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Eleventh Annual Pacific Northwest

July 19–23, 2010

Children’s Book Conference For writers and illustrators


Schedule

Eleventh Annual Pacific Northwest

Children’s Book Conference July 19–23, 2010 It gives me great pleasure to invite children’s book writers and illustrators to the eleventh annual Pacific Northwest Children’s Book Conference, sponsored by Portland State University and held on the beautiful campus of Reed College in Portland, Oregon. Our terrific faculty this year includes Susan Blackaby, Marla Frazee, David Gifaldi, Ann Whitford Paul, Susan Goldman Rubin, Elsa Warnick, and Emily Whitman. Because they are published authors and illustrators and experienced teachers, they are able to communicate in ways that are truly meaningful to students. Their sympathy for the creative struggle—having been through it themselves—and their willingness to share what they’ve learned are among the things that distinguish our conference from most others. Our special guest this summer is Liz Bicknell, editorial director of Candlewick Press, one of the country’s outstanding publishers of children’s books. In her 13 years at Candlewick, she has published numerous award-winning titles in all genres, and brings an enthusiasm and intelligence to her work that is reflected in her success. Liz will provide a fresh perspective on the world of children’s publishing today. This summer we have a full week of lectures that focus on the craft of writing: creating memorable characters, writing picture books, finding your story, avoiding the “show, don’t tell” pitfall, getting started in nonfiction,

2

2010 Children’s Book Conference

writing great dialogue, probing the young adult market and overcoming the difficulties of living a creative life. First page analyses, an open mike, and more—all this in a retreat-like campus setting in Portland! In the afternoons, illustrators will work on creating compelling and enduring characters and will learn about the “tools” of the illustrator and the business side of their profession; writers will divide into workshop groups led by a faculty member. (In order to be sure you are assigned to a group at your level of experience, we ask that you email the first five pages of your manuscript by June 22, 2010. For details, please see page 10 of this brochure.) These workshops will provide feedback and support for writers in a collegial setting. Individual manuscript and portfolio critiques will also be available. Attendees will have the option of staying on campus and sharing meals with the faculty. This chance to exchange ideas and make connections is a major factor in contributing to the friendly atmosphere that makes this conference memorable. I look forward to seeing you this summer! Linda Zuckerman, Director Pacific Northwest Children’s Book Conference

Monday, July 19 7:30–8:30am

Breakfast

8:45–9:30am

Orientation

9:45–10:35am

Can the Book Survive? Liz Bicknell

A prep-school library in Massachusetts has removed all 20,000 of its books and replaced them with three flat screen TVs, 18 e-readers, and an espresso bar. Enormous technological changes are occurring throughout publishing, from editorial to marketing to sales. Will the electronic democratization of information—that mighty slayer of newspapers, magazines, and encyclopedias (remember them?)—extend to children’s books? After consulting experts from kindergartners to economists, from Malcolm Gladwell to the Magic 8 Ball, Liz provides a definitive answer.

10:50–11:40am

Getting Started, A–Z Suz Blackaby

10:50–11:40am

Talent and motivation cannot be underestimated, but when it comes to achieving your creative goals, you need to know the rules of the publishing game. Suz gets down to the no-nonsense basics: what you have to do, what you should do, and most important, what you must never, ever do to find success in the often unpredictable and frequently whimsical world of children’s book publishing.

Everyone Knows an Eeyore: Creating Great Characters Emily Whitman How do you create characters so vibrant and alive that readers will follow them through every page of your book? Emily looks at character from the inside out and the outside in, explores how point of view affects the tools at our disposal, and investigates how flawed characters create interesting plots. With exercises and examples, you’ll discover some real characters.

11:50am–12:20pm

Workshops and Critiques: What to Expect All writing faculty

If you have never had a manuscript discussed in a group situation, the prospect can seem daunting. But it needn’t be. David Gifaldi and the faculty describe the process and its goals so that you can be better prepared to give—and take—positive feedback.

12:30–1:30pm

Lunch

1:45–2:35pm

Picture Books 101 Ann Whitford Paul Picture books, with their few words and many pictures, seem to be easy to write, but the truth is otherwise. Ann talks about everything you need to know about what makes them unique and challenging—from format to subject matter to the all-important page turn. Here are the basics and beyond for the picture book writer.

www.ceed.pdx.edu/children

3


Schedule

Eleventh Annual Pacific Northwest

Children’s Book Conference July 19–23, 2010 It gives me great pleasure to invite children’s book writers and illustrators to the eleventh annual Pacific Northwest Children’s Book Conference, sponsored by Portland State University and held on the beautiful campus of Reed College in Portland, Oregon. Our terrific faculty this year includes Susan Blackaby, Marla Frazee, David Gifaldi, Ann Whitford Paul, Susan Goldman Rubin, Elsa Warnick, and Emily Whitman. Because they are published authors and illustrators and experienced teachers, they are able to communicate in ways that are truly meaningful to students. Their sympathy for the creative struggle—having been through it themselves—and their willingness to share what they’ve learned are among the things that distinguish our conference from most others. Our special guest this summer is Liz Bicknell, editorial director of Candlewick Press, one of the country’s outstanding publishers of children’s books. In her 13 years at Candlewick, she has published numerous award-winning titles in all genres, and brings an enthusiasm and intelligence to her work that is reflected in her success. Liz will provide a fresh perspective on the world of children’s publishing today. This summer we have a full week of lectures that focus on the craft of writing: creating memorable characters, writing picture books, finding your story, avoiding the “show, don’t tell” pitfall, getting started in nonfiction,

2

2010 Children’s Book Conference

writing great dialogue, probing the young adult market and overcoming the difficulties of living a creative life. First page analyses, an open mike, and more—all this in a retreat-like campus setting in Portland! In the afternoons, illustrators will work on creating compelling and enduring characters and will learn about the “tools” of the illustrator and the business side of their profession; writers will divide into workshop groups led by a faculty member. (In order to be sure you are assigned to a group at your level of experience, we ask that you email the first five pages of your manuscript by June 22, 2010. For details, please see page 10 of this brochure.) These workshops will provide feedback and support for writers in a collegial setting. Individual manuscript and portfolio critiques will also be available. Attendees will have the option of staying on campus and sharing meals with the faculty. This chance to exchange ideas and make connections is a major factor in contributing to the friendly atmosphere that makes this conference memorable. I look forward to seeing you this summer! Linda Zuckerman, Director Pacific Northwest Children’s Book Conference

Monday, July 19 7:30–8:30am

Breakfast

8:45–9:30am

Orientation

9:45–10:35am

Can the Book Survive? Liz Bicknell

A prep-school library in Massachusetts has removed all 20,000 of its books and replaced them with three flat screen TVs, 18 e-readers, and an espresso bar. Enormous technological changes are occurring throughout publishing, from editorial to marketing to sales. Will the electronic democratization of information—that mighty slayer of newspapers, magazines, and encyclopedias (remember them?)—extend to children’s books? After consulting experts from kindergartners to economists, from Malcolm Gladwell to the Magic 8 Ball, Liz provides a definitive answer.

10:50–11:40am

Getting Started, A–Z Suz Blackaby

10:50–11:40am

Talent and motivation cannot be underestimated, but when it comes to achieving your creative goals, you need to know the rules of the publishing game. Suz gets down to the no-nonsense basics: what you have to do, what you should do, and most important, what you must never, ever do to find success in the often unpredictable and frequently whimsical world of children’s book publishing.

Everyone Knows an Eeyore: Creating Great Characters Emily Whitman How do you create characters so vibrant and alive that readers will follow them through every page of your book? Emily looks at character from the inside out and the outside in, explores how point of view affects the tools at our disposal, and investigates how flawed characters create interesting plots. With exercises and examples, you’ll discover some real characters.

11:50am–12:20pm

Workshops and Critiques: What to Expect All writing faculty

If you have never had a manuscript discussed in a group situation, the prospect can seem daunting. But it needn’t be. David Gifaldi and the faculty describe the process and its goals so that you can be better prepared to give—and take—positive feedback.

12:30–1:30pm

Lunch

1:45–2:35pm

Picture Books 101 Ann Whitford Paul Picture books, with their few words and many pictures, seem to be easy to write, but the truth is otherwise. Ann talks about everything you need to know about what makes them unique and challenging—from format to subject matter to the all-important page turn. Here are the basics and beyond for the picture book writer.

www.ceed.pdx.edu/children

3


Schedule 2:45–4:15pm

The Collaboration Begins: Workshop for Illustrators Marla Frazee

2:45–4:15pm

Workshops for Writers All writing faculty

Illustrators launch the collaborative process by using words and phrases selected from manuscripts submitted by the conference writers as the basis for a sketch of a compelling and enduring character. Explore characterization, setting, composition, and interpretation of text, and begin drawing—and thinking—like children’s book illustrators.

Writers have the opportunity to hear a portion of their work read in faculty-led, smallgroup workshops. The excerpt (no more than five pages, double-spaced) is then critiqued by the group and the faculty leader. Fear not! A supportive and constructive environment will prevail. Students should bring nine copies of their manuscript for distribution in the workshop.

4:30–6pm

Meet the faculty/faculty reading

6–7pm

Dinner

Tuesday, July 20

11:30am–12:20pm The Illustrator’s Toolbox, Part 1* Elsa Warnick The power of an illustration comes not from its particular subject—or the what it is. It comes from the visual mind, the voice and skill of the illustrator—or the how it is. Elsa demonstrates how illustrators’ choices—scale, context, vantage point, line, palette, and gesture—can be used to enhance the development of character and bring writers’ words to life. Please bring pencils or markers and paper. * for illustrators only 12:30–1:30pm

Lunch

1:45–2:35pm

Show, Don’t Tell: What It Means, How to Do It Linda Zuckerman

1:45–2:35pm

The Illustrator’s Toolbox, Part 2* Elsa Warnick

* for illustrators only

One of the most common writing flaws is the tendency to tell about something rather than to allow the reader to experience it. Creating a small scene—complete with dialogue, description, and internal monologue—can transform flat and boring writing into prose that bristles with energy. Linda helps you spot the opportunities for rewriting in your own work and allows for time in class to begin the process.

7:30–8:30am

Breakfast

2:45–4:45pm

Workshops (writers and illustrators)

8:20–9:20am

Individual manuscript critiques/portfolio reviews

5–6pm

Individual manuscript critiques/portfolio reviews

9:30–10:20am

How on Earth Did THAT Get Published? Liz Bicknell

6–7pm

Dinner

10:30–11:20am

The Last Page Turn Marla Frazee

Liz offers the top 10 reasons why a book clearly inferior to your own has made its way into print.

Picture book endings should disarm, move, and satisfy us. But to create an ending that really delivers, you need to know what is truly at the heart of your story. Geared to both picture book writers and illustrators, this session explores the elusive and tricky nature of picture book endings—some that work and some that don’t quite work…yet.

11:30am–12:20pm Searching for Story David Gifaldi Where do stories come from? Locked away in “rooms” of one’s childhood? Entangled in the gauze of the subconscious? Do characters, situations, and first lines simply “arrive” unbidden? Or are there steps the writer takes to access the story gems that await discovery? David discusses the many paths writers follow in uncovering the stories they need to tell.

4

Schedule

2010 Children’s Book Conference

Wednesday, July 21 7:30–8:30am

Breakfast

8:20–9:20am

Individual manuscript critiques/portfolio reviews

9:30–10:20am

The Ballerina and the Fire Hydrant: Similes and Metaphors David Gifaldi

David talks about similes and metaphors—clichéd, mixed, and otherwise debauched. By looking at the good, the bad, and the ugly, he demonstrates how to avoid the unintentionally hilarious and make your comparisons rich, real, and unique.

10:30–11:20am

Secrets, Surprises, Suspense: Finding the Story in Nonfiction Susan Goldman Rubin

You have a hobby (making birdhouses) or a sudden interest (slugs and snails). Is there a book here? Susan will outline the steps from private obsession to finished proposal, choosing a topic, jotting down first thoughts, and finding the story that allows you to create a dramatic, fact-filled narrative that is age-appropriate for your readers. Points covered include checking out the competition and finding an angle that is fresh and different. “If you’ve got the hook, you’ve got the book!”

www.ceed.pdx.edu/children

5


Schedule 2:45–4:15pm

The Collaboration Begins: Workshop for Illustrators Marla Frazee

2:45–4:15pm

Workshops for Writers All writing faculty

Illustrators launch the collaborative process by using words and phrases selected from manuscripts submitted by the conference writers as the basis for a sketch of a compelling and enduring character. Explore characterization, setting, composition, and interpretation of text, and begin drawing—and thinking—like children’s book illustrators.

Writers have the opportunity to hear a portion of their work read in faculty-led, smallgroup workshops. The excerpt (no more than five pages, double-spaced) is then critiqued by the group and the faculty leader. Fear not! A supportive and constructive environment will prevail. Students should bring nine copies of their manuscript for distribution in the workshop.

4:30–6pm

Meet the faculty/faculty reading

6–7pm

Dinner

Tuesday, July 20

11:30am–12:20pm The Illustrator’s Toolbox, Part 1* Elsa Warnick The power of an illustration comes not from its particular subject—or the what it is. It comes from the visual mind, the voice and skill of the illustrator—or the how it is. Elsa demonstrates how illustrators’ choices—scale, context, vantage point, line, palette, and gesture—can be used to enhance the development of character and bring writers’ words to life. Please bring pencils or markers and paper. * for illustrators only 12:30–1:30pm

Lunch

1:45–2:35pm

Show, Don’t Tell: What It Means, How to Do It Linda Zuckerman

1:45–2:35pm

The Illustrator’s Toolbox, Part 2* Elsa Warnick

* for illustrators only

One of the most common writing flaws is the tendency to tell about something rather than to allow the reader to experience it. Creating a small scene—complete with dialogue, description, and internal monologue—can transform flat and boring writing into prose that bristles with energy. Linda helps you spot the opportunities for rewriting in your own work and allows for time in class to begin the process.

7:30–8:30am

Breakfast

2:45–4:45pm

Workshops (writers and illustrators)

8:20–9:20am

Individual manuscript critiques/portfolio reviews

5–6pm

Individual manuscript critiques/portfolio reviews

9:30–10:20am

How on Earth Did THAT Get Published? Liz Bicknell

6–7pm

Dinner

10:30–11:20am

The Last Page Turn Marla Frazee

Liz offers the top 10 reasons why a book clearly inferior to your own has made its way into print.

Picture book endings should disarm, move, and satisfy us. But to create an ending that really delivers, you need to know what is truly at the heart of your story. Geared to both picture book writers and illustrators, this session explores the elusive and tricky nature of picture book endings—some that work and some that don’t quite work…yet.

11:30am–12:20pm Searching for Story David Gifaldi Where do stories come from? Locked away in “rooms” of one’s childhood? Entangled in the gauze of the subconscious? Do characters, situations, and first lines simply “arrive” unbidden? Or are there steps the writer takes to access the story gems that await discovery? David discusses the many paths writers follow in uncovering the stories they need to tell.

4

Schedule

2010 Children’s Book Conference

Wednesday, July 21 7:30–8:30am

Breakfast

8:20–9:20am

Individual manuscript critiques/portfolio reviews

9:30–10:20am

The Ballerina and the Fire Hydrant: Similes and Metaphors David Gifaldi

David talks about similes and metaphors—clichéd, mixed, and otherwise debauched. By looking at the good, the bad, and the ugly, he demonstrates how to avoid the unintentionally hilarious and make your comparisons rich, real, and unique.

10:30–11:20am

Secrets, Surprises, Suspense: Finding the Story in Nonfiction Susan Goldman Rubin

You have a hobby (making birdhouses) or a sudden interest (slugs and snails). Is there a book here? Susan will outline the steps from private obsession to finished proposal, choosing a topic, jotting down first thoughts, and finding the story that allows you to create a dramatic, fact-filled narrative that is age-appropriate for your readers. Points covered include checking out the competition and finding an angle that is fresh and different. “If you’ve got the hook, you’ve got the book!”

www.ceed.pdx.edu/children

5


Schedule 11:30am–12:20am First Impressions, Part 1 Liz Bicknell and Linda Zuckerman It is sad but true that among those editors—and agents—who are willing to look at unsolicited manuscripts, very few have the time to read more than the first page. Is this fair? Yes. You are the same writer on page 1 as you are on page 67, and many problems in a manuscript are often hinted at or even revealed in those first few paragraphs. In this eye-opening session, Linda and Liz read from anonymously submitted first pages, give a thumbs-up or a thumbs-down, explain their reactions, and offer suggestions for improvement. 12:30–1:30pm

Lunch

1:45–3:15pm

First Impressions, the Sequel Liz Bicknell and Linda Zuckerman

3:30–4:45pm

* no workshops for writers today

3:30–4:20pm

5–6pm 6–7pm

6

9:30–10:20am

Curious about what makes a poem a poem? Terrified that you might have to write one? Or ready to jump in? Ann shows you what a poem is and why and how it’s different from prose, and demonstrates that playing with poetry will improve your writing, whether you’re working on fiction, nonfiction, or picture books.

Individual manuscript critiques/portfolio reviews Dinner

7:30–8:30am

Breakfast

8:20–9:20am

Individual manuscript critiques/portfolio reviews

9:30–10:20am

The Thrill of the Chase: How to Research and Write Successful Nonfiction Susan Goldman Rubin Susan talks about researching, taking notes, and writing a nonfiction book for children. Following a detailed handout, she discusses how to begin with secondary sources—books and the Internet—and then move on to primary sources—interviews and letters. When can you stop researching and start writing? Points covered include writing a proposal and sample chapters, coming up with a snappy title, and dealing with permissions, plagiarism, and public domain.

2010 Children’s Book Conference

A professional submission can make the difference between eternal silence and that encouraging phone call from the editor or art director. Elsa talks about researching the various sectors in children’s publishing, targeting mailings, and submitting illustrations. Learn what to send, to whom, how much, what format, and how often—and the importance of record keeping. Elsa also discusses trade publishing contracts, mass market and vanity press agreements, and self-publishing. Handouts list both Web sites and books. * for illustrators only

Outsiders, Vampires, and Beyond: Writing the Young Adult Novel Emily Whitman

Books for teens are booming, and it’s not all Twilight. From the classic problem novel to the current surge of fantasy, from the familiar to the edgy, what distinguishes the YA novel? Emily looks at the do’s and don’ts in writing for teens; discusses immediacy and emotion, including the advantages and dangers of writing in the first person; and peeks at the role of social media in teens’ ownership of their reading world.

10:30–11:45am

Open Mike

12:30–1:30pm

Lunch

1:45–2:35pm

Look Who’s Talking! Suz Blackaby

Marla Frazee Playing with Poetry Ann Whitford Paul

Taking Care of Business* Elsa Warnick

9:30–10:20am

Workshop for Illustrators*

Thursday, July 22

Schedule

Here is a chance to read your work and receive the resounding applause you so richly deserve! Find a short portion of a work-in-progress—a poem, a brilliant cover letter, a proposal, or a deft revision—and share with your fellow students. Tangible rewards for grace under pressure will be provided.

Dialogue is a critical plot-pushing tool. It provides background, creates tension, and moves your story forward. At the same time, the pacing, tone, and nuance of dialogue can reveal the essential nature of your characters. Suz presents examples and exercises that explore the ways voice, resonance, and allusion are used to build character.

1:45–4:15pm

Workshop for Illustrators Marla Frazee

2:45–4:45pm

Workshops for Writers All writing faculty

5–6pm

Individual manuscript critiques/portfolio reviews

6–7pm

Dinner

www.ceed.pdx.edu/children

7


Schedule 11:30am–12:20am First Impressions, Part 1 Liz Bicknell and Linda Zuckerman It is sad but true that among those editors—and agents—who are willing to look at unsolicited manuscripts, very few have the time to read more than the first page. Is this fair? Yes. You are the same writer on page 1 as you are on page 67, and many problems in a manuscript are often hinted at or even revealed in those first few paragraphs. In this eye-opening session, Linda and Liz read from anonymously submitted first pages, give a thumbs-up or a thumbs-down, explain their reactions, and offer suggestions for improvement. 12:30–1:30pm

Lunch

1:45–3:15pm

First Impressions, the Sequel Liz Bicknell and Linda Zuckerman

3:30–4:45pm

* no workshops for writers today

3:30–4:20pm

5–6pm 6–7pm

6

9:30–10:20am

Curious about what makes a poem a poem? Terrified that you might have to write one? Or ready to jump in? Ann shows you what a poem is and why and how it’s different from prose, and demonstrates that playing with poetry will improve your writing, whether you’re working on fiction, nonfiction, or picture books.

Individual manuscript critiques/portfolio reviews Dinner

7:30–8:30am

Breakfast

8:20–9:20am

Individual manuscript critiques/portfolio reviews

9:30–10:20am

The Thrill of the Chase: How to Research and Write Successful Nonfiction Susan Goldman Rubin Susan talks about researching, taking notes, and writing a nonfiction book for children. Following a detailed handout, she discusses how to begin with secondary sources—books and the Internet—and then move on to primary sources—interviews and letters. When can you stop researching and start writing? Points covered include writing a proposal and sample chapters, coming up with a snappy title, and dealing with permissions, plagiarism, and public domain.

2010 Children’s Book Conference

A professional submission can make the difference between eternal silence and that encouraging phone call from the editor or art director. Elsa talks about researching the various sectors in children’s publishing, targeting mailings, and submitting illustrations. Learn what to send, to whom, how much, what format, and how often—and the importance of record keeping. Elsa also discusses trade publishing contracts, mass market and vanity press agreements, and self-publishing. Handouts list both Web sites and books. * for illustrators only

Outsiders, Vampires, and Beyond: Writing the Young Adult Novel Emily Whitman

Books for teens are booming, and it’s not all Twilight. From the classic problem novel to the current surge of fantasy, from the familiar to the edgy, what distinguishes the YA novel? Emily looks at the do’s and don’ts in writing for teens; discusses immediacy and emotion, including the advantages and dangers of writing in the first person; and peeks at the role of social media in teens’ ownership of their reading world.

10:30–11:45am

Open Mike

12:30–1:30pm

Lunch

1:45–2:35pm

Look Who’s Talking! Suz Blackaby

Marla Frazee Playing with Poetry Ann Whitford Paul

Taking Care of Business* Elsa Warnick

9:30–10:20am

Workshop for Illustrators*

Thursday, July 22

Schedule

Here is a chance to read your work and receive the resounding applause you so richly deserve! Find a short portion of a work-in-progress—a poem, a brilliant cover letter, a proposal, or a deft revision—and share with your fellow students. Tangible rewards for grace under pressure will be provided.

Dialogue is a critical plot-pushing tool. It provides background, creates tension, and moves your story forward. At the same time, the pacing, tone, and nuance of dialogue can reveal the essential nature of your characters. Suz presents examples and exercises that explore the ways voice, resonance, and allusion are used to build character.

1:45–4:15pm

Workshop for Illustrators Marla Frazee

2:45–4:45pm

Workshops for Writers All writing faculty

5–6pm

Individual manuscript critiques/portfolio reviews

6–7pm

Dinner

www.ceed.pdx.edu/children

7


Schedule Friday, July 23 7:30–8:30am

Breakfast

8:20–9:20am

Individual manuscript critiques/portfolio reviews

9:30–11:00am

Writers and Illustrators Unite! Review of Sketches Based on Writers’ Submissions Marla Frazee

Illustrators display their interpretations of the character studies provided by conference writers and share their discoveries. Writers share their reactions upon seeing their words interpreted visually for the first time. This inspiring session is one of the highlights of the conference!

11:10am–12:20pm

Art Show

12:30–1:30pm

Lunch

1:45–2:35pm

Last meetings of workshops

2:45–3:35pm

The Creative Life Ann Whitford Paul

3:45–4:15pm

Why are we compelled to write and draw? How do we deal with friends and family who don’t understand what we do? What keeps us going in the face of rejection? How can we love other creative people in our field, but still experience the bitter taste of envy for their successes? Learn what sustains us, prevents us from working, and keeps us going as we strive to share our vision of the world with others.

Words of wisdom and farewell until next year!

2010 Children's Book Conference Faculty Liz Bicknell is the editorial director of Candlewick Press, a position she has held for 13 years. Books she edited have received the National Book Award, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, the Boston Globe–Horn Book Medal, the Theodor Seuss Geisel Medal, and the E. B. White Read-Aloud Award. She has also edited ten New York Times bestsellers. She works with such celebrated authors as M. T. Anderson, Lauren Child, Jules Feiffer, Paul Fleischman, Laura McGee Kvasnosky, Gregory Maguire, Leonard Marcus, Chris Raschka, and Jane Yolen, among many others. Susan Blackaby has worked in educational publishing for 30 years. On the clock, Suz hones her skills writing fiction and nonfiction titles for the K–8 audience. On her own time, she writes poetry, picture books, and middle-grade fiction. She is the author of Rembrandt’s Hat (Houghton Mifflin, 2002); Cleopatra: Egypt’s Last and Greatest Queen (Sterling, 2009); and a collection of poetry entitled Nest, Nook, and Cranny (Charlesbridge, 2010). Marla Frazee is the author-illustrator of A Couple of Boys Have the Best Week Ever, which received a Caldecott Honor Award and a Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor; Roller Coaster; Santa Claus the World’s Number One Toy Expert; and Walk On! She is the illustrator of many other acclaimed books, including The Seven Silly Eaters; the New York Times best-selling Clementine series; and All the World, which received a Caldecott Honor Award this year. She teaches children’s book illustration at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California, and works in a small studio cabin in the backyard under an avocado tree. David Gifaldi is a Portland writer and teacher. His eight published books for young readers include picture books, a tall tale, middle-grade novels, and a collection of young adult short stories. His latest novel, Listening for Crickets, was a 2009 Notable Book for a Global Society, was on the 2009 Cooperative Children’s Book Center’s annual best-of-the-year list, and was awarded the Oregon Spirit Award by the Oregon Council of Teachers of English. David has lectured widely to both children and adult writers. He currently teaches high school English for the Vancouver School District and has been on the faculty of the MFA in Writing for Children and Young Adults program at the Vermont College of Fine Arts. Ann Whitford Paul, author of Writing Picture Books: A Hands-on Guide from Story Creation to Publication, has published nearly 20 picture books, poetry books, and early readers. Her books have won awards and landed on best-of lists, including the New York Times Notable Books, Carl Sandburg Award for Children’s Literature, Bank Street College Best Books list, Notable Science and Social Studies Books, National Parenting Center’s Seal of Approval, and 2001 Recognition of Merit from the George C. Stone Center for Children’s Books of the Claremont Graduate University. Susan Goldman Rubin is the author of 50 books for children with a focus in recent years on nonfiction. Andy Warhol: Pop Art Painter, Degas and the Dance, and The Cat with the Yellow Star: Coming of Age in Terezin were ALA Notable Books. Delicious: The Life & Art of Wayne Thiebaud won the 2008 Sugarman Children’s Biography Award. Forthcoming in 2010 is Wideness & Wonder: The Art of Georgia O’Keeffe. Elsa Warnick turned to illustration after a successful career as a gallery artist. Among her illustrated books is a three-book series on animal migration by the acclaimed science writer Seymour Simon and the multi-awardwinning Song for the Whooping Crane by Eileen Spinelli. Elsa’s own book, Bedtime, was a Children’s Bookof- the-Month Club Main Selection. Most recently she illustrated This is What I Pray Today by Phyllis Tickle. Elsa currently teaches children’s book illustration at Portland Community College. Emily Whitman is the author of Radiant Darkness (Greenwillow, 2009). A retelling of the Greek myth of Persephone, it was number one on the Indie Next list. Her next novel is Wildwing (Greenwillow, 2010). Emily has worked in library reference, led story times, and written poetry, fiction and nonfiction for educational publishers. She lives in Portland with her husband and two children. She is proud to have met her editor at the Pacific Northwest Children’s Book Conference. Linda Zuckerman has been a children’s book editor for more than 40 years. She is the editor of three books that were awarded the Caldecott Medal and two that received Newbery Honor citations. Linda’s first book, I Will Hold You ’Til You Sleep, was illustrated by Jon J Muth; her novel, A Taste for Rabbit, received the 2008 Oregon Book Award for Young Adult Literature. Linda has been the director of the Pacific Northwest Children’s Book Conference since its inception.

8

2010 Children’s Book Conference

www.ceed.pdx.edu/children 9


Schedule Friday, July 23 7:30–8:30am

Breakfast

8:20–9:20am

Individual manuscript critiques/portfolio reviews

9:30–11:00am

Writers and Illustrators Unite! Review of Sketches Based on Writers’ Submissions Marla Frazee

Illustrators display their interpretations of the character studies provided by conference writers and share their discoveries. Writers share their reactions upon seeing their words interpreted visually for the first time. This inspiring session is one of the highlights of the conference!

11:10am–12:20pm

Art Show

12:30–1:30pm

Lunch

1:45–2:35pm

Last meetings of workshops

2:45–3:35pm

The Creative Life Ann Whitford Paul

3:45–4:15pm

Why are we compelled to write and draw? How do we deal with friends and family who don’t understand what we do? What keeps us going in the face of rejection? How can we love other creative people in our field, but still experience the bitter taste of envy for their successes? Learn what sustains us, prevents us from working, and keeps us going as we strive to share our vision of the world with others.

Words of wisdom and farewell until next year!

2010 Children's Book Conference Faculty Liz Bicknell is the editorial director of Candlewick Press, a position she has held for 13 years. Books she edited have received the National Book Award, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, the Boston Globe–Horn Book Medal, the Theodor Seuss Geisel Medal, and the E. B. White Read-Aloud Award. She has also edited ten New York Times bestsellers. She works with such celebrated authors as M. T. Anderson, Lauren Child, Jules Feiffer, Paul Fleischman, Laura McGee Kvasnosky, Gregory Maguire, Leonard Marcus, Chris Raschka, and Jane Yolen, among many others. Susan Blackaby has worked in educational publishing for 30 years. On the clock, Suz hones her skills writing fiction and nonfiction titles for the K–8 audience. On her own time, she writes poetry, picture books, and middle-grade fiction. She is the author of Rembrandt’s Hat (Houghton Mifflin, 2002); Cleopatra: Egypt’s Last and Greatest Queen (Sterling, 2009); and a collection of poetry entitled Nest, Nook, and Cranny (Charlesbridge, 2010). Marla Frazee is the author-illustrator of A Couple of Boys Have the Best Week Ever, which received a Caldecott Honor Award and a Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor; Roller Coaster; Santa Claus the World’s Number One Toy Expert; and Walk On! She is the illustrator of many other acclaimed books, including The Seven Silly Eaters; the New York Times best-selling Clementine series; and All the World, which received a Caldecott Honor Award this year. She teaches children’s book illustration at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California, and works in a small studio cabin in the backyard under an avocado tree. David Gifaldi is a Portland writer and teacher. His eight published books for young readers include picture books, a tall tale, middle-grade novels, and a collection of young adult short stories. His latest novel, Listening for Crickets, was a 2009 Notable Book for a Global Society, was on the 2009 Cooperative Children’s Book Center’s annual best-of-the-year list, and was awarded the Oregon Spirit Award by the Oregon Council of Teachers of English. David has lectured widely to both children and adult writers. He currently teaches high school English for the Vancouver School District and has been on the faculty of the MFA in Writing for Children and Young Adults program at the Vermont College of Fine Arts. Ann Whitford Paul, author of Writing Picture Books: A Hands-on Guide from Story Creation to Publication, has published nearly 20 picture books, poetry books, and early readers. Her books have won awards and landed on best-of lists, including the New York Times Notable Books, Carl Sandburg Award for Children’s Literature, Bank Street College Best Books list, Notable Science and Social Studies Books, National Parenting Center’s Seal of Approval, and 2001 Recognition of Merit from the George C. Stone Center for Children’s Books of the Claremont Graduate University. Susan Goldman Rubin is the author of 50 books for children with a focus in recent years on nonfiction. Andy Warhol: Pop Art Painter, Degas and the Dance, and The Cat with the Yellow Star: Coming of Age in Terezin were ALA Notable Books. Delicious: The Life & Art of Wayne Thiebaud won the 2008 Sugarman Children’s Biography Award. Forthcoming in 2010 is Wideness & Wonder: The Art of Georgia O’Keeffe. Elsa Warnick turned to illustration after a successful career as a gallery artist. Among her illustrated books is a three-book series on animal migration by the acclaimed science writer Seymour Simon and the multi-awardwinning Song for the Whooping Crane by Eileen Spinelli. Elsa’s own book, Bedtime, was a Children’s Bookof- the-Month Club Main Selection. Most recently she illustrated This is What I Pray Today by Phyllis Tickle. Elsa currently teaches children’s book illustration at Portland Community College. Emily Whitman is the author of Radiant Darkness (Greenwillow, 2009). A retelling of the Greek myth of Persephone, it was number one on the Indie Next list. Her next novel is Wildwing (Greenwillow, 2010). Emily has worked in library reference, led story times, and written poetry, fiction and nonfiction for educational publishers. She lives in Portland with her husband and two children. She is proud to have met her editor at the Pacific Northwest Children’s Book Conference. Linda Zuckerman has been a children’s book editor for more than 40 years. She is the editor of three books that were awarded the Caldecott Medal and two that received Newbery Honor citations. Linda’s first book, I Will Hold You ’Til You Sleep, was illustrated by Jon J Muth; her novel, A Taste for Rabbit, received the 2008 Oregon Book Award for Young Adult Literature. Linda has been the director of the Pacific Northwest Children’s Book Conference since its inception.

8

2010 Children’s Book Conference

www.ceed.pdx.edu/children 9


inf o rm at io n

regis t r at io n Please print

Campus The eleventh annual Pacific Northwest Children’s Book Conference will be held on the campus of Reed College in southeast Portland’s Eastmoreland neighborhood, five miles from downtown and at the headwaters of Crystal Springs Creek. There are several walking trails within the wooded wetlands and a rhododendron garden just across the street. Visit the college’s Web site for a map and directions, www.reed.edu. Housing and meals Participants may choose to stay on-campus or commute from home daily. The dormitory is a pleasant walk from the center of campus and offers single or double (partitioned) rooms with shared baths. All meals are served during scheduled meal times in the student dining hall, where faculty and students can intermingle. The on-campus option includes full board for the week. Lunch is included in the commuter package, and additional meals may be purchased individually. Academic credit Academic credit (3 quarter credits) is available through the Library Media program in the PSU Graduate School of Education. Credit can be taken at the undergraduate level (LIB 408) or graduate level (LIB 508). Please indicate your credit option on your registration, and check at the conference registration table on Monday morning, July 19, for course assignment and submission guidelines. For more information contact Ruth Murray at 503-318-1972 or murrayr@pdx.edu. Manuscripts for afternoon writing workshops In order for us to assign you to the appropriate afternoon workshops, you will need to email the first five (5) pages of your manuscript to Linda Zuckerman (email: lindajz@verizon.net) by June 22, 2010. Linda will not open email attachments, so please embed your five pages into the body of an email, and in the subject line, type your name followed by “five pages for CBC10”. Please bring nine (9) copies with you to the conference to share in the afternoon workshops. Individual manuscript and portfolio critiques Twenty-five-minute manuscript and portfolio critiques with faculty are available for an additional $60/critique. Manuscripts (double-spaced, 15-page maximum) must be received no later than June 15, 2010—no exceptions. Please send your manuscript to: Linda Zuckerman 15418 SW Ashley Drive Tigard, OR 97224 People who want portfolio critiques should indicate this on the registration form and bring their portfolios to the conference. The schedule of appointments will be announced the first day of the conference. For more information Contact Continuing Education at 503-725-9786, 1-800-547-8887 ext 9786, or katagiri@pdx.edu. You can also visit our Web site, www.ceed.pdx.edu/children. PSU is an affirmative action/equal opportunity institution.

Date__________________________

Last name first NAME middle Initial (If previous records are under a different name, please include other name.) Social Security Number date of birth (month/day/year) (Optional unless applying for tax credit. If you choose not to use SSN, an ID number will be assigned for you.) home address apt. #

City

State

Zip

day Phone evening Phone FAX

Writer Genre:

EMAIL

Illustrator picture book

Please check if This is your first conference.

chapter book

young adult

You are in a critique group.

nonfiction

not sure

You have submitted a manuscript to a children's publisher.

Register before May 15 to receive early bird rates! Registration deadline: June 15, 2010.

Early Bird By 5/15/10 Noncredit (Conference with lunch for 5 days)

$799

After 5/15/10 $855

3 credits: Add $300 to noncredit fee and check your credit option: ___Undergrad LIB408

___Grad LIB508

Campus: Add $450 to noncredit or 3-credit fee. Includes dorm (shared room w/walled partition for privacy), breakfasts, lunches, and dinners for 5 days. Limited # shared rooms. Campus: Add $550 to noncredit or 3-credit fee. Includes dorm (single room), breakfasts, lunches, and dinners for 5 days. MS Critique/Portfolio Review: Add $60 to the noncredit fee for each review

Total Registration Deadline: June 15, 2010 Register by May 15, 2010 for discounted conference fees. Registration must be accompanied by payment. Registration limited to 18 illustrators and 70 total participants; others will be wait-listed and fees will be assessed using the rates in effect on the wait-listed date.

Payment method Check enclosed (payable to Portland State University) Visa

MasterCard Card #____________________________ Exp. date______________

$__________ $__________

Authorized signature______________________________________________________________ Purchase order #___________________________ Organization________________________

$__________

Register online For credit or noncredit online registration please visit www.ceed.pdx.edu/children. MAIL: Complete the registration form and mail to: Portland State University, Continuing Education/ Graduate School of Education, Attn: Valerie Katagiri, CEED/GSE 204, PO Box 751, Portland, OR 97207-075 CANCELLATIONS AND REFUNDS: Cancellations made 30 days prior to the start of the conference will receive a full refund. Cancellations made less than 30 days before the start of the conference are not eligible for refunds. FOR MORE INFORMATION: Visit our Web site at www.ceed.pdx.edu/children.

10

2010 Children’s Book Conference

Portland State University fully supports the right of equal access to its classes by students with disabilities and makes every reasonable effort to ensure this access. Students who require assistance should contact the School of Extended Studies at www.ceed.pdx.edu/children 11 503-725-8279 at least 30 working days before the beginning of class.


inf o rm at io n

regis t r at io n Please print

Campus The eleventh annual Pacific Northwest Children’s Book Conference will be held on the campus of Reed College in southeast Portland’s Eastmoreland neighborhood, five miles from downtown and at the headwaters of Crystal Springs Creek. There are several walking trails within the wooded wetlands and a rhododendron garden just across the street. Visit the college’s Web site for a map and directions, www.reed.edu. Housing and meals Participants may choose to stay on-campus or commute from home daily. The dormitory is a pleasant walk from the center of campus and offers single or double (partitioned) rooms with shared baths. All meals are served during scheduled meal times in the student dining hall, where faculty and students can intermingle. The on-campus option includes full board for the week. Lunch is included in the commuter package, and additional meals may be purchased individually. Academic credit Academic credit (3 quarter credits) is available through the Library Media program in the PSU Graduate School of Education. Credit can be taken at the undergraduate level (LIB 408) or graduate level (LIB 508). Please indicate your credit option on your registration, and check at the conference registration table on Monday morning, July 19, for course assignment and submission guidelines. For more information contact Ruth Murray at 503-318-1972 or murrayr@pdx.edu. Manuscripts for afternoon writing workshops In order for us to assign you to the appropriate afternoon workshops, you will need to email the first five (5) pages of your manuscript to Linda Zuckerman (email: lindajz@verizon.net) by June 22, 2010. Linda will not open email attachments, so please embed your five pages into the body of an email, and in the subject line, type your name followed by “five pages for CBC10”. Please bring nine (9) copies with you to the conference to share in the afternoon workshops. Individual manuscript and portfolio critiques Twenty-five-minute manuscript and portfolio critiques with faculty are available for an additional $60/critique. Manuscripts (double-spaced, 15-page maximum) must be received no later than June 15, 2010—no exceptions. Please send your manuscript to: Linda Zuckerman 15418 SW Ashley Drive Tigard, OR 97224 People who want portfolio critiques should indicate this on the registration form and bring their portfolios to the conference. The schedule of appointments will be announced the first day of the conference. For more information Contact Continuing Education at 503-725-9786, 1-800-547-8887 ext 9786, or katagiri@pdx.edu. You can also visit our Web site, www.ceed.pdx.edu/children. PSU is an affirmative action/equal opportunity institution.

Date__________________________

Last name first NAME middle Initial (If previous records are under a different name, please include other name.) Social Security Number date of birth (month/day/year) (Optional unless applying for tax credit. If you choose not to use SSN, an ID number will be assigned for you.) home address apt. #

City

State

Zip

day Phone evening Phone FAX

Writer Genre:

EMAIL

Illustrator picture book

Please check if This is your first conference.

chapter book

young adult

You are in a critique group.

nonfiction

not sure

You have submitted a manuscript to a children's publisher.

Register before May 15 to receive early bird rates! Registration deadline: June 15, 2010.

Early Bird By 5/15/10 Noncredit (Conference with lunch for 5 days)

$799

After 5/15/10 $855

3 credits: Add $300 to noncredit fee and check your credit option: ___Undergrad LIB408

___Grad LIB508

Campus: Add $450 to noncredit or 3-credit fee. Includes dorm (shared room w/walled partition for privacy), breakfasts, lunches, and dinners for 5 days. Limited # shared rooms. Campus: Add $550 to noncredit or 3-credit fee. Includes dorm (single room), breakfasts, lunches, and dinners for 5 days. MS Critique/Portfolio Review: Add $60 to the noncredit fee for each review

Total Registration Deadline: June 15, 2010 Register by May 15, 2010 for discounted conference fees. Registration must be accompanied by payment. Registration limited to 18 illustrators and 70 total participants; others will be wait-listed and fees will be assessed using the rates in effect on the wait-listed date.

Payment method Check enclosed (payable to Portland State University) Visa

MasterCard Card #____________________________ Exp. date______________

$__________ $__________

Authorized signature______________________________________________________________ Purchase order #___________________________ Organization________________________

$__________

Register online For credit or noncredit online registration please visit www.ceed.pdx.edu/children. MAIL: Complete the registration form and mail to: Portland State University, Continuing Education/ Graduate School of Education, Attn: Valerie Katagiri, CEED/GSE 204, PO Box 751, Portland, OR 97207-075 CANCELLATIONS AND REFUNDS: Cancellations made 30 days prior to the start of the conference will receive a full refund. Cancellations made less than 30 days before the start of the conference are not eligible for refunds. FOR MORE INFORMATION: Visit our Web site at www.ceed.pdx.edu/children.

10

2010 Children’s Book Conference

Portland State University fully supports the right of equal access to its classes by students with disabilities and makes every reasonable effort to ensure this access. Students who require assistance should contact the School of Extended Studies at www.ceed.pdx.edu/children 11 503-725-8279 at least 30 working days before the beginning of class.


Continuing Education/Graduate School of Education PO Box 751 Portland, OR 97207-0751

2010 Pacific NW Children's Book Conference  
2010 Pacific NW Children's Book Conference  

Brochure for Children's Book Conference

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