. Interested candidates should submit their resume and cover letter to: Dina Obolsky, RN, MBA, Practice Administrator at: dobolsky@healthand lawresource.com. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: The Psychology Department at the University of Chicago, seeks to make an appointment at the level of tenure-track first-term or second-term assistant professor. Exceptional candidates who are currently assistant professors and who meet the University of Chicago’s standards for tenure may be considered for an appointment as associate professor with tenure. We are currently seeking to make a faculty appointment in the area of cognition. We are particularly interested in candidates whose research demonstrates a strong potential for interdisciplinary connections within the department and across the university. Candidates using converging methodologies (such as neuroimaging or individual differences) to answer cognitive questions are especially encouraged to apply. For information about the faculty, department, and interdisciplinary opportunities, see http://psychology.uchicago. edu/about/index.shtml. The application process will continue until the position is filled or until the application deadline of March 31, 2013. Applicants must apply online at the University of Chicago’s Academic Career Opportunities website http://tinyurl.com/cfgns3g. Applications are required to include 1) a brief cover letter, 2) current curriculum vitae, 3) a statement of research interests, and 4) a teaching statement. In addition, applicants are strongly encouraged to submit, as optional, up to three representative publications. Also, three letters of reference are required to be submitted online. Ph.D. must be in hand by start of appointment as assistant professor. Review of applications will start on November 1, 2012. Early application is encouraged. The University of Chicago is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. LICENSED CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGISTS: Licensed clinical psychologists needed for multiple job openings working in skilled nursing facilities throughout metro Chicago and Illinois. Excellent pay. Flexible scheduling. Part-time with benefits. Possibility of growth into full-time. Send cover letter and resume to: Dr.

Parisi at markdparisi@sbcglobal.net or fax to (847) 299-4952. TWO LICENSED CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST POSITIONS: David Goodman, Ph.D. Psychologist Associates with offices in St. Charles and Oak Brook is currently seeking two licensed clinical psychologists, one to work with children and adolescents and their families and one for individual and marital counseling. Send resume to: goodmand3@ comcast.net. PSYCHOLOGIST POSITION IN A GROUP PRACTICE: Gersten Center for Behavioral Health, a private psychology practice with locations in Chicago, is looking for two full-time licensed psychologists to join our expanding group. Both candidates should be open to working with the full spectrum of clinical disorders. Position 1: The ideal candidate should have broad experience and interest in working with children, adolescents, and adult populations. Position 2: The ideal candidate should have broad experience and interest in working with adoles­cents and adult populations. Send your curriculum vitae to: Dr. Deborah Liebling at dliebling@gerstencenter. com. We welcome you to visit us at www.gerstencenter.com. CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Wheaton College (IL) is seeking to fill two fulltime, tenure-track assistant professor positions for fall 2013. As a diverse community of faculty and students who share a faith-based commitment to professional practice as service, especially to those marginalized and wounded by society, we strongly encourage applications from groups underrepresented in higher education, including women and ethnic and racial minorities. All candidates should demonstrate a commitment to the integration of Christian faith and theology with psychology, possess a terminal degree, and be licensed or licenseeligible in Illinois. 1) Core faculty M.A.: clinical psychology program accepting applications from cognate disciplines such as counselor education. Specialization open, with preference for strengths in multicultural competency, couple and family therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, and clinical supervision. Responsibilities will include: teaching and internship seminar supervision. 2) Core faculty Psy.D. clinical psychology program: specialization open, with preference for strengths in psychological assessment, research methods, statistics, and gerontology. Responsibilities include: teaching, practicum seminar supervision, dissertation research supervision, and development of a strong research program including student mentoring. Review of applicants will begin October 1, 2012, and continue until the position is filled. Send letter of interest, curriculum vitae, and names of refer-

ences by e-mail to: Terri.Watson@ wheaton.edu, or mail to: Dr. Terri Watson, Associate Dean, Department of Psychology, Wheaton College, 501 College Avenue, Wheaton, IL 60187. Application forms will be sent to promising applicants.

INDIANA ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY IN CLINICAL PSYCHIATRY: Clinical psychologist/assistant professor or above, Indiana University School of Medicine. The Department of Psychiatry at Indiana University School of Medicine is seeking to fill an immediate opening for a full-time clinical track assistant professor or above position in the area of adolescent clinical psychology. Candidates should possess a Ph.D. or Psy.D. in clinical psychology and be eligible for licensure and independent practice as a health service provider in psychology in the State of Indiana. Responsibilities will consist of evaluation and treatment of adolescents with longstanding psychological/behavioral problems, in an intermediate-term inpatient setting. Other responsibilities will include: participation on treatment teams, coordination of interventions with unit staff and on-site teachers, participation on department committees, and supervision/teaching of residents, interns, and medical students. The Department of Psychiatry has a broad research, clinical, and teaching mission and maintains both a clinical psychology internship and psychiatry residency program, in addition to training rotations for medical students. The department and the university place a high priority on creating a diverse learning environment and on supporting the professional development of ethnic minorities, women, and people with disabilities. Applications are encouraged from professionals of all ethnic backgrounds. Located in Indianapolis, Indiana University School of Medicine is the second largest medical school in the United States, with a student body that includes over 50% women and 24% ethnic minorities. Indianapolis is the 12th largest city in the United States and has a culturally diverse population. In addition to having active sports, cultural, arts, and educational events and programs, Indianapolis is located centrally near several other major cities including Chicago, Louisville, Cincinnati, and Columbus. Interested applicants should send their curriculum vitae, three letters of reference, and statement of clinical, teaching, and research interests to: William Kronenberger, Ph.D., Attn: Robbie Smith, Department of Psychiatry, Indiana University School of Medicine, 791 Union Drive, PR 111, Indianapolis, IN 46202-4887. Applications will be accepted until the

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position is filled. The departmental website is located at http://www. iupui.edu/~psych/. Indiana University School of Medicine is an Equal Opportunity Employer/Affirmative Action/M/W/D. SCIENCE OF LEARNING FACULTY POSITION, INDIANA UNIVERSITY: The Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences at Indiana University–Bloomington seeks to fill a faculty position at either the rank of assistant professor (tenuretrack) or associate professor (tenure-track or tenured), to begin August 2013. Applicants must have a doctorate, a strong record of publication, a program of research with the promise of significant and sustained contributions and the potential for research funding. Understanding and improving educational outcomes is one of the single most impactful applications of the psychological and brain sciences. We aim to hire a researcher interested in learning, how learning is best promoted, and why. The position is open to researchers with backgrounds in human learning, machine learning, cognitive science, neuroscience, development, or social psychology. The ideal candidate would be pursuing research on learning that spans both basic (empirical and theoretical) and applied efforts. Teaching responsibilities will include: courses at the graduate and undergraduate levels. Review of all applications will begin on October 8, 2012 and will continue until the position is filled. To apply, send curriculum vitae, copies of representative publications, statements of research and teaching interests, and three letters of recommendation to: William P. Hetrick, Ph.D., Chair, Department of Psycholo­gical and Brain Sciences, 1101 E. 10th St., Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, Attn: Learning Search. Indiana University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. The department is committed to increasing faculty diversity and welcomes applications from women and underrepresented ethnic, racial, and cultural groups, sexual minorities, and from people with disabilities. Information about the department and the university is available at www. iub.edu. CHARLES HICKS CHAIR IN EDUCATIONAL ASSESSMENT AND PROGRAM EVALUATION—DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES, COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, PURDUE UNIVERSITY: The College of Education at Purdue University, invites applications for the Charles Hicks Chair in educational assessment and program evaluation, at the rank of associate or full professor in the department of educational studies. We seek an individual with an outstanding record of achievement who can provide leadership in assessment and program evaluation through the application of rigorous

conceptual frameworks and empirical approaches to address complex questions about schooling, assessment, and educational policy. The department of educational studies seeks to build an internationally recognized program in educational assessment and evaluation. The successfully applicant will have an opportunity for input into future hires in the program, and will be expected to build a pre-eminent program of research, attract extramural funding, contribute to the graduate program through teaching and guiding students, and forge productive collaboration across departments within the College of Education, across other departments at the University, the State of Indiana, and/or national and state agencies. The College of Education and Purdue University provide numerous opportunities for cross-disciplinary collaborations and these are highly valued by our academic community. Applicants should have an earned doctorate in social science research, educational psychology or related field. Strong methodological and quantitative research expertise is required; a master’s degree in statistics is highly desirable. Applicants must have a strong record of published research with a focus in one or more areas that bear on critical issues in America’s schools (e.g., educational reform, student diversity, education in urban settings, social stratification in classrooms and schools, teacher effectiveness and accountability, assessment of teacher knowledge and skills, large scale assessments). A strong record of extramural funding in support of research in the candidate’s area(s) of expertise is required. The College of Education is committed to advancing diversity in all areas of faculty effort, including scholarship, instruction, and engagement and a successful candidate would be expected to be able to show evidence of being able to integrate this emphasis into at least one of these areas. The search committee will begin reviewing applications on October 30, 2012 and will continue until the position is filled. All application materials and inquiries should be directed to the Search Chair, Professor MantzicopoulosJames (mantzi@purdue.edu) Department of Educational Studies, BRNG, 100 North University Street, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 479072098. Applicants should send the following materials: 1) letter of application, 2) curriculum vitae (including home address and preferred e-mail address), 3) statement of research interests and professional goals relative to the College of Education strategic plan http://www.purdue.edu/spa/ documents/College_of_Education_ Strategic_Plan.pdf, 4) three examples of their scholarship, 5) three letters of recommendation. Candidates who proceed to a short list may be asked to submit additional reference letters or materials, including teaching evaluations. A background check is required for employment in this position. Purdue University is an Equal

OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

Opportunity/Equal Access Affirmative Action Employer fully committed to achieving a diverse workforce. PSYCHOLOGIST: New position open to provide individual, family, and marital therapy, plus assessments for a variety of populations. Luzio & Associates Behavioral Services, Inc., in Evansville, IN, is a large private outpatient clinic. We provide services for both children and adults. Qualifications requirements include: Ph.D. or Psy.D. from an accredited program. Competitive salary and benefits package commensurate with experience. Send curriculum vitae to: Rebecca Luzio, Luzio & Associates Behavioral Services, Inc., 3101 N. Green River Road, Suite 910, Evansville, IN 47715, fax to (812) 479-5014 or e-mail to: info@luzioassociates. com. INTERVENTION, IMPLEMENTATION, AND DISSEMINATION SCIENCE, FACULTY POSITION, INDIANA UNIVERSITY: The Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences at Indiana University– Bloomington seeks to fill a faculty position at the level of assistant professor (tenure-track) to begin August 2013. Applicants must have a doctorate, a strong record of publication, and the potential for research funding. We seek applicants whose research program addresses important questions about the development, implementation, and dissemination of psychological interventions. The department is highly integrative and collaborative, and the clinical science program has strong connections with other areas of the department. Teaching responsibilities will include: courses at the graduate and undergraduate levels. Review of all applications will begin on October 8, 2012 and will continue until the position is filled. To apply, send curriculum vitae, copies of representative publications, statements of research and teaching interests, and three letters of recommendation to: William P. Hetrick, Ph.D., Chair, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, 1101 E. 10th St., Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, Attention: Clinical Search. Indiana University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. The department is committed to increasing faculty diversity and welcomes applications from women and underrepresented ethnic, racial, and cultural groups, sexual minorities, and from people with disabilities. Information about the department and the university is available at www.iub.edu. LICENSED PSYCHOLOGIST OPENINGS—VERICARE: Are you looking for rewarding and fulfilling employment? Vericare, is a leader in geropsychology, providing multidisciplinary behavioral interventions in long-term care facilities. Our professionals provide a spectrum of therapies including individual psychotherapy, short-term solu-

tion-focused therapy and behavior management. Vericare has opportunities throughout Indiana. Experience with medical/inpatient settings and multi-disciplinary teams preferred. For more information, apply online at www.vericare.com or contact Sanel Lekic at (800) 2578715 ext. 1166. Vericare is offering a $500 “Thank You” referral bonus for any colleagues you refer that get hired. Feel free to call us for details.

KANSAS ASSISTANT PROFESSOR CLINICAL: The Department of Psychology at Wichita State University, Wichita, KS invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professor position for the academic year beginning in August 2013. Applicants must have a Ph.D. in Psychology by then, a record of research productivity, abilities to attract external funding and interact collegially, a commitment to teaching graduate students and undergraduates, and a demonstrated commitment to diversity. The position will have primary responsibility in our APA-accredited community oriented clinical doctoral program. The successful candidate will supervise students in research and clinical practice in our community clinical model. A Ph.D. from an APA-accredited clinical program with an APA or APPIC accredited internship is required as are the credentials to be licensed in Kansas. Candidates must be committed to clinical research, practice and teaching from a scientist-practitioner and community psychology action-research perspective. The Department has strong connections with the city’s educational, social service and mental health organizations. The department is research oriented with extensive external funding. Wichita State University is located in the state’s largest city and major industrial metropolitan area with a population of over a half million. Women and minorities are especially encouraged to apply. WSU is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Educator and Employer, and is committed to excellence through diversity. Salary is competitive, negotiable, and commensurate with qualifications. Review of applications will begin immediately, and will continue until the position is filled. Applicants should apply at https://jobs. wichita.edu. Three letters of recommendation should be sent to: Dr. Alex Chaparro, Chairperson, Psychology Department, Wichita State University, 1845 Fairmount, Wichita, KS 67260-0034.

MAINE EXPERIMENTAL SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, TENURE-TRACK, OPEN RANK: The Department of Psychology at Colby College has a tenure-track position in experimental social psychology beginning Sep93


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tember 1, 2013. We anticipate hiring at the assistant professor level, but will consider exceptional applicants at any rank. The successful candidate will be expected to teach with passion and a commitment to excellence, to establish an active and sustained program of research that contributes to the global effort to advance psychological knowledge, to involve Colby’s exceptional undergraduates in that research, and to become an active and engaged member of our academic community. Teaching responsibilities include: introductory and advanced courses in the candidate’s area of research interest, participation in a team-taught introduction to psychology course, and supervision of student independent research. The ability to contribute to the department’s methodology and statistics offerings is also desirable. The specific area of research interest is open. We are especially interested in candidates with research interests that would be compatible with and complementary to the current research programs in the department (for information see our website at http://www.colby.edu/psychology). The Ph.D. should be completed by the starting date. Colby is a highly selective liberal arts college recognized for excellence in undergraduate education and close student-fac-

ulty interaction. Applicants should send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, statements of teaching and research interests, copies of publications or in-press manuscripts, and three letters of recommendation to: Professor Martha E. Arterberry, Chair, Department of Psychology, Colby College, Waterville, ME 04901; E-mail: socialpsychsearch@colby.edu. Electronic submission of applications materials is preferred. Review of applications will begin October 15, 2012, and will continue until the position is filled. Colby College is committed to equality and diversity and is an Equal Opportunity Employer. We encourage inquiries from candidates who will contribute to the cultural and ethnic diversity of our college. Colby College does not discriminate on the basis of race, gender, sexual orientation, disability, religion, ancestry or national origin, or age in employment or in our educational programs. For more information about the College, visit our website: www.colby.edu. HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY, TENURE-TRACK, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: The Department of Psychology at Colby College has a tenure-track position in Health Psychology beginning September 1, 2013. The successful candidate will

The Department of Mental Health invites applications for master’s level, doctoral, and postdoctoral studies for the 2013–2014 academic year. The Department engages in population-based research on the etiology, occurrence, prevention, and control of mental and substance use disorders. Research is particularly active in the areas of: adult psychiatric epidemiology; genetic epidemiology of mental and behavioral disorders, cognitive health and aging; psychoactive drug use; school, family, and community-based preventive interventions; research methodology; youth violence; women’s mental health and pregnancy; international programs in mental health; child sexual abuse and pedophilia; and research on mental health service systems. Support is available for doctoral and postdoctoral level studies from government-sponsored training programs in Psychiatric Epidemiology, Child Mental Health Services and Service Systems Research, Epidemiology of Drug Dependence, Aging and Neuropsychiatric disorders, and the Interdisciplinary Doctoral Training Program in Education Research. Stipends are $22,032 for doctoral studies and from $39,264 to $54,180 for postdoctoral fellows. Candidates for government-sponsored support must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents. Limited support for other students is available from other sources, including 75% tuition scholarships after six quarters of doctoral study. Minority students and those with demonstrated commitment to minority health are eligible for special doctoral scholarships. The Master of Health Science (MHS) degree requires four terms of graduate study. Applications should be received by December 15, 2012 to be maximally competitive. Applications must be submitted to: http://www.jhsph.edu/ admissions/. For Additional Information Contact: Patty Scott, Department of Mental Health 624 N. Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21205-1999 Tel. 410-955-1906 • Fax 410-614-7469 Email: MHDept@jhsph.edu • URL: http://www.jhsph.edu/Dept/MH The Johns Hopkins University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, sexual preference, national or ethnic origin, age, disability or veteran status in any student program or activity administered by the University, or with regard to admission or employment.

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be expected to teach with passion and a commitment to excellence, establish an active and sustained program of research that contributes to the global effort to advance psychological knowledge, to involve Colby’s exceptional undergraduates in that research, and to become an active and engaged member of our academic community. Teaching responsibilities include: introductory and advanced courses in the candidate’s area of research interest, participation in a team-taught introduction to psychology course, and supervision of student independent research. The ability to contribute to the department’s methodology and statistics offerings is also desirable. The specific area of research interest is open. We are especially interested in candidates with research interests that would be compatible with and complementary to the current research programs in the department (for information see our website at http://www.colby.edu/psychology). The Ph.D. should be completed by start date. Colby is a highly selective liberal arts college recognized for excellence in undergraduate education and close student-faculty interaction. Applicants should send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, statements of teaching and research interests, copies of publications or inpress manuscripts, and three letters of recommendation to: Professor Martha E. Arterberry, Chair, Department of Psychology, Colby College, Waterville, ME 04901. E-mail: hea lt hpsychsea rch@colby.e du. Electronic submission of applications materials is preferred. Review of applications will begin November 1, 2012, and will continue until the position is filled. Colby College is committed to equality and diversity and is an Equal Opportunity Employer. We encourage inquiries from candidates who will contribute to the cultural and ethnic diversity of our college. Colby College does not discriminate on the basis of race, gender, sexual orientation, disability, religion, ancestry or national origin, or age in employment or in our educational programs. For more information about the College, visit our website: www.colby.edu. CHILD CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST, EDMUND N. ERVIN PEDIATRIC CENTER: MaineGeneral Medical Center in Augusta and Waterville, ME is seeking a fulltime, doctoral level psychologist to join the innovative interdisciplinary team at the Edmund N. Ervin Pediatric Center. The successful candidate will have expertise in developmental and psychological evaluation of children and adolescents presenting with a wide array of psychological, behavioral, learning and developmental problems, with emphasis on evaluations of infants and children who have experienced trauma and neglect. Evaluations will be conducted both as individual psychological assessments, and as part of three interdisciplinary evalua-

tion programs (working in conjunction with physicians, social workers, and developmental services providers). Training and experience in assessment and treatment of young children are necessary. The successful candidate will be licensed or immediately license-eligible in Maine. We are located in scenic central Maine, just a short drive away from ski resorts, lakes and rivers, awardwinning golf courses, abundant hiking trails, and the beautiful Maine coast. We are just an hour north of Portland, Maine’s largest city, and three hours from Boston. MaineGeneral is currently building a new, state-of-the-art, 192-bed regional hospital to open in late 2013 that will consolidate inpatient hospital services in Augusta. Visit ournewhospital.org for details. Send curriculum vitae to Lisa Nutter, Physician Recruiter at lisa.nutter@ mainegeneral.org, call 1 (800) 3446662, or visit mainegeneral.org for more information.

MARYLAND FACULTY POSITION—JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY: The Department of Cognitive Science in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences and the School of Education at Johns Hopkins University seek a faculty candidate, at any level, with an exceptional record of conducting and directing research in the area of the university’s new science of learning initiative. Research approaches and content areas of particular interest include learning, development, and plasticity in the areas of language, visual or speech perception, and spatial representation. The ideal candidate should carry out research that makes substantive contact with theory, uses experimental, developmental, linguistic, neuroscience, and/or computational approaches, and has implications for application within the broad field of learning. The appointment will be joint between the cognitive science department and the school of education, with the expectation of responsibilities in both, but will have tenuretrack and/or tenured status within the cognitive science department. Candidates should be strongly interdisciplinary, prepared to carry out effective teaching, student supervision, and collaboration in a formally-oriented, highly interdisciplinary Cognitive Science department, and eager to take advantage of collaborations with the school of education and its connection to diverse student populations in area public and private schools. Candidates should be capable of making significant contributions to the science of learning initiative involving the Cognitive Science Department, the School of Education, and other units; further faculty growth in this area is anticipated. The Cognitive Science Department and the School of Education have a strong commitment to achieving diversity among fac-

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ulty and staff. We are particularly interested in receiving applications from members of underrepresented groups and strongly encourage women and persons of color to apply for this position. Applications are due by November 1, 2012. Johns Hopkins University actively encourages interest from minorities and women. Send cover letter, curriculum vitae, research statement, and three letters of recommendation. Send electronic submissions only. Submit to: search@cogsci.jhu.edu. The Johns Hopkins University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer; minorities, women, Vietnam-era veterans, disabled veterans and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

undergraduate levels. Applicants should e-mail to psychsearch.dev@ bc.edu one attached pdf document containing a cover letter, curriculum vitae, research statement, and teaching statement outlining teaching experience and philosophy. Applicants should arrange to have three letters of reference, in pdf format, e-mailed to the same address (these references should be named in the cover letter). All materials must be submitted on or before October 15, 2012 for full consideration. Review of applications will continue until the position is filled. For further information, contact Search Committee Chair, Dr. Ellen Winner (winner@ bc.edu). Boston College, a university of eight schools and colleges, is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

MASSACHUSETTS

POSTDOCTORAL RESIDENCY IN FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY: The Law-Psychiatry Program, University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS), expects three positions for a one-year post-doctoral forensic psychology resident fellowship, beginning September 1, 2013. The training focuses on work with an adult forensic population and includes seminars covering a broad range of topics within forensic psychology as well as review of landmark case law; supervised research on issues in mental health law; and training in expert witness testimony. Rotation sites include inpatient forensic units and court clinics. Applicants must have completed all requirements for a Ph.D./Psy.D. in clinical or Counseling Psychology, by September 1, 2013, from an APA-/CPA-accredited program, including an APA-/ CPA-accredited pre­ doctoral clinical internship. Stipend $35,797 plus $2,000 support for educational/research expenses, and excellent fringe benefit package. All materials must be received no later than January 25, 2013 at 5 p.m., eastern-time. Full program description, downloadable application form, and instructions for submission of applications are available at: http://www.umassmed.edu/ forensicpsychology Inquiries: Ira K. Packer, Ph.D., ABPP (Forensic), Director Forensic Psychology Training, Ira.Packer@umassmed. edu The University of Massachusetts is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE: The Department of Psychology of Boston College invites applications for a tenure-track position in behavioral neuroscience to begin July 1, 2013. Outstanding research in all areas of behavioral neuroscience will be considered, although we are particularly interested in applicants studying neural mechanisms of motivation, learning and memory, or behavioral development in mammals. Applicants should have postdoctoral experience. The rank is assistant professor, but for an outstanding candidate, appointment at the associate professor level is possible. Applicants will be evaluated on their potential to establish a prominent, externally funded research program and to excel in teaching at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. Applicants should e-mail to psychsearch.bns@ bc.edu one attached pdf document containing a cover letter, curriculum vitae, research statement, and teaching statement outlining teaching experience and philosophy. Applicants should arrange to have three letters of reference, in pdf format, e-mailed to the same address (these references should be named in the cover letter). All materials must be submitted on or before October 15, 2012 for full consideration. Review of applications will continue until the position is filled. Boston College, a university of eight schools and colleges, is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY: The Department of Psychology of Boston College invites applications for a tenure-track position as assistant professor in developmental psychology to begin July 1, 2013. We are particularly interested in candidates whose research is in the area of cognitive or social-cognitive development or developmental neuroscience. Applicants will be evaluated on their potential to establish a prominent, externally funded research program and to excel in teaching at both the graduate and

methodology, statistics, and urban studies. Faculty research fellow appointments are designed to be commensurate and competitive with tenure-track academic or research appointments at any leading research university or organization, and are intended to lead directly into a research professor tenure-track career within the survey research center. We seek to attract the very best early career social scientists whose interests and aspirations incline them toward a career doing externally funded interdisciplinary social science research on problems of social and scientific importance (e.g., education, poverty and social welfare, psychosocial and economic factors of aging and health, social and psychological development of individuals and families over the life course). Applicants may initiate the process by submitting a letter describing their scholarly activities and interests in SRC, along with a curriculum vita, names of three references, and one or two recent publications or working papers. Concurrently, applicants should request that the three letters of reference be sent directly to the e-mail address below. Send applications, letters of reference, and inquiries electronically to SRCSearch@isr.umich.edu and reference position #72722. Applicants are encouraged to apply no later than November 1, 2012. For more information on the Survey Research Center and the Faculty Research Fellows Program, visit our website at http://www.src.isr.umich.edu. The University of Michigan is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer and is responsive to the needs of dual career couples. Women and minority candidates are encouraged to apply. POSTDOCTORAL CLINICAL CHILD RESIDENCY: The University of Michigan Department of Psychiatry is accepting applications for a two-year APA-accredited postdoctoral fellowship in clinical child psychology. The program provides a core curriculum, evidence-based clinical training, and focused research mentorship. We seek applicants with strong research potential E A R LY

CAREER

who are highly motivated to develop their own program of systematic research and prepare for a productive career as a scientist practitioner. Opportunities are available to pursue mentored research in the following domains: 1) (Julie Kaplow): longitudinal studies of bereaved youth; biopsychosocial risk associated with maladaptive grief and youth PTSD; grief screening and assessment; development and evaluation of interventions for traumatized and grieving youth; 2) (Michelle Kees; Kate Rosenblum): risk and resilience in military families; large-scale evaluation of impact of military deployment; development and evaluation of interventions for parenting, spouse resiliency, and military family support; 3) (Cheryl King): youth suicide risk, bullying victimization; development of screening, risk assessment, and intervention strategies for at-risk youth; 4) (Kate Rosenblum): infant/early childhood mental health; evaluation of relationship-focused interventions for high-risk families with young children; longitudinal studies of parenting in at-risk families. Applicants must have completed a doctoral degree in clinical psychology from an accredited academic program by August 2013 to be considered. The start date of the fellowship is September 1, 2013. The stipend for first year fellows is currently $45,913 and second year fellows earn $48,395. Benefits includes: vacation, sick and professional development time, limited funding of travel to conferences, and health care coverage. We especially encourage applications from members of underrepresented groups. Deadline for applications is January 1, 2013. For upto-date information and application materials, see the Clinical Child Psychology web page (http://www. psych.med.umich.edu/education/ psychology/clinical-child/.) For further information, contact: Julie B. Kaplow, Ph.D., ABPP, Director, Clinical Child Psychology Postdoctoral Training Program, julieb@ med.umich.edu. The University of Michigan is a non-discriminatory/ Affirmative Action Employer. P SYC H O L O G I S T S

Money matters

MICHIGAN FACULTY RESEARCH FELLOW: The Survey Research Center in the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan invites applications from outstanding candidates for faculty research fellow appointments in any area of social science research including anthropology, demography, economics, education, geography, psychology, public health, social epidemiology, social work, sociology, survey

OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

Psychologists are helping young couples keep afloat financially in increasingly turbulent economic waters—page 48.

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PEDIATRIC AND ADULT POSTDOCTORAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY RESIDENCIES: The UniverSITY OF -ICHIGANn6! !NN !RBOR (EALTHCARE 3YSTEM #ONSORTIUM IN #LINICAL.EUROPSYCHOLOGYISACCEPTing applications for a two-year resIDENCY STARTING 3EPTEMBER  The program follows the scientistpractitioner model and emphasizes the training and development of psychologists who can assume leadership roles in research, teaching, and clinical service. Postdoctoral residents participate in a core curriculum, general clinical training, and programmatic research. Applications are currently being accepted for clinical emphases in either pediatric neuropsychology or adult neuropsychology. Pediatric research emphases include developmental disorders, and medical and neurologic disorders. Adult research emphases include geriatric, general medical, TBI and mood disorders. Applicants may indicate a preference for more than one area of emphasis. Residencies are for two years, and follow the Houston Conference Training Guidelines. Our training program provides a rich interdisciplinary environment with seminars, invited lectures, and opportunities for collaboration with faculty across disciplines and departments. The stipend for 1st year FELLOWSISCURRENTLY 3ECOND YEAR FELLOWS EARN   Benefits include: vacation, sick leave and options for health insurance. We especially invite and encourage applications from members from underrepresented groups. The University of -ICHIGANANDTHE6ETERANS!DMINIStration are non discriminatory Affirmative Action Employers. For up-todate information and application materials, see the Consortium web page (http://www.psych.med.umich.edu/ education/psychology/clinical-neuro psychology/). Deadline for applications is January 1, 2013. For further information and to arrange an INTERVIEWATTHE).3MEETINGIN(AWAIIIN&EBRUARY CONTACT,INas A. Bieliauskas, Ph.D., Director OF .EUROPSYCHOLOGY 4RAINING $E-

PARTMENT OF 0SYCHIATRY  #OMMONWEALTH "LVD 3TE # 5NIVERSITY OF-ICHIGAN !NN!RBOR -ICHIGAN  E MAILADDRESSLINAS UMICH edu.

#ELEBRATING ITS TH ANNIVERSARY THIS YEAR #ENTRAL -ICHIGAN 5NIVERsity is one of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 100 largest public universities and the fourth LARGESTIN-ICHIGAN WITHMORETHAN   STUDENTS ON ITS -OUNT 0LEASEXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY/ ant campus and another 7,000 enPERCEPTION (TENURE-TRACK, rolled online and at more than 50 loASSISTANT PROFESSOR): The CATIONSACROSS.ORTH!MERICA#-5 Department of Psychology at Central offers academic programs at the un-ICHIGAN5NIVERSITYINVITESAPPLICA- dergraduate, masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, specialist and tions for a tenure-track assistant pro- doctoral levels, including several in FESSORPOSITIONEFFECTIVE!UGUST key areas of strength and emerging The successful candidate will join a INTEREST #-5 ALSO HAS ESTABLISHED DEPARTMENT WITH  FACULTY MEM- A #OLLEGE OF -EDICINE WHICH IS ACBERSASAMEMBEROFTHEEXPERIMENTAL tively recruiting students for its inaupsychology program. This program gural class that will start in the sumcomprises 16 full-time faculty mem- MER#-5 AN!FlRMATIVE!Cbers and offers a doctoral degree in tion/Equal Opportunity Institution, APPLIED EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY AS strongly and actively strives to inwell as a terminal masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree crease diversity within its communiIN EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Candi- ty (see www.cmich.edu/aaeo/). dates must have a research program in perception, and preference will be ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN given to candidates whose research BIOPSYCHOLOGY: The DepartIS IN APPLIED EXPERIMENTAL AND HU- ment of Psychology at the Univerman factors/ergonomics that comple- SITY OF -ICHIGAN !NN !RBOR INMENTSEXISTINGPROGRAMFACULTY%VI- vites applications for a tenure-track DENCEOFSUCCESSINSECURINGEXTERNAL assistant professor position in biofunding to support research and stu- PSYCHOLOGY TO BEGIN 3EPTEMBER  dents is desired. Consideration will  PENDING AUTHORIZATION 4HIS be given to those who have a Ph.D. in is a university-year appointment. psychology as well as those who are We encourage applications from ABD in psychology. Further, candi- scientists who conduct research in dates are required to have demon- any area of biopsychology, from bestrated teaching effectiveness, and havioral neuroscience to evolutionqualifications to teach perception as ary and comparative biopsycholwell as interest in teaching cours- ogy. The specific area of research es in introductory psychology, his- interest is open, but preference will tory and systems, statistics, and re- be given to individuals who consearch methodology. Consideration duct laboratory studies or combine of applications will begin Novem- laboratory and naturalistic studies. ber 15, 2012, and priority will be Applicants who conduct systems/ given to those who have complet- circuit-level neuroscience will also ed their application by this date. BE CONSIDERED 3UCCESSFUL CANDITo apply, visit www.jobs.cmich.edu dates must have a Ph.D. in a relevant and upload a cover letter, curricu- discipline (e.g., psychology, neurolum vitae, publication reprints, as science) by the time the position well as evidence of teaching effec- starts, must have a commitment to tiveness. Three letters of recommen- undergraduate and graduate teachdation should be sent to: Dr. Rich- ING AND WILL BE EXPECTED TO ESTABard W. Backs, Chair, Perception lish an independent research pro3EARCH #OMMITTEE $EPARTMENT OF gram. All application materials 0SYCHOLOGY #ENTRAL -ICHIGAN 5NI- should be submitted by November VERSITY -OUNT 0LEASANT -)  1, 2012 for full consideration.3UBFor further information contact Dr. mit a letter of intent, curriculum viBacks at backs1rw@cmich.edu. tae, a statement of current and future research plans, a statement of TEACHINGPHILOSOPHYANDEXPERIENCE (including any evidence of teachING EXCELLENCE AND REPRESENTAtive publications. Applicants should also request at least three letters of recommendation from referees. All materials should be e-mailed as attachments to: Biopsychology. 3EARCH UMICHEDU 4HE 5NIVERSITYOF-ICHIGANISAN%QUAL/PPORJuly 31â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 4, 2013â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Honolulu, HI tunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Qualified women and minority candidates are encouraged to apply. August 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10, 2014â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Washington, DC The University is supportive of the needs of dual-career couples.

For Future Planning Dates and sites for APAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future conventions:

August 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9, 2015â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Toronto, Ontario, Canada August 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7, 2016â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Denver, CO www.apa.org/convention



tioner model and emphasizes the training and development of psychologists who can assume leadership roles in research, teaching, and clinical service. Postdoctoral residents participate in a core curriculum, evidence-based clinical training, and focused mentored research in a range of areas including perinatal depression and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s menTALHEALTHSLEEPDISORDERSANXIETY DISORDERS 043$ NEUROIMAGING and psychophysiology. Fellowships are for one year, but opportunities for a second year of training AREAVAILABLEINTHE5-PARTOFTHE consortium. Applicants must have completed a doctoral degree in clinical psychology from an APAaccredited academic institution by !UGUSTTOBECONSIDERED3TART DATE FOR THE FELLOWSHIP IS 3EPTEMBER   /UR TRAINING PROGRAM provides a rich interdisciplinary environment with seminars, invited lectures, and opportunities for collaboration with faculty across disciplines and departments. The stipend for first year fellows is curRENTLY 3ECONDYEARFELLOWS EARN Benefits include: vacations, sick leave and options for health insurance. We especially invite and encourage applications from members from underrepresented groups. The University of -ICHIGANANDTHE6ETERANS!DMINistration are non discriminatory/Affirmative Action Employers. Deadline for applications is January 1, 2013. For up-to-date information and application materials, see the Consortium webpage (http://www. psych.med.umich.edu/education/ psychology/clinical-adult/). If further information is needed, contact: Henry A. Buchtel, Ph.D., Director of Psychology Training, DepartMENTOF0SYCHIATRY #OMMONWEALTH "LVD 3TE # 5NIVERSITY OF -ICHIGAN !NN !RBOR -)  e-mail address: gusb@umich.edu.

MINNESOTA

POSTDOCTORAL CLINICAL/RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP: The ProGRAM IN (UMAN 3EXUALITY AT THE 5NIVERSITY OF -INNESOTA -EDICAL 3CHOOLISSEEKINGAPPLICANTSTOJOIN a vibrant team of faculty and postdoctoral fellows for a two-year fellowship program. Fellows would provide individual, family, couple and group psychotherapy for a wide RANGE OF SEXUAL DYSFUNCTIONS AND problems including: relationship AND SEXUAL PROBLEMS TRANSGENDER ISSUES SEXUAL ORIENTATION CONCERNS COMPULSIVE SEXUAL BEHAVIOR PARAPHILIAS SEXUAL OFFENDING AND ()6 counseling. The clinic serves a diverse group of patients (an average POSTDOCTORAL RESIDENCIES OF   VISITS PER MONTH INCLUDIN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY: The ing children, adolescents, minori5NIVERSITY OF -ICHIGANn6! !NN ties, disabled individuals, and cli!RBOR (EALTHCARE 3YSTEM #ONSOR- ents with chronic medical or mental tium in clinical psychology is ac- health problems. The training will cepting applications for residencies help the fellow develop skills in adin our training program. The pro- DRESSINGSEXUALISSUESINANYCLINICAL gram follows the scientist-practi- SETTINGANDCONDUCTINGPSYCHOSEXUAL -/.)4/2/.039#(/,/'9s/#4/"%2


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CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

evaluations. In addition to sex therapy, treatment addresses a wide variety of Axis I and Axis II disorders. This kind of diversity makes for an exciting and stimulating fellowship! Fellows complete a research project that is tailored to their own interests. Applicants must have their Ph.D., Psy. D. or M.D. The fellowship helps individuals gain licensure. The fellowship includes: a competitive salary, excellent benefits, and a professional travel stipend. We are looking to fill two positions by fall 2013. Interested candidates should submit a copy of their curriculum vitae, and cover letter no later than December 31, 2012, to the Program in Human Sexuality, attn. Eli Coleman, 1300 S. 2nd St., Suite 180, Minneapolis, MN 55454.

MISSOURI SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGIST: The Department of Psychology at the University of Missouri–St. Louis invites applicants for a tenure-track assistant professor opening in social psychology, with a starting date of August 15, 2013. Area of specialization within this area of psychology is open but the ability to complement and extend the current strengths of the psychology department is essential. We seek a scholar with a strong record of scholarly research activity, potential to attract extramural funding and teaching experience. Responsibilities include: active participation in one of the department’s graduate programs, maintaining an active research program, directing Ph.D. and M.A. graduate student research, and teaching graduate and undergraduate courses. Candidates are to teach a graduate social psychology course and an introductory course in the social psychology area. More information about the position and the application procedure may be found at the following link: http://www.umsl.edu/ divisions/artscience/psychology/ SocialOpening.pdf. UM-St. Louis is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer committed to excellence through diversity. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR/STATISTICS—SOCIAL PERSONA­ LITY: Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Psychology, is seeking candidates for an assistant professor position in the area of personality/social psychology with strong quantitative skills. The primary teaching responsibility for the candidate will be the undergraduate statistics course required of our psychology majors. Any area of personality/social psychology will be considered, though preference will be given to candidates with personality or relationships background. The successful candidate will be expected to publish in peer-reviewed journals, teach classes, conduct research, advise students, and participate in departmental governance and uni-

versity service. A Ph.D. is required by the start date. We especially encourage applications from women and members of minority groups. The Search Committee will begin the formal review process November 1, 2012; applications will be accepted until the position is filled. Send curriculum vitae, reprints, a short statement of research interests and teaching experience to our website at https://jobs.wustl. edu and apply to job posting number 24040. Also, arrange for three letters of reference to be sent to: Cheri B. Casanova at: cbcasano@ wustl.edu. Washington University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Employment eligibility verification required upon hire. CHILD TRAUMA PSYCHOLOGIST: The Department of Psychology at the University of Missouri – St. Louis announces a tenure-track opening at the assistant, associate or full professor rank in the area of child maltreatment and trauma to begin August 15, 2013. Candidates will have a Ph.D. in an area of psychology including, but not limited to, clinical, applied developmental or applied social psychology with research and teaching expertise in child maltreatment and trauma. We seek a scholar with a strong record of scholarly research activity, potential to attract external funding, and teaching experience. The position involves active participation in the department’s APA-accredited clinical psychology program, including program governance, research supervision and teaching/ supervision. Duties of the position include: development of a research program in child maltreatment/ trauma and teaching undergraduate courses for a new certificate in collaboration with the Child Advocacy Center, a division in the UMSt. Louis Psychology Department. The UM-St. Louis Children’s Advocacy Services of Greater St. Louis (CASGSL) is housed on campus in a state-of-the-art clinical and clinical training facility. CASGSL is affiliated with the National Child Traumatic Stress Network and is accredited by the National Children’s Alliance. Information about the psychology department can be found at www.umsl. edu/divisions/artscience/psychology and about CASGSL at http://www. stlouiscac.org. Review of applications will start October 15, 2012, and will continue until the position is filled. Submit all materials electronically to the following e-mail account, CTopening@ UMSL.edu, including cover letter, curriculum vitae, statements of research and teaching interests, and 3–5 representative reprints/ preprints. Three reference letters should come directly from your references either electronically to that same e-mail account or by hard copy to: Psychology Search Committee Child Trauma, Department

OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

of Psychology, University of Missouri-St. Louis, One University Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63121. UMSt. Louis is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer committed to excellence through diversity. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR/PERSONALITY: Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Psychology, is seeking candidates for an assistant professor position in the area of personality psychology, broadly defined. Any area of personality psychology will be considered, including personality theory, assessment and psychometrics, or any research topic concerned with individual or group differences, e.g., culture, well-being, etc. The successful candidate will be expected to publish in peer-reviewed journals, teach classes, conduct research, advise students, and participate in departmental governance and university service. A Ph.D. is required by the start date. We especially encourage applications from women and members of minority groups. The Search Committee will begin the formal review process November 1, 2012; applications will be accepted until the position is filled. Send curriculum vitae, reprints, a short statement of research interests and teaching experience to our website at https://jobs.wustl.edu and apply to job posting number 24039. Also, arrange for three letters of reference to be e-mailed to: Cheri B. Casanova at cbcasano@wustl.edu. Washington University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Employment eligibility verification required upon hire.

MONTANA CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST: Unique Mental Health Private Practice Opportunity in beautiful Missoula, MT. Multidisciplinary and extremely well-respected group has immediate opening due to unexpected relocation of co-founding psychiatrist. Looking for license-eligible clinical psychologist to become part of our office sharing arrangement. Established for 20-years, professional group of eight independent practitioners provides collegial relationships and active referral base. Located in a modern downtown high-rise office building. Missoula is home to The University of Montana and provides year-round recreational and cultural activities. Send cover letter and resume to: Phil Bornstein, Ph.D., gc-po@hotmail. com.

NEW HAMPSHIRE PSYCHOLOGIST: We have a new position that was just opened for a full-time person. We are a well established large multidisciplinary group practice in beautiful Seacoast New Hampshire. One hour to Bos-

ton or the White Mountains. Preference given to person with a distinct specialty area, such as children of all ages, substance abuse, couples and families, etc. Excellent income potential. Highly professional group with strong and long-standing referral base. Must be New Hampshire licensed. Licensed social workers/ mental health counselors also considered. Send resume to: Susan Ferguson, Practice Administrator, 16 Fifth St., Dover, NH 03820 or fax (603) 749-2475.

NEW JERSEY TWO ASSISTANT PROFESSOR POSITIONS—SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY AND CHILD PSYCHOLOGY: The Department of Psychology at Rutgers University– Camden Campus, invites applications for two tenure track positions at the assistant professor level to start in fall 2013. One position is in the area of social psychology; we seek a candidate who is able to teach graduate and undergraduate courses in social psychology, research methods, and experimental psychology. A second position is in the area of child clinical or developmental psychology; we seek a candidate who is able to teach graduate and undergraduate courses in educational psychology, research methods and experimental psychology. For this position, applicants whose research focuses on autism or developmental disabilities are of particular interest. For either position, applicants who can potentially contribute to interdisciplinary initiatives on campus involving 1) teacher training and education, 2) health sciences, or 3) digital literacy/ digital media/communications, will be given special consideration. Applicants with skills in psychophysiological recording methods, like EEG, and applicants whose teaching or research focus relates to cultural factors or diversity will also be given special consideration. Rutgers–Camden is a research-intensive campus of 7,000 students located in Camden, New Jersey, directly across the Delaware River from Philadelphia. The teaching load for junior faculty and research-active senior faculty is 2:2, and salaries and benefits are competitive. Review of applications will begin on October 22, 2012. Send a letter of application, curriculum vitae, supporting materials (including at most four recent papers), and three letters of recommendation to: Search Committee (Social or Child), Psychology Department, 311 N. Fifth Street, Rm. 301, Rutgers University, Camden, NJ 08102-1405. Rutgers is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer and a recipient of a National Science Foundation ADVANCE Institutional Transformation Award. The University and the department seek to attract an active, culturally diverse faculty of the highest caliber. Women and minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. 97


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NEW MEXICO

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR— HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY, QUANTITATIVE PSYCHOLOGY OR DECISION MAKING/PROBLEM SOLVING: The Department of Psychology at New Mexico State University invites applications for a tenure-track, nine-month position to begin in fall 2013 in any of the following areas: health psychology, quantitative psychology, or decision making/problem solving, or from another area that complements the existing areas of emphasis within the department, cognitive, Engineering, and social psychology. This is a new opening at the assistant professor level. A Ph.D. degree is required (in hand by hire date). Applicants are expected to have demonstrated excellence in research that will complement the department’s existing strengths in basic and applied research. A demonstrated capability for, and willingness to continue, conducting externally funded research is desirable. Candidate’s ability to collaborate across disciplinary boundaries is a plus. Psychology faculty teach undergraduate and graduate courses in their areas of expertise. Faculty members also serve on and chair master’s and doctoral students committees. We invite outstanding researchers and teachers to help maintain the strong tradition of excellence in a psychology department that values both applied and basic research. Review of applications will begin on Novem-

ber 1, 2012, and will continue until the position is filled. Send curriculum vitae, a letter describing research interests, relevant reprints or preprints, unofficial transcript of highest degree earned, and three letters of recommendation to Psychology Search Committee, Department of Psychology, MSC 3452, Box 30001, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003. Our web address is http://www-psych. nmsu.edu/. New Mexico State University is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer. Offer of employment is contingent upon verification of applicable credentials, criminal and other background information.

NEW YORK (•) ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: The Clinical Psychology (Health Emphasis) Ph.D. program seeks to hire a tenure-track assistant professor. Candidates in all areas of clinical health psychology will be considered. Applicants with a research focus on one or more of the following will be given special consideration: chronic disease, health behavior change, research methods– quantitative, qualitative, patient-centered, and community-based participatory research, advocacy, primary care, prevention, research on diversity and disparity, interdisciplinary research, behavioral genetics, and global health. Responsibilities include: developing an in-

dependent program of research, graduate teaching, mentoring students in doctoral level research, and in the development of clinical skills. Applicants with a strong track-record of research productivity and external funding are sought. Salary commensurate with experience is competitive/nine months. Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology is located on Yeshiva University’s Albert Einstein College of Medicine Campus. Information on the Clinical Psychology (Health Emphasis) Ph.D. Program can be obtained at http://www.yu.edu/ferkauf/clinicalpsychology-health-emphasis/. Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology offers three APA-accredited doctoral programs: clinical psychology (health emphasis) Ph.D., clinical psychology Psy.D., and school-clinical-child Psy.D. Applications from minority candidates are especially encouraged. Yeshiva University is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Review of applications will begin immediately, and will continue until the position is filled. Send in both print copies and e-copies of personal statement—research and teaching, curriculum vitae, representative publications, evidence of teaching effectiveness, and three letters of reference to: Dean Lawrence Siegel, Ph.D., ABPP at clinicalhealthsearchfgs@ gmail.com, and at Ferkauf Gra­ duate School of Psychology, Rousso Building, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx NY 10461. Put Attention Clinical Health Search on the envelope.

Department Chair, Psychology Department Pace University-New York City

Pace University invites applications for the position of Chair of the Psychology Department at its New York City campus to begin July 1, 2013. The Psychology Department is housed within the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences and offers a Psy.D. in School-Clinical Child Psychology, a MSED in School Psychology, a MA in Psychology, 2 undergraduate degrees, and a combined BA/MA degree. Essential qualifications include: experience with undergraduate and graduate education; ability to foster collaboration between the program and the community; ability to enhance student preparation in the field; administrative and leadership skills; a distinguished record of teaching, research, and service; and curriculum and program development. Preference will be given to candidates with a distinguished scholarly record, a history of external funding, administrative experience, strong leadership skills, and contributions to the profession. Applicants should submit a cover letter addressing all qualifications specified above; statement of purpose, including short and long-term goals/objectives for the department; statement of research and teaching interests; CV; representative publications; and 3 letters of recommendation to: Dr. Richard Velayo, Psychology Chair Search, Psychology Department, 13th floor, Pace University, 41 Park Row, New York, NY 10038. Applications must be received by December 1, 2012. Pace University is an Equal Employment and Affirmative Action Employer, M/F/H/V, committed to ensuring a diverse learning and working environment. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply.

PACE UNIVERSITY 98

(•) TWO ASSISTANT PROFESSOR POSTIONS—YESHIVA UNIVERSITY, FERKAUF GRADUATE SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY, CLINICAL PROGRAM: The clinical program seeks to hire two tenure-track assistant professor in clinical psychology to start in fall 2013. Candidates in all areas of clinical psychology will be considered, although strong preference will be given to applicants with a research focus on one or more of the following: quantitative and research methods, assessment, eating disorders, women’s issues, substance abuse, cross-cultural and cross-socioeconomic research, severe and persistent mental illness including schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and personality disorders. Responsibilities include: developing an independent program of research; mentoring students in doctoral level research; graduate teaching; and clinical supervision. Applicants with a strong track record of research productivity, external funding, and active clinical involvement are sought. The candidate should be licensed or license-eligible in New York State as a clinical psychologist. Salary is competitive/ nine months. Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology is located on Yeshiva University’s Albert Einstein College of Medicine Campus. The clinical program has been in effect since 1979 and has been an APAaccredited Doctor of Psychology program since 1984. Information about the program can be obtained at: http://www.yu.edu/ferkauf/ clinical-psychology/. Ferkauf offers three APA-accredited doctoral programs: Clinical, School-ClinicalChild and Clinical Health and offers one New York State Registered M.A. program in counseling psychology. Applications from minority candidates are especially encouraged. Applications review will begin immediately and will continue until the positions are filled. Send in both print copies and e-copies of 1) curriculum vitae, 2) research statement along with evidence of research credentials, 3) teaching statement along with evidence of teaching credentials, 4) representative publications, and 5) three letters of reference to: Dr. Lata. K. McGinn, Director, at c l i n i c a l p r o g r a m fg s p s e a r c h @ gmail.com, and at Ferkauf Gradate School of Psychology, Rousso Building, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461. Put Attention Clinical Program Tenure-track Search.Yeshiva University is an Equal Opportunity Employer. WEILL CORNELL POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP AT THE CORNELL COGNITIVE THERAPY CLINIC: A one-year post-doctoral clinical fellowship is available for a psychologist, starting July 1, 2013. The fellowship offers intensive training in individual cognitivebehavior psychotherapy. The patient

MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


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CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

population consists of adults with a wide variety of acute emotional and behavioral disorders. There are many opportunities to participate in, and to develop clinical research studies. Must have Doctorate by start date. Salary is $39,000. Send curriculum vitae and letter of interest by December 14, 2012 to: Susan Evans, Ph.D., Director of Education in Psychology, 425 East 61st Street, PH Floor, New York, NY 10065 or e-mail to: sue2002@med. cornell.edu. (•)ASSISTANT PROFESSOR—INDUSTRIAL-ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY: The Psychology Department at the University at Albany, State University of New York, invites applications for a tenure track assistant professor position in industrial/organizational psychology, to begin in fall 2013. Review of applications will begin on October 22, 2012, and will continue until the position has been filled. For further information and to apply, visit our website: http://albany. interviewexchange.com /joboffer details.jsp?JOBID=34156. LONG ISLAND, NY: Private Practice, 20–40 hours per week. New York State-license desirable, licensure supervision possible, participation in medicare, medicaid, HMO panels desirable. Evenings and Saturday hours required. Salary negotiable. To apply, call Dr. Baumgarten at (631) 669-3735. SALARIED OR INDEPENDENT PRACTICE POSITIONS AVAILABLE: Despite recent hires, more space is available—salaried or independent practice positions. Join a well established multidisciplinary behavioral health practice in the Greater Binghamton, NY area. This unique opportunity is available to licensed psychologists for full or part-time. Send curriculum vitae and statement of interest to: Oakdale Psychology Associates, PLLC, 423 East Main Street, Suite 3, Endicott, NY 13760. Fax: (607) 754-1107. E-mail: opapsych1@stny.rr.com.

E A R LY

CAREER

PART-TIME CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST, PH.D./PSY.D., NYS LICENSED: Work with older adults in Westchester or Long Island. Rewarding population, flexible schedule, collegial atmosphere, ongoing supportive supervision with highly experienced geropsychologist. Excellent clinical and administrarive skills required. Send curriculum vitae to: Aging Matters Psychological Services, P.C. at drptomasso@ agingmattersny.com. WEILL CORNELL POSTDOCTO­RAL FELLOWSHIPS IN CHILD PSYCHOLOGY AND ADULT CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY—WESTCHESTER DIVISION: The Department of Psychiatry at New YorkPresbyterian Hospital (NYPH) Westchester Division in White Plains, NY, is accepting applications for two-year postdoctoral psychology fellowship positions available in the adult outpatient division and the child outpatient division. Affiliated with Weill Cornell Medical College, NYPH offers training in the scientist/clinician model for psychologists who are interested in becoming academic leaders. The child psychology fellowship provides training in the evaluation and treatment of children, adolescents, and their families, including family systems treatment and group therapy. The adult clinical fellowship provides training in the evaluation and treatment (individual and group-based) of adults presenting with a wide range of diagnoses on the DSM-IV-TR Axis I and Axis II. Requirements: Applicants must have a doctorate in Clinical Psychology from an APA-accredited program, evidence potential to participate in collaborative research, and be able to submit materials required to obtain the limited permit issued by the New York State Department of Education before their start date. Application deadline: December 14, 2012. Start date: August 31, 2013. Fellowship Duration is two years. Salary: Salary is competitive with full health benefits and vacation package included. Application: Applicants

P SYC H O LO G I S T S

Money matters Psychologists are helping young couples keep afloat financially in increasingly turbulent economic waters—page 48.

OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

should send current curriculum vitae and three letters of recommendation, along with a letter of intent indicating to which division the application pertains and describing career goals and plan for the fellowship. Direct applications electronically to: Susan Evans, Ph.D., Director of Education in Psychology, New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical College, E-mail: sue2002@med.cornell.edu, cc: deh2001@med.cornell.edu.

NORTH CAROLINA ASSISTANT/ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: East Carolina University, Department of Psychology invites applications for a tenure-track position in developmental psychology, at the assistant professor level, beginning August 12, 2013. The successful applicant will have the potential to develop an active research program, secure extramural funding, and teach at the undergraduate and graduate levels, preferably with demonstrated teaching experience. A doctorate is required and must be awarded by the start date. Appointment at the associate professor level may be considered for the right candidate with a well-established record of teaching and research. We are particularly interested in candidates with a research focus in cognitive development, applied developmental psychology, or whose work has an educational or health focus. It is expected that the candidate will supervise undergraduate students in research and theses, and affiliate with one of our existing graduate programs by supervising graduate research and serving on committees. The department has M.A. programs in School and I/O psychology, and a Ph.D. health psychology program with concentrations in pediatric school, clinical health, and occupational health psychology. Applicants for this position must complete

CH E

a candidate profile and submit a letter of interest, statements of teaching and research interests, and curriculum vitae online at www.jobs.ecu.edu. In addition, mail representative reprints and arrange for three current letters of reference to be sent to: Developmental Psychology Search Committee Chair, Department of Psychology, Mail Stop 565, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. Screening will begin October 15, 2012, and will continue until the position is filled. The Department of Psychology (www.ecu.edu/psyc) has 38 full-time faculty, over 650 undergraduate majors, and graduate programs in school, I/O, and health psychology. ECU is a public doctoral/research-intensive institution in eastern North Carolina. It is located halfway between the beautiful NC beaches and the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill area, thus allowing ECU researchers access to a range of rural and urban environments and diverse populations. Individuals requesting a disability accommodation should call the ECU Office of Disability Support Services at (252) 737-1016. Proper documentation of identity and employability is required at the time of employment. Official transcripts required upon employment. CHILD CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST IN PRIVATE PRACTICE: Silber Psychological Services P.A. is seeking an experienced psychologist to join a well established child/ adolescent practice in Raleigh, NC on a full-time basis. Ours is a collegial practice where a wide range of services are offered including assessments, individual & family treatment, parenting work, and social skills groups. Eclectic in orientation, we utilize considerable behavioral and CBT work with a wide spectrum of disorders. Good interpersonal skills, organization and efficiency are required. This is an excellent opportunity in a prac-

CHE Senior Psychological Services

I am pleased to call to your attention to available Career opportunities for licensed psychologists (part or full time) with CHE Senior Psychological Services. For the past fifteen years our group has been providing psychological services, neuropsychological/cognitive rehabilitation, and behavioral medicine services to residents of over 200 skilled nursing, short term rehabilitation, and adult day care facilities as well as community based group homes throughout NY State. Where: NY upstate and downstate regions with immediate openings in Buffalo, Binghamton, and Syracuse and throughout the five boroughs and Long Island. We also have immediate opportunities available for candidates with language proficiencies in Spanish and Russian. What do we provide: 1) We offer a clinically as well as a financially rewarding position with a flexible work schedule Provide training in geropsychology under the supervision of our prominent clinical directors. 2) Postdoctoral training opportunities in behavioral medicine and geropsychology to develop license-eligibility. Who will you be joining: A team of colleagues committed to clinical excellence, compassionate care, and professional integrity; An organization that welcomes your participation in a “collaborative” approach to the integration of psychological services in multidisciplinary settings; A group which provides individualized training, ongoing clinical supervision, and professional development workshops in all our service domains. For further information please call: 1-800-275-3243, visit our website at www.cheservices.com, and/or e-mail your curriculum vitae to: nathanT@cheservices.com.

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tice with a stable referral base. Must have or be eligible for North Carolina license. Visit our website at www.silberpsych.com. Fax resumes to: (919) 790-1521 or e-mail clsilber@gmail.com.

NORTH DAKOTA ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY: The Department of Psychology at North Dakota State University announces a tenure track assistant professor position in health psychology, broadly construed, beginning August 16, 2013. The candidate should conduct research on health and be able to contribute to our doctoral program in health/social psychology. Our department offers a modest teaching load of three courses per year and competitive start-up packages. NDSU is dedicated to developing strong research programs and has been nationally recognized by the Carnegie Foundation as a “Research University/Very High Research Activity” institution. The minimum qualifications for the position are: Ph.D. degree or near completion, evidence of research accomplishments, excellent potential for external funding, and abilities to teach courses in our curriculum and interact effectively with colleagues and students. For more information, go to: http://www.ndsu.edu/psychology. To apply, submit a cover letter describing research and teaching interests, curriculum vitae, copies of representative publications, available summaries of teaching evaluations, and three letters of recommendation to: http://jobs.ndsu.edu. Applications will be reviewed beginning November 1, 2012, and will continue until the position is filled. Direct inquiries to: Clayton Hilmert, Health Psychology Search Committee Chair, Department of Psychology, NDSU Department 2765, P.O. Box 6050, Fargo, ND 581086050, clayton.hilmert@ndsu.edu, (701) 231-5148. North Dakota State University is an Affirmative Action/ Equal Opportunity Employer and an NSF/ADVANCE institution. PSYCHOLOGIST TO PRACTICE AS INTEGRAL PART OF ESTABLISHED PAIN CLINIC: Sanford Health Fargo is currently recruiting for a psychologist to be integrated full-time as part of our well-established Pain Medicine Clinic. Our clinic currently consists of three full-time pain physicians, a .8 FTE psychologist, three NPs and a full nursing staff. We are in the process of developing comprehensive, evidence-based programming for our patients with chronic pain that further embeds behavioral health throughout our process of care. The psychologist in this position will work in coordination with physicians and nurse practitioners. The ideal candidate will have competence with individual and group evidence-based strategies for chronic 100

pain management, effectively conduct pre-surgical assessments, assist with the development of the department programming and train department staff to elevate our standard of care. Sanford Health Fargo, employing over 600 physicians, is part of the Sanford Health system, the largest non-profit rural healthcare system in the Nation. At Sanford Health Psychologists are appropriately recognized as doctoral-level providers who have the same employment benefits as physicians. Applicant must have graduated from an APA-accredited program with approved internship and be licensed or license-eligible in North Dakota. Fargo, ND, a metropolitan community of 190,000 is located on the southeastern border of North Dakota just a few miles from the lake country of Minnesota. The community offers two universities, one private college, excellent schols, and a wonderful blend of cultural and recreational activity, low crime and affordable and upscale living. To learn more about this excellent practice opportunity contact: Jean Keller, Physician Recruiter, Phone: (701) 280-4853; E-mail: Jean.Keller@ sanfordhealth.org.

OHIO QUANTITATIVE PSYCHOLOGY— THE DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY AT THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY: seeks an outstanding candidate for a faculty position in quantitative psychology. Pending the availability of funds, this tenure-track position is expected to be at the assistant or associate professor level. Competitive candidates will have a strong program of research that links to other areas of psychology (e.g., cognitive, clinical, social). We are especially interested in applicants whose expertise is in the development and application of modern latent variable models such as causal inference, multilevel models, generalized latent variable models, meta-analysis and research synthesis, mixture and latent class models, quasi-experimental design, time-toevent and frailty models, methods for missing data, and robust statistical methods as applied to behavioral data. The above list is not exhaustive and strong applicants with expertise in related areas of quantitative psychology will be considered as well. Applicants must have earned a Ph.D. in psychology or a related field prior to September 2013. All applicants are expected to have strong and fundable research programs and to contribute to both graduate and undergraduate supervision and instruction. Review of applications will begin on October 1, 2012, and continue until the position is filled. Prospective candidates should submit a letter of application, curriculum vitae, statements of research and teaching interests, selected reprints, and three letters of recommendation to: Scott Higgins, Quantitative Search Committee,

Department of Psychology, The Ohio State University, 1835 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1222. Electronic applications will not be accepted. For more information about the department, visit: www.psy. ohio-state.edu. To build a diverse workforce, Ohio State encourages applications from individuals with disabilities, minorities, veterans, and women. An Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer. BEHAVIORAL GENETICS: The Department of Psychology at The Ohio State University seeks an outstanding candidate for a faculty position in behavioral genetics. Pending the availability of funds, this tenure-track position is expected to be at the assistant or associate professor level. Individuals whose research uses animal models to examine the epigenetics of behavioral functions or dysfunctions are especially attractive. Applicants must have earned a Ph.D. in psychology or a related field prior to September 2013. All applicants are expected to have strong and fundable research programs and to contribute to both graduate and undergraduate supervision and instruction. Review of applications will begin on October 1, 2012, and continue until the position is filled. Electronic applications will not be accepted. Prospective candidates should submit a letter of application, curriculum vitae, statements of research and teaching interests, selected reprints, and three letters of recommendation to: Scott Burch, Behavioral Genetics Search Committee, Department of Psychology, The Ohio State University, 1835 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1222. For more information about the department, visit: www.psy.ohio-state.edu. To build a diverse workforce, Ohio State encourages applications from individuals with disabilities, minorities, veterans, and women. An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. DECISION SCIENCE: The Department of Psychology at The Ohio State University seeks an outstanding candidate for a faculty position in decision science. Pending the availability of funds, this tenure-track position is expected to be at the assistant or associate professor level. Especially welcome are candidates who study judgment or decision processes and whose work makes a basic science contribution to one of our core graduate program areas (e.g., clinical, cognitive, developmental, quantitative, social) and is also relevant to an applied topic (e.g., health, the environment, risk perception and communication). Judgment and decision processes are broadly defined, including but not limited to experimental, computational, theoretical, individualdifference, lifespan, psychophysiological and human neuroscience approaches. The College of Arts and Sciences has made the study of decision making a core initiative across

several departments and the successful hire is expected to contribute to this interdisciplinary program. Applicants must have earned a Ph.D. in psychology or a related field prior to September 2013. All applicants are expected to have strong and fundable research programs and to contribute to both graduate and undergraduate supervision and instruction. Review of applications will begin on October 1, 2012, and continue until the position is filled. Electronic applications will not be accepted. Prospective candidates should submit a letter of application, curriculum vitae, statements of research and teaching interests, selected reprints, and three letters of recommendation to: Sheena Riepenhoff, Decision Science Search Committee, Department of Psychology, The Ohio State University, 1835 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1222. For more information about the department, visit: www.psy.ohio-state.edu. To build a diverse workforce, Ohio State encourages applications from individuals with disabilities, minorities, veterans, and women. An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE: The Department of Psychology at The Ohio State University seeks an outstanding candidate for a faculty position in developmental neuroscience. Pending availability of funds, this tenure-track position is expected to be at the assistant professor level. We seek a scholar who uses neurobiological approaches to study development of basic cognitive or social processes using human or animal models. Applicants must have earned a Ph.D. in psychology or a related field prior to September 2013. All applicants are expected to have strong and fundable research programs and to contribute to both graduate and undergraduate supervision and instruction. Review of applications will begin on October 1, 2012, and will continue until the position is filled. Prospective candidates should submit a letter of application, curriculum vitae, statements of research and teaching interests, selected reprints, and three letters of recommendation to: Jennifer Poe, Developmental Neuroscience Search Committee, Department of Psychology, The Ohio State University, 1835 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH 432101222. Electronic applications will not be accepted. For more information about the department, visit: www. psy.ohio-state.edu. To build a diverse workforce, Ohio State encourages applications from individuals with disabilities, minorities, veterans, and women. An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. SOCIAL NEUROSCIENCE: The Department of Psychology at The Ohio State University seeks an outstanding candidate for a faculty position in social neuroscience with an emphasis on brain imaging methodologies. Pending the availability of funds, this tenure-track

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position is expected to be at any career stage. Candidates investigating any area within social psychology who use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) as a core methodological tool are encouraged to apply. A state of the art MRI facility with a research dedicated Siemens Trio scanner opened within the psychology building in January 2011. Applicants must have earned a Ph.D. in psychology or a related field prior to September 2013. All applicants are expected to have strong and fundable research programs and to contribute to both graduate and undergraduate supervision and instruction. Review of applications will begin on October 1, 2012, and will continue until the position is filled. All candidates should submit a letter of application, curriculum vitae, and three letters of recommendation. Junior candidates should also send selected reprints and a statement of teaching and research interests to: Paula Cullen, Social Neuroscience Search Committee, Department of Psychology, The Ohio State University, 1835 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1222. Electronic applications will not be accepted. For more information about the department, visit: www.psy. ohio-state.edu. To build a diverse workforce, Ohio State encourages applications from individuals with disabilities, minorities, veterans, and women. An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

OREGON ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY: Western Oregon University invites applications for a full-time tenure-track assistant professor position in clinical or counseling psychology for the academic year starting September 16, 2013. Candidates with either a clinical or counseling Ph.D. will be given preference. ABDs considered if degree will be completed before the start date. Candidates with teaching experience and a plan for a research program will be given priority. The successful candidate will join a department with 10 other tenure-track faculty, one other tenured faculty member in the clinical area and numerous non-tenure track faculty (see our website at www.wou.edu/ psych). The teaching load is three courses per term and may include interviewing and appraisal, psychological assessment, introduction to behavior modification, abnormal psychology, childhood psychopathology, general psychology, theories of personality, introduction to research methods and seminars/ courses in the applicant’s specialty area. Review of applications begins January 10, 2013, and will continue until the position is filled. For additional information and application requirements for this position, visit our website at

https://www.wou.edu/jobs. Western Oregon University is an Equal Opportunity Employer committed to the diversity of its workforce.

PENNSYLVANIA ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN EVOLUTION: The School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professor appointment in evolution, broadly interpreted. We are interested in exceptional scientists and mathematicians who have welldeveloped research programs employing mathematical or computational techniques to study the evolution of dynamical processes far from equilibrium in the context of any of the following: biology, chemistry, or materials from the molecular to the systems scale, language, geology, psychology, or the environment. The successful candidate’s primary appointment will be in a single department in the natural sciences: biology, chemistry, earth and environmental science, linguistics, mathematics, physics and astronomy, or psychology. Secondary appointments in other departments can be arranged, as appropriate. This appointment will be the first in a cluster of appointments across the natural sciences in various aspects of evolution; the successful candidate should therefore have a strong interest in building such a program and in interacting with researchers from other disciplines whose research lies within the overarching theme of evolution. The successful candidate will teach courses in his or her home department and will participate in the development of curriculum pertinent to the theme of the cluster. Review of applications will begin November 16, 2012 and will continue until the position is filled. Applications should be submitted online at: http// facultysearches.provost.upenn.edu/ applicants / Central?quick Find = 51089 and include curriculum vitae, a research statement that includes the candidate’s perspective on how she or he fits into one of the core departments, links to no more than three journal publications, and the contact information for three individuals who will be contacted by the University with instructions on how to submit a letter of recommendation. The University of Pennsylvania is an Affirmative Action/ Equal Opportunity Employer and is strongly committed to establishing a diverse faculty: http://www. upenn.edu/almanac/volumes/v58/ n02/diversityplan.html. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES: The Department of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professor appointment in basic psychological processes to begin July 1, 2013 at

OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

the earliest. We are particularly interested in scientists who study one or more of the areas of perception, attention, learning, and me­mory in humans or other animals. In addition, scientists whose research includes methods drawn from the subfields cognitive neuroscience, systems neuroscience, and/or computational modeling will be attractive. The successful candidate is expected to establish an externally funded research program and participate in undergraduate and graduate teaching. Applications should be submitted online at: http//faculty s e a r c h e s .p r o vo s t . u p e n n . e d u / applicantsCentral?quickFind=51086, and include curriculum vitae, research statement, and the contact information for three individuals who will be contacted by the University with instructions on how to submit a letter of recommendation. Review of applications will begin October 15, 2012 and will continue until the position is filled. The University of Pennsylvania is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, PSYCHOLOGY: The Department of Psychology at Muhlenburg College invites applications for a tenuretrack assistant professor position in developmental psychology to begin fall 2013. Candidates with expertise in one or more of the following are preferred: Adolescence or adulthood, cognitive development, diversity-related teaching or research, research methods/statistics. Teaching load is three courses per semester. We seek candidates who are strongly committed to teaching and research in a small liberal arts college environment. The successful candidate will be student centered and collaborate with colleagues in contributing to departmental and general education goals. Qualifications include: a Ph.D. (or ABD) in developmental psychology or human development, evidence of excellent teaching, and research that can involve students. For information about our department, visit

http://www.muhlenberg.edu/depts/ psychology/aboutus.html. Review of applications will take place primarily during September and October, 2012. To apply, submit a letter of application, curriculum vitae, statement of teaching and research interests, evidence of teaching excellence, and three letters of reference to: Dr. Mark Sciutto, Department of Psychology, Muhlenberg College, 2400 Chew St., Allentown, PA 18104-5586. Muhlenberg College is committed to building a culturally diverse community and encourages persons of color, persons with disabilities, and women to apply. An Equal Opportunity Employer. ASSISTANT OR ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR—PSYCHOLOGY/ CRIMINOLOGY: Chatham University, a thriving dynamic institution with three colleges and one school—Chatham College for Women and the co-educational College for Graduate Studies, College for Continuing and Professional Studies, and School of Sustainability and the Environment, invites applications for the position of assistant/associate professor of Psychology/Criminology. Duties for this faculty position are divided between the undergraduate psychology major and the criminology major. Responsibilities include: teaching courses in both programs including abnormal psychology, theories of counseling, personality, criminal justice, corrections, and criminology. You will also supervise undergraduate research projects, advise majors, and engage in scholarship and service to the Chatham University community. The successful candidate must have a Ph.D. in clinical psychology, academic or work experience in criminal justice, criminology or a related field, and teaching experience preferably at the undergraduate level. Chatham University offers a competitive salary, an excellent benefits package, including tuition remission for qualified personnel, and a generous retirement plan. All interested candidates should send a cover letter

PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT Clinical Psychology Full-time, tenure-track Assistant Professor position available beginning August 2013. Teach undergraduate courses such as general psychology, developmental psychology, behavior modification and other courses. Teach graduate courses including Personality Assessment and Psychotherapy and other courses. Required: Master’s degree plus ABD in Clinical or Counseling Psychology from an APA accredited Ph.D. program (must have doctorate for eligibility for re-appointment to the third year). For a full description of the position and qualifications and to apply, go to https://jobs.millersville.edu and create a faculty application. A cover letter, vitae, copies of all transcripts and contact information for three professional references will be required. Full consideration given to applications received by November 12, 2012. See www.millersville.edu for more information about the university and department. An EO/AA institution. www.millersville.edu

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with salary requirements, curriculum vitae, and names of three professional references to: Chatham University, Attn: Human Resources Department, Position #1469, Woodland Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15232. E-mail: chathr@chatham.edu. Visit: www. chatham.edu. Chatham University is an Equal Opportunity Employer. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR — SOCIAL, OPEN RANK, MOTIVATION: The Department of Psycho­ logy and the Learning Research and Development Center (LRDC) at the University of Pittsburgh are seeking to fill up to two joint tenure-track positions, pending budgetary approval. One is an open-rank position in the area of motivation. This search focuses on applicants at the associate and full professor levels, but outstanding candidates at the advanced assistant professor level will be considered. Senior applicants should be highly visible scholars with active research programs and track records of extramural funding. Applicants are expected to affiliate with one or more of the graduate training programs in the psychology department (see below). The second is an assistant professor position in the area of social psychology. For both positions, the ability to complement and extend the strengths of the psychology department and LRDC is essential, as is a strong commitment to undergraduate teaching and graduate training. The psychology department (http://www. psychology.pitt.edu) is committed to excellence in research and in teaching at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. The Department has 35 tenure-stream faculty and houses five graduate training programs: biological and health, clinical, cognitive, developmental, and social, as well as cross-program training opportunities. The interdisciplinary nature of psychological science is reflected in both faculty research interests and training opportunities afforded to graduate students. LRDC (http:// www.lrdc.pitt.edu) is a University Center that brings together leading researchers from several disciplines whose work focuses on human cognition and learning, the structure of knowledge, effective schooling and training, and educational policy. In addition to providing a supportive environment for basic research on the cognitive, motivational, and social bases of knowledge acquisition and use, LRDC is committed to applying research findings to improving learning and performance in schools and workplaces. Successful candidates will pursue research programs that contribute to these areas. Faculty in the psychology department and LRDC collaborate with colleagues in several other units at the University of Pittsburgh, including the School of Education, the Center for Neuroscience, and the School of Medicine (including Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic). In addition, faculty participate in several joint enterprises with colleagues at Carnegie Mellon University, including the Pittsburgh 102

Science of Learning Center (http:// learnlab.org) and the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition (http:// www.cnbc.cmu.edu). Deadline for submitting applications was October 1, 2012. Applicants should apply electronically by sending a cover letter, curriculum vitae, statement of research and teaching interests, and up to three papers to joint@ pitt.edu. Three letters of recommendation should be sent to the above e-mail address with the following subject heading: the applicant’s last name and the word “recommendation.” Inquiries regarding the position can be addressed to the chair of the search committee, John Levine, (jml@pitt.edu). Include the word “joint” in the subject line. The University of Pittsburgh is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Women and members of minority groups under-represented in academia are especially encouraged to apply. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: The Department of Psychology at the University of Pittsburgh is seeking to fill two tenure-track positions at the assistant professor level in the area of social psychology, pending budgetary approval. Research specialization for one position is open. For the other position, preference will be given to candidates whose work focuses on health psychology. For both positions, the ability to complement and extend the strengths of the psychology department is essential, as is a strong commitment to undergraduate teaching and graduate training. The psychology department (http://www. psychology.pitt.edu) is committed to excellence in research and in teaching at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. The department has 35 tenure-stream faculty and houses five graduate training programs: biological and health, clinical, cognitive, developmental, and social, as well as cross-program training opportunities. The interdisciplinary nature of psychological science is reflected in both faculty research interests and training opportunities afforded to graduate students. Faculty in the psychology department collaborate with colleagues in several other units at the University of Pittsburgh, including the learning research and development center, the Center for Neuroscience, the School of Medicine (including Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic), and the School of Education. In addition, faculty participate in several joint enterprises with colleagues at Carnegie Mellon University, including the Pittsburgh Science of Learning Center (http://learnlab.org) and the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition (http://www.cnbc.cmu. edu). Applicants should apply electronically by sending a cover letter, curriculum vitae, statement of research and teaching interests, and up to three papers to socpsy@ pitt.edu. Three letters of recommendation should be sent to the

above e-mail address with the following subject heading: the applicant’s last name and the word “reco­ mmendation.” Deadline for submitting applications was October 1, 2012. Inquiries regarding the position can be addressed to the Chair of the Search Committee, John Levine, (jml@pitt.edu). Include the word “socpsy” in the subject line. The University of Pittsburgh is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Women and members of minority groups under-represented in academia are especially encouraged to apply. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: The Department of Psychology at the University of Pittsburgh announces a tenure track faculty position at the assistant professor level that focuses on underrepresented minority groups in the United States, pending budgetary approval. Candidates for this position should be pursuing a research program that would advance theoretical and empirical perspectives on historically underrepresented minority groups in the United States, such as African-Americans or Hispanic-Americans. We seek to promote a broader appreciation of the significance of ethnic and cultural diversity in the context of a wide range of psychological phenomena. The area of specialization should fall within the scope of one or more of our graduate training areas in biological and health, clinical, cognitive/cognitive neuroscience, developmental, or social psychology. For more information about these specialty areas and existing programs of faculty research, see http://www. pitt.edu/~psych. The successful candidate will have a demonstrated record of scholarly productivity, evidence of excellence in teaching, and the strong potential to develop an independent program of extramurally-funded research. Responsibilities will include: maintaining an active program of research with a superior publication record, mentoring doctoral students, and teaching at the graduate and undergraduate levels. The review of application will begin immediately, with applications completed by December 1, 2012 receiving full consideration. Applicants should apply electronically by sending a cover letter, a research and teaching statement, three letters of recommendation, representative publications, and curriculum vitae to: disearch@pitt.edu. Letters of recommendation should include the applicant’s last name and the word “Recommendation” in the subject line. For more information about the position, contact: Professor Tom Kamarck, search committee chair, at tkam@pitt.edu or (412) 6242080. The Department of Psychology is committed to increasing the diversity of its faculty, students, and staff to enrich its educational experiences and scholarly perspectives. The University of Pittsburgh is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Members of minority groups

under-represented in academia are especially encouraged to apply. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR/CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGIST— THOMAS JEFFERSON UNIVERSITY/JEFFERSON MEDICAL COLLEGE: Responsibilities include: neuropsychological assessments for a large surgical epilepsy program and a general neurology outpatient service. Ideal candidate has strong knowledge and interest in epilepsy, with strong competencies in all areas of neuropsychological assessment relevant to a medical/neurologic setting. Interest and skills to conduct clinically-oriented research in epilepsy and other areas of neuropsychology. Contact: joseph.tracy@jefferson.edu. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY—QUANTITATIVE: The Department of Psychology at the University of Pittsburgh invites applications for an appointment specializing in quantitative psychology and one or more of the department’s specialty areas. The appointment is at the assistant professor level beginning in August 2013, pending budgetary approval. Candidates are sought who have strong credentials in quantitative methods and a substantive expertise and research program in at least one of our five graduate training areas: biological and health, clinical, cognitive, developmental, or social psychology. The faculty will help teach statistics courses at the graduate level as well as courses in their own substantive specialty at the graduate and undergraduate levels. Review of applications began September 1, 2012, and continue until October 15, 2012. Applicants should apply electronically by sending curriculum vitae, statement of research and teaching interests, representative publications, description of quantitative training, and a list of quantitative courses they are interested in teaching to quantsr@pitt.edu. Three letters of recommendation should be sent to the above e-mail address with the subject heading as follows: the applicant’s last name and the word recommendation. For more information about the department, including details about research emphases in each of the five program areas, see http://www.psychology.pitt.edu. For more information about the position, contact: Elizabeth Votruba-Drzal (412) 624-8365, evotruba@pitt.edu). The University of Pittsburgh is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Women and members of under-represented minority groups are especially encouraged to apply. CLIN ICAL PSYCHOLOGIST: James E. Van Zandt is recruiting for one full-time Clinical Psychologist at VAMC, Altoona, PA. Incumbent will provide a full range of psychological assessment services and diagnoses of mental disorders for veterans. A doctoral degree in Psychology accredited by APA and as well

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as completed psychology internship training accredited by APA. Full unrestricted license. Call: Human Resources at (814) 943-8164, ext. 7069.

ence with ADHD, LD, anxiety, and/ or mood disorders is helpful. Compensation is competitive. Send curriculum vitae and letter of interest to: job@ndcri.com.

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY: Penn State Hazleton, a campus of The Pennsylvania State University, invites applications for an assistant professor of psychology (tenure-track, 36 week position) to begin August 2013. Responsibilities: Teach three courses each semester in B.A. and B.S. programs in psychology, including introductory courses, using traditional and hybrid delivery modes. Conduct research, publish in refereed journals, and participate in service activities. To learn more about the campus and Penn State, visit http:// www.psu.edu /ur /cmpcoll.htm l. Qualifications: Ph.D. in Psychology with a specialization in clinical psychology completed no later than August 1, 2013. To learn more about the position and how to apply, visit http://www.psu.jobs/Search/ Opportunities.html; follow “Faculty” link. An Affirmative Action/ Equal Opportunity Employer.

SEMANTICS/PR AGMATICS — BROWN UNIVERSITY: The Department of Cognitive, Linguistic and Psychological Sciences is seeking to fill a tenure-track assistant professor position in the areas of semantics, pragmatics, and/or discourse. The successful candidate will have a research program grounded in linguistic theory, which also makes contact with broader issues in cognitive science and psychology. A crosslinguistic component is highly desirable. Preference will be given to candidates who enhance our existing strengths while broadening our current program, and who can contribute to our linguistics and cognitive science of language programs. Successful candidates are expected to have a record of excellence in research and a readiness to contribute to undergraduate and graduate teaching and mentoring. We anticipate conducting one additional search in future years in the areas of linguistics and cognitive science of language. Brown has a highly interdisciplinary research environment in the study of the mind, brain, behavior, and language; the department has recently moved into a renovated state-of-theart building in the heart of campus. Applications received by December 10, 2012 are assured of full review. All Ph.D. requirements must be completed before July 1, 2013. Curriculum vitae, reprints and preprints of publications, statement of research interests, a teaching statement (one page each), and three letters of reference should be submitted. To apply http://www.interfolio.com/ apply/13566. Brown is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Minorities and women are especially encouraged to apply.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR: Executive Director for Pennsylvania Psychological Association, a statewide nonprofit association in Harrisburg, PA, with 3,000 members. Through leadership and innovative management the executive director works closely with the member-driven board of directors and psychologists statewide. Candidates must have knowledge of: nonprofit management and governance principles, strategic planning, leadership practices, government relations, membership recruitment, fundraising, fiscal management, staff management, strong oral and written communication skills, and facilitating voluntary leadership. Preference is given to candidates who have the following: at least five years experience in nonprofit executive management, MBA or equivalent degree, CAE designation, and familiarity with the field of psychology or health care. Salary commensurate with background. Send resume along with salary requirements to: PPA. execsearch@gmail.com by October 31, 2012.

RHODE ISLAND CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST OR NEUROPSYCHOLOGIST: Join the staff of The NeuroDevelopment Center, a thriving private assessment and treatment center in Providence, RI. We work with children and adults with neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders and offer traditional evidence-based and innovative assessment and treatment modalities. We need an experienced, licensed psychologist or neuropsychologist to provide evaluations, therapy, and school consultation. Experience with autism spectrum disorder is necessary. Experi-

SOUTH CAROLINA ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, COMMUNITY-BASED HEALTH AND SOCIAL DISPARITIES RESEARCH—UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA: The Department of Psychology invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position at the rank of assistant professor for candidates whose research programs focus on health and social disparities (e.g., physical health, psychological well-being). We seek candidates with experience in community-based prevention and intervention research who will 1) be competitive for national funding initiatives, 2) contribute to USC’s priority on health-focused research, and 3) complement the university’s mission to address the health and welfare of state residents. Qualifications include: a promising record in original research, a commitment to quality teaching, and a doctoral degree or satisfactory progress to-

OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

ward completion of a doctoral degree in psychology or a related field. We seek a scholar with expertise in community-engaged health disparity research to understand interactions between individual and environmental factors that can affect health and disparities in health. The assistant professor will be expected to build a strong research program investigating the role of social, cultural, policy, or environmental influences on psychological well-being and health. Specific responsibilities include: 1) creating research collaborations with community settings to investigate health disparities and related social conditions, 2) seeking and obtaining external funding for community-based research, 3) offering research and learning opportunities to graduate and undergraduate students. The University of South Carolina’s main campus is located in the state capital, close to mountains and coast. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching has designated the University of South Carolina as one of only 73 public and 32 private academic institutions with “very high research activity”. The Carnegie Foundation also lists USC as having strong community engagement. The University has over 29,500 students on the main campus (and over 44,500 students system-wide), more than 350 degree programs, and a nationally-ranked library system that includes one of the nation’s largest public film archives. The Department of Psychology has three Ph.D. programs: clinical-community psychology, experimental psychology, and school psychology, with interest areas that cut across programs—child and family issues, cognitive and behavioral neuroscience, developmental processes, drug abuse and addiction, psychopathology, prevention and community-based intervention. For additional information, the department website is http://www.psych. sc.edu. Electronic application submissions are preferred and should be e-mailed to lewterv@mailbox. sc.edu with assistant professor search in the subject line. Paper submissions may be sent to: Community-Based Health and Social Disparities Search Committee Chair, University of South Carolina, Department of Psychology, Columbia, SC 29208. For full consideration, all application materials should have been received no later than October 1, 2012 and should include a letter of application, curriculum/ research vitae, and three letters of recommendation. Additional materials that demonstrate educational, academic, and work experience should accompany the application package. For further information about this position, contact: Associate Professor and Search Committee Chair, Bret Kloos at: kloos@sc.edu. The University of South Carolina is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Minorities and women are encouraged to apply. The University of South Carolina

does not discriminate in educational or employment opportunities or decisions for qualified persons on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, sexual orientation or veteran status.

TENNESSEE VANDERBILT—THE DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY, NEUROSCIENCE: The Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Science, invites applications for a tenure-track position in neuroscience at the assistant professor level. We seek applicants with innovative research programs that address core questions at the interface of psychology and neuroscience. We particularly welcome applications from scientists who utilize cutting edge methodologies (e.g., behavioral and imaging genetics, multimodal functional neuroimaging, rTMS, optogenetics, computational neuroanatomy) and whose work complements existing programs of research at Vanderbilt in cognitive, behavioral, and systems neuroscience. We especially encourage women and minority scholars to apply. The candidate will have opportunities to teach and supervise students in our excellent undergraduate and graduate programs in neuroscience and psychology. The institutional resources in neuroscience at Vanderbilt are outstanding and include the Center for Cognitive and Integrative Neuroscience, Vanderbilt Brain Institute, Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt Vision Research Center, Center for Human Genetics Research and the John F. Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development. Review of applications will begin immediately. To receive full consideration, applications should arrive by December 1, 2012. Applicants should send curriculum vitae, copies of relevant publications, a letter describing research and teaching interests and endeavors, and the names of individuals who may serve as references to: Neuroscience Search Committee, Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, PMB 407817, 2301 Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, TN 37240-7817. Informal inquiries may be sent via e-mail to: david.zald@vanderbilt.edu. Vanderbilt University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY— THE DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHO­ LOGY, CLINCAL SCIENCE: The Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Science invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professor faculty position in the clinical science area. We seek applicants whose research focuses on core DSM psychopathologies (e.g., mood disorders, schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, substance use disorders, personality disorders). We are particularly interested in applicants whose scholarly work involves multiple levels of analysis (e.g., behavioral, neuroimaging, genetic, psy103


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chophysiological); and/or 2) integrates the study of psychopathology with more basic research on social, affective, or cognitive processes. We especially encourage women and minority scholars to apply. The Department of Psychology and the Department of Psychology and Human Development at the Vanderbilt Peabody College of Education and Human Development offer a joint graduate program in psychological Sciences, one component of which is an APA-accredited Clinical Sciences program (http://www. va nd e r bi lt .edu / psychologica l _ sciences /graduate /progra ms / clinical.php). We have strong collaborative relations with the Department of Psychiatry and other departments affiliated with the Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Institutional resources are outstanding and include the Vanderbilt Institute of Imaging Science, the Vanderbilt Brain Institute, and the John F. Kennedy Center for Research on Human

Development. Review of applications will begin immediately. To receive full consideration, applications should arrive by December 1, 2012. Applicants should send curriculum vitae, copies of relevant publications, a letter describing research and teaching interests and endeavors, and at least three letters of reference to: Clinical Search Committee, Department of Psychology, 301 Wilson Hall, 111 21st Avenue South, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 3740. Informal inquiries may be sent via e-mail to sohee.park@vanderbilt. edu. Vanderbilt University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. LICENSED PSYCHOLOGIST OPENINGS—VERICARE: Are you looking for rewarding and fulfilling employment? Vericare, is a leader in geropsychology, providing multidisciplinary behavioral interventions in long-term care facilities. Our professionals provide a spec-

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY

Two Assistant Professors in Human Experimental Psychology Job Posting #: 2013-11, Review Date: October 1, 2012 Appointment Date: Fall 2013

Position Description (responsibilities/duties)

Duties for two Assistant Professor tenure-track positions include: 1) Teaching undergraduate and graduate courses in experimental psychology relevant to successful applicant’s expertise and related courses in psychological science, 2) Developing and maintaining an active research program, 3) Involving undergraduate and graduate students in the research, 4) Supervising Master’s theses, 5) Seeking external funding, and 6) Participating in appropriate departmental service.

Qualifications

Required: 1) Ph.D. (or ABD) in Psychology or a closely related discipline with Ph.D. by time of appointment, with graduate-level training in human experimental psychology or a related field, 2) Specialization in any division of experimental psychology that fits (a) department’s research foci and (b) undergraduate and graduate curricula needs. Preferred: 1) Quality collegiate teaching experience with strong student evaluations relevant to appropriate experimental psychology courses, 2) Scholarship productivity demonstrating active research program, 3) Involving undergraduate and/or graduate students in research, 4) Current, prior or potential grant-seeking activity, 5) Current or prior service activity, 6) Post-doctoral research experience, and, 7) Strong methodological/quantitative background.

trum of therapies including individual psychotherapy, short-term solution-focused therapy and behavior management. Vericare has opportunities throughout Tennessee. Experience with medical/inpatient settings and multi-disciplinary teams preferred. For more information, apply online at www.vericare.com, or contact Sanel Lekic at (800) 2578715 ext. 1166. Vericare is offering a $500 “Thank You” referral bonus for any colleagues you refer that get hired. Feel free to call us for details.

TEXAS PSYCHOLOGY CLINIC DIRECTOR POSITION: The Department of Psychology and Neuroscience at Baylor University has an opening for a Director of the Baylor University Psychology Clinic. The anticipated position is full time, 12-month, nontenure-track. Responsibilities include: providing overall direction to the Baylor University Psychology Clinic, supervising clinical practica, initiating and maintaining contact with community agencies, participating in graduate teaching, and assisting the director of the Psy.D. clinical psychology program in various responsibilities. Opportunities for clinical research are possible as well. The ideal candidate will be a person with excellent clinical background, experience in psychotherapy, psychological testing, supervision, integration of research into practice, and an ability to contribute to our doctoral program in clinical psychology. The clinic director position provides substantial opportunity to have a positive influence on graduate students in clinical psychology and thereby shape the future of our field. The position blends administration, clinical supervision, graduate teaching, and other activities. Candidates for this position should be licensed or license eligible in Texas, possess an APA-accredited degree (Ph.D. or Psy.D.) in clinical psychology, and have experience in the relevant areas. Baylor University is a moderate size (14,000 students) university and Waco is a temperate, low-cost metropolitan area of 200,000+ people with a large VA medical center. To ensure

full consideration, complete applications must be submitted by November 15, 2012. To apply: send or e-mail letter of application, curriculum vitae, transcripts, reprints, and three letters of recommendation to: Dr. Gary Elkins, Chair of Clinical Search, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, One Bear Place 97334, Waco, TX 76798. E-mail inquiries to Gary_Elkins@baylor.edu. Baylor, the world’s largest Baptist university, holds a Carnegie classification as a “high-research” institution. Baylor’s mission is to educate men and women for worldwide leadership and service by integrating academic excellence and Christian commitment within a caring community. Baylor is actively recruiting new faculty with a strong commitment to the classroom and an equally strong commitment to discovering new knowledge as Baylor aspires to become a top tier research university while reaffirming and deepening its distinctive Christian mission as described in Pro Futuris (http://www. baylor.edu/profuturis/). Baylor is a Baptist university affiliated with the Baptist General Convention of Texas. As an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer, Baylor encourages minorities, women, veterans, and persons with disabilities to apply. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR—BAYLOR UNIVERSITY: The Department of Psychology and Neuroscience at Baylor University invites applications for a tenure-track position at the assistant professor level effective fall 2013. The ideal candidate will be able to address quantitative teaching needs and be able to maintain an independent program of research. Teaching responsibilities will include: undergraduate courses in statistics and research design, graduate-level courses including design, regression, multivariate statistics, other advanced techniques (e.g., HLM, SEM), and courses in the candidate’s area of expertise. Area of research is open, but we are interested in applicants who will engage undergraduate students in research and mentor graduate students in one of the tracks in our psychology Ph.D. program (social psychology, general experimental, and behavior-

Application Procedures

Send electronic copies of the following items via email to the Human Experimental Psychology Search Committee at HEP-Search@txstate.edu: 1) Cover letter, 2) Current vita, 3) Statement of teaching philosophy, 4) Statement of research interests, 5) Copies of representative published work, and 6) Evidence of teaching effectiveness. Also, please arrange for 3 letters of reference to be sent via email. If necessary, paper copies of materials may be sent to HEP Search Committee, Department of Psychology, Texas State UniversitySan Marcos, 601 University Dr., San Marcos, TX 78666. Transcripts will be solicited from finalists selected for a campus visit. Applicant’s file with items listed in the application procedures must be received by October 1 deadline. Texas State University-San Marcos is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer and strongly encourages applications from candidates who would enhance the diversity of the University’s faculty. Texas State University-San Marcos is a tobacco-free campus. Smoking and the use of any tobacco product will not be allowed anywhere on Texas State property or in university owned or leased vehicles.

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Money matters Psychologists are helping young couples keep afloat financially in increasingly turbulent economic waters—page 48.

MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY • OCTOBER 2012


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al neuroscience). A commitment to excellence in teaching and a strong potential to attract external funding is essential. More detailed information about the department and Ph.D. program can be found at www. baylor.edu/psychologyneuroscience (follow graduate program link). Baylor University is a moderate size university (14,000 students) and Waco is a temperate, low-cost metropolitan area of 200,000+ people. To ensure full consideration, complete applications must be submitted by November 15, 2012. To apply send a letter of interest, curriculum vitae, representative reprints, graduate transcripts, and three letters of recommendation to: Dr. Matt Stanford, Search Committee Chair, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, One Bear Place 97334, Waco, TX 76798. E-mail inquiries to Matthew_ Stanford@baylor.edu. Baylor, the world’s largest Baptist university, holds a Carnegie classification as a “high-research” institution. Baylor’s mission is to educate men and women for worldwide leadership and service by integrating academic excellence and Christian commitment within a caring community. Baylor is actively recruiting new faculty with a strong commitment to the classroom and an equally strong commitment to discovering new knowledge as Baylor aspires to become a top tier research university while reaffirming and deepening its distinctive Christian mission as described in Pro Futuris (http://www.baylor.edu/ profuturis/). Baylor is a Baptist university affiliated with the Baptist General Convention of Texas. As an Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity Employer, Baylor encourages minorities, women, veterans, and persons with disabilities to apply. DEPARTMENT HEAD: The Department of Psychology at Texas A&M University invites applications for the position of Department Head, beginning academic year 2013–2014. A successful candidate will be able to: promote a vision for our teaching, research and service programs, both internally and externally; maintain a strong nationally recognized research program and facilitate internal and external grant support of the faculty; work closely with faculty in establishing program priorities and supervise the allocation of physical, budgetary, and support staff resources. The department currently has 39 tenured/ tenure-track faculty and doctoral training programs in the following areas: behavioral and cellular neuroscience (BCN), clinical, cognitive, developmental, I/O, and social psychology. A Ph.D. in a substantive area of psychology is a requirement for the position. Specific area of research focus is open, but applications from persons with backgrounds that build on specific strengths within the department (i.e., personality processes, BCN)

are particularly welcome. The position carries a nine month appointment and two months of summer salary. Research support and salary are negotiable. Additional information can be obtained by contacting the Search Chair, John Edens, johnedens@tamu.edu. Individuals wishing to be considered for the position should send an electronic copy of their curriculum vitae and a letter of intent. Additional information, and letters of recommendation, will not be requested until after a preliminary review of the applicant pool. Texas A&M University is an Equal Opportunity Employer and has a policy of being responsive to the needs of dual-career couples. LICENSED PSYCHOLOGIST OPENINGS—VERICARE: Are you looking for rewarding and fulfilling employment? Vericare is a leader in geropsychology, providing multidisciplinary behavioral interventions in long-term care facilities. Our professionals provide a spectrum of therapies including individual psychotherapy, short-term solution-focused therapy and behavior management. Vericare has opportunities throughout Texas. Experience with medical/inpatient settings and multi-disciplinary teams preferred. For more information, apply online at www.vericare.com or contact Deblee Tran at (800) 257-8715 ext. 1146. Vericare is offering a $500 “Thank You” referral bonus for any colleagues you refer that get hired. Feel free to call us for details.

UTAH TENURE-TRACK ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN EXPERIMENTAL OR APPLIED COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY: The Psychology Department at Weber State University (http://weber.edu/psychology) invites applications for a tenure-track position at the assistant professor level. We seek a candidate with a strong commitment to undergraduate education, an interest in involving students in research, and a strong background in experimental or applied cognitive psychology. The successful candidate will demonstrate an interest in teaching undergraduate core (introductory psychology, research methods, and statistics) and experimental (cognition, conditioning and learning, courses in areas of expertise) course offerings. Preference will be given to those with a Ph.D. by the time of appointment (July 1, 2013), but ABD candidates will be considered who have completed all required course work by the time of appointment. Weber State University is located at the foot of the Wasatch Mountains in Ogden, UT, 35 miles north of Salt Lake City. The area offers year-round outdoor recreational activities. Salary is competitive with excellent benefits. To apply, fill out the faculty application at http://jobs. weber.edu and attach a letter of ap-

OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

plication, curriculum vitae, statements of research and teaching philosophy, evidence of teaching excellence (e.g., course evaluations), reprints/preprints, graduate transcripts, three letters of recommendation, and other documents in support of the application by November 2, 2012. Additionally you may send application materials to: Dr. Aaron Ashley, Chair, Cognitive Search Committee, Weber State University, 1202 University Circle, Ogden, UT 84408-1202.

VERMONT TENURE-TRACK POSITION IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY AT THE ASSISTANT PROFESSOR LEVEL: The Department of Psychology at the University of Vermont seeks to fill a tenure-track position in clinical psychology at the assistant professor level, to begin August 2013. Candidates should have an established program of independent research in clinical psychological science, focused on adult psychopathology (e.g., anxiety, mood disorders, eating disorders, addiction). The University of Vermont is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the neuroscience, behavior, and health transdisciplinary research initiative (see http://www.uvm.edu/~nbhspire/). Research interests should complement and expand those of current clinical and departmental faculty. Applicants must have a doctorate in clinical psychology from an APAaccredited program, have a strong record of publications, have the potential to secure extramural funding, have demonstrated excellence in teaching, have completed an APAaccredited clinical internship, and preferably be license-eligible in Vermont. The successful candidate will be expected to: 1) undertake an active program of research that leads to publication and presentation in peer-reviewed scholarly outlets and to seek extramural funding for that research; 2) teach courses as needed by the department, including some of the following: undergraduate courses in abnormal psychology and introduction to clinical psychology, graduate courses in adult psychopathology, and specialty courses in evidence-based clinical intervention; 3) mentor undergraduate and doctoral students in research; and 4) provide clinical supervision for graduate trainees. The University of Vermont is committed to building a culturally diverse educational environment and is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the academic community through their research, teaching, and/or service. Review of applications began October 1, 2012 and will continue until the position is filled. The University of Vermont is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. The department is committed to increasing diversity

and welcomes applications from women and underrepresented ethnic, racial, and cultural groups, sexual minorities, and people with disabilities. Departmental information is available at www.uvm.edu/ psychology. Founded in 1791, UVM has been called one of the “public ivies” and is consistently ranked as one of the top public universities in the United States. The University is located in Burlington, one of the best small cities in America, in numerous rankings. Burlington enjoys a panoramic setting on the shores of Lake Champlain, between the Green Mountains of Vermont and the Adirondacks of New York. Burlington has an unusually rich cultural scene for a city its size, with many opportunities for community involvement and outdoor recreation. Apply online at www.uvmjobs.com. Search for the position using department name (psychology) only. Attach to your application curriculum vitae, statements of research and teaching interests, summaries of teaching evaluations (if available), representative publications, and contact information of three references. In their cover letter, applicants are requested to include information about how they will further the University’s diversity goals and how they can contribute to the Transdisciplinary Research Initiative program. Direct questions to : Professor Timothy Stickle, Clinical Search Committee Chair, Department of Psychology, University of Vermont, 2 Colchester Avenue, Burlington, VT 05405-0134, tstickle@ uvm.edu, (802) 656-3842.

VIRGINIA ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY: The Department of Psychology at the University of Mary Washington invites applications for a full-time tenure-track assistant professor position beginning August 15, 2013. The candidate must have a Ph.D. in clinical or counseling psychology from an APA-accredited program by August 15, 2013. Candidates should be able to teach some combinations of general psychology, research seminar in personality or abnormal psychology, clinical psychology, applied counseling, abnormal psychology, and other courses compatible with the candidate’s area of interest and as needed by the department. Candidates must have a strong commitment to teaching undergraduates, directing undergraduates in independent research, and being a productive scholar. Submit letter of application, curriculum vitae, statement of teaching and research interests including how you would involve undergraduates in your research endeavors, and any materials that show evidence of effective teaching (e.g., syllabi, sample assignments, sample exams, teaching evaluations, etc.) electronically to https://careers.umw.edu posi105


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TION&'RADUATETRANSCRIPTS three letters of recommendation that SPECIlCALLY ADDRESS TEACHING EXPERTISE AND EXPERIENCE AND OTHER materials not available in electronic format should be mailed to: Dr. #HRISTOPHER +ILMARTIN 3EARCH Chair, Department of Psychology, 5NIVERSITY OF -ARY 7ASHINGTON  #OLLEGE !VE &REDERICKSBURG 6!  Deadline for receipt of materials is October 28, 2012. 0OSTMARKSWILLNOTBEHONORED3END e-mail inquiries to ckilmart@umw. edu. The University and department are particularly interested in receiving applications from members of underrepresented groups. In a continuing effort to enrich its academic environment and provide equal educational and employment opporTUNITIES 5NIVERSITY OF -ARY 7ASHington actively encourages women, minorities, disabled individuals, and veterans to apply. For more in-

formation about our department and this position see http://psyc. umwchandler.net/. PEDIATRIC PSYCHOLOGIST: Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital of Richmond at VCU, Brook Road campus is in search of a full-time pediatric psychologist for our feeding program. The psychologist participates in the outpatient therapy of patients and advises colleagues on appropriate behavioral interventions, and provides individual and/or family treatment to feeding program outpatients as appropriate. Qualified candidates will have a doctoral degree in clinical, counseling, or school psychology with specialization in pediatric populations. Completion of APA or APPIC-accredited doctoral training and internship programs required. Candidates must be licensed as a clinical psychologist in the Commonwealth of VA or eligi-

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FOR EMPLOYERS s 3EARCHDATABASEOFOVER RESUMES s4APINTOTHERIGHTAUDIENCE s #REATEYOUROWNCRITERIATOSCREENAPPLICANTS s 3AVETHERESUMESTHATINTERESTYOU s &INDTHEMOSTQUALIlEDCANDIDATES s 0LACEADSINPRINTWITHFREEONLINEORONLINEONLY

WWW0SYC#AREERSCOM AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION 

BLEFORLICENSURE%XPERIENCEINFEEDing therapy is not required. This position offers benefits and a competitive salary. If you are interested, please download and e-mail your completed application, along with a current resume/curriculum vitae to: careers@chva.org. Visit our website for an application and more information about the position and facility; www.childrenshosp-richmond.org. An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer/Drug free workplace. PSYCHOLOGIST SENIOR: 3OUTHWESTERN 6IRGINIA -ENTAL (EALTH )NSTITUTE376-() PARTOFTHE#OMmonwealth of Virginiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s behavioral health system, is seeking qualified candidates for a clinical psychologist position (psychologist senior). 376-() IS A MODERN INPATIENT FAcility whose mission is to promote mental health by assisting people in their recovery in the underserved southwestern Virginia region. The successful candidate will be capable of working collaboratively with other clinical disciplines in a fast-paced treatment environment, where improving the quality of care is viewed as a continual process. We are seeking an applicant with strong skills in psychological assessment, group and individual therapy, and behavioral interventions, but entry level professionals with a commitment to assisting others in their recovery ARE ENCOURAGED TO APPLY %XPERIENCE helping persons with serious mental disorders and/or substance abuse problems to recover is strongly desired. Psychologists work on an interdisciplinary treatment team providing a full range of psychological services to a highly diverse patient population. Psychologists also play a major role in risk assessment/management and forensic evaluations, and training in these areas is available. A doctorate in clinical psychology or documented equivalent and eligibility for licensure as a clinical psychologist in Virginia is strongly preferred. 3UPERVISION FOR THE YEAR OF POSTDOCtorate residency required for Virginia LICENSURECANBEPROVIDED376-() is located in the safe, family orientED COMMUNITY OF -ARION 6IRGINIA The area is known for its high quality of life, low cost of living, beautiful mountain scenery and abundant outdoor recreational opportunities. Applicants must complete an online application by visiting our hospitalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website and clicking on the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Human Resourcesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; page at www.swvmhi. dbhds.virginia.gov or you may call a member of Human Resources at      SIGN ON BOnus available, and moving/relocation allowance may be available. CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST: *OIN &AMILY&IRST0SYCHOLOGICAL3ERVICES PC, a fast-growing private practice in the heart of Vienna, VA. Familyfriendly, supportive and energetic ENVIRONMENT 3EEKING 6IRGINIA LIcensed clinical psychologist for full TIMEPOSITIONmEXIBLEHOURS %XPE-

rience in child/adolescent therapy and assessment is required. Adult ANDCOUPLESTHERAPYEXPERIENCEISA PLUS 3END RESUME TO MKANAKOS FAMILYlRSTVACOMORCALL  9090.

WASHINGTON ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: The Department of Psychology at WashINGTON 3TATE 5NIVERSITY INVITES APplications for two tenure-track assistant professor positions in Pullman, WA, beginning August 16,  Duties include: developing and maintaining a productive research program, mentoring graduate student research, and teaching graduate and undergraduate courses. The first position is for an assistant professor of health psychology, with interests in either 1) health AND AGING RESEARCH  HEALTH AND ADDICTIONS RESEARCH OR  METHODologies for studying health-related outcomes. Required qualifications: Applicants must have earned a Ph.D. in psychology or a closely related discipline, with a demonstrated record of research publicaTION AND COLLEGE LEVEL TEACHING EXperience. Preferred qualifications: Applicants who can contribute to the departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s graduate training areas in neuropsychology, clinical health psychology, psychopathology, applied quantitative methods, or biopsychology, and who have demonstrated ability to work with historically disadvantaged populations, are especially desirable. Inquiries can be directed to: Dr. -AUREEN 3CHMITTER %DGECOMBE Chair of the Health Psychology 3EARCH#OMMITTEE ATSCHMITTER E wsu.edu. The second position is for an assistant professor of social or cognitive psychology, with interests in persuasion, normative influence, risk perception and decisionmaking, or information integration. Ideally, the candidate will contribute to the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s emerging emPHASIS ON %NERGY  3USTAINABILITY by conducting research on the social and psychological aspects of energy consumption and conservation. Required qualifications: Candidates must have earned a Ph.D. in psychology, with a demonstrated record of research publication AND COLLEGE LEVEL TEACHING EXPERIence. Preferred qualifications: Applicants with demonstrated ability to teach undergraduate and/or graduate statistics, as well as demonstrated ability to work with historically disadvantaged populations, will be especially considered. Inquiries can be directed to: Dr. #RAIG 0ARKS #HAIR OF THE 3OCIAL #OGNITIVE 3EARCH #OMMITTEE AT parkscd@wsu.edu. Applicants SHOULD APPLY ONLINE THROUGH 735 Human Resources (http://www. wsujobs.com) and submit a letter of application describing their relEVANT EXPERIENCE CURRICULUM VITAE up to four reprints, and three letters of recommendation. Review of ap-

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CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

plications begins November 15, 2012. Washington State University is a moderate-sized (20,000 students) land-grant institution located in Pullman, Washington, a small college town in rural southeastern Washington. The Psychology Department has over 800 undergraduate majors and wellestablished doctoral programs in clinical psychology and in experimental psychology, with the first Ph.D. degrees granted in 1956. For a description of the department of psychology see http://www.wsu.edu/psychology/. Our department is interested in candidates who will contribute to diversity and equal opportunity in higher education through their teaching, research, and service. WSU employs only U.S. citizens and lawfully authorized non-U.S. citizens. All new employees must show employment eligibility verification as required by U.S. citizenship and immigration services. Washington State University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Educator and Employer. People of color, women, Vietnam-era or disabled veterans, persons of disability and/or persons age 40 and over are strongly encouraged to apply. WSU is committed to excellence through diversity, has faculty friendly policies including a partner accommodation program, and a NSF Advance Institutional Transformation grant to increase the advancement of women faculty in science, engineering and math, http://www.ADVANCE.wsu.edu/. A S S I S TA N T PROFESSOR SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY—CENTRAL WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY, ELLENSBURG, WA: Tenuretrack assistant professor with expertise in school psychology, beginning September 16, 2013. Responsibilities: teach undergraduate psychology courses, teach graduate courses in school psychology, and serve on master’s thesis committees. Qualifications: An earned doctorate in school psychology or a closely related field and eligibility for certification as a school psychologist by September 17, 2013. Applications are accepted online at: https://jobs.cwu. edu/. Screening begins November 30, 2012. Complete job announcement is available at www.cwu.edu/ psychology, or contact: Dr. Heath Marrs, Search Chair at (509) 9632349 or marrsh@cwu.edu. An Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity/ Title IX Institution. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY— UNIVERSIT Y OF PUGET SOUND: Appointment Status: Full-time, tenure-line position; begins fall term 2013. Responsibilities: Teach courses in the following areas: laboratory course in animal learning and behavior that incorporates an operant lab and facilities designed for rats; an upperdivision interdisciplinary course in area of expertise; introductory psychology; and an upper-division elective in area of expertise. Ability

to teach advanced experimental methodology and applied statistics is highly desirable. Standard teaching assignment is three courses (or two courses plus lab) per semester. Qualifications: Ph.D. (ABD considered) in psychology, with an emphasis in animal learning, psychobio­ logy, or related field. Commitment to undergraduate teaching, liberal arts education, and scholarship also required. How to apply: For complete job description and application instructions, visit: http://apptrkr. com/270454. As a strategic goal and through our core values, University of Puget Sound is committed to an environment that welcomes and supports diversity. We seek diversity of identity, thought, perspective, and background in our students, faculty, and staff. An Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer.

WISCONSIN ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN PSYCHOLOGY: University of Wisconsin Oshkosh seeks tenure-track assistant professor in psychology, specializing in industrial/organizational psychology. Excellent teaching skills (courses in I/O and Introductory), develop and maintain active research program, work collaboratively with graduate and undergraduate students, advise undergraduate majors and supervise master’s level theses. Ph.D. in Psychology by September 1, 2013. Deadline: November 2, 2012. For additional information and application procedure see www.uwosh. edu/departments/psychology. Employment requires criminal background check. An Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN REHABILITATION PSYCHOLOGY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN MADISON: Degree and area of specialization: Earned doctoral degree with preparation in rehabilitation counseling/rehabilitation psychology or closely related field by appointment start date. License/certification: Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) credential is desirable. Eligibility for license as a professional counselor and/or as a psychologist in Wisconsin is also desirable. Minimum number of years and type of relevant work experience: Direct service experience in rehabilitation or related setting. Evidence of ability to conduct research and scholarship of theoretical and practical. Significance: Evidence of effective university-level teaching abilities. Evidence of ability to work collaboratively within and outside the university. Knowledge and skills related to teaching and counseling culturally diverse and disability diverse populations. Principal duties: Teach courses in B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. programs in rehabilitation counseling/ rehabilitation psychology as assigned by the department. Supervise students in practicum and internship

OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

placements. Advise undergraduate and graduate students and supervise graduate student research. Obtain financial support necessary to conduct research. Participate in shared governance and committee activities within the university. Participate in community and professional service, including positions of leadership at the local, state, and national levels. A criminal background check will be conducted prior to hiring. Contact: rpse-search@education.wisc.edu. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR-COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE: As part of a major research growth initiative, The University of WisconsinMilwaukee is seeking applicants for a faculty position in cognitive neurosciences. This position will build directly on the current strength of our program (http://neuroscience.uwm. edu). The appointment will be made at the assistant professor level. Successful applicants will participate in the Center for Imaging Research (http://www.mcw.edu/CIR), which provides multiple research dedicated imaging platforms and technical infrastructure for brain mapping in human subjects and laboratory animals. Area of research specialization is open but outstanding individuals with interests in attention, perception, action, language, or emotion are particularly encouraged to apply. Responsibilities include: developing an independent extramurally funded research program and teaching

graduate and undergraduate courses in the neurosciences and experimental psychology. Applicants must have a Ph.D. in neuroscience or a closely related field, research interests in cognitive neuroscience, and significant postdoctoral research experience. Preferred qualifications are strong potential for extramural funding; demonstrated research productivity; interest in fostering graduate and undergraduate research experience; excellence in graduate and undergraduate teaching; and the ability to strengthen or expand existing programs. Review of applications will begin on November 23, 2012 and continue until the position is filled. To apply online, see http://jobs.uwm. edu/postings/10500 A complete application will consist of a cover letter, curriculum vitae, a concise statement of research interests, and three letters of reference. Candidates may submit a statement of teaching interests. All application materials may be submitted electronically, except applicants should arrange for three letters of reference to be mailed to: Neuroscience Search Committee, Department of Psychology, UWM, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201. UWM is an Equal Opportunity Institution committed to diversity. BEST OPPORTUNITY EVER: Gundersen Lutheran seeks a full time psychologist within the Neuroscience center at our main campus in La Crosse, WI. Join an established

Pediatric Psychologist The Child Development Center at the Medical College of Wisconsin Department of Pediatrics is recruiting for a full-time associate professor to direct our ADHD Program. Qualifications include a PhD in an APA-approved clinical psychology, school psychology, or neuropsychology program with clinical experience assessing and treating school-aged children. The successful candidate for this position will be part of a multidisciplinary team that includes psychology, developmental medicine, speech/language pathology and psychiatry. Primary responsibilities include directing our Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder clinic that is designed to diagnose and treat ADHD and associated conditions. Clinical duties include completion of ADHD evaluations of children and adolescents, interface and consultation with school personnel as needed, and psychotherapy services. Experience in individual, group and family evidence-based treatment modalities will be expected. Clinical, research and collaborative opportunities will be available in the Child Development Center and other clinics throughout Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin. Applicants should send a CV and three letters of recommendation to: Lisa Meder, Practice Manager, Child Development Center, MS 744, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, P.O. Box 1997, Milwaukee, WI 532011997; E-mail: lmeder@mcw.edu.

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PsycCareers.com CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

team of four full time psychologists providing comprehensive psychological and neuropsychological services within an integrated neurosciences division. The qualified applicant must hold a doctoral degree in clinical psychology from an APAaccredited institution, be eligible to practice as a psychologist in the state OF 7ISCONSIN AND HAVE EXPERIENCE working in a healthcare setting with an emphasis in rehabilitation psychology, in addition to knowledge of pain psychology or neuropsychology. Depending on interest and specialization, the desired candidate will have opportunity to participate in numerous clinics and professional activities. Clinic service opportunities include involvement in: adult neurodevelopment disorder clinic, comprehensive childcare center, Downâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s syndrome clinic, memory disorder clinic, movement disorder clinic, pain medicine clinic, sleep disorder clinic, spine center. Opportunities for involvement in professional activities are numerous and may include neuropsychological assessment and rehabilitation of individuals with known or suspected brain impairment, psychological assessment and management of pain, assessment of psychological adjustment to disabil-

ity and health impairments, and contributions of psychological/behavioral factors in the maintenance of health and illness. A substantial portion of clinical activity is devoted to specific clinical activities related to pre-surgical psychological evaluations, assessment for appropriateness of long-term opioid therapy, and presurgical neuropsychological evaluaTION#ONTACT#ATHY-OONEYAT   OR CAMOONEY GUNDLUTH org, to find out more.

MENT 0HONE    &AX    % MAIL BLEHL affinityhealth.org Visit our website at: www.affinityhealth.org. An Equal Opportunity Employer.

CANADA

TIER II CANADA RESEARCH CHAIR IN CHILD AND YOUTH MENTAL HEALTH: The Department of Psychology, in partnership with the Department of Psychiatry CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST: Af- and Hotchkiss Brain Institute, at the lNITY-EDICAL'ROUP ANINTEGRATED University of Calgary invites applihealth care organization in East Cen- cations for a tenure-track position tral Wisconsin, is seeking a clinical and Tier II Canada Research Chair psychologist to join our psychology/ IN #HILD AND 9OUTH -ENTAL (EALTH behavioral health team, housed in Child and adolescent mental health an outpatient medical clinic, in Os- has been identified as a priority fohkosh, WI. We are seeking a gener- cus for the university. We are seeking alist psychologist in outpatient prac- an individual with a strong research tice, including psychological assess- record appropriate to a researchment and treatment of depression, oriented doctoral program and who ANXIETY BEHAVIOR PROBLEMS AND RE- has strong commitments to teaching lationship adjustment. Qualifica- and research supervision of undertions required include: a Ph.D. or graduate and graduate students. The 0SY$ WITH THREE TO lVE YEARS EX- SUCCESSFUL APPLICANT WILL BE EXPECTperience dealing with adult patients, EDTOESTABLISHASUCCESSFULANDEXTER YEARS AND OLDER INCLUDING GERI- nally funded program of research in atric assessment and treatment. For CHILDANDYOUTHMENTALHEALTH%XCELmore information, contact: Barbara lent candidates with active research ,EHL !FlNITY 0HYSICIAN 2ECRUIT- programs in any area of child and youth mental health will be considered. The position involves teaching, research, and supervision of graduate students. As a member of the clinical psychology program, a doctorate in clinical psychology, including a CPA or APA-accredited clinical internship or equivalent, is required. The successful applicant will be appointed within the faculty of arts, department of psychology with crossappointment in the department of psychiatry in the faculty of medicine and would be a full member of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute. This tenure-track appointment will made at the rank of assistant or associate professor. The Canada Research Chair program requires that the successful applicant be within 10 years of completing doctoral training. Review of applications will begin November 15, 2012 and will continue until the position is filled.3ENDLETTER of application, statement of research interests, statement of teaching philosophy and interests, curriculum vitae, representative reprints/preprints, and at least two letters of recommendation to: Dr. David Hodgins, Chair OF THE #LINICAL 0SYCHOLOGY 3EARCH Department of Psychology, UniverGo to http://my.apa.org sity of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CanADA 4. . % MAIL DHODGINS ucalgary.ca. With a population of Log in using your APA user ID over one million, Calgary is one of and password Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest head office cities and enjoys a vibrant economic cliClick on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pay 2013 Duesâ&#x20AC;? mate based on energy, high-tech, fi(Have your credit card or APA nancial services, and tourism. This Bank of America card handy) business environment provides a variety of opportunities for scholars. 3ITUATED IN THE FOOTHILLS OF THE #AScan here to access My.APA.org NADIAN 2OCKY -OUNTAINS THE CITY with your smartphone OFFERS EXCELLENT YEAR ROUND RECREational opportunities. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent

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residents will be given priority. The University of Calgary respects, appreciates and encourages diversity. TENURE-TRACK CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY ASSISTANT PROFESSORSHIP: The Department of Psychology at the University of Calgary, in collaboration with the Alberta Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital Research InstiTUTE FOR #HILD AND -ATERNAL (EALTH !#(2) THE 3OUTHERN !LBERTA #ANCER 2ESEARCH )NSTITUTE 3!#2) and the Childhood Cancer Collaborative funded by the Alberta Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital Foundation, is seeking applications for a tenure-track clinical psychology professorship at the assistant professor level in the field of health psychology with a focus on children. Candidates with active research programs in any area of child health psychology will be considered. We are seeking individuals with strong research records appropriate to a research-oriented doctoral program and who are committed to teaching and research supervision of undergraduate and graduate students. The successful applicant will BE EXPECTED TO ESTABLISH A SUCCESSFUL AND EXTERNALLY FUNDED PROGRAM of research in health psychology with children. The position involves teaching, research, and supervision of graduate students. As a member of the clinical psychology program, a doctorate in clinical psychology, including a CPA or APA-accredited clinical internship, is required. The successful applicant will be appointed within the faculty of arts, department of psychology with cross-appointment in Paediatrics, Faculty of -EDICINE 4HE POSITION OFFERS  protected research time, with a one half-course teaching requirement per academic year, for a period of FOUR YEARS !FTER THE EXPIRATION OF the four year term, teaching duties will be re-negotiated with the Dean. Review of applications will begin immediately, and end on November 30, 2012 or until the position is filled. 3ENDLETTEROFAPPLICAtion, statement of research interests, statement of teaching philosophy and interests, curriculum vitae, representative reprints/preprints, and at least two letters of recommendation to: Dr. Tavis Campbell, Chair of THE#LINICAL0SYCHOLOGY3EARCH $Epartment of Psychology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada, 4. . % MAIL TSCAMPBELL ucalgary.ca. With a population of over one million, Calgary is one of Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest head office cities and enjoys a vibrant economic climate based on energy, high-tech, financial services, and tourism. This business environment provides a variety of opportunities for scholars. 3ITUATED IN THE FOOTHILLS OF THE #ANADIAN 2OCKY -OUNTAINS THE CITY OFFERS EXCELLENT YEAR ROUND RECREational opportunities. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority. The University of Calgary respects, appreciates and encourages diversity.

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Practice

PRACTICE FOR SALE HILO, HAWAII: 19-year-old lucrative practice (grossing over $250,000 before downsizing) for sale in Hilo, HI, on the Big Island, includes two furnished offices and good will and/or postdoctoral supervision/introductions. Instantly busy at 100% capacity once you get credentialed and listed by the various insurance agencies. $195,000.00, negotiable. Need cash/ income, retiring. Contact: spollard@ hawaiiantel.net. MIDDLE TENNESSEE: Psychology practice for sale in Cooke­ ville, TN. Office is centrally located, two blocks from Cookeville Regional Hospital and one block from Tennessee Tech University. Practitioner retiring and will assist in transition for new clinician concerning all aspects of the business. Turnkey operation. Interested parties contact: Juanita J. Fussell, Ed.D. (931) 526-8000.

OPPORTUNITIES

management with succession planning: potential for expansion, eased entry to HMOs, established referral network, easy access in suburban setting. Opportunity for professional development in proximity to teaching hospitals and universities. Contact: North Shore Psychodiagnostics at (978) 352-9001, or drrfz@ verizon.net. NEVADA: Las Vegas, NV area Psychology practice for sale, with or without testing materials, biofeedback and wellness labs. Thriving, well-established, with referral base. Income $200,000–$300,000 with potential. Great community outside of Las Vegas. Near medical offices. No state taxes. Psychologists in demand. Will stay to assist transition. Partial owner financing. Contact: Dr. Rogers: (702) 563-1000; soundforhealing@aol.com.

OFFICE NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL PRAC- SPACE AVAILABLE TICE FOR SALE: An established North Shore Massachusetts practice with over 30 years experience in psychological and neuropsychological assessments is seeking a takeover to better leverage existing practice opportunities while providing current

BAYSIDE (BAY TERRACE)— QUEENS, NY: Part-time or fulltime psych office available within shared psych suite in the Bayside Medical Arts Center, directly opposite the upscale Bay Terrace Shopping Center. Furnished/

Publications AND OTHERS CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY OF DREAMS (IASD)—30TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE: June 21–25, 2013, at the beautiful beachfront Virginia Beach Resort Hotel and Conference Center on the Chesapeake Bay in Virginia. Seeking proposals related to dreams and dreaming for papers, workshops, and panels. Submissions may focus on: clinical, research, theory, cultural, arts, education, spiritual, PSI approaches. Conference attendees can earn up to 25 CE credits. IASD is approved by the APA to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. IASD maintains responsibility for the program. Deadline: December 15,

2012. Submissions: Go to: http:// asdreams.org/2013 and select the “call for presentations.”

DISSERTATION CONSULTING STATISTICAL CONSULTANT: for dissertations, grants, papers. 15 years of experience. Small jobs, big jobs, rush jobs. www. statisticalanalysisconsulting.com or peterflomstat@gmail.com. ACCURATELY CONDUCTED ANA­LYSIS: (e.g., ANOVA, T-TEST, Time-series, SEM), web survey design. Plain language explanations. Visit or call for free initial consultation. Call: (877) 437-8622; www. statisticssolutions.com.

unfurnished, newly renovated. Best location, signage/exposure, onsite valet parking, onsite super. Easy access to LIRR/bus/ LIE/Cross Island Pkwy/Clearview Expy. Ideal setting to relocate your practice or open satellite office. Call: Manage­ment Professional Enter­ prises Organization, Inc. (718) 2293598; www.2391bell.com.

practitioners. Available for Mac and Windows computers. Download a fully functional demo at www.ShrinkRapt.com. Visit us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ shrinkrapt and follow us on Twitter at ShrinkRaptTweet.

DIRECTORIES THE FAMIILY AND MARRIAGE COUNSELING DIRECTORY: Get referrals from the #1 website on Google for “Marriage Counseling.” http://family-marriage-counseling. com.

BILLING SERVICES JB BILLING SOLUTIONS, INC: We specialize in mental health billing. We will submit your claims, mail statements and deal with insurance companies so you won’t have to! We have a 98% collection rate. Call: (888) 696-8989 for more details!

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Save the Date

201 3 201 3 Annual Convention July 31–August 4, 2013 Honolulu, HI

Workshops AND CONFERENCES INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR ETHICAL PSYCHO­ LOGY AND PSYCHIATRY CONFERENCE: November 2–3, 2012, Philadelphia, PA. Alternatives to biological psychiatry—treatments that work. Speakers: Irving Kirsch, Gary Greenberg, and James Gordon. Register at www. psychintegrity.org.

JOIN US ON A CRUISE AND EARN YOUR CE CREDIT: Firstrate topics, trainers, and locations and the prices are great. CEs approved for all MH/SA professio­ nals. www.LandOrSeaCEUs.com or (877) 901-4335.

OCTOBER 2012 • MONITOR ON PSYCHOLOGY

American Psychological Association www.apa.org/convention

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Continuing EDUCATION

APA-Approved Sponsors of Continuing Education APA recognizes the responsibility of psychologists to continue their educational and professional development, building upon the foundations of a completed doctoral program in psychology. The #ONTINUING%DUCATION3PONSOR!PPROVAL3YSTEMANDTHE#ONTINUing Education Committee work together to establish standards and criteria for those organizations wishing to offer continuing education for psychologists and to maintain the highest level of quality in those programs.

For a complete list of APA-approved sponsors, a calendar of upcoming CE activities, and information about becoming an approved sponsor, go to http://www.apa.org/ EDSPONSORINDEXASPXor CALL  EXT American Psychological Association 3PONSOR!PPROVAL3YSTEM &IRST3TREET .% 7ASHINGTON $# 

Feel the Power of Advertising Monitor on Psychology Expand your visibility No matter what your budget is, the Monitor on Psychology can afford you the opportunity to expand and promote your business or services. There are a number of advertising options in the print and online versions of the Monitor that can work for you. We have two types of print ads and four web ad sizes available. Let us build a marketing plan for you. For more informations, contact James Boston at (202) 336-5565, or e-mail: jboston@apa.org

For Future Planning

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APA HANDBOOK OF BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS Volume 1. Methods and Principles Volume 2. Translating Principles into Practice Editor-in-Chief Gregory J. Madden

Behavior analysis emerged from the nonhuman laboratories of B. F. Skinner, Fred Keller, Nate Schoenfeld, Murray Sidman, James Dinsmoor, Richard Herrnstein, Nate Azrin, and others who pioneered experimental preparations designed to do one thing–find orderly relations between environment and behavior. Over the last 50 years the field of behavior analysis has grown substantially both in the number of practicing behavior analysts and the range of behavior to which behavioral principles have been applied. Today the laboratory study of basic principles of behavior continues to expand our understanding of behavior and to inform the treatment of disorders ranging from autism to substance abuse. The present volumes continue this inductive translational approach to the science of behavior analysis by providing overview and in-depth chapters spanning the breadth of behavior analysis. Volume 1 provides comprehensive coverage of the logic, clinical utility, and methods of single-case research designs. Chapters walk the reader through the design, data collection, and data analysis phases and are appropriate for students, researchers, and clinicians concerned with best practice. Volume 1 also provides an overview of the experimental analysis of behavior, and chapters reviewing some of the most important areas of contemporary laboratory research in behavior analysis. Topics covered include memory, attention, choice, behavioral neuroscience, and behavioral pharmacology. Volume 2 includes 10 chapters illustrating how principles of behavior discovered in basic-science laboratories have provided insights on socially important human behavior ranging from the complex discriminations that underlie human language to disorders treated by clinical psychologists. The second section of Volume 2 includes 12 chapters, each devoted to a particular behavioral/developmental disorder (e.g., behavioral treatments of ADHD, autism) or to behavior of societal importance (e.g., effective college teaching, effective treatment of substance abuse). Each of these chapters provides a review of what works and where additional research is needed. Series: APA Handbooks in Psychology™. 2013. 1,412 pages. 2-Volume Set. List: $395.00 | APA Member/Affiliate: $195.00 | ISBN 978-1-4338-1111-1 | Item # 4311509 For the complete Table of Contents, including chapter titles and authors, please visit the book’s page: www.apa.org/pubs/books/4311509

Contents

Volume 1: Methods and Principles | I. Overview | II. Single-Case Research Designs | III. The Experimental Analysis of Behavior | 6œÕ“iÊÓ\Ê/À>˜Ã>̈˜}Ê*Àˆ˜Vˆ«iÃʘ̜Ê*À>V̈Vi | I. Translational Research in Behavior Analysis | II. Applied/Clinical Issues

ALSO OF INTEREST

Advanced Methods for Conducting Online Behavioral Research

Edited by Samuel D. Gosling and John A. Johnson 2010. 286 pages. Hardcover. List: $69.95 | APA Member/Affiliate: $49.95 ISBN 978-1-4338-0695-7 | Item # 4311014

Behavioral Mechanisms and Psychopathology

Advancing the Explanation of Its Nature, Cause, and Treatment Edited by Kurt Salzinger and Mark R. Serper 2009. 240 pages. Hardcover.

List: $49.95 | APA Member/Affiliate: $39.95 ISBN 978-1-4338-0452-6 | Item # 4317186

Impulsivity

The Behavioral and Neurological Science of Discounting Edited by Gregory J. Madden and Warren K. Bickel 2010. 453 pages. Hardcover. List: $49.95 | APA Member/Affiliate: $39.95 ISBN 978-1-4338-0477-9 | Item # 4318058 Credit: 9

APA BOOKS ORDERING INFORMATION: nää‡ÎÇ{‡ÓÇÓ£ÊÊUÊÊwww.apa.org/pubs/books ˜Ê7>ň˜}̜˜]Ê

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AD2230


APA ADDICTION SYNDROME HANDBOOK

Volume 1: Foundations, Influences, and Expressions of Addiction Volume 2: Recovery, Prevention, and Other Issues Edited by Howard J. Shaffer This two-volume handbook provides a comprehensive review of addiction. Volume 1 has an introduction and three sections focusing on the background and history of addiction, the distal and proximal influences on addiction, and the expressions of addiction; the latter includes chapter discussions about the universal and unique consequences of addiction. Volume 2 also has three major sections. These sections examine the many aspects associated with recovery from addiction, the prevention of addiction, and other essential issues commonly associated with addiction, such as technology, driving under the influence, and homelessness. There is also a Foreword in Volume 1 and an Epilogue in Volume 2 that provide insight and perspective about the addiction syndrome and the place of this handbook within the development of a science of addiction. Editor-in-chief Howard J. Shaffer asked contributors to consider their areas of interest with respect to the addiction syndrome model. In addition, to advance the conceptual framework that guides addiction research and treatment, contributors were asked to provide evidence to support or refute the addiction syndrome model. Shaffer hopes this approach will stimulate an enthusiastic dialogue that can advance the field by revising and improving the etiological models that provide the guiding wisdom about addiction and its causes and consequences. Series: APA Handbooks in Psychology™. 2012. 948 pages. Two-Volume Set. List: $395.00 | APA Member/Affiliate: $195.00 | ISBN 978-1-4338-1103-6 | Item # 4311507 Please visit us online at http://www.apa.org/pubs/books/4311507.aspxÊvœÀÊ̅iÊi˜ÌˆÀiÊ/>LiʜvÊ œ˜Ìi˜ÌÃÊ>˜`ÊVœ˜ÌÀˆLÕ̜ÀʏˆÃÌ

CONTENTS

6œÕ“iÊ£°ÊœÕ˜`>̈œ˜Ã]ʘyÕi˜ViÃ]Ê>˜`Ê Ý«ÀiÃȜ˜ÃʜvÊ``ˆV̈œ˜ | Part I. Background and History of Addiction | Part II. Distal and Proximal Influences on Addiction | Part III. Expressions of Addiction | Volume 2. Recovery, Prevention, and Other Issues | Part I. Recovering From the Addiction Syndrome | Part II. Prevention of Addiction | Part III. Other Issues

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Addictive Behaviors

New Readings on Etiology, Prevention, and Treatment Edited by G. Alan Marlatt and Katie Witkiewitz 2009. 778 pages. Paperback. List: $49.95 | APA Member/Affiliate: $39.95 ISBN 978-1-4338-0402-1 | Item # 4317166 Credit: 8

Handbook of Drug Use Etiology

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Monitor on psychology octomber 2012