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About the Newsletter

DID YOU KNOW? Combined number of menʼs and womenʼs basketball games on national television during the coming season. Thatʼs 23 menʼs games on the Big Ten Network or an ESPN-related channel and nine games featuring the Lady Lions. Many more games will be carried on bigtennetwork.com.

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Twelve members of the menʼs gymnastics team—thatʼs 60 percent of the squad—were honored as All-America Scholar Athletes by the College Gymnastics Association.

Volume 31, No. 1 Fall 2010 U.Ed. ICA-11-30

— Inside this Issue —

NLC Notebook:........................................................3

STEP Questions-Answers: Success, Seat Selections ............4-5 In-Depth Story: Goalkeepers Earn Their Reputation ...............6-7

Men’s Basketball: Seniors Anticipate Season ......................8 Women’s Basketball: Oh Captain, Our Captain ...................9

Photos: Interaction, Fun at Endowment Dinner ...................10-11

The Nittany Lion Club Newsletter is a quarterly publication sent to all Nittany Lion Club members. The magazine is published by the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics.

Nittany Lion Club Web Site www.nittanylionclub.com

Official Web Site of Penn State Intercollegiate Athletics www.gopsusports.com

Executive Editors

Greg Myford, John Nitardy

SAAB Story Student-Athletes Set Standard ...........................12

Giving: University’s Largest-Ever Gift a Strong Start ..............14-15

Thank-A-Thon: Members, Student-Athletes Enjoy Event .............16

Broadcasting Boost: Big Gift in Honor of Steve Jones............18 DEPARTMENTS Recent Gift List, 13 Student-Athlete Snapshots, 18

Assistant Editors

Nikki Potoczny, Mike Milliron

Contributors

Penn State Athletic Communications, Steve Sampsell

Photographers

Penn State Athletic Communications, Steve Manuel, Mark Selders

Printing

Spectrum Printing Inc., East Petersburg, Pa.

ON THE COVER

Director of Athletics Tim Curley with (left to right) record-setting donors Kim and Terry Pegula and Penn State President Graham Spanier after the announcement of the Pegulas’s gift. See story, Pages 14-15.

PENN STATE ATHLETICS Mission Statement

Consistent with the Universityʼs mission, the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics offers students exemplary programs that develop scholarship, sportsmanship and leadership within the educational and social environments of the Pennsylvania State University.

— Contact Us — Phone: 1-800-NITTANY (648-8269) / E-mail: nittanylionclub@athletics.psu.edu The Nittany Lion Club, comprised of Penn State alumni and friends of the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics, was established in 1959 to create greater interest in and financial support of Penn State varsity athletics. Members of the Nittany Lion Club make possible grant-in-aid support for more than 800 student-athletes each academic year and provide operational support for the Universityʼs entire 29sport intercollegiate athletics program.

NLC Staff Profile Carol continued her longtime deMail: 157 Bryce Jordan Center, University Park, PA 16802 velopment work Michelle Davidson, by joining the Bob White, Ken Cutler, Nittany Lion NLC Stewardship NLC Director of Marketing/ NLC Director Club staff in and Events Coordinator, Operations-Suites and Club of Development 2005. Her prioyd3@psu.edu Seats, blw6@psu.edu for Athletics, mary duties enkmc2@psu.edu compass direct Carol Spangler staff support for Janine Hawk, John Nitardy, R.J. Gimbl, NLC Development Assistant, Ken Cutler, NLC director of developNLC Director of Major Gifts NLC Major Gifts Officer, ment for athletics, and she assists jkh6@psu.edu and Annual Giving rjg20@psu.edu with a variety of NLC projects. jdn13@psu.edu Nikki Potoczny, NLC Assistant Director, nlw10@psu.edu

Casey Keiber, NLC Major Gifts Officer, cmk184@psu.edu

Mike Milliron, NLC Varsity ‘S’ and Sport-Restricted Giving Coordinator, jm540@psu.edu

For all the latest Penn State sports news ...

Staff Assistants Valerie Cingle, vjc4@psu.edu Jennifer DeAngelo, jxk298@psu.edu Stephanie Gordon, slh122@psu.edu Barbra Marsden, blm18@psu.edu Kristin McKee, kmm21@psu.edu Carol Spangler, cmh7@psu.edu Sharon Ries, sxr33@psu.edu Robin Yeaney, rly2@psu.edu

www.GoPSUsports.com

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Success with Honor


Fall moves toward winter with lots of optimism NLC NOTEBOOK

Itʼs late fall, November, and that means the start of basketball season as well as playoff and tournament action in other sports.

Since our last issue ...

With that timing in mind, Penn State Intercollegiate Athletics has plenty of room for optimism. We have several fall sports teams in contention for Big Ten Conference and national championships. We also have numerous teams ready to start their seasons.

For the team that supports the teams— thatʼs you, our Nittany Lion Club members—this month also marks the start of the next part of our Seat Transfer and Equity Program (STEP).

Members of the men’s basketball team come together at the end of an early With current NLC members having deseason practice at the Bryce Jordan Center. (Photo by Mark Selders) clared their intentions for 2011, some members may soon begin to select their basketball previews and information on other teams, seat locations inside Beaver Stadium for the 2011 we also share a look at the many charitable and offseason. Itʼs an exciting time, with that process outthe-field work coordinated by the Student-Athlete Adlined on the next two pages of the Newsletter. visory Board.

In addition, this issue includes more information on the largest private gift ever to Penn State, along with photos from our Endowment Dinner and the annual Thank-a-Thon.

We also have a separate story about a significant gift made and named for alumnus and longtime Penn State play-by-play voice Steve Jones. Along with

We hope you enjoy the issue, and continue to support the NLC and our Penn State student-athletes and teams as you have in the past.

Itʼs a great time of year! We are .... Penn State! — John Nitardy, NLC Director of Major Gifts and Annual Giving

Spanier to chair BCS committee Penn State President Graham Spanier was named chairman of the 12-member Bowl Championship Series (BCS) Presidential Oversight Committee.

“The BCS system enjoys strong support from the Presidential Oversight Committee, and Dr. Spanier is the perfect person to lead the committee for the next term,” said BCS executive director Bill Hancock. “He knows that college football is thriving because it has the best season anywhere, delivers the national championship game and preserves the appeal and pageantry of the bowl system.” The Presidential Oversight Committee manages the

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State Successes

BCS with particular focus on policy, format, revenue distribution and contractual obligations.

“I am honored by my presidential colleagues to be selected to lead the governance activities of one of the great modern traditions in intercollegiate athletics,” said Spanier. “The BCS will endeavor to serve the best interests of our universities, our student-athletes and the many alumni and fans who follow collegiate football.”

Spanier is a founding member of the BCS Oversight Board, where he has represented the Big Ten since its inception. He is a former chair of the NCAA Division I Board of Directors.

 Five Penn State coaches who consistently produce teams who beat the average Division I Academic Progress Report score for their respective sport were noted in an NCAA announcement. They were: Robbie Wine (baseball), Ed DeChellis (menʼs basketball), Coquese Washington (womenʼs basketball), Joe Paterno (football) and Beth Alford-Sullivan (womenʼs indoor and outdoor track and field). The coaches had teams that earned an APR score above the Division I APR score for their respective sport a combined 28 of a possible 32 times since the NCAA began compiling data in 2003-04.

 Field hockey coach Char Morrett recorded her 400th career victory with the teamʼs 4-0 decision over Temple at home on Sep. 18. Sheʼs only the fourth coach in NCAA history with 400 victories. “To me it is something I am very proud of, of course,” she said. “I think that it speaks volumes of the players that I have had the opportunity to coach and the coaching staff that has always supported me.”  Senior Treavor Gelsinger (Shady Grove, Pa.) scored an overtime goal to give the Nittany Lions a 2-1 menʼs soccer victory over Ohio State on Senior Day (Oct. 23), with dozens of alumni in attendance as part of a 100th anniversary celebration.

 Sandy Meyer, assistant director of the Morgan Academic Support Center for Student Athletes, recently received the Lan Hewlett Award from the National Association of Academic Advisors for Athletics. The award was presented to Meyer at the N4Aʼs annual convention.

www.nittanylionclub.com / NLC NEWSLETTER 3


STEP Q&A: After strong response, donations, seats next MEMBERSHIP MATTERS

With full implementation of the Seat Transfer and Equity Program at Beaver Stadium just nine months away—the program will be implemented for the season that begins Sept. 3, 2011—just a few more steps remain for Nittany Lion Club members to ensure their intentions are met and that things move smoothly.

Some common questions follow, with answers to help NLC members make the process most efficient. Most importantly, the deadline for 2011 NLC donations and renewals is Feb. 1, 2011. And keep in mind that Nittany Lion Club donations are non-refundable. As always, anyone with questions may call 1-800NITTANY (648-8269) or visit the STEP website.

Passionate Penn State fans renewed their Nittany Lion Club memberships at a higher than 95 percent rate for 2010, and they have responded strongly to the Seat Transfer and Equity Program that will be implemented for 2011. (Photo by Mark Selders)

More information online www.GoPSUsports.com/step

What do I do if Iʼm a displaced ticket holder who has indicated that I want to retain my seating rights inside the stadium? If your intention is to retain, your minimum donation is based on the blue zone per-seat donation. If (after you lock in for 2011) your seat is in a zone higher than blue, you will be required to donate the difference at that time.

FOR EXAMPLE: If John Smith has two displaced tickets because of the movement of the student section, he still must make the minimum donation for tickets and parking by Feb. 1, 2011. If he were to secure red or black zone seating during the seat selection process that will take place Jan. 5-26, 2011, he would be required to pay the donation difference at that time.

Whatʼs next if I plan to retain my tickets? By retaining you have elected to stay in your exact 2010 seat location in 2011. Therefore, you can calculate your exact minimum donation needed for tickets and parking in 2011. A calculator may be found at www.GoPSUsports.com/step-calculator What if my intentions are to upgrade for 2011? If you plan to upgrade, your minimum donation for 2011 is based on your 2010 ticket location. If you select a seat in a higher-priced zone during the seat selection process, you will be required to donate the difference at that time. FOR EXAMPLE: Sue Smith has four tickets in the red zone in 2010

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and intends to upgrade to the black zone. She needs to make a minimum donation based on the red zone by Feb. 1, 2011. Then, after spring seat selection, if she secures her seats in the black zone, she will be required to donate the difference at that time. What if my intentions are to downgrade for 2011? If thatʼs the case, your donation will be based on the blue zone per-seat minimum. If (after you lock in for 2011) your seat is in a zone higher than blue, you will be required to donate the difference at that time.

No matter what my intention or seating zone location for 2011, how do I calculate my 2011 donation? First, check the Beaver Stadium seating chart and the NLC benefits chart online that shows per-seat donation levels. A calculator may be found at www.GoPSUsports.com/step

Key Dates

Jan. 5-26, 2011

Displaced season ticket

holders will select new seating locations for 2011.

Feb. 1, 2011

2011 NLC donation deadline; donation amounts to reflect

STEP participation.

March 2011 to May 2011

2011 NLC members will

participate in seat selection process based

upon registered seat intentions and 2010 NLC point order.

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online. Donations may then be made by mail or at www.nittanylionclub.com. To speak to a member of the Nittany Lion Club staff or someone from the Intercollegiate Athletics customer relations staff, you may call 1-800-NITTANY (648-8269).

MEMBERSHIP MATTERS

Will Intercollegiate Athletics be assigning my seats for 2011 or will I have input? The STEP program provides some first-ever flexibility for NLC members who hold season tickets. That includes a customercontrolled, online ticket process that will allow NLC members to select their own seats based on NLC points. The Athletic Ticket Office will not make those selections.

“Itʼs really one of the more exciting portions of STEP,” said Associate Director of Athletics Greg Myford. “Itʼs a response to what our membership wants and utilizing technology for their benefit. Once everyone has declared their intentions, weʼll notify members who may then go online and pick their seats in their new giving level. Theyʼll do so in order based on Nittany Lion Club points. Plus, the process will show them where the seats are and even a view of Beaver Stadium from those seats.”

For a tutorial about the system visit http://psu.io-media.com. (Actual available seats will not be reflected, but the tutorial will provide a sample of the process.)

If I choose to select a new seat in the spring, do I still have to give a minimum gift by Feb. 1? Yes, Nittany Lion Club members must make a donation by the Feb. 1 deadline to move forward with any part of the process.

Although seat locations will not change for ticket holders until 2011, have there already been

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STEP Intentions Results Retain............68% Upgrade .........21% Downgrade .......4% Waive..............7% Percentages based on submitted ticket intentions, not NLC accounts.

changes or an impact because of STEP? Yes, with revenue generated from the transfer portion of the program last spring and summer some changes/upgrades have already been made at Beaver Stadium. Fans this fall have probably noticed additional steps on either side of the north end zone upper deck to improve egress to that section of the stadium. Once the program gets fully implemented, Intercollegiate Athletics can generate an additional $3 to $5 million annually, and we have several projects that we hope can move forward, including many in Beaver Stadium, if we reach those levels.

NLC Membership Deadline Feb. 1, 2011 Members must make their annual donations by Feb. 1, 2011, in order for ticketing and parking privileges to be credited to their accounts. Questions? Call 1-800-NITTANY (648-8269)

www.nittanylionclub.com / NLC NEWSLETTER 5


IN-DEPTH STORY

Keepers: Just a Little Crazy

Field hockey goalkeeper Ayla Halus battles to stop an opponent from scoring during a match earlier this season. (Photo by Mark Selders)

Coaches, student-athletes agree it takes a special mentality on last line of defense

By the time Warren Gross started playing youth soccer, he was already a proven goalkeeper. Or at least a keeper by necessity.

As the youngest of three boys, he was regularly at his older brothersʼ soccer practices. “My mom was coaching and she brought me along rather than leave me with a babysitter,” Gross says. “So, theyʼd stick me in goal so theyʼd know where I was.”

Heʼs been there ever since, learning—in part as a means of survival— how to stop soccer balls that come whizzing directly at him.

“My brother Ryan was three or four years older, so I was in net against him and his teammates,” Gross says. “At some point, I guess I realized that if I was going to be back there I might as well get good at it.” For Gross (Sarasota Springs, N.Y.) and other goalkeepers at Penn State, the job they must do differs distinctly from that of all their teammates. While everyone else wants to score, keepers hope to erect a permanent stop sign—in the form of their actions and bodies—in front of the goal.

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To do that takes a special mentality. Itʼs what makes keepers different. And everyone knows it.

“I would say goalies are people that probably their parents wanted to put in a cage when they were little,” field hockey coach Char Morett says. “Theyʼre definitely a different breed. You have to be special to want to put all that smelly stuff on day after day, and you have to have a different mentality because youʼre the last line of defense.”

Among fall sports teams at Penn State, the goalkeepers include:  Gross, a redshirt junior (menʼs soccer);  Ayla Halus (Hershey, Pa.), a redshirt sophomore (field hockey); and  Krissy Tribbett (Centennial, Colo.), a redshirt sophomore (womenʼs soccer).

Each has shone at times during the season. In fact, Halus was named Big Ten Defensive Player of the Week three times through mid-October, becoming only the third field hockey player in school history to earn the conferenceʼs weekly award three times in the same season.

Each has also given up goals during the season. Thatʼs one of many things that just happen to come with the job.

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IN-DEPTH STORY

“You learn pretty quickly that thereʼs a lot that comes with playing back there,” says Tribbett, who started her career as a field player and was later moved back into goal when a coach thought her athleticism, basketball experience, hand-eye coordination and height would help her thrive as a keeper. “Along with being able to shake things off if thereʼs a goal, you have to communicate,” Tribbett says. “Plus, you have to be willing to take anything. You get kicked, punched, stepped on—and you have to keep playing.”

Thatʼs why coaches look for athleticism as well as mental toughness from their keepers. While physical attributes might be easy to pinpoint, a student-athleteʼs mental makeup cannot be determined with any on-field test. Still, coaches believe standout keepers can be easy to spot.

there are some stereotypes that just happen to ring true. While neither of the soccer keepers fits the mold as either big or overweight (a misconception Tribbett especially resents when she first meets people who expect a “heavier” female keeper), they do admit some goalkeepers are at least unique. “Everybodyʼs a little off, right?” Tribbett asks. “Maybe more goalies just happen to be that way.” “Plus, weʼre obviously the normal keepers,” Gross adds with a laugh.

“It takes a courageous person to deal with balls struck at you from three yards away, or to plunge into a pile of 10 players confident knowing that you’re going to get that ball. ... When you find one that does all that, it’s a pretty special combination and it means a lot for a team.” — Erica Walsh

“If someone has that ʻit,ʼ itʼs pretty easy to see,” says menʼs soccer coach Bob Warming, himself a former keeper. “If they have that presence, you know.”

By definition or, more appropriately by position, Warming believes goalies must be different from other players on the field.

“They see the game differently—they have to,” Warming says. “Theyʼre the only players on the team where everything unfolds in front of them. They just see the game in a totally different way.” Most keepers also possess a few idiosyncrasies or superstitions. At the least, theyʼre somehow distinctive and usually strongly self-motivated. Coaches especially like those traits.

Whether different or normal, unique or special, keepers almost always hold a special place in the hearts of their coaches. Coaches know that those playing back there do possess some special skills and traits that can make a team better in a heartbeat.

“Thereʼs no position on the field that can elevate a team like a goalkeeper,” Warming says. “Personality wise, Iʼve had them run the gamut—from guys who maybe did not have all the oars in the water to others who were worried about every little thing. And neither one of those is better than the other. If you have a good keeper, you make it work. And they help make the whole team work.”

Plus, while keepers put pressure on themselves as the last line of defense, and coaches utter those words as well, those same coaches know itʼs ultimately a team game.

“The game is never won or lost by goaltending, I donʼt believe that for a second,” Morett says. “But, you have to have a goalkeeper whoʼs a great communicator and has the physical skills to keep the ball out. We want somebody whoʼs aggressive and fearless. Theyʼve got to have confidence and just rule their circle.”

“It takes a courageous person to deal with balls struck at you from three yards away, or to plunge into a pile of 10 players confident knowing that youʼre going to get that ball. We need that from our keeper,” says womenʼs soccer coach Erica Walsh. “At the same time, we need them to communicate and be leaders. When you find one that does all that, itʼs a pretty special combination and it means a lot for a team.”

Plus, goalkeeping can be a lonely job. In team games, goals against and saves become highly personal statistics pretty quickly—and thatʼs when the action comes to your end of the field. When itʼs at the other end, thereʼs the keeper and the net and thatʼs it. So keepers have to work to remain engaged in the action at all times, even when thereʼs nothing happening directly in front of them. “Youʼre back there talking to your defense, keeping things organized and trying to keep everyone on the same page,” Gross says. “Even if thereʼs not something at your end, thereʼs usually a lot happening and you have to be aware of it—and what could happen because of it.”

Misconceptions exist about goalies (most notably about their size, according to Gross and Tribbett), but

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Warren Gross grabs a ball during a game this season against Binghamton. (Photo by Mark Selders)

www.nittanylionclub.com / NLC NEWSLETTER 7


Seniors acknowledge urgency, embrace their roles MEN’S BASKETBALL

For the seniors on the menʼs basketball team, the start of another season—their last season as Nittany Lions—means something special.

SCHEDULE

After enjoying highs and enduring lows during their careers, they also know a razor-thin line exists that defines the difference between wins and losses. They hope to lead the team on the positive side of that line repeatedly this season. “You canʼt get too high and you canʼt get too low, because itʼs a long season,” said guard David Jackson (Farrell, Pa.). “Plus, the difference between winning and losing can be the bounce of a ball, a rebound here or there, just any little thing. “As seniors, as leaders, we have to help keep people focused on those things and the season itself.”

Along with all-Big Ten Conference guard Talor Battle (Albany, N.Y.), the senior class includes: Andrew Jones grabs a rebound against Michigan. (Photo by Mark Selders) Jeff Brooks (Louisville, Ky.); “Itʼs all gone by rapidly,” Brooks said “More Jackson; Andrew Jones (Philadelphia); and than quick, thatʼs for sure. It seems like one Steve Kirkpatrick (Carlisle, Pa.). day youʼre a freshman and the next day Itʼs the first time the Nittany Lions have ever returned four senior starters under coach Ed DeChellis. Overall, the seniors have played in 420 games, making 298 starts during their careers. Three seniors—Battle, Jackson and Jones— have produced more than 500 career points, while Brooks has scored 449.

Standout Battle often gets much of the attention, but the others shoulder important roles, on and off the court, for the team.

“We can talk all we want, but we have to lead by our actions,” Jackson said. “Your actions have to line up with what you say.” Typically Battle and Jackson serve as the teamʼs more vocal leaders, although any member of the senior class can—and has— pulled aside a teammate to offer advice, encouragement or some tough love.

As the most experienced players on the team, they have high hopes for this season but they know time is running out as well.

youʼre getting ready for your senior year.”

Jones believes the final season makes everything a bit more important. “We all know that after this there is no next year,” Jones said. “That really amplifies things.”

While each member of the senior class can point to personal improvement during their careers, they remain focused on team goals this season. Sure, theyʼre more basketball savvy than they were when they first stepped on campus, and theyʼre stronger physically—but that all means little without some team success.

They also know their own strengths and weaknesses. Thatʼs why Brooks knows heʼs not a vocal leader, not the type to stand up and address the entire team with a message. But heʼs quite comfortable sharing his experiences with teammates in one-on-one situations.

“Hey, I was one of those guys who when I was younger might not have been the most disci-

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Date ......................Opponent......................Time Nov. 12 ..........................LEHIGH........................7:30 p.m. Nov. 16 .....................ST. JOSEPH’S...................7:30 p.m. Nov. 19 ........................FAIRFIELD......................7:30 p.m. Nov. 22 ............................CCSU ..............................7 p.m. Nov. 26......................at Mississippi............................TBA Nov. 28 .........................FURMAN.......................3:30 p.m. *Dec. 1 .......................MARYLAND ....................9:15 p.m. Dec. 4 .........................DUQUESNE..........................6 p.m. Dec. 7 ..................MOUNT ST. MARY’S..............7:30 p.m. Dec. 12 ....................at Virginia Tech ..........................TBA Dec. 21 ...........................MAINE .............................5 p.m. Dec. 27.........................at Indiana ......................6:30 p.m. Jan. 2..........................at Michigan..........................4 p.m. Jan. 5 ............................PURDUE .......................6:30 p.m. Jan. 8 .....................MICHIGAN STATE.....................1 p.m. Jan. 11..........................ILLINOIS............................9 p.m. Jan. 15.......................at Ohio State....................5:30 p.m. Jan. 19.........................at Purdue......................8:30 p.m. Jan. 26 ............................IOWA .........................6:30 p.m. Jan. 29 .......................WISCONSIN .........................4 p.m. Feb. 1............................at Illinois............................9 p.m. Feb. 6 ..........................MICHIGAN ..............................TBA Feb. 10 ...................at Michigan State .....................7 p.m. Feb. 13...................NORTHWESTERN................3:30 p.m. Feb. 17 .......................MINNESOTA .........................7 p.m. Feb. 20.......................at Wisconsin.........................6 p.m. Feb. 24 ....................at Northwestern ......................9 p.m. March 1......................OHIO STATE .........................9 p.m. March 6 .....................at Minnesota ............................TBA March 3-6.............Big Ten Tournament.......................TBA *-ACC/Big Ten Challenge

plined either, so it would be wrong for me to tell other guys about that,” Brooks said. “But, Iʼve learned a lot through the years from older guys like Danny Morrissey about how to prepare, how to take care of yourself—and thatʼs stuff I can share.” In fact, that unified approach by the senior class provides a perfect example of the teamwork the squad needs.

Opponents will work to stop Battle in every game this season, so any success will come from a balanced attack—with every player realizing that their positive contributions matter, no matter how big or small they might seem to others. “My time here has just flown by. Itʼs really been a blur if you take time to think about it,” Jackson said. “Weʼve all had highs and lows. The team has had them, too. We just want to work together and go out on a high note.”

As a testament to their leadership, the seniors also embrace the insights and personalities of the underclassmen. The seniors want to set a tone, but theyʼre not set on being iron-fisted rulers. They want to be facilitators, leaders that help the Nittany Lions back to consistent success.

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WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Team captain Nickson already a leader for Lady Lions After sitting out last season, Mia Nickson anxiously awaits her first game as a Lady Lion. “I’m not here to look nice in the uniform,” she said. (Photo by Mark Selders)

She has never played a game for the Lady Lions and she might not start this season, but Mia Nickson has exactly what the womenʼs basketball team needs as one of its two team captains this season.

“Consistency,” said coach Coquese Washington. “Consistency is the biggest thing. You can count on Mia to do the right thing at the right time all the time.” Nickson will serve as a co-captain with Julia Trogele (Devon, Pa.).

After starting her career at Boston College, Nickson (Ashburn, Va.) transferred to Penn State and sat out last season. She wanted to find a program where she could make a bigger contribution and had met Washington when she was still an assistant at Notre Dame. In addition, Nicksonʼs high school coach knew the Penn State assistant coaches well, and thought the school could be a good fit. After practicing, watching from the sideline and working in the classroom last season, Nickson is ready to play. More than ready, in fact.

“After you sit a year, you really realize what youʼre missing and you want to get back out there,” Nickson said. But, as an obvious example of her leadership, Nickson believes she has improved as a player because of watching—and she knows how to keep things in perspective.

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“One of the big things I learned last year was the importance of patience, going about what you need on the court calmly,” she said.

The toughest part of watching all last season was fighting the urge to get involved. “Iʼm not big, but I like physical play,” she said. “There were times last year when we couldʼve used another body, thatʼs all.”

By not playing, Nickson got acclimated to Penn State and found her decision to move to Happy Valley was right on every level. A selfdescribed “Army brat” and “jokester,” sheʼs right at home on campus and as the sometimes-silly soul of the Lady Lions. She also appreciates the emphasis on student-athletes at Penn State. “The coaches care about you academically, not just if youʼre eligible,” she said. “Thatʼs what they instill.” When it comes to Nickson, itʼs athletics, academics and more that make an impression.

“She has a caring spirit and she looks out for her teammates,” Washington said. “I just think she is somebody that they look up to and follow her lead in all areas.” Nickson always brings a sense of optimism to the court. She also brings a sense of humor, or at least an appropriately lighthearted approach. She was never a captain in high school, but she seems to know just when to do what for the benefit of the squad. That might be fighting for a rebound with

SCHEDULE Date ......................Opponent......................Time Nov. 12 .........................at Dayton ...........................7 p.m. Nov. 14 ...........................RIDER..............................2 p.m. Nov. 18 ........................at Oakland......................6:30 p.m. Nov. 21..................SOUTH CAROLINA ...............3:30 p.m. @Nov. 25..........................Utah...................................TBA @Nov. 26 ............Wisconsin-Green Bay......................TBA @Nov. 27.......................Hartford ................................TBA *Dec. 2...................at Boston College .....................7 p.m. #Dec. 5 ......................TEXAS TECH.........................2 p.m. Dec. 8..............................ARMY.........................6:30 p.m. Dec. 12 ...........................MAINE ...............................Noon Dec. 19 .......................DELAWARE..........................2 p.m. Dec. 21 ..........................DREXEL .......................7:30 p.m. Dec. 28........................BUCKNELL ..........................7 p.m. Dec. 30 ............................IOWA ..............................7 p.m. Jan. 2.........................at Wisconsin.........................2 p.m. Jan. 6 ......................at Northwestern .................8:30 p.m. Jan. 13 .......................MINNESOTA .........................7 p.m. Jan. 16..........................ILLINOIS............................4 p.m. Jan. 20 .........................at Purdue ...........................7 p.m. Jan. 23 ..........................INDIANA ............................2 p.m. Jan. 27..........................at Illinois............................8 p.m. Jan. 30 .......................OHIO STATE .........................2 p.m. Feb. 3..........................at Michigan..........................7 p.m. Feb. 6 .............................at Iowa .............................3 p.m. Feb. 10 ...................MICHIGAN STATE.....................7 p.m. Feb. 13 .........................at Indiana ....................12:30 p.m. Feb. 17.......................at Ohio State.........................7 p.m. Feb. 24 ..........................PURDUE ............................7 p.m. WBCA Pink Zone Feb. 27...................NORTHWESTERN.......................Noon March 10-13.........Big Ten Tournament.......................TBA

every ounce of energy (which always happens) or diving out of bounds to save a ball and adding an extra flourish just to make people smile. “Thatʼs just me,” she said.

www.nittanylionclub.com / NLC NEWSLETTER 9


Endowme

Successful session allows coaches, student-athletes to me

Forever Blue & White donors met with coaches and student-athletes during the annual event at the Penn Stater Conference Center Hotel. (Photos by Mark Selders)

Erin Thomas and Tom Derr

Sarah Igler, Peg Stine, Brittany Chamberlin, Theresa Zichelli and Kay Kustanbauter.

Standing: Jaclyn Hakes, Amy Lewis, Jermaine Marshall, Jeff Brooks, Ben Rivera, Owen Dawson. Seated: M

Eleanor Weirman, Bob Weirman and Jocelyn Witmer

Brooklyne Ridder, Jeff Tambroni, Susan Mathias, Jim Mathias, Matthew Mackrides and Eric David Heiser

10 NLC NEWSLETTER /www.nittanylionclub.com

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ent Dinner

eet and thank alumni and friends who support programs

Theresa Zichelli

arie Knecht, Bill Knecht, Dave Noss, Marge Delozier-Noss.

Guanhaua Chen and Harry Kauffman

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Aleks Ochocki

Ken Guise, Cerena Guise and Juanita Guise

Ira Stolzer

Robin Petrini

Danielle Hover, Linda Forrest and Keith Forrest

www.nittanylionclub.com / NLC NEWSLETTER 11


SAAB programs provide ample interaction, opportunity INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS

“Game night” has more than one meaning for many Penn State student-athletes.

While it might mean the time when they compete with teammates in their respective sport, it also means an opportunity for outreach and a chance to serve others. Specifically, Game Night at The Village, when student-athletes visit The Village at Penn State for a night of board games and group activities, is one of many activities conducted by the Student-Athlete Advisory Board (SAAB).

With representatives from every varsity team, SAAB conducts a variety of service programs on and off campus each year. A sampling of activities conducted through the Heart of the Lion Community Service Program includes:  Lunch with the Lions, an on-cam- Activities such as reading programs—with student-athletes reading to area elementary school children—have been a big part pus meal when student-athletes dine of outreach efforts conducted by the Student-Athlete Advisory Board for years. with students with special needs; “I love it. I love being exThey also conducted a vol Penn Pal Program, when student-athtremely busy,” she said. “If I leyball tournament in OctoDonations from NLC members letes correspond on a monthly basis with elehad more free time, it ber, with funds from that support the Morgan Academic mentary school students from the region; and would just go to waste.” going to THON. Support Center for Student-Ath Roar for Reading, when student-athletes letes, which assists members visit elementary schools and read books. For Ostman, and many “Student-athletes get inSAAB also strongly supports the Penn State Dance Marathon (THON), raising money through an on-campus tailgate at the HUBRobeson Center, a volleyball tournament and other activities. The group hopes to raise $100,000 for THON this year.

“Itʼs an ambitious goal, but weʼre an ambitious group,” said senior womenʼs volleyball player Alyssa DʼEricco (Bryron, N.Y.), who serves as president of SAAB. “Our main goal is to engage student-athletes in activities on and off campus in a variety of ways. “Weʼre busy with our sports, but other students are busy with things, too. Itʼs a lot of fun—and really rewarding—to be able to participate in the things we do with SAAB. The activities allow us to engage in campus and the community in different ways.”

The THON effort represents one of SAABʼs more visible efforts. And the $100,000 goal has added a bit more urgency for the group this year. A large portion of the groupʼs income for THON will come from an online auction later this fall. Items for sale in the auction may be found at GoPSUsports.com online.

SAAB volunteers, the thrill volved in SAAB because Board with its outreach and of helping others rivals the they want to make a posiprogramming efforts. Many opthrill of success on the tive impact at the Univerportunities to support the Morfield. sity. We want to be gan Center and its programs involved in a lot of different with donations exist. Call (814) “As soon as you get your ways, not just with our foot in the door as a freshteams,” said sophomore 863-GIFT (4438) for more man and start volunteering, baseball player Drew information. you thrive off that energy Yukelson (State College), and it gets the ball moving,” who serves as SAABʼs she said. “You have a core group of friends THON chairperson this year. “Itʼs just a lot of from what you do in class or in your sport, and fun to do these things on campus.” you can broaden that when you get out in the community and volunteer some time.” SAAB reaches far beyond campus, too. Student-athletes do so with structured programs Not every student-athlete coordinates activifor certain groups and with hundreds of hours ties like Yukelson or volunteers their time as of community service projects each semester. abundantly as Ostman, but SAAB participants at Penn State inevitably find their own producSenior softball player Mary Ostman (Northtive niche—a way to better others, and in the brook, Ill.) coordinates SAABʼs community process better themselves. service and completes an abundant amount of community service herself. Itʼs really a rather simple, and successful, approach. “Itʼs just fun to do,” said Ostman, who was carrying 19 credits and a part-time job during “We do so much in SAAB that people can find the fall semester. She still makes time to volsomething that works for them,” DʼEricco said. unteer for opportunities that range from col“Then, once you find something you enjoy, it lecting items for the food bank to raking keeps growing. We all enjoy doing our little leaves for community members who cannot part here at Penn State.” do that for themselves.

12 NLC NEWSLETTER / www.nittanylionclub.com

of the Student-Athlete Advisory

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GIVING We are pleased to announce these gifts and pledges of $25,000 and above to our “For the Future: The Campaign for Penn State Students.” We sincerely thank the donors who, through their generosity, made these important funds a reality.

Opportunities exist to endow scholarships in specific sports or an area that meets your interest. Of course, all such

opportunities provide tax benefits. If you would like information on how to participate, please call us at (814) 863-GIFT (4438).

Donors

Scholarship/Naming Opportunity

Anonymous.........................................................................................................................................................................................Football Program Anonymous............................................................................................................................................................Men’s Soccer Endowed Scholarship Anonymous .....................................................................................................................................................................Endowed Athletic Scholarship Rick and Sue Barry .................................................................................................................................................Steve Jones Broadcasting Complex David and Kimberly Brannon ..........................................................................................................David and Kimberly Brannon Program Endowment for the Morgan Academic Support Center for Student-Athletes Robert Breslin...............................................................................................................................Breslin Family Endowed Track and Field Scholarship Butterbaugh Investors ...............................................................................................................................................................Lasch Football Building Anthony Campagnini...............................................................................................................................Anthony C. Campagnini Program Endowment for the Morgan Academic Support Center for Student-Athletes James and Martha Chadwick...................................................................................................................Barth/Chadwick Athletic Position Scholarship Enrico and Linda Della Corna ........................................................................................Della Corna Family Program Support Endowment for Baseball Christel L. Ertel and Gary N. Stewart..............................Christel L. Ertel and Gary N. Stewart Family Program Support Endowment for Women’s Golf Thomas S. and Karen L. Flad ..................................................Tom, Karen and Stephen Flad Football Scholarship in Memory of Charles ‘Guy’ Meyers and Stephen Flad Operating Fund for Men’s Rugby Keith and Linda Forrest ..................................................................................................................................................Various women’s scholarships Thomas S. Giotto.......................................................................................................................................Giotto Family Endowed Athletic Scholarship Susan and Jeffrey Hahn .........................................................................................Susan and Jeffrey Hahn Program Support Endowment for Football Todd B. and Barbara C. Hilsee Foundation ....................................................................Todd B. and Barbara C. Hilsee Abilities Program Support Fund Tommy C. Hogan and Sharon R. Frost...............................................................................................Hogan-Frost Endowment for Women’s Volleyball Ira Lubert ......................................................................................................................................................................................Rec Hall Video Board Christian Massetti .............................................Lasch Football Building Naming Opportunity—Christian ’97 and Joanna ’98 Massetti Tutoring Room Robert F. and Cathy L. McKeon..............................................................................................................................................................Men’s Lacrosse Scott and Carole McKeon..........................................................................................................Scott and Carole McKeon Men’s Lacrosse Scholarship Brian and Susan McWhirter.....................................................................Susan and Brian McWhirter Trustee Scholarship for Intercollegiate Athletics Art and Paige Nagle ................................................................................................................................Russ Rose Middle Hitter Position Endowment Anthony and Caroline Nastasi ..........................................................................Nastasi Family Trust Endowed Athletic Scholarship for Defensive Ends James R. Packer .............................................................Lasch Football Building Naming Opportunity—Clark and Inez Packer Family Tutoring Room Kent Pearce............................................................Lasch Football Building Naming Opportunity—Pearce Group at Merrill Lynch, Kent Pearce Family Terrence and Kim Pegula..........................................................................................................................................Ice Arena and Hockey Endowment Rocco and Elizabeth Petrilli ..............................................................................Rocco and Elizabeth Petrilli Program Support Endowment for Football Howard and Alice Pickering .....................................................................................................Alice A. and M. Martin McFeatters Football Scholarship Hal and Renee Rosenbluth..............................................................Hal and Renee Rosenbluth Sports Medicine Fellowship in Intercollegiate Athletics Edward and Theresa Shea ...........................................................................................Mary Lou and Edward Shea Jr. Women’s Lacrosse Scholarship Brandon and Mahreen Kidwai Short .....................Ozella Wilkes Program Endowment for the Morgan Academic Support Center for Student-Athletes Richard J. and Nancy H. Shutt .....................................................................Richard J. and Nancy H. Shutt Program Endowment for Sports Medicine Richard and Susan Sokolov ..........................................................................................................................................................Various designations Peter and Ann Tombros..........................................................................................................................Russ Rose Middle Hitter Position Endowment Jean C. Townsend...........................................................................................................................James E. Townsend Endowed Football Scholarship James and Missy Vasilko ...........................Lasch Football Building Naming Opportunity—Jim and Missy Vasilko Equipment and Staff Locker Room Penn State Women’s Volleyball Booster Club ......................................................................................Women’s Volleyball Team Program Endowment

For matching gifts, annual Feb. 1 membership deadline especially important Donors are welcome to use corporate matching funds to increase their Nittany Lion Club giving level. However, the matching funds must be received by the University before the donor can receive NLC credit for ticketing/parking privileges. If the match is not re-

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ceived by Feb. 1, the donor will be responsible for making up the difference, if they wish to receive benefits at a certain NLC level. Additionally, matching funds received after the Feb. 1 deadline will be provided with Nittany Lion Club point credit only.

www.nittanylionclub.com / NLC NEWSLETTER 13


COVER STORY

Record gift ($88 million) supports hockey, much more A throng of more than 150 people (community members, media members and University personnel) attended the news conference about the gift. (Photo by Mark Selders)

The largest private gift in Penn State history will make a significant impact on Intercollegiate Athletics and far beyond the University.

When the University announced an $88 million gift from Terry and Kim Pegula in midSeptember, it represented just the first step in a positive process that will continue for years.

The gift will create a state-of-the-art, multipurpose arena to house two new varsity programs (menʼs and womenʼs ice hockey) at Penn State. With that comes 36 more Nittany Lion student-athletes who will receive scholarship support (18 for womenʼs hockey, 18 for menʼs hockey). In addition, the arena will open the door to thousands of hours of access and opportunity annually for community members, youth teams and others to utilize the facility—which will be open 14 to 16 hours a day, 360 days a year.

Beyond the gift announcement, many notable milestones remain in the months and years to come. Those include:  the selection of an architect to the arena (to be announced soon);  the hiring of coaches for the menʼs and womenʼs ice hockey teams (in 2011);  the start of NCAA competition in ice hockey (for the 2012-13 season);  and the completion of the arena (in late 2013 or early 2014). “Our family hopes that our gift inspires other Penn State hockey and ice skating enthusiasts to become involved with this project as

well as other athletic endeavors under the very capable leadership of the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics,” said Terry Pegula, a 1973 Penn State graduate. He and his wife had previously made significant gifts to the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences, Intercollegiate Athletics, and Outreach and Cooper- Terry Pegula (standing, second from left) accepts congratulations from Rodney Erickson, executive vice provost, and Cynthia Baldwin (second from right), the University’s chief ative Extension. legal officer, during the Board of Trustees meeting. (Photo by Mark Selders) “We plan to conThe facility will provide new training and pertinue to support a variety of Penn State acaformance opportunities for the varsity ice demic, cultural and athletic programs in the hockey teams and for Penn Stateʼs popular future.” and successful figure skating club. It also will offer ice time to recreational and high school Perhaps the most visible result of the Peguhockey programs, as well as intramural and lasʼ gift will be the arena itself—a 5,000- to local speed skating and broomball clubs. The 7,000-seat facility that will be the only major arena will be able to host events such as prorink within an 80-mile radius and on par with fessional ice shows and National Hockey the best collegiate facilities in the country. League and American Hockey League exhibition games, generating tourism and other ecoThe facility will be built on the corner of Curtin Road and University Drive, directly west of the nomic impacts in the region. Bryce Jordan Center. It will include two ice “The Pegulasʼ unparalleled generosity will sheets and other features that will allow it to make it possible for Penn State to serve our be used for a broad range of campus and region and our student-athletes in exciting community activities, from commencement new ways,” Penn State President Graham ceremonies to kinesiology classes to public Spanier said. “This arena will be an invaluable skating sessions and camps for youth. year-round asset for members of the Univer-

14 NLC NEWSLETTER / www.nittanylionclub.com

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sity community as well as for children, youth and families throughout central Pennsylvania, and it will be an engine for economic growth and development. The Pegulasʼ support also will help us build a program that extends our rich tradition of preparing student-athletes for success in competition and in life.”

COVER STORY

The gift comes as the University is engaged in the largest fundraising effort in its history, For the Future: The Campaign for Penn State Students.

“This gift establishes a new standard in philanthropy at Penn State and will inspire support from other alumni and friends of the University,” said Peter Tombros, a Penn State alumnus and the campaignʼs volunteer chair.

“The construction of the new arena will be entirely funded by private gifts,” said Rod Kirsch, senior vice president for development and alumni relations. “Penn State will now be launching an ambitious campaign to ask other donors to join Terry and Kim in supporting this facility and the creation of other endowments to support the hockey and skating programs. Our goal is to make this arena, and the vast array of activities to be held in it, a national model by which all other programs are measured.” The addition of menʼs and womenʼs ice hockey will increase the number of sports that Intercollegiate Athletics offers to 31, which will tie it for third among the 120 institutions in the NCAAʼs Football Bowl Subdivision. Within that category, only Stanford (35) and Ohio State (34) field more sports, while Boston College also has 31. The last varsity athletic team that Penn State added was womenʼs soccer in 1994.

“This is the fulfillment of a dream for many that have been long-time advocates and supporters of Penn State hockey,” said Director of Athletics Tim Curley. “As with all of our programs, we will expect both the men's and women's teams to compete for championships and achieve at a high level.”

Penn Stateʼs current club hockey programs have experienced success throughout their respective histories. Established as a club team in 1971-72 after fielding a varsity squad from 1939-40 to 1945-46, the Icers have won seven American Collegiate Hockey Association (ACHA) national championships. The Lady Icers began as a club program in 199697 and have made appearances in the 200001 ACHA Final Four, six national tournaments and were the 1999 Mid-Atlantic Womenʼs Collegiate Hockey Association champions after an undefeated season. “We are excited to add ice hockey as a varsity sport,” said Susan Delaney-Scheetz, associ-

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The hockey arena will be built along University Drive, across the street from the Bryce Jordan Center near Shields Building (top photo) and include two full-size sheets of ice as well as other amenities to serve the community.

ate athletic director and senior woman administrator. “The sport is growing in popularity, and the new facility will help showcase our programs and allow us to grow our tradition of recruiting top student-athletes to Penn State. We have great expectations for the future success of both the menʼs and womenʼs programs.”

Longtime Penn State employee Joe Battista, who most recently worked in the Smeal College of Business, was a previous director of the Nittany Lion Club and served as longtime coach of the Icers, was named associate athletic director for ice arena operations and the director of the ice arena and hockey campaign.

In those roles, he will have principal responsibility for the fundraising efforts to secure $10 million to support the ice arena, the varsity ice hockey programs and the intramural and skating recreational programs that will be housed in the arena. He will also provide consultation and advice on features of the arena during design and construction and coordinate the search committees for the men's and women's varsity coaches as well as for arena and rink managers. In addition, he will have overall responsibility for the administration of the men's and women's ice hockey programs and will serve as the arenaʼs chief administrator.

www.nittanylionclub.com / NLC NEWSLETTER 15


Thank-A-Thon again a success

MEMBERSHIP MATTERS

A group of Penn State student-athletes showed their appreciation to Nittany Lion Club members and Penn State fans Sept. 18 during the annual ThankA-Thon.

Representatives from various menʼs and womenʼs teams gathered in the mezzanine lobby of the Bryce Jordan Center and handed out water bottles while interacting with hundreds of NLC members and Penn State fans. The student-athletes also visited numerous people in the parking lots around Beaver Stadium on the football gameday.

Student-athletes who participated in the Thank-a-Thon met enthusiastic alumni, friends and Nittany Lion Club members in the Bryce Jordan Center and locations around Beaver Stadium during the annual event.

“Obviously the Nittany Lion Club is huge as far as supporting our programs and our operations and what we do,” said senior menʼs basketball player Andrew Jones (Philadelphia). “Without the generous donations from Nittany Lion Club members what we do wouldnʼt be possible. So whenever we get a chance to come out and show our support you know we jump to the chance and really let them know that we appreciate what they do.” Jones said student-athletes enjoy the session just as much as fans.

John Long, a member of the Nittany Lion Club for more than 20 years, was particularly excited to receive a gift from and talk to the student-athletes.

“This is great,” said Long. “Weʼve been here and weʼve had various players stop out and hang with us after the game all the time, thatʼs the highlight.”

Still, Long was quick to explain why he really enjoyed spending time with the studentathletes.

“They are very thankful, they love seeing us,” said Jones. “We always go over to the tailgate and see them. We just talk to them about the upcoming season you know, the new guys, how things are going—they are pretty much just a joy to be around.”

“I think the players impress me the most in things that they do that you donʼt expect,” said Long. “What you see that Penn State has established with the students is amazing. That shows why Penn State graduates academic scholars at the highest graduation rate. Itʼs just, tradition here is winning with ethics and there are no cutting corners.”

“This is just kind of a small thing that we can do to show our appreciation in comparison to the big things that they do,” said Jackson. “Itʼs always good to go out and meet new Penn State faces and see new friends and they always want to talk to us and we are happy to do it.”

“You know if youʼre going to live here you

David Jackson (Farrell, Pa.), a senior forward on the menʼs basketball team, agreed.

Most NLC members greeted the student-athletes and smiles as they took their water bottles and then struck up conversations about statistics, expectations and Big Ten titles. Betts Moyer, another long-time NLC member, was quick to praise and advocate for the club as a whole.

should be a Nittany Lion Club member, and you should go to the activities,” said Moyer. “Thatʼs the whole purpose of it, and itʼs great.” The student-athletes made their rounds through the football parking areas to countless donors and fans, and each and every one of them couldnʼt help but smile.

Warren Yang of the menʼs gymnastics squad said student-athletes really enjoyed and valued the opportunity.

“You know itʼs really great to see the people behind the scenes and the people that really make the show run,” said Yang (Nepean, Ontario). “So whenever I get the chance I always try to make the most of it and really get out there and talk with the donors and the Nittany Lion Club members because itʼs really them that help us get to where we are right now.”

Get your men’s and women’s basketball tickets ... Group tickets, season tickets, flex books 1-800-NITTANY ask for Joel Diamond Single-game tickets (814) 865-5555 or online at www.ticketmaster.com

16 NLC NEWSLETTER / www.nittanylionclub.com

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‘Old’ newcomers ready to take mat for wrestling team INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS

Several redshirt freshmen who had a year to prepare for varsity action and a redshirt sophomore who had taken a year off after making a big impact for the wrestling team two seasons ago, could play big roles for the wrestling team this season. Itʼs a talented but youthful group—a bunch of “old” newcomers—and they have earned numerous preseason accolades. They get to start proving themselves for real when the season begins Nov. 12.

Plus, with season-ticket sales for matches at Rec Hall at record levels, and with the NCAA Championships scheduled for Philadelphia at the end of the season, team members have many reasons for motivation.

In terms of national rankings, TheOpenMat.com has tabbed coach Cael Sanderson's crew No. 6 in its preseason team rankings. Five Penn State grapplers have also received preseason individual nods.

The Nittany Lions are one of four Big Ten Conference teams in TOM's top 10 and one of nine conference teams in the top 25. Minnesota (third), Iowa (fifth), Penn State (sixth), Wisconsin (seventh), Ohio State (11th), Purdue (13th), Northwestern (18th), Illinois (19th) and Michigan (20th) represent the league on the list. Two-time All-American Frank Molinaro a junior from Barnegat, N.J., is ranked No. 3 at 149 after finishing fifth last year. He heads into his junior campaign with a 56-26 career record. Junior Cameron Wade (Twinsburg, Ohio) is ranked No. 8 at heavyweight. Wade has a 37-25 career mark.

The “newcomers” include redshirt sophomore All-American Quentin Wright (Wingate, Pa.), ranked No. 5 at his new weight of 184 after taking sixth at 174 in 2009.

SCHEDULE

Date ......................Opponent......................Time Nov. 12 .....................at Bloomsburg .......................7 p.m. Nov. 14 ..........................LEHIGH.............................2 p.m. Nov. 21.......at Sprawl and Brawl Duals ..(Binghamton, N.Y.) Dec. 5..................NITTANY LION OPEN .............8:30 a.m. Dec. 12 ......................LOCK HAVEN ........................2 p.m. Dec. 19.......................OHIO STATE .........................2 p.m. Dec. 29-30 ............at Southern Scuffle...(Greensboro, N.C.) Wright went 33-13 as a Jan. 7-8...................at Virginia Duals ..........(Hampton, Va.) Jan. 21 .............................PITT ...............................7 p.m. true freshman two Jan. 23 .........................at Indiana ...........................1 p.m. years ago. Also, redJan. 30 ............................IOWA ..............................2 p.m. shirt freshman David Feb. 4 .....................at Michigan State .....................7 p.m. Taylor (St. Paris, Ohio) Feb. 6..........................at Michigan..........................2 p.m. and classmate Ed Feb. 11..........................ILLINOIS............................7 p.m. Ruth (174) have Feb. 13.......................at Minnesota.........................3 p.m. earned numerous pre- Feb. 18 .......................WISCONSIN .........................7 p.m. season accolades. The March 5-6..........Big Ten Championships(West Lafayette, Ind.) March 17-19 .......NCAA Championships........(Philadelphia) incoming freshman

class also includes several highly touted wrestlers.

Penn State will begin its season on Friday, Nov. 12, at Bloomsburg in a 7 p.m. dual.

The Nittany Lions open up home action two days later on Sunday, Nov. 14, when rival Lehigh comes to Rec Hall for a 2 p.m. dual.

Several teams continue strong performances during seasons The two-time defending national champion fencing team started its season with Penn State Lion Open and Penn State Junior Open, faring well all disciplines at the late-October event.

Among the many highlights for Penn State at the two-day event were:  defending national champion Margherita Guzzi Vincenti (Milan, Italy) finishing first in womenʼs epee;  Samuel Larsen (State College) finishing first in the mixed epee;  a first-place finish for All-American David Willette (Lafayette, Calif.) in junior mixed;  a victory by Kylei McGill-Patterson in womenʼs foil;  at top-three sweep in menʼs foil by Daniel Gomez-Tanamachi (Mexico City), Willette and Michael El-Saleh (Houston) and Jeremy Goldstein (Westport, Conn.), who tied for third; and  at top-three sweep in womenʼs sabre by Anne Stephenson, Nicole Glon and Daniella Goldenberg (Guilford, Conn.), respectively.

Cross country

Juniors Kyle Dawson (Coatesville, Pa.) and Vince McNally (Paoli, Pa.) posted second and third-place finishes, respectively, leading the 23rd-ranked Nittany Lions to a second-place

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finish in the team standings at the Penn State National. On the womenʼs side, sophomore Brooklyne Ridder (Cincinnati, Ohio) paced the Nittany Lions to a third-place effort, finishing 20th individually.

the top spot in the 200 freestyle with a time of 1:49.71 before touching the wall first in the 200 backstroke with a 1:58.82 clocking. Later, she wrapped up the meet with a victory in the 200 IM after cruising to a time of 2:03.60.

Sophomore Petra Januskova (Ottawa, Canada) advanced to the singles finals of the ITA Atlantic Regional with a pair of victories. Januskova defeated the tournament's No. 2 seed, Virginia's Erin Vierra, in the quarterfinals. In the semifinals, Januskova rallied from a 3-5 deficit in the third set to win the next four points and defeat Marshall's Martha Blakely (6-4, 5-7, 7-5). She faced the tournamentʼs top seed—Marshall's Michaela Kissel—and lost 5-7, 0-6, just missing a qualifying spot for the National Indoors in Flushing, N.Y.

The menʼs team lost its meet with Virginia Tech but won eight events—led by Brian Alden (Lansdale, Pa.) and Mitch Scherer (Pottstown, Pa.), who were a part of five combined victories for the team.

Womenʼs tennis

Swimming and diving

The womenʼs swimming and diving team captured its first home meet of the season as the Nittany Lions downed Virginia Tech, 187-113, during a non-conference battle at the McCoy Natatorium. During the meet, Amy Modglin (Fort Myers, Fla.) captured three individual events as she was lethal at the 200-yard distance. She took

Not to be outdone, Hailey Campbell (Lakeville, Minn.) and Paige Whitmire (Lederach, Pa.) each took home three titles as well.

Menʼs gymnastics

The team opens its season at home Jan. 8 against Army. It also plays host to Michigan on Jan. 22, Springfield College on Feb. 12 and Ohio State on Feb. 26.

Womenʼs gymnastics

After opening at Alabama on Jan. 7, the team competes at home four times during the season: Jan. 22 vs. New Hampshire; Feb. 6 vs. Pitt, West Virginia and Bridgeport; Feb. 26 vs. Ohio State; and March 4 vs. North Carolina State and Maryland.

www.nittanylionclub.com / NLC NEWSLETTER 17


Gift for broadcasting complex recognizes Steve Jones GIVING

cated on the west side of Penn State's campus, and it will comprise two control rooms, an editing lab, an HD viewing room and Rec Hall's first dedicated media room.

A significant gift to Penn State and Intercollegiate Athletics from alumni Richard and Susan Barry will create the Steve Jones Student Sports Broadcasting Complex. Named for long-time Penn State broadcaster and College of Communications instructor Steve Jones, the state-of-the-art production center will be a major portion of a planned renovation of Rec Hall and offer hands-on experience to students pursuing careers in sports broadcasting.

“The generosity of the Barrys will enable the athletic department to create a uniquely robust broadcasting and producSteve Jones tion environment like never seen before,” Director of Athletics Tim Curley said. “This their past commitments include gifts for the complex will enrich the gameday experience Abram Nesbitt III Academic Commons and the for teams and fans alike, will provide Penn John R. Murphy Student Services Center at State students an incredible learning opportuPenn State Wilkes-Barre, where Rick began his nity, and will be a game-changer in how we dePenn State education. liver live Penn State Athletics content to the Big Ten Network.” “We are excited to provide the funds for what we feel is a very important space both for athThe gift is one of the largest in the history of letics and academics,” said Rick Barry, who first Penn State Intercollegiate Athletics, and it conmet Jones while both were Penn State stutinues the philanthropic leadership of Rick and dents. “To have the complex named after Sue Barry. someone that I was so close to while at the Wilkes-Barre campus and have watched grow Rick Barry graduated from Penn State in 1980 into a legend in Penn State sports broadcasting with a bachelorʼs degree in political science, and history is a thrill for me. What Steve Jones has his career in the financial industry has included added to the legacy of Penn State broadcasting posts at Merrill Lynch, Robertson Stephens Inthroughout his professional career, in addition vestment Management and other leading comto what he has been able to pass on to the next panies. He retired earlier this year as the generation of broadcasters as an instructor in managing member and portfolio manager of the classroom, is the essence of what this comEastbourne Capital Management, a Californiaplex is all about.” based investment firm he founded in 1999. The San Rafael, Calif., couple is among the Universityʼs most generous supporters, and

The Steve Jones Student Sports Broadcasting Complex will be housed in historic Rec Hall, lo-

Your ringtone? Ryan Ignas

STUDENT-ATHLETE SNAPSHOTS Best holiday?

Swimming

Caitlin Lane (Greenwich, N.Y.)

A 1980 Penn State graduate with a degree in speech communication and broadcasting, Jones began doing radio play-by-play of Nittany Lion basketball games during his undergraduate career. He became the voice of the men's basketball team in 1982 and debuted on the football broadcast with the 2000 Blue-White Game. In all, he has done radio play-by-play for nearly 900 Penn State basketball and football games.

Guilty food pleasure?

Verizon Latin Generic

Christmas

Russell Crowe

Honey roasted peanuts mixed with M&Ms

Standard on phone, loud enough to hear across room.

Thanksgiving

Russell Crowe

Any sweets

Thanksgiving

Rachel McAdams

French fries

Baseball

(State College, Pa.)

“The Steve Jones Student Sports Broadcasting Complex will be a spectacular additional home for real world experiences for students in the College of Communications,” said Doug Anderson, dean of the College of Communications. “We have hundreds of students majoring in broadcast journalism, along with scores more who are enrolled in our John Curley Center for Sports Journalism, who are interested in sports broadcasting or production. “The opportunities we are able to offer our students have grown immensely over the past decade, but this facility will take us to a new level because our students now will be able to produce live sporting events for a national audience.”

____ would play me in a movie.

(Lansdale, Pa.)

Jon Cochrane

“This project is a perfect match for its namesake,” said Curley. “Steve's passion for his career as well as his dedication to teach the next generation of sports broadcasters and producers is unparalleled. This facility will enable Steve's legacy to live on in the students who will learn there through these hands-on experiences.”

“Your body is a wonderland,” by John Mayer.

Cross Country 18 NLC NEWSLETTER / www.nittanylionclub.com

Success with Honor


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www.nittanylionclub.com / NLC NEWSLETTER 19


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Coming soon ...

Championships on Campus NCAA Women’s Volleyball Regionals

Dec. 9-10, 2010

NCAA Women’s Basketball First and Second Rounds

March 19-21, 2011

NCAA Men’s Volleyball National Championship

May 5-7, 2011


Varsity ‘S’ Day draws alumni from 17 teams

More than 140 former student-athletes returned to Happy Valley to celebrate Varsity ‘S’ Day 2010 on Sept. 25. All Varsity ‘S’ Club members were invited to attend a pre-game tailgate party, which provided the opportunity for former teammates to both reconnect and meet fellow letter winners. Seventeen varsity teams were represented at the event, with track/cross country leading the way with 25 former letter winners in attendance. Other teams with significant participation included: baseball, cheerleading, women’s basketball, men’s basketball and wrestling. All former student-athletes gathered inside the hospitality tent to enjoy a catered meal and the friendly atmosphere generated by friends and family. Teammates reminisced about their playing days and enjoyed hearing about exciting events and developments in each other’s lives. Following the social event, members cheered on the Nittany Lion football team to victory against Temple. During the game, all Varsity ‘S’ Club members were asked to stand to be recognized by the 100,000 plus fans inside Beaver Stadium. Though their playing days are over, the Varsity ‘S’ Club provides our former letter winners the opportunity to remain active in Penn State Intercollegiate Athletics. The annual Varsity ‘S’ Day is just one of many activities held to honor and host alumni back in Happy Valley. We thank all of those who attended Varsity “S” Day 2010 and are already looking forward to the excitement of the event next fall!

REWARDING REUNION Women’s lacrosse alumni participated in an alumni game and social activities during their reunion.


Golf reunions mix new, old score big results

Over the course of two weekends, nearly 80 alumni from the men’s and women’s golf teams returned to campus to celebrate the opening of the Tombros Varsity Golf Clubhouse. The women’s team conducted its event Aug. 28-29, with more than 30 alumni in attendance. After a Friday night social at the Nittany Lion Inn, the alumni participated in a tournament Saturday at the Blue Course. Attendees came from as far away as Maine, North Carolina, Florida and Texas. Former coaches Mary KennedyZierke and Annette Thompson also attended. The men’s golf team conducted its event Sept. 2-3 in conjunction with the official dedication of the Tombros Varsity Golf Clubhouse on Sept. 3. Alumnus Gary Durbin (’79) led the organizing and planning of the event and worked cohesively with the Varsity ‘S’ Club to make the reunion a reality. Activities began Friday with breakfast and tours at the Tombros Varsity Golf Clubhouse. A golf tournament followed, with the 40 alumni who attended paired with members of the current team. On Friday night, there was a social at the Allen Street Grill. Official dedication activities took place Friday. Alumni who attended came from all over the United States, including Arizona, Florida and Texas. All attendees for both the women’s and men’s reunion events displayed their commitment to the programs by making donations to their specific sport.

The Tombros Varsity Golf Clubhouse provided a backdrop for group photos for alumni of both the men’s and women’s golf teams during successful reunions. The men’s session included (left to right) assistant coach Jon Dunlap, alumnus Gil Muhl, alumnus Gary Durbin and coach Greg Nye.


FIELD HOCKEY FUN A reunion for the women’s field hockey team attracted alumni who enjoyed on-field activities and socializing.

A Plan: One Gift, Any Size, Every Year

WONDERFUL WEDDING

Former cheerleader Jess Patrick (’02) married Jason Chelik (’01, ’03) on Aug. 28, 2010, at the Nittany Lion Inn. They had an all-Penn State bridal party and were introduced as husband and wife with fanfare provided by members of the Blue Band.

Opportunities abound for alumni assistance Former Penn State student-athletes and Varsity ‘S’ Club members may choose from a variety of ways to support “For the Future: The Campaign for Penn State Students.” Options range from easy, such as simply attending an alumni event, to more committed, such as giving to the Nittany Lion Club. And, by participation in the Nittany Lion Club, former student-athletes may designate their support to a specific team and still earn NLC benefits. Gifts of any size make a difference in the success of each and every varsity sports program. A committee of more than 30 former stu-

dent-athletes has been created to assist the Varsity ‘S’ Club and Penn State Intercollegiate Athletics with reaching out and reconnecting with our more than 11,000 former student-athletes. Volunteer representatives on the committee from each of the sports will be contacting alumni from those sports in the near future to seek more participation from all of our alumni.

As you know, Penn State is a fully self-sustaining athletic department, meaning it does not utilize state funds, University funds or tuition dollars to finance its 29 varsity sports. We rely heavily on private donations through the Nittany Lion Club. And, we are continuing the opportunity for former athletes to designate their NLC donations directly back to their team, helping make an immediate impact on the sports that have given them so much. It doesn’t take a million dollars to make a difference, either. If you are looking for other ways to financially support your team, contact any of the following:

 RJ Gimbl (814) 865-5576 / rjg20@psu.edu;  Casey Keiber (814) 865-8137 / cmk184@psu.edu;  John Nitardy (814) 863-7664 / jdn13@psu.edu; or  Ken Cutler (814) 863-6761 / kmc2@psu.edu.

In 2009, former student-athletes gave more than $4.5 million to Intercollegiate Athletics.


Mail from Mike ... For the Glory, For the Future

Dear Fellow Nittany Lions, I am sure all of you can recall your finest moment as a PSU student-athlete. Whether it was scoring the winning goal, driving in a go ahead run, winning a Big Ten Conference Championship, or working tirelessly to make Mike Milliron the line up, it was those moments that defined us (814) 867-2202 as Nittany Lion student-athletes. varsitys@athletics.psu.edu Recently, you should have received a letter from one of our coaches asking for you to continue to be a part of the team by making a donaFind Varsity ‘S’ on Facebook! tion in support of our current student-athletes. Donations, of all sizes, enable Penn State to continue our tradition of “Success with Honor.” During our years as Nittany Lions we were very grateful for all the support from our Penn State family, friends, administration and alumni. Now, it is our time to repay that support, to ensure that future Nittany

Contact the Varsity ‘S’ Club

Lions have the same opportunities to reach their full potential as students, athletes and leaders. By giving back to your sport, you are investing in the next Big Ten Conference winners or national champions. Last year we had a record number of more than 1,500 student-athlete alumni make donations back to the Nittany Lion Club. Our goal for this yearsurpass 2,000! Remember why you chose to play at Penn State: for the passion, for the glory and for the opportunity to be a part of something that is bigger than any one person—the Penn State Family. We are…PENN STATE (’05 Baseball)

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!

If you need to update your contact information or wish to submit news for possible inclusion, please e-mail VarsityS@athletics.psu.edu with “VSC Member Update” in the subject line.


NLC Newsletter (Fall 2010)