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KIM DIEHL

MINI Page 78

August 2016 • Issue 141

HOW

SCRAPPY ARE YOU? 9 QUILTS TO MAKE

FROM YOUR STASH

Behind the Scenes with

Jenny Doan Page 16

AllPeopleQuilt.com


With the latest in quilting technology, easy-to-use features, superior stitch quality and a design that stands the test of time, with a Gammill, you too can create long-lasting quilted treasures. Contact your local Gammill dealer for more information.

by Patricia Coleman Hudman

A Quilter’s Story For the past 14 years, I’ve been sharing my love of quilting with clients. My Mother and I began our business, Melody Hill Quilts, together in 2002. We work as a team, with her piecing the tops and me at the Gammill Longarm Machine. Each quilt and project is special but sometimes we have the incredible opportunity to finish a quilt that will not only keep a client warm or look beautiful in their home, but will be a cherished reminder of someone they love. When Karen brought us a stack of ties from her father-in-law who had recently passed away, it was such a meaningful experience to use them to craft two quilts, one for her husband and another for his sister. I know these quilts will be a precious reminder and a family heirloom for generations to come.

Read more at gammill.com/tie-quilt


departments From the Editors ................... 4 Sew in the Know ....................8 an inside look at products and social media faves

Tips from Readers ............... 14 Back to Basics ..................... 98

features Jenny Doan: Rockin’ the Block ................ 16 Meet the face of Missouri Star Quilt Co., and learn how a family business has transformed a small Midwestern town.

Explore with the Experts: Picture This ........................ 30 Get tips from designer Joanna Figueroa on how to take photos that can inspire quilt designs.

On the Cover MINI

HOW

SCRAPPY ARE YOU?

9 QUILTS TO MAKE FROM YOUR STASH

Behind the Scenes with

Jenny Doan AllPeopleQuilt.com

COVER PHOTO CARSON DOWNING

78

Point • Click • Quilt: Using Photos as Design Inspiration 30, 34, and 42 How Scrappy Are You? 9 Quilts to Make from Your Stash 24, 34, 42, 50, 58, 64, 70, 78, and 86

ALLPEOPLEQUILT.COM

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contents projects

Star Bright, Star White ........... 24 Foundation-piece controlled scrappy blocks that pop off a solid white background.

Photo Finish .............................. 34 A Spanish palace inspired a quilt that has stitch-and-flip corners.

24

34

42

50

58

64

Just Rosy ................................... 42 Combine Shoo Fly and Snowball blocks with stylized rose appliqués.

Antique Chic .............................50 Remake a seriously scrappy quilt using templates in multifaceted star blocks.

Stairsteps .................................. 58 Tiny red-and-white triangle-square units climb a path created by Rail Fence blocks.

Great Scott ................................64 Needle-turn Scottish terrier appliqués, then embellish the wall hanging with rickrack and hand embroidery.

Citrus Squeeze ......................... 70 Curve-piece wedge shapes for a table runner that has a fresh vibe.

Fantasy Garden ........................ 78 Machine-appliqué colorful flowers atop a cream foundation for a vibrant table topper.

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Tapestry ..................................... 86 Stitch strip sets (or join individual squares) to achieve a complex look.

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86

quilt it

Mystery Row Quilt

3 WAYS

Discover Row 4 in our year-long mystery quilt.

94

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AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

Explore three ways to quilt Shoo Fly and Snowball blocks.

104


A ST U D I O . . . AT L AST

Save up to 30% Off MSRP during the Koala National Floor Model Sale at your participating Koala retailer. Now is your chance to get the lowest prices of the year on floor models loaded with quality features. Visit mykoalastudio.com to try Koala’s Online Room planner and find a retailer to help you transform your extra space into a beautiful sewing room.

While Supplies Last! Sale Ends August 31st

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from the editors What does scrappy mean to you? Senior Editor Elizabeth Tisinger Beese and I are on opposite ends of the spectrum when it comes to scrappy. If I had my own scrap-o-meter, it would hover in the slightly scrappy quadrant most often. (Elizabeth offers her view on scrappy, below.) I tend to tackle a scrappy project when I need a fresh perspective. Of the scrappy projects I’ve made, my favorites include a crazy Log Cabin quilt I assembled for my godson out of a fish print and tropical colors, an off-center Log Cabin quilt I stitched for a wedding gift, and a half Log Cabin quilt, right, I pieced for my best friend. (It’s interesting that all my scrappy quilts have been Log Cabin variations!) In this issue, we show you quilts that use an assortment of fat quarters for a multifabric look and others where you’ll need to dig deep into your scrap bin. The scrap-ometer that accompanies each project and color option indicates how scrappy the featured quilt is. Where do you fall on the scrap-o-meter?

My scrappy tip: Toss strips or other like-size pieces into a bag, shake the bag, and use the pieces in the order you pull them out.

SCRAP-O-METER

Linda Augsburg, Editorial Content Chief

To me, scrappy means happy! Preferably it also means incorporating 100 or more fabrics in a quilt. I know I’m not alone when I say I have more scraps than I will ever be able to use. But one thing I can do is use up tons of tiny bits of my fabrics with every quilt I make. (This, too, makes me feel a little better about the usefulness of my stash, if not its size!) Even quilts that I would call controlled scrappy can help me put a dent in certain areas of my stash. I once nearly used up my purples making all-purple wedding and graduation quilts (never fear, the purple stash has since recovered). And I made inroads into my collection of 1930s prints, and even dipped into polka dots and solids, when working on my version, right, of our Mystery Row Quilt. (Get instructions for Row 4 on page 94.) It felt great using up some of the

SCRAP-O-METER

smallest scraps I own, including a few bits of real feed sacks.

My scrappy tip: When choosing fabrics for a scrappy quilt, sometimes it’s easier to specify colors you’re not going to use. For my Mystery Row Quilt, above, I challenged myself to not use red, black, or purple—and ended up cheating on the red!

Whatever your personal definition of scrappy and happy, I hope you find it in these pages. — Elizabeth Tisinger Beese, Senior Editor

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AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016


Explore our growing list of advanced quilting features: Automatic Height AdjusterTM (AHA®) feature for smooth, even stitches on multiple fabric layers Pivot Feature for easily turning corners MuVit™ Digital Dual Feed System for smooth feeding of multiple layers of fabric My Design Center feature in THE Dream Machine for applying custom stippling Droppable Feed Dogs for easy free-motion quilting UItimate Accessories, like THE Dream Fabric Frame, for embellishing any size quilt, all within a 3’ x 5’ space

Think we’re only sewing and embroidery? Think again. Visit BrotherIsQuilting.com to learn more. 1-800-4A-BROTHER

/brothersews ©2016 Brother International Corporation. All rights reserved.


to better serve you

SUMMER 2016

17

TREND ALERT!

Dresdens

PROJECTS Perfect for Summer

More for you: Get instructions for 17 fresh projects in Quilts and More™ Summer 2016 magazine.

Make It Modern

POP ART Appliqué the Easy Way

AllPeopleQuilt.com

Go on a virtual shop hop through the pages of Quilt Sampler® Spring/Summer 2016 magazine. Take a peek inside 11 quilt shops and get instructions for an exclusive project from each one. Find these issues—on sale now—at your local quilt shop, on newsstands, or at AllPeopleQuilt.com/shop.

EDITORIAL CONTENT CHIEF

Linda Augsburg

Using Traditional Blocks

Spring/Summer 2016

10 All-New Quilts

+ a Scrappy Table Runner

PEEK INSIDE Fabulous Stores

Plan Your Next

SHOP HOP! 11 Great Locations

Many of our magazines are available as digital editions. For details, visit AllPeopleQuilt.com/getdigital.

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our promise Prior to publication we cut, sew, and assemble at least four blocks of every quilt to verify the accuracy of our patterns and instructions. Then an experienced team of editors reviews the materials lists, how-to directions, and illustrations to make sure the information we provide you is clear, concise, and complete.

DESIGN DIRECTOR Nancy Wiles ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR Elizabeth Stumbo CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATOR Chris Neubauer CONTRIBUTING PHOTO STYLIST Tari Colby CONTRIBUTING GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Mary Pat Crowley, Alison Gamm, and Amy Mathews ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Lori Eggers CONTRIBUTING COPY EDITOR Mary Helen Schiltz

–––––––––––––––

From the Editors of

AllPeopleQuilt.com

SENIOR EDITOR Elizabeth Tisinger Beese EDITORS Jill Abeloe Mead and Jody Sanders ASSISTANT EDITOR Lisa Schumacher ASSISTANT MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Lindsay Mayland CONTRIBUTING QUILT TESTER Laura Boehnke CONTRIBUTING TECHNICAL EDITORS Sue Bahr and Lisa Flyr CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Judith Stern Friedman, Angela Ingle, and Emily Van Schmus

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Scott Mortimer Doug Stark

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SENIOR PRODUCTION MANAGER April Bracelin PRODUCTION MANAGER Debbie Reynolds NEWSSTAND Jennifer Hamilton ASSOCIATE ADVERTISING BUSINESS MANAGER Edward Hayes ASSOCIATE BUSINESS DIRECTOR Jenna Bates BUSINESS MANAGER Tony Rouse CONSUMER MARKETING DIRECTOR Liz Bredeson

––––––––––––––– Meredith National Media Group PRESIDENT TOM HARTY EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENTS President, Parents Network CAREY WITMER President, Women’s Lifestyle THOMAS WITSCHI President, Meredith Digital JON WERTHER Chief Marketing Officer NANCY WEBER Chief Revenue Officer MICHAEL BROWNSTEIN General Manager DOUG OLSON SENIOR VICE PRESIDENTS Chief Digital Officer ANDY WILSON Digital Sales MARC ROTHSCHILD Research Solutions BRITTA CLEVELAND VICE PRESIDENTS Business Planning and Analysis ROB SILVERSTONE Content Licensing LARRY SOMMERS Corporate Sales BRIAN KIGHTLINGER Direct Media PATTI FOLLO Brand Licensing ELISE CONTARSY Communications PATRICK TAYLOR Human Resources DINA NATHANSON Strategic Sourcing, Newsstand, Production CHUCK HOWELL Chief Strategy Officer KIM MARTIN Creative Content Leader DANA POINTS –––––––––––––––

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer STEPHEN M. LACY President, Meredith Local Media Group PAUL KARPOWICZ ––––––––––––––– Vice Chairman MELL MEREDITH FRAZIER In Memoriam — E. T. MEREDITH III (1933–2003) For editorial questions: American Patchwork & Quilting, 1716 Locust St., LN-204, Des Moines, IA 50309-3023. Advertising: American Patchwork & Quilting, 1716 Locust St., LN-200, Des Moines, IA 50309-3023. Phone: 515/284-3575. Fax: 515/284-3110. SUBSCRIBER PLEASE NOTE: Our subscribers list is occasionally made available to carefully selected firms whose products may be of interest to you. If you prefer not to receive information from these companies by mail or by phone, please let us know. Send your request along with your mailing label to Magazine Customer Service, P.O. Box 37508, Boone, IA 50037-0508. For reuse and reprint requests, contact CLpermissions@meredith.com.

The staff of American Patchwork & Quilting 6

AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING

PRINTED IN THE USA


with %'' Secret Garden Booklet Wild Orchid Applique Quilt Size: 72” x 72”

%'' The Raven Size: 68” x 68”

© 2016 moda fabrics • all rights reserved

ead hr

Lush, large-scale prints in pink, purple, black and cheddar evoke a sense of autumn and childhood memories of Halloween. The variety of quilts by Blackbird Design offer a range from mystical to feminine in warm, rich and elegant motifs. Visit your favorite fabric store this June 2016 for the whole collection of patterns, fabric and pre-cuts featuring Wild Orchid.

edle and t ne

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know

You save even the tiniest scraps to use in future projects. AllPeopleQuilt.com/296

IN THE

WHAT KIND OF SCRAPPY QUILT SHOULD YOU MAKE? Whether you pull assorted fabrics from your stash or use one fabric collection, these free quilt patterns will help you achieve a scrappy look that matches your style.

You love quilts made entirely from your stash. No wonder they call you the scrap queen! AllPeopleQuilt.com/297

You prefer to combine yardage with scraps to tie the look together. AllPeopleQuilt.com/299

SCRAP MASTERS! When you’re thinking scrappy, these blogs are sure to provide inspiration. Cheryl Arkison naptimequilter.blogspot.com Get tips for combining fabric scraps with confidence.

You like a scrappy look, but with coordinating fabric. AllPeopleQuilt.com/298

by the numbers

Gayle Bong gaylebong.blogspot.com Be inspired by classic scrappy piecing in beautiful quilts. 11 ⁄ 2" STRIPS

Joan Ford scrap-therapy-quilts.blogspot.com Gain tricks for organizing and storing your scraps.

31 ⁄ 2" SQUARES 2" SQUARES

Bonnie K. Hunter quiltville.blogspot.com Learn to make do while using your stash to its full potential.

4% 6%

We asked our readers what size they commonly cut their scraps.

12% 78%

21 ⁄ 2" STRIPS Vote in our next poll at AllPeopleQuilt.com/vote.

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AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016


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know

IN THE

Designed by quilter Jodie Davis and hand-carved by the oldest clock manufacturer in Germany, the Quilt Shop Cuckoo Clock is a suitable timepiece for your sewing room. On the hour and half hour, the quilter rotary-cuts fabric, the cat jumps up and down on the fabric bolts, the cuckoo pops out of his door and sings, and a chimney sweep peeks from the chimney. The finishing touch is the clock’s pendulum, which is a hand-painted spool of thread. $395 plus shipping; thecuckooclockdesigner.com

cheater fabric Fabric with a pieced look, called cheater cloth, is perfect for getting a scrappy look quickly! Here are four reasons we love playing with preprinted fabric. 1.Get an intricate look with no work. Cut fabric for your blocks from the ColorWorks Concepts collection by Deborah Edwards for Northcott (northcott.net). You’ll get a scrappy pieced look with little effort. 2.Finish a quilt fast. Create a Double Wedding Ring quilt with preprinted yardage that you simply quilt. The fabric is from the Tick Tack collection by Quilt Gate (quilt-gate.com/eng).

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3.Make faux Nine-Patch blocks. Get the look of Nine-Patch or Four-Patch blocks by fussycutting this print from the Strawberry Biscuit collection by Elea Lutz for Penny Rose Fabrics (pennyrosefabrics.com). 4.Practice machine quilting. Use this print from the Fragmental collection by Angela Walters for Robert Kaufman Fabrics (robertkaufman.com) to try your hand at quilting triangles, squares, and negative space.

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AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016


The HQ Avanté 18-inch longarm

of life. Just over a year later, it’s all about the quilting. QUILTING BY DONNA ESTES See her video, inspiration, fabric and pattern at HandiQuilter.com/donna.

Learn more about HQ Education at HandiQuilter.com/education. WWW.HANDIQUILTER.COM • 1.877.MY.QUILT (697.8458)

CONNECT WITH US


know

IN THE

books

to check

Use scraps as tiny as 1½" square with the three grid size options.

Half-Scrap Quilts by Mickey Depre offers lessons on combining your scraps with yardage for customized and consistent looks. $24.95; American Quilter's Society; 2015; shop.americanquilter.com

ScrapTherapy books by Joan Ford, must-haves for scraplovers, contain tips for organizing your scraps. Take control of your stash with Cut the Scraps! (available only by e-book; $17.99). Quilt through your stash by adding one new element, like a solid background, as described in Scraps Plus One! $24.95; Taunton Press; 2013; tauntonstore.com

we love

PRODUCT Above the Curve Karen Kay Buckley’s Perfect Pins are extra thin so they easily glide through fabric, making them ideal for piecing curves and appliqué shapes. Tip: Place pins on a piece of felt to make them easier to pick up when pinning fabric. 45 for $8.95; karenkaybuckley.com

Sisters by Carmen Geddes has 10 one-patch quilt projects. To quickly piece intricate quilts, use the piecing grid preprinted on iron-on interfacing to lay out a project, fuse the squares down, and sew long straight seams. Book $19.99; piecing grid starts at $2.50; TenSisters Handicraft; 2015; tensisters.com

FREE!

Turn to page 70 to find a project perfect for using these pins. 12

AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

Sign up to get our FREE weekly newsletter. You’ll get patterns, tips, and tutorials sent straight to your in-box! Visit AllPeopleQuilt.com/ newsletter to sign up.


tips from readers Make use of your scraps with these inventive tips.

MONOGRAM MAKER I reuse twill tape that is wrapped around fat quarter bundles to make quick quilt tags. Back the twill tape with a piece of tear-away stabilizer, and machine-embroider your initials and the year. Tear off the stabilizer, fold the twill tape in half and tuck it under the binding so it gets stitched in place as you sew down the binding. Use grosgrain ribbon if you want to match the label to your quilt.

Time-saving tip:

Martha L. Gamm Dakota Dunes, South Dakota

SMALL BUT STRIKING

canned goods

On my miniature quilts, I always use single-thickness binding because it has less bulk than the doublefold binding often used on full-size quilts. For one-of-a-kind binding, I use leftover quilt scraps. I cut strip ends on a 45° angle, stitch the strips together, press seams open, and trim for a seamless look.

For each project I make, I save scraps, snippets, and selvage edges in a canning jar. I cut a circle of fabric and place it under the canning jar ring to set the theme for what is inside. I write the project name on the jar label in case I want to make the project again. Inside the jar I place a note listing the cutting measurements, the date the project was completed, and for whom it was made. I store the jar on a shelf and pull out fabric scraps for ongoing projects as needed.

Christine Carlson Cumming, Georgia

PACKING PADDING I have been saving batting scraps for a long time. Recently I used them when folding several wall hangings for off-season storage. The batting isn’t slippery like tissue paper can be so it stays where I want it to stay. Mary Ellen Fleschner Foristell, Missouri

dish towel dedication As much as I love giving a quilt away, it can be a little sad. To remind me of quilts I’ve given away, I sew scraps and strips left over from the quilt to a cotton towel I use for drying dishes. Patty Dodson Omaha

Pam Atyeo Clear Lake, South Dakota

sort through the scraps One day I got frustrated searching through my scraps for some specific pieces I wanted to use in a scrappy quilt. I knew I had them in my stash but wasn’t able to find them. I went out and purchased plastic bins that have snap lids, separated my scraps into the bins by color, and labeled the front of each bin. This has been a huge time-saver for me! Shirley Hester New Braunfels, Texas

SHARE YOUR TIPS: For each original tip we publish, we’ll send a gift hand-picked by our editors. E-mail your tips with your name, address, and daytime phone number to apq@meredith.com; type Quilting Tips in the subject line. Or send tips to American Patchwork & Quilting, Quilting Tips, 1716 Locust St., LN-204, Des Moines, IA 50309.

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AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

one step!

bonus round When I finish making a bed-size quilt, I always have a lot of leftover fabric. I use it to make a small (lap size or larger), scrappy companion quilt. I use a simple pattern so the small quilt comes together quickly. Every recipient has always been pleased and surprised to have a smaller coordinating quilt. I also have considered making complementary pillow covers or wall hangings. Helen Orem Middle River, Maryland

STRING IT TOGETHER I use my scraps to combine my two favorite quilting techniques, appliqué and string piecing. I buy large wood shapes, such as a heart or mitten, to use as templates and cut the shapes from string-pieced blocks to appliqué onto coordinating solids. Joyce Wright Sarasota, Florida


How far can

27 take you?

$

GIVE YOURSELF THE GIFT OF INSPIRATION your favorite latte every day for a week

dinner at your

favorite restaurant a monthly manicure

Make it last a LIFETIME with a GOOD BOOK. Find these books and more at your friendly local quilt shop or online at ShopMartingale.com

Connect with us!


Meet quilting superhero Jenny Doan, whose contagious energy has sparked a main ABOVE: “I just teach what I know,” Jenny Doan says. She records most of her video tutorials without a script and considers her dialogue like a conversation with a friend.

street makeover. She and her Missouri Star Quilt Co. team are quite literally the fabric of small-town Hamilton, Missouri.

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AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016


Jy Do

WRITER JUDITH STERN FRIEDMAN PHOTOGRAPHER TATJANA ALVEGÄRD

’ N I K C O RTHE BLOCK Jelly Roll Race! A Quilt Top in Less Than an Hour: Beginner Free-Motion Quilting:

1,963,763 views.

1,137,255 views. 1,166,070 views.

How to Bind a Quilt with a Sewing Machine: — YouTube.com

Pioneering women never would have dreamed that a single quilter could round up such a bee. Nor did Jenny Doan imagine so many eyes would be on her when in 2009 she began recording quilting tutorial videos and posting them on YouTube. “I just wanted to sew,” she says, “and help working women and stay-at-home moms who had no time to take a class.” The response of Internet-savvy quilters, however, was overwhelmingly enthusiastic and shows no sign of waning. To date, Jenny has posted more than 340 YouTube videos, and her sons still record her every Friday, capturing her friendly smile, easygoing manner, and willingness to show her humanness. “My sense of humor runs deep,” says Jenny, who often confesses her mistakes on camera. “That didn’t work so well,” she is known to say with a laugh. In another moment, she jokes about pressing her seams “to the dark side.” Jenny is magnetic both on and off camera—and her quilting genius is equally compelling. “I’m not interested in total perfection,” Jenny says. “My intention is to teach people how to sew and how to love it.” Jenny is known for her disappearing blocks, which require simple cuts and rearranging pieces to create complex-looking—but easy—quilt designs. Jenny’s work, however, is far from disappearing. ALLPEOPLEQUILT.COM

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LEFT: A rendering of the town’s old train depot on the outside wall of Missouri Star Quilt Co. (MSQC) reflects the early days of Hamilton, Missouri, which is about an hour northeast of Kansas City. BELOW: MSQC has renovated multiple buildings on Hamilton’s main street for additional retail space. This one eventually became Floral Fabric. BOTTOM: Murals painted by local artist Kelly William Poling conceal unsightly flaws in century-old brick walls.

“Hands down, quilting is the most creative thing I’ve ever done.” —Jenny Doan In fact, it has grown into a multifaceted business—the Missouri Star Quilt Co. (MSQC)—that employs 250 people, including six of her seven children. The business even earned the attention of the White House in 2015, receiving a prestigious Small Business of the Year Award. Based in Hamilton, Missouri (population 1,800), MSQC comprises a 42,500-square-foot warehouse; 12 individual quilt shops, each with a different theme; and a retreat center called the Sewing Center. The company stocks what it says is the world’s largest supply of precut fabrics and uses that fabric to fill more than 2,000 online orders daily. On the warehouse’s second floor, employees utilize 10 long-arm machines to quilt 40 customer quilts a day. And the rest of the business occupies nearly half the buildings on the main street. “We’re a quilt show every day,” Jenny says of the MSQC presence in Hamilton, which some refer to as the Disneyland of Quilting. Quilters come from as far as Australia and South America to surround themselves in the quilting culture. Those who want to live the dream can stay in the retreat center, which has sewing, kitchen, and dorm facilities that accommodate 37 guests. While Jenny is the quilting mind behind the Hamilton empire, she credits her children for the successful business operations. 18

AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

TAKEAWAYS FROM JENNY DOAN • Honor every quilt you make. Your quilt doesn’t have to look like mine. It just has to be finished. • Quilt to share—not to be judged. Quilt because you love someone and want to give that person a gift from your own hands. • Enjoy your journey. Don’t feel the need for your quilt to be 100% perfect. Just as you are not perfect, neither does your quilt need to be.


Dena Designs FreeSpirit presents Meadow by Dena Designs, now available at your favorite quilt shop. Download the free Meadow Quilt pattern from makeitcoats.com.

#iamafreespirit Copyright 2016, All rights reserved.

makeitcoats.com


1

MSQC fills 12 Hamilton storefronts with solid, seasonal, reproduction, batik, backing, primitive, and licensed fabrics. Penney’s Quilt Shop is named for the former J.C. Penney department store in which it resides. James Cash Penney was born in Hamilton.

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and Two of the company’s newest shops— MSQC Modern (photo 2) and MSQC Kids & Baby (photo 3)—tip the color wheel to happy.

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Timeless solids and basics fill Penney’s Quilt Shop.

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At Batik Boutique, shelves are dedicated to batik precuts and yardage.

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For visitors inspired by the town’s abundant fabric selection, The Machine Shed offers sewing machines and notions.

7 In Licensed to Sew, quilters find novelty and licensed character-theme fabrics.

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ABOVE: Once a men’s clothing store and barbershop, this rest spot for nonquilters offers a dozen recliners—each with its own remote—televisions, billiards, and a kitchenette.

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AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

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3


7

Sarah Galbraith and Alan Doan co-own the company; Sarah administers goingson in Hamilton, and Alan oversees the Internet aspects. Natalie Earnheart manages and edits Block, the bi-monthly publication of Jenny’s patterns. Hillary Sperry is part of the design team. Jacob Doan handles all filming and editing, and Josh Doan works at the warehouse. Dave Misfud, the only nonfamily member of the administrative team, is responsible for the financials. How did MSQC reach this place of wonder? It was launched in 2008 as Jenny was building a long-arm quilting business. Its roots go back to 1995, however, when Jenny and her husband, Ron, a retired factory machinist, moved to Hamilton from the Monterey Bay, California, area in pursuit of a rural lifestyle for their family. When their kids had grown, Jenny looked for a business opportunity. “I didn’t want a hobby just to pass time,” she says. Realizing there was opportunity in long-arm quilting—local home stitchers were backed up for nearly a year—Jenny’s children bought her a longarm quilting machine. One finished quilt led to another, and eventually the family invested in a storefront. “People wanted to try us because we were a real family business,” Jenny says. Naturally, they began carrying backing fabrics,

ALLPEOPLEQUILT.COM

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PACKAGING AN ONLINE ORDER Orders received at missouriquiltco.com are processed by a computer system located in the warehouse. LEFT: Bythe-yard fabric orders are sent from the warehouse to the appropriate brick-and-mortar shops. BELOW LEFT: At the individual shops, fabric is cut, labeled for tracking, and returned to the warehouse. BELOW RIGHT: Meanwhile, precuts, tools, and books are gathered using electronic devices that pinpoint each item's warehouse location.

which took them to International Quilt Market to explore options. When a fabric rep at market explained that they could purchase one square of every fabric in a line—without buying all 42 bolts—Jenny paid close attention. “There were so many things I could do in the realm of one square,” she says. She followed the rep’s suggestion to brainstorm patterns for precut fabrics. In becoming a fan of these color-matched super packs, Jenny discovered a design niche. Then, as her YouTube tutorials took hold, quilters began requesting the fabrics she used. “All of a sudden, we had too much fabric,” Jenny says. Sarah reduced the overload by moving Civil War prints into

BELOW: The Sewing Center offers cozy beds and pampering space for up to 37 quilters. A fully stocked

another building, then batiks into another, and one by one, the town’s abandoned structures became the receptacles for MSQC’s growing inventory. “This wasn’t at all what I was expecting,” says Jenny, who appreciates the fact that she gets to work daily with her kids. Her video studio is filled with pictures of family, quilts she thought she never could stitch, giant scissors, and other things that make her smile. In building this quilting destination, designing, teaching, and continuing her tutorials, Jenny and MSQC are living proof that it takes a town to make a quilt. For more about Jenny Doan and Missouri Star Quilt Co., go to missouriquiltco.com. Or take a trip to Hamilton, Missouri, to visit the stores in person. Shop hours: Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (closed on Sundays).

kitchen and open eating area keep quilters nourished for marathon shopping, piecing, and fun.

Sneak peek! See more photos of our time with Jenny Doan at AllPeopleQuilt.com/300. 22

AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016


Vintage 30’s Ruby’s Treasures by Barbara J. Eikmeier & McKim Studios

Finished Size: 74” x 74” To view the full Vintage 30’s Ruby’s Treasures collection please visit www.pbsfabrics.com. A free download for the Ruby’s Treasures quilt pattern can be found on our blog, inspiredbyfabric.blogspot.com.


DESIGNER REBECCA BRYAN OF BRYAN HOUSE QUILTS (BRYANHOUSEQUILTS.COM) MACHINE QUILTER CHRISTINA LANE

STAR BRIGHT

STAR WHITE In this big block throw, scrappy teals, corals, and golds mix with white for a fresh palette. Foundation piecing makes it easy to get sharp teal and coral points.

intermediate

materials 1

1 ⁄4 yards total assorted coral prints (blocks)

71 ⁄ 2 yards backing fabric

1

89" square batting Lightweight tracing paper or other foundation material

1

6 yards solid white (blocks, sashing, border)

1

1

11 ⁄ 2 yards total assorted light teal prints (blocks)

Finished quilt: 801 ⁄ 8" square Finished block: 237⁄ 8" square

1

11 ⁄ 2 yards total assorted medium teal prints (blocks)

1

11 ⁄ 2 yards total assorted dark teal prints (blocks)

Yardages and cutting instructions are based on 42" of usable fabric width. Measurements include 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Sew with right sides together unless otherwise stated. Press seams in directions indicated by arrows on diagrams. If no direction is specified, press seam toward darker fabric.

⁄ yard total assorted gold prints (blocks)

1 78

⁄ yard light teal dot (binding)

1 34

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1

1

AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016


PHOTOGRAPHER CAMERON SADEGHPOUR


make foundation papers

foundation-piece units A–C

Foundation Patterns are on Pattern Sheet 4. (Or download the pattern at AllPeopleQuilt.com/301, and photocopy or print foundation papers.)

To foundation-piece, you stitch fabric pieces to a foundation paper with the marked side of the paper facing up and the fabric pieces layered under the paper. The resulting pieced unit is a mirror image of the foundation paper. (For step-by-step instructions on foundation piecing, see the appropriate section in “Back to Basics” on page 98.)

1. Using a pencil, trace foundation patterns onto tracing paper or the foundation material of your choice the number of times specified, tracing all lines and numbers. 1 36 of Foundation Pattern A 1 72 of Foundation Pattern B 1 72 of Foundation Pattern C 2. Cut out each traced foundation roughly 1 ⁄4" outside dashed lines to make foundation papers.

cut fabrics

1. Referring to Diagram 1, cut a coral print 5×7" rectangle in half diagonally from lower left to upper right to make two position 2 triangles. Repeat with 17 additional assorted coral print rectangles to make 36 position 2 triangles total.

AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

3

3

Wrong Side

2

Right Side UNIT A DIAGRAM 3

4. Gather a foundation paper B, a solid white small triangle (position 1), a light teal print 13⁄4×6" rectangle (position 2), a medium teal print 13⁄4×6" rectangle (position 3), a dark teal print 13⁄4×6" rectangle (position 4), and a solid white large triangle (position 5). Foundationpiece in numerical order to make a Unit B (Diagram 4). Referring to “Improvise,” opposite, repeat to make 72 B units total. 1

1 5

2

26

2

1

2

Cut pieces in the following order. From assorted coral prints, cut: 1 36—5×7" rectangles From solid white, cut: 1 12—21 ⁄ 2×42" strips for sashing and border 1 6—21 ⁄ 2×243⁄ 8 " sashing rectangles 1 36—7" squares 1 18—61 ⁄ 2 " squares 1 9—61 ⁄ 8 " squares 1 72—51 ⁄ 2 " squares, cutting each in half diagonally for 144 large triangles total 1 72—31 ⁄ 2 " squares, cutting each in half diagonally for 144 small triangles total From assorted light teal prints, cut: 1 144—13⁄ 4×6" rectangles From assorted medium teal prints, cut: 1 144—13⁄ 4×6" rectangles From assorted dark teal prints, cut: 1 144—13⁄ 4×6" rectangles From assorted gold prints, cut: 1 18—61 ⁄ 2 " squares From light teal dot, cut: 1 9—21 ⁄ 2×42" binding strips

1

5

2

2

3

3

4

4

DIAGRAM 1

2. Cut remaining assorted coral print 5×7" rectangles in half diagonally from lower right to upper left (Diagram 2) to make 36 position 3 triangles.

Wrong Side

Right Side UNIT B DIAGRAM 4

5. Using C foundation papers, repeat Step 4 to make 72 C units (Diagram 5).

3 5 3

1

1

2

2

3

3

4

4

5

DIAGRAM 2

3. Gather a foundation paper A, a solid white 7" square (position 1), a coral print position 2 triangle, and a coral print position 3 triangle. Referring to Diagram 3, foundationpiece in numerical order to make a Unit A. The unit should be 61 ⁄ 8" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make 36 A units total.

Wrong Side

Right Side UNIT C DIAGRAM 5


SCRAP-O-METER

assemble blocks 1. Use a pencil to mark a diagonal line on wrong side of each solid white 61 ⁄ 2" square.

2. Layer a marked solid white square atop an assorted gold print 61 ⁄ 2" square. Sew together with two seams, stitching 1 ⁄4" on each side of drawn line (Diagram 6). Cut pair apart on drawn line and press open

to make two triangle-squares. Each should be 61 ⁄ 8" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make 36 triangle-squares total.

DIAGRAM 6

improvise In some B and C units, designer Rebecca Bryan foundationpieced the teal print rectangles improvisationally, stitching slightly above or below the lines between positions 2 and 3 and between positions 3 and 4. If you wish to use this method, make sure all seams remain parallel to the first seam (between positions 1 and 2).

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27


21⁄ 2×801⁄ 8"

21⁄ 2×24 3⁄ 8"

21⁄ 2×761⁄ 8"

QUILT ASSEMBLY DIAGRAM

3. Referring to Diagram 7, lay out four triangle-squares, four A units, and one solid white 61 ⁄ 8" square in three rows. Sew together pieces in each row. Join rows to make block center. The block center should be 173⁄ 8" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make nine block centers total.

61⁄ 8" sq.

4. Referring to Diagram 8, lay out two B units and two C units in pairs. Sew together units in each pair. Join pairs to make a corner unit. Repeat to make 36 corner units total.

C

B

B DIAGRAM 7

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AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

C DIAGRAM 8


5. Sew corner units to opposite edges of a block center (Diagram 9). Add corner units to remaining edges to make a block. The block should be 243⁄ 8" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make nine blocks total.

assemble quilt top 1. Cut and piece solid white 21⁄ 2×42" strips to make: 2—21 ⁄ 2×801 ⁄ 8" border strips 1 4—21 ⁄ 2×761 ⁄ 8 " sashing strips 1

2. Referring to Quilt Assembly Diagram, lay out blocks, solid white 21 ⁄ 2×243⁄ 8" sashing rectangles, and solid white 21 ⁄ 2×761 ⁄ 8" sashing strips in seven horizontal rows. Sew together pieces in each block row. Press seams toward sashing rectangles. Join rows; press seams toward sashing strips. 3. Sew solid white 21⁄ 2×801⁄ 8" border strips to side edges of joined rows to complete quilt top. Press seams toward border.

DIAGRAM 9

finish quilt 1. Layer quilt top, batting, and backing; baste. (For details, see Complete Quilt, page 101.)

QUILTING DIAGRAM

2. Quilt as desired. Christina Lane machine-quilted a variety of angled lines, pebbles, and feathers in the blocks and Xs in the sashing and border (Quilting Diagram). 3. Bind with light teal dot binding strip. (For details, see Complete Quilt.) APQ

CO O OPTION The background of Star Bright, Star White becomes dark and dramatic in quilt tester Laura Boehnke’s 541 ⁄4"-square version of the quilt. Laura’s use of light to medium oranges and green tone-on-tones makes the center star and outer points of each block glow against the dark background. FABRICS are from the Safari collection by Jinny Beyer for RJR Fabrics (rjrfabrics.com).

SCRAP-O-METER

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i

t

h

PICTURE THIS!

ts p

w

er

ex

or

e

pl

x the e

WORDS AND PHOTOS BY JOANNA FIGUEROA OF FIG TREE & CO. (FIGTREEQUILTS.COM)

1 Looking at the world through the lens of a camera affords me a perspective that is completely different from what my own eyes are able to see. I have played around with photography since I was a little girl, but it wasn’t until I became a quilt and fabric designer that my camera became a permanent extension of who I am. As a textile artist, I try to use my camera every day and experiment with something new as often as I can. However, when I am on vacation, I have

30

AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

Instead of taking the usual snapshots on your next vacation, try these eight tips to get photos that can serve as the muse for your next quilt.

2 a freedom and a much more relaxed time frame, which enables me to focus on photography in a way that I can’t in my crazy daily life as a business owner, quilter, wife, and mother. The explore mode that I’m in when on vacation immediately makes me reach for my camera. It’s almost as if I can’t see everything I want to without it, which in a way is true. When you are looking the through the lens of a camera, there is a level of stop and pay attention that happens. It makes you slow down and take in the details

around you, some of which you likely otherwise would miss. Because most of my family lives in Europe, a European vacation has become somewhat of a regular occurrence for my spouse, kids, and me, and my camera has become the primary vehicle through with I explore and “see” my adventure. As a result, we spend more of our time walking around the back roads, munching on baguettes and fresh berries and taking in the sights and sounds, than we do at traditional tourist locations.


1 Look for a color palette that draws you in. This palette in a Paris café grabbed me. If you train yourself to look for color combinations wherever you go, you will be expanding the amount of inspiration you find a hundredfold. Keep your inspiration photo close at hand when choosing fabrics. The more your fabric color proportions reflect your inspiration, the closer you’ll come to capturing the

3 Last summer my husband and I were lucky enough to take our family to Paris and southern Spain, and I spent a few hours every day exploring my surroundings with my camera. The photos on these pages are a few of my favorites from that trip. I hope that on your next adventure, whether close to home or far away, you get a chance to see the beauty around you from a completely different perspective. Let your camera be your guide.

feeling that made you fall in love with the photo. 2 Take a dozen shots of the same thing from various angles and various vantage points. 3 Try to get as close as you can so that there aren’t competing colors or objects on the edges of the photo. I took this photo at a farmers market,

one of my favorite places to find color palettes. Flea markets, flower shops, and street vendors also provide attractive-to-me color palettes. 4 On the flip side, purposely include things along the photo edges to gain a different perspective. In this photo I’m peeking into a French patisserie.

4 Designer Joanna Figueroa challenged herself and fellow quilt designers Laurie Simpson and Vanessa Christenson to design a project inspired—in color, texture, or pattern—by one of Joanna’s travel photos. For Joanna’s Photo Finish quilt, turn to page 34; for Laurie’s Just Rosy quilt, turn to page 42. Vanessa’s Frill Seeker pillow, right, appeared in the June 2016 issue of American Patchwork & Quilting® magazine. See the photo that inspired this pillow at AllPeopleQuilt.com/302.

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31


6

5

7 5 Consider texture the subject of a photo. I love to shoot photos of something soft and organic next to something hard and angular, such as this fence in front of a garden on Rue Mouffetard in Paris. Doors, trellises, flowers in buckets, fences, and garden gates also offer interesting textures.

8 6 Learn to use selective focus on your camera (or smart phone camera, if it offers it) in order to blur some parts of your photos so they just become a wash of color. This lets you put one item (here, the garden gate) in focus while blurring the remainder. 7 Keep pattern in mind. I find pattern absolutely everywhere I go,

32

AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

including in tile floors, old architectural elements, cobblestone roads, and even product packaging . 8 Search out designs. If you train your eye to see designs everywhere, you’ll be rewarded with multiple ideas for quilts. This display of fans by a Målaga, Spain, street vendor could easily be translated into a quilt pattern.


intermediate

PHOTOGRAPHER ADAM ALBRIGHT

DESIGNER JOANNA FIGUEROA OF FIG TREE & CO. (FIGTREEQUILTS.COM) QUILTMAKERS JOANNA FIGUEROA AND CHERYL HADLEY MACHINE QUILTER DIANA JOHNSON


photo finish Inspired in both color and form by a palace visited during a memorable trip to Europe, this pieced throw has plenty of texture thanks to nubby wovens—including chambray and linen—and dense quilting.

ABOVE: This photo, above, is one I took of the unbelievably intricate tilework and carving of the Alhambra, a 14th-century palace and fortress of Moorish monarchs in Granada, which is in the Andalusia region of southern Spain. I created my Photo Finish quilt, left, to try to show a little bit of the beauty I found there. —designer Joanna Figueroa ALLPEOPLEQUILT.COM

35


choose fabrics To get a look similar to that of the featured quilt, choose three darker hues and two lighter hues of each color. One of designer Joanna Figueroa’s darker grays is actually a black

chambray. It was woven with black threads in the warp and white threads in the weft. For textural appeal, Joanna used gray linen, gray chambray, gray tone-on-tone, and a gray printed to look like burlap.

tips Scrappy Quilt Ideas from Joanna Figueroa BINDING I love scrappy bindings! I recommend combining strips no longer than 20" so you see variety along each edge.

LAYOUT Make sure you like the color layout before you begin joining the blocks. This is especially important if you are using darker and lighter backgrounds because you want to achieve balance throughout the quilt.

materials 1

5—1-yard pieces assorted gray prints (blocks, sashing, outer border)

1

5—3⁄4-yard pieces assorted orange prints (blocks, sashing squares, inner border, binding)

1

33⁄4 yards backing fabric

1

67" square batting

Finished quilt: 583⁄4" square Finished block: 123⁄4" square Yardages and cutting instructions are based on 42" of usable fabric width.

Fresh Art. Incredible Talent. Innovative Design. Be inspired by stunning exhibits and learn from the best instructors in quilting. Shop aisle after aisle of fabrics, machines, and quilting supplies. There is something for everyone at AQS QuiltWeek!

For more information, visit us at QuiltWeek.com or call 270-898-7903. Detail: FANTASYLAND by Sheila Frampton-Cooper

Measurements include 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Sew with right sides together unless otherwise stated. Press seams in directions indicated by arrows on diagrams. If no direction is specified, press seam toward darker fabric.

cut fabrics Cut pieces in the following order. You will have enough pieces to assemble 10 blocks, which is one more than is needed. The extra block will give you flexibility in layout. Save the leftover for another project or use it as a label on the back of the quilt.

Chattanooga, Tennessee September 14–17, 2016 Chattanooga Convention Center

Des Moines, Iowa October 5–8, 2016 Iowa Events Center


From each assorted gray print, cut: 1 8—37⁄ 8 " squares 1 8—23⁄ 8×5" rectangles 1 16—23⁄ 8 " squares 1 8—2×23⁄ 8 " rectangles 1 8—15⁄ 8×23⁄ 8 " rectangles 1 16—2" squares From scraps of assorted gray prints, cut: 1 24—31 ⁄ 2×131 ⁄ 4" sashing strips 1 34 to 38—31 ⁄ 2 "-wide strips in lengths ranging from 61 ⁄ 2" to 81 ⁄ 2" for outer border (Joanna cut primarily 31 ⁄ 2×81 ⁄ 2" and 31 ⁄ 2×61 ⁄ 2" strips, adding whatever leftover ends she had from cutting the sashing strips.) 1 64—2" squares for sashing (16 sets of 4 matching squares)

From each assorted orange print, cut: 1 2—71 ⁄ 4" squares 1 3—21 ⁄ 2×20" binding strips 1 4—31 ⁄ 2 " squares (you will use 16 of the 20 total cut) 1 16—23⁄ 8×31 ⁄ 2 " rectangles 1 8—15⁄ 8×31 ⁄ 8 " rectangles 1 8—15⁄ 8×2" rectangles From scraps of darkest orange prints, cut: 1 6—11 ⁄ 2×42" strips for inner border

71⁄4" sq. 37⁄ 8" sq.

DIAGRAM 1

23⁄ 8×5" rectangles, four 2×23⁄ 8" rectangles, and four 15⁄ 8×23⁄ 8" rectangles) and one orange print (one 71 ⁄4" square, eight 23⁄ 8×31 ⁄ 2" rectangles, four 15⁄ 8×31 ⁄ 8" rectangles, and four 15⁄ 8×2" rectangles).

assemble blocks These instructions result in one block. Repeat the steps to make 10 blocks total.

1. Gather pieces from one gray print (four 37⁄ 8" squares, eight 23⁄ 8" squares, eight 2" squares, four

2. Use a pencil to mark a diagonal line on wrong side of each gray print square (37⁄ 8", 23⁄ 8", and 2"). 3. Align marked gray print 37⁄ 8" squares with opposite corners of orange print 71 ⁄4"

square (Diagram 1; note direction of drawn lines). Sew on drawn lines; trim excess, leaving 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Press open attached triangles.

4. Align marked gray print 37⁄ 8" squares with remaining corners of orange print square; sew, trim, and press as before to make a large Square-in-aSquare unit. The unit should be 71 ⁄4" square including seam allowances.

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37

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www.eversewn.com


SCRAP-O-METER

5. Align a marked gray print 23⁄ 8" square with one end of an orange print 23⁄ 8×31 ⁄ 2" rectangle (Diagram 2; note direction of drawn line). Sew on drawn line; trim excess, leaving 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Press open attached triangle. Align a marked gray print 2" square with opposite corner of orange print rectangle. Stitch, trim, and press as before to make Unit A. Repeat to make four A units total.

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AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

23⁄ 8" sq.

7. Sew together one each of units A and B to make a point unit (Diagram 4). The point unit should be 41 ⁄4×31 ⁄ 2" including seam allowances. Repeat to make four point units total.

2" sq.

UNIT A DIAGRAM 2

6. Referring to Diagram 3, repeat Step 5, reversing direction of drawn lines, to make four of Unit B.

DIAGRAM 4 UNIT B DIAGRAM 3


2 3⁄ 8×5"

8. Referring to Diagram 5, join a gray print 15⁄ 8×23⁄ 8" rectangle and an orange print 15⁄ 8×31 ⁄ 8" rectangle to make Unit C. The unit should be 15⁄ 8×5" including seam allowances. Repeat to make four C units total. 15⁄ 8

15⁄ 8

2 ⁄ 8"

3 ⁄ 8"

× 3

C

C

D

3. Using Step 1 pieces, repeat Assemble Blocks, page 37, steps 3 and 4, to make a sashing Square-in-a-Square unit (Diagram 8). The unit should be 31 ⁄ 2" square including seam allowances. 31⁄ 2" sq.

D

× 1

DIAGRAM 8

UNIT C DIAGRAM 5

4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 to make 16 sashing Square-in-a-Square units total. DIAGRAM 7

9. Referring to Diagram 6, sew together a gray print 2×2 ⁄ 8" rectangle and an orange print 15⁄ 8×2" rectangle along 2" edges to make Unit D. The unit should be 2×31 ⁄ 2" including seam allowances. Repeat to make four D units total. 3

2× 15⁄ 8 × 2 3⁄ 8" 2" UNIT D DIAGRAM 6

10. Referring to Diagram 7, lay out gray print 23⁄ 8×5" rectangles, units C and D, point units, and the large Square-in-a-Square unit. To assemble the block, first sew together gray print rectangles and C units. Then join D units to two of the point units. Finally, sew together pieces in each horizontal row. Join rows to make a block. Press seams in one direction. The block should be 131 ⁄4" square including seam allowances.

assemble sashing units 1. Use a pencil to mark a diagonal line on wrong side of each remaining gray print 2" square. 2. Gather one orange print 31 ⁄ 2" square and four marked 2" squares from one gray print.

ALLPEOPLEQUILT.COM

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31⁄ 2×58 3⁄4" 11 ⁄ 2×52 3⁄4"

11⁄ 2×50 3⁄4"

31⁄ 2×52 3⁄4"

31⁄ 2×131⁄4"

31⁄ 2×131⁄4"

QUILT ASSEMBLY DIAGRAM

40

assemble quilt center

2. Join rows to make quilt center.

1. Referring to Quilt Assembly Diagram, lay out blocks, sashing Square-in-a-Square units, and assorted gray print sashing strips in seven rows. Sew together pieces in each row. Press seams toward sashing strips.

Press seams toward sashing rows. The quilt center should be 503⁄4" square including seam allowances.

AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

assemble and add borders 1. Cut and piece assorted orange print 11 ⁄ 2×42" strips to make:

2—11 ⁄ 2×523⁄4" inner border strips 1 2—11 ⁄ 2×503⁄ 4" inner border strips 1

2. Sew short inner border strips to opposite edges of quilt center. Add long inner borders strips to remaining edges. Press all seams toward inner border. The quilt center now should be 523⁄4" square including seam allowances.


3. Cut and piece assorted gray print 31 ⁄ 2"-wide strips to make: 1 2—31 ⁄ 2×583⁄ 4" outer border strips 1 2—31 ⁄ 2×523⁄ 4" outer border strips 4. Sew short outer border strips to opposite edges of quilt center. Add long outer border strips to remaining edges to complete quilt top. Press all seams toward outer border.

2. Quilt as desired. Diana Johnson machine-quilted a custom floral design in the center of each block (Quilting Diagram). For the block backgrounds, she alternated between small stippling and straight-line echo quilting. Diana stitched a stand-alone feather design in each sashing strip and a small fleur-de-lis design in each sashing Square-in-a-Square unit. She quilted the inner border with a swirl and the outer border with a continuous feather. QUILTING DIAGRAM

finish quilt

3. Sew together assorted orange

1. Layer quilt top, batting, and

print 21 ⁄ 2×20" binding strips to make a pieced binding strip. Bind quilt with pieced binding strip. (For details, see Complete Quilt.) APQ

backing; baste. (For details, see Complete Quilt, page 101.)

CO O OPTION Quilt tester Laura Boehnke used nautical prints to continue the travel-inspired theme in her 43"-square version of Photo Finish. Instead of just two fabrics in each block, as was done in the original, Laura used four fabrics: sailboats or boat houses in the block centers, solid cream surrounding the centers, a bold red or stripe for the eight-pointed stars, and a more neutral but playful novelty print for the backgrounds.

Dream of the sea! Make this quilt in nautical prints using the pattern at AllPeopleQuilt .com/303.

FABRICS are from the Sea View collection by Makower UK and Dimples basics, both from Andover Fabrics (andoverfabrics.com).

SCRAP-O-METER

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PHOTOGRAPHER ADAM ALBRIGHT

THIS PHOTO: The happy spring colors of the flowers in the photo, opposite, along with the gray of the metal bucket inspired Just Rosy. I reinterpreted the flowers as simple circles. Once I decided on pink, green, and gray, other fabrics from the Bread ‘n Butter fabric collection just fell into place. 42

AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

—designer Laurie Simpson


intermediate

DESIGNER LAURIE SIMPSON OF MINICK AND SIMPSON (MINICK ANDSIMPSON.BLOGSPOT.COM) MACHINE QUILTER MAGGI HONEYMAN

JUST

rosy A French flower market photo elicits a wall hanging of Snowball and Shoo Fly blocks, stylized rose appliqués, and a steel gray ground.


materials 1

2 ⁄4 yards gray chambray (blocks, border)

1

11 ⁄4 yards total assorted bright prints in blue, orange, yellow, pink, and red (blocks, rose appliqués)

1

⁄ yard total assorted green prints (blocks, leaf appliqués)

1 34

⁄ yard red-and-white print (binding)

1 5 8

1

3 yards backing fabric

1

52×64" batting

Finished quilt: 431 ⁄ 2×551 ⁄ 2" Finished blocks: 6" square Yardages and cutting instructions are based on 42" of usable fabric width. Measurements include 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Sew with right sides together unless otherwise stated. Press seams in directions indicated by arrows on diagrams. If no direction is specified, press seam toward darker fabric.

cut fabrics Cut pieces in the following order. Cut gray chambray border strips lengthwise (parallel to the selvages). Patterns for appliqués are on Pattern Sheet 3. To make templates of patterns, see Make and Use Templates, page 98. Be sure to add a 3⁄ 16" seam allowance to appliqué shapes when cutting them out.

44

From gray chambray, cut: 1 2—7×431 ⁄ 2 " border strips 1 2—7×421 ⁄ 2 " border strips 1 17—61 ⁄ 2 " squares 1 36—27⁄ 8 " squares 1 72—21 ⁄ 2 " squares From assorted bright prints, cut: 1 20 each of patterns A and B From assorted green prints, cut: 1 40 of Pattern C From remaining assorted bright and green prints, cut 18 sets of: 1 2—27⁄ 8 " squares 1 1—21 ⁄ 2 " square From remaining assorted bright and green prints, cut 17 sets of: 1 4—21 ⁄ 2 " squares From red-and-white print, cut: 1 6—21 ⁄ 2×42" binding strips

open to make two trianglesquares. Each should be 21 ⁄ 2" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make four triangle-squares total.

fabric, leaving 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Press open attached triangles to make a Snowball block. The block should be 61 ⁄ 2" square including seam allowances. 21⁄ 2" sq.

DIAGRAM 1

4. Referring to Diagram 2, lay out triangle-squares, gray chambray 21 ⁄ 2" squares, and bright or green print 21 ⁄ 2" square in three rows. Sew together pieces in each row. Join rows to make a Shoo Fly block. The block should be 61 ⁄ 2" square including seam allowances. 21⁄ 2" sq.

61⁄ 2" sq.

DIAGRAM 3

3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 to make 17 Snowball blocks total.

21⁄ 2" sq.

assemble Shoo Fly blocks

assemble quilt center

1. Use a pencil to mark a diagonal line on wrong side of each gray chambray 27⁄ 8" square.

1. Referring to Quilt Assembly Diagram, page 46, alternate Shoo Fly and Snowball blocks in seven horizontal rows.

2. For one Shoo Fly block, gather two marked gray chambray 27⁄ 8" squares, four gray chambray 21 ⁄ 2" squares, and a set of three squares from one bright or green print (two 27⁄ 8" squares and one 21 ⁄ 2" square).

3. Layer a marked gray chambray square atop a bright or green print 27⁄ 8" square. Sew together with two seams, stitching 1 ⁄4" on each side of drawn line (Diagram 1). Cut pair apart on drawn line and press

AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

DIAGRAM 2

5. Repeat steps 2–4 to make 18 Shoo Fly blocks total.

assemble Snowball blocks 1. Mark a diagonal line on wrong side of four matching bright or green print 21 ⁄ 2" squares. 2. Align a marked bright or green print square with each corner of a gray chambray 61 ⁄ 2" square (Diagram 3; note direction of marked lines). Sew on drawn lines. Trim excess

2. Sew together blocks in each row. Press seams toward Snowball blocks. Join rows to make quilt center; press seams in one direction. The quilt center should be 301 ⁄ 2×421 ⁄ 2" including seam allowances.


Center 8"

8"

8" 1"

A B C

C 1¼"

APPLIQUÉ PLACEMENT DIAGRAM

7×431⁄ 2"

8"

appliqué and add border 1. Fold a gray chambray 7×431 ⁄ 2" border strip in half crosswise. Press lightly to make a center guideline; unfold. Referring to Appliqué Placement Diagram, mark guidelines (with a pencil or crease) 8" and 16" from the center guideline (five guidelines total). 2. Center a bright print A circle on each guideline, 1" from border strip top edge. Layer a bright print B circle atop each A circle; pin or baste pieces in place to make five layered roses.

7×421⁄ 2"

3. Arrange two assorted green print C leaves below each layered rose, 11 ⁄4" from border strip bottom edge. (Appliqué Placement Diagram). Pin or baste pieces in place.

To order a kit of fabrics for quilt top and binding for $109.45 ppd. (California residents, $117.61 ppd.), contact American Jane Patterns, 925/947-3977; americanjane.com.

K it

QUILT ASSEMBLY DIAGRAM

46

AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016


4. Working from bottom layer to top, use threads that match the appliqués and small slip stitches to hand-stitch each piece to border strip to make a long appliquéd border strip. Turn under 3⁄ 16" seam allowances with your needle as you stitch.

Designed for the details.

5. Repeat steps 1–4 to make a second long appliquéd border strip.

Featuring Dual Duty Plus® Hand Quilting Thread.

6. Using gray chambray 7×421 ⁄ 2" border strips, repeat steps 1–4 to make two short appliquéd border strips. (The layered roses on the ends will be closer to the border strip short edges than those on the long border strips.) 7. Referring to Quilt Assembly Diagram, join short appliquéd border strips to side edges of quilt center. Add long appliquéd border strips to remaining edges to complete quilt top. Press all seams toward border.

finish quilt 1. Layer quilt top, batting, and backing; baste. (For details, see Complete Quilt, page 101.)

For more information visit:

makeitcoats.com ALLPEOPLEQUILT.COM

47


FABRICS are from the Bread ‘n Butter collection by American Jane for Moda Fabrics (modafabrics.com).

2. Quilt as desired. “The quilt had a traditional-meets-modern look to me, so I combined traditional and modern quilting elements,” says Maggi Honeyman. She machinequilted loops and dense ripples in the Shoo Fly blocks and a feathered wreath in the center of each Snowball block (Quilting Diagram). She outline-quilted

around the appliqué shapes and stitched a vein in each leaf. To fill the background of the border, she quilted dense ripples below the leaf appliqués and a flowing swirl design above the leaves.

3. Bind with red-and-white print binding strips. (For details, see Complete Quilt.) APQ

QUILTING DIAGRAM 48

AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016


QUILTED CO O

OPTION

a neutral palette for quilt tester Laura Boehnke’s 261 ⁄ 2×381 ⁄ 2" version of Just Rosy. When the large-scale florals, organic scrolls, and multicolor stripe are cut into pieces for the Shoo Fly blocks, they offer visual interest and make the two-fabric blocks look more scrappy. Snowball blocks are a natural place to show off a quilting design, such as the computerized Celtic knot that Handi Quilter Studio Educator Kerri Rawlins centered in each one (Quilting Diagram). A windmill design formed from multiple kite shapes in each Shoo Fly block makes an appealing counterpoint to the block seams.

Let the fabric be your guide. I used the inner border multicolor stripe to determine the spacing of the parallel lines in both borders.

—Kerri Rawlins Handi Quilter Studio Educator

FABRICS are from the Mochachino collection by Penny Sturges for Red Rooster Fabrics (redroosterfabrics.com). QUILTING DESIGNS Windmill and JS212 Abstract are in the Pro-Stitcher design library from Handi Quilter (handiquilter.com).

NEUTRAL NOTES Coffee-color prints provide

QUILTING DIAGRAM

Extra, extra! Get instructions for this quilt at AllPeopleQuilt.com/304.

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If a quilt could talk, what would this antique coverlet say about its unlikely sashing colors of blue, purple, and orange? Was it intentional or did fabric colors change with age? Regardless, there is no doubt that this worn scrappy treasure was well-loved.

ANTIQUE CHIC QUILT COLLECTOR TARA LYNN BAISDEN OF SEW UNIQUE CREATIONS (SEWUNIQUECREATIONS.COM)

advanced

50

materials 1

31 ⁄ 2 yards total assorted medium and dark prints in blue, red, pink, tan, and black (blocks)

1

25⁄ 8 yards total assorted light prints (blocks)

1

15⁄ 8 yards solid cream (sashing squares, binding)

1

3 yards total assorted stripes, plaids, and solids in orange, blue, and purple (sashing rectangles)

1

51 ⁄ 2 yards backing fabric

1

83×97" batting

AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

Finished quilt: 75×89" Finished block: 91 ⁄ 2" square Yardages and cutting instructions are based on 42" of usable fabric width. Measurements include 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Sew with right sides together unless otherwise stated.

choose machine or hand piecing The following instructions involve machinepiecing the blocks. If you prefer to hand-piece the many set-in seams, stitch carefully on seam lines between matching points, sewing from dot to dot.


PHOTOGRAPHER CAMERON SADEGHPOUR


plan fabrics

cut fabrics

The unknown quiltmaker used a scrappy assortment of dark, medium, and light prints in each block. She selected matching pieces for various positions, likely to bring variety to the quilt top. For example, in the block shown below, the quiltmaker alternated just two fabrics in the center star unit, positioned matching blue print diamonds around the star unit, and used one pink print for the outer rectangles. Refer to the photo, page 54, for inspiration as you plan your fabric placement.

Cut pieces in the following order. Patterns are on Pattern Sheet 1. To make templates of patterns, see Make and Use Templates, page 98, referring to the instructions for machine piecing (or hand piecing, if you prefer). Be sure to transfer the dots to the templates, then to fabric pieces. The dots are matching points used when joining pieces and setting in seams. For advice about making templates and cutting fabric pieces, refer to “Tips for Templates,” below. From assorted medium and dark prints, cut: 1 960 of Pattern A

TIPS FOR TEMPLATES Quilt designer and collector Tara Lynn Baisden offers these tips for success with templates. * Use a fine-point permanent marker to accurately trace each pattern onto template plastic. * Use a ⁄ " hole punch to make a hole in your templates at each dot (where the seam allowances intersect). These holes are the perfect size to accommodate a pencil or fabric pen. * Before cutting, spray fabric with starch and press. This will help stabilize the bias edges of the cut pieces.

From assorted light prints, cut: 1 360 of Pattern B (or rotary-cut 360—17⁄ 8" B squares) 1 240 of Pattern C (or rotary-cut 60—31 ⁄4" squares, cutting each diagonally twice in an X for 240 C triangles total) 1 120 of Pattern D (or rotary-cut 120—17⁄ 8×31 ⁄4" D rectangles) From solid cream, cut: 1 9—21 ⁄ 2×42" binding strips 1 42—5" sashing squares From assorted stripes, plaids, and solids, cut: 1 71—5×10" sashing rectangles

assemble blocks 1. For one block, gather 32 assorted medium or dark print A diamonds, 12 assorted light print B squares, eight assorted light print C triangles, and four assorted light print D rectangles. (If desired, select matching pieces for some positions as the unknown quiltmaker frequently did; see Plan Fabrics, left, for more information.) 2. Pin together two assorted print A diamonds, aligning marked matching points (Diagram 1). Sew together between matching points—do not stitch into the 1 ⁄4" seam allowances— to make a diamond pair. Repeat to make 16 diamond pairs total.

A

A

DIAGRAM 1

3. In same manner, join two diamond pairs between matching points to make a star half (Diagram 2). Repeat to make a second star half.

DIAGRAM 2

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AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016


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WHAT’S NEXT

a stor y in ever y stitch

Memory Craft 9400QCP


SCRAP-O-METER

4. Pin star halves together, aligning matching points. To prevent puckering at center, join star halves with two seams, beginning each seam at the center and stitching to outer matching points, to make a star unit (Diagram 3). Press all seam allowances in one direction; the seam allowances should swirl neatly, reducing bulk at the center.

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AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

DIAGRAM 3


SCRAPPY PROGRESSION While we don’t know anything about the maker of Antique Chic, it’s interesting to imagine what her plan might have been for this quilt and surmise when she started to add make-do elements. Here is what we’re assuming. The original plan was to alternate light and dark blues in the star points, have a white shirting background, and use one dark blue fabric for the diamonds surrounding the center star.

Burgundy and red prints were called on to fill in some of the dark blue areas and pinks and blues were substituted for the white shirting in parts of the background.

Blacks and more reds were incorporated in some blocks but were mostly alternated with the dark blue. Darker pinks and blues eventually became part of the background. In some extremely scrappy blocks, much of the block form is lost, though they are still fun to study!

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5. Referring to Diagram 4, sew a light print B square into each angle of the star unit using set-in seams. (For details, see Set in Seams, page 100.) Press seams away from squares.

7. Join a corner unit to each corner of Step 5 star unit using set-in seams (Diagram 7); press seams toward corner units.

2. Referring to Quilt Assembly Diagram, join six assorted stripe, plaid, and solid sashing rectangles and five blocks to make a block row. Press seams toward sashing rectangles. Repeat to make six block rows total.

B

3. Join rows to complete quilt top. Press seams away from block rows. B

finish quilt

DIAGRAM 7 DIAGRAM 4

8. Referring to Diagram 8, join light 6. Referring to Diagram 5, join three diamond pairs, stitching between dots as before; press seams in one direction. Using set-in seams, sew a light print B square into the center angle of the joined diamond units, and sew a light print C triangle to each outer angle to make a corner unit (Diagram 6). Press all seams toward diamond units. Repeat to make four corner units total.

print D rectangles to sides of Step 7 unit using set-in seams to make a block. Press seams away from rectangles. The block should be 10" square including seam allowances. D

1. Layer quilt top, batting, and backing; baste. (For details, see Complete Quilt, page 101.) 2. Quilt as desired. The unknown quiltmaker hand-quilted diagonal lines 1"–11 ⁄4" apart across the quilt top (Quilting Diagram). 3. Bind with solid cream binding strips. (For details, see Complete Quilt.) Note: The antique quilt is not bound; the sashing pieces are turned over and stitched to the backing.

D

DIAGRAM 8 DIAGRAM 5

9. Repeat steps 1–8 to make 30 blocks total.

C B

C

DIAGRAM 6

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AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

assemble quilt top 1. Referring to Quilt Assembly Diagram, sew together six solid cream sashing squares and five assorted stripe, plaid, and solid sashing rectangles to make a sashing row. Press seams toward sashing rectangles. Repeat to make seven sashing rows total.

QUILTING DIAGRAM


5×10"

5×10"

5" sq.

QUILT ASSEMBLY DIAGRAM

CO O OPTION Dark sashing squares cut from an intricate Jacobean floral, far right, top, grab attention and set the stage for a sophisticated, traditional look in quilt tester Laura Boehnke’s version of Antique Chic. Laura brought more order to the quilt by making each block with the same fabrics in the same positions. Diamonds cut from ombré red stripes, far right, bottom, and ombré blue stripes vary subtly between medium and dark.

Freebie alert! Grab this quilt pattern at AllPeopleQuilt .com/305. FABRICS are from the Canterbury collection by Quilting Treasures (quiltingtreasures.com).

SCRAP-O-METER

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advanced

DESIGNER JO KRAMER OF JO’S COUNTRY JUNCTION (JOSCOUNTRYJUNCTION.COM)

steps

stair

While this variation on Rail Fence blocks is simple to sew, it is the sheer number of itty-bitty pieces in this project that impresses.

“I started with some leftover bonus triangles, thinking I had a lot of them and I had probably 250,” designer Jo Kramer says. “Boy, was I surprised when they didn’t get me very far! When I saw that I couldn’t match the reds, I went into my cupboard and pulled out all the reds I had that were 1 ⁄4 yard or more. From there I narrowed my options to four solids for the triangles. The different reds give the quilt sparkle. I ended up really liking the look!”

materials 1

2 ⁄ 8 yards total assorted white prints (triangle-squares)

1

25⁄ 8 yards total assorted solid reds (triangle-squares)

1

25⁄ 8 yards total assorted light prints (Rail Fence units)

1

25⁄ 8 yards total assorted medium prints (Rail Fence units)

1

25⁄ 8 yards total assorted dark prints (Rail Fence units)

5

⁄ yard black print (binding)

1 34

58

AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

1

71 ⁄ 2 yards backing fabric

1

89×97" batting

Finished quilt: 801 ⁄ 2×881 ⁄ 2" (full-size with 13" drop) Finished blocks: 4" square Size options: For a chart of materials needed to make this quilt in three more sizes, turn to page 63. Yardages and cutting instructions are based on 42" of usable fabric width. Measurements include 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Sew with right sides together unless otherwise stated. Press seams in directions indicated by arrows on diagrams. If no direction is specified, press seam toward darker fabric.

PHOTOGRAPHER ADAM ALBRIGHT

choose fabrics


SCRAP-O-METER

cut fabrics Cut pieces in the following order. From assorted white prints, cut: 1 880—17⁄ 8 " squares From assorted solid reds, cut: 1 880—17⁄ 8 " squares From assorted light prints, cut: 1 49—11 ⁄ 2×42" strips From assorted medium prints, cut: 1 49—11 ⁄ 2×42" strips 60

AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

From assorted dark prints, cut: 1 49—11 ⁄ 2×42" strips From black print, cut: 1 9—21 ⁄ 2×42" binding strips

2. Layer a marked white print square atop a solid red 17⁄ 8" square. Sew together with two seams, stitching 1 ⁄4" on each side of drawn line (Diagram 1).

make triangle-squares 1. Use a pencil to mark a diagonal line on wrong side of each assorted white print 17⁄ 8" square.

DIAGRAM 1


APQS L I F E T I M E

W A R R A N T Y

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*Limited to the original owner.

TM

apqs.com


A

B

A

B

A

B

B

A

A

B

B

A

QUILT ASSEMBLY DIAGRAM

3. Cut Step 2 pair apart on drawn line and press open to make two triangle-squares. Each should be 11 ⁄ 2" square including seam allowances. 4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 to make 1,760 triangle-squares total.

assemble Rail Fence units

assemble blocks 1. Referring to Diagram 3, lay out four triangle-squares and a Rail Fence unit; note orientation of trianglesquares. Join triangle-squares in a row. Sew the row to light print edge of Rail Fence unit to make Block A. The block should be 41 ⁄ 2" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make 220 A blocks total.

1. Referring to Diagram 2, sew together a light, medium, and dark print 11 ⁄ 2×42" strip to make a strip set. Cut strip set into nine 41 ⁄ 2"-wide Rail Fence units. Each unit should be 41 ⁄ 2×31 ⁄ 2" including seam allowances. BLOCK A DIAGRAM 3

41⁄ 2"

2. Reversing direction of triangle-

DIAGRAM 2

squares, repeat Step 1 to make 220 B blocks (Diagram 4).

2. Sew together blocks in each row. Press seams in one direction, alternating direction with each row. 3. Join rows to make quilt top. Press seams in one direction.

finish quilt 1. Layer quilt top, batting, and backing; baste. (For details, see Complete Quilt, page 101.) 2. Quilt as desired. Jo machinequilted a free-form Baptist Fan design over the entire quilt top (Quilting Diagram). 3. Bind quilt with black print binding strips. (For details, see Complete Quilt.) APQ

2. Using remaining light, medium, and dark print 11 ⁄ 2×42" strips, repeat Step 1 to make 49 strip sets total, cutting them into 440 Rail Fence units total. BLOCK B DIAGRAM 4

assemble quilt top 1. Referring to Quilt Assembly Diagram, alternate A and B blocks, rotating B blocks as shown, in 22 rows of 20 blocks each. QUILTING DIAGRAM

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AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016


Optional Sizes

CO O OPTION

Layout: 12 rows of 9 blocks each Finished size ............................................ 361 ⁄ 2×481 ⁄ 2" 12

108

54 A

54 B

432

Assorted white prints (triangle-squares) ....1 yard Assorted solid reds (triangle-squares) ........1 yard Assorted light prints (Rail Fence units) .......1 yard Assorted medium prints (Rail Fence units) .1 yard Assorted dark prints (Rail Fence units) .......1 yard Black print (binding)......................................1 ⁄ 2 yard Backing fabric ..............................................21 ⁄ 2 yards Batting ..........................................................45×57"

Layout: 24 rows of 23 blocks each Finished size ............................................ 921 ⁄ 2×961 ⁄ 2" 62

552

276 A

276 B

2,208

Assorted white prints (triangle-squares) ....31 ⁄4 yards Assorted solid reds (triangle-squares) ........31 ⁄4 yards Assorted light prints (Rail Fence units) .......31 ⁄ 8 yards Assorted medium prints (Rail Fence units) .31 ⁄ 8 yards Assorted dark prints (Rail Fence units) .......31 ⁄ 8 yards Black print (binding)......................................7⁄ 8 yard Backing fabric ..............................................81 ⁄ 2 yards Batting ..........................................................101×105"

SCRAP-O-METER

Quilt tester Laura Boehnke used cheerful 1930s reproduction prints for her version of Stairsteps. To bring a little calm to the many small prints, Laura restricted their use in

Number of blocks ..................................... 676 Layout: 26 rows of 26 blocks each Finished size ............................................. 1041 ⁄ 2" sq.

the blocks to the Rail Fence units and used mottled solids for the trianglesquares. Borders that finish at 1" and 2" wide provide the finishing touches

76

676

to the 381 ⁄ 2×461 ⁄ 2" wall hanging. 338 A

338 B

FABRICS are from the Toy Chest

2,704

Assorted white prints (triangle-squares) ....37⁄ 8 yards Assorted solid reds (triangle-squares) ........37⁄ 8 yards Assorted light prints (Rail Fence units) .......33⁄4 yards Assorted medium prints (Rail Fence units) .33⁄4 yards Assorted dark prints (Rail Fence units) .......33⁄4 yards Black print (binding)......................................7⁄ 8 yard Backing fabric ..............................................91 ⁄ 2 yards Batting ..........................................................113" sq.

Solids II collections, all by Sara Morgan for Washington Street Studio (pbtex.com/wss).

Pump up the color! Use bright prints in the pattern at AllPeopleQuilt.com/306.

ALLPEOPLEQUILT.COM

63


great

SCOTT Create pieced backgrounds for adorable Scottish terrier appliqués. Add interest with rickrack, pieced binding, and hand embroidery.

materials 1

12 to 15—9×21" pieces (fat eighths) or 11 ⁄ 2 yards total assorted aqua prints (blocks) ⁄ yard black tone-on-tone (dog appliqués)

1 34

⁄ yard total assorted red prints (bow appliqués)

1 1 8

1

Scrap of aqua-and-red dot (knot appliqués) ⁄ yard red-and-white stripe (inner border, binding)

1 1 2

1

11 ⁄ 8 yards aqua floral (outer border, binding)

1

3 yards backing fabric

1

53" square batting

1

Embroidery floss: red, black, variegated aqua

1

31 ⁄ 2 yards 1 ⁄ 8"-wide rickrack: red

1

33⁄4 yards 1 ⁄4"-wide rickrack: red

Finished quilt: 441 ⁄ 2" square Finished block: 10" square Yardages and cutting instructions are based on 42" of usable fabric width. Measurements include 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Sew with right sides together unless otherwise stated.

Press seams in directions indicated by arrows on diagrams. If no direction is specified, press seam toward darker fabric.

cut fabrics Cut pieces in the following order. Patterns are on Pattern Sheet 3. To make templates of the patterns, see Make and Use Templates, page 98. Be sure to add a scant 1 ⁄4" seam allowance to appliqué shapes when cutting them out. From each of nine assorted aqua prints, cut: 1 1—71 ⁄ 2 " square From remaining assorted aqua prints, cut: 1 18—6" squares, cutting each in half diagonally for 36 triangles total From black tone-on-tone, cut: 1 9 of Pattern A From assorted red prints, cut: 1 9 of Pattern B From aqua-and-red dot, fussy-cut: 1 9 of Pattern C From red-and-white stripe, cut: 1 3—21 ⁄ 2×42" binding strips 1 2—11 ⁄ 2×321 ⁄ 2 " inner border strips 1 2—11 ⁄ 2×301 ⁄ 2 " inner border strips From aqua floral, cut: 1 4—61 ⁄ 2×42" strips for outer border 1 2—21 ⁄ 2×42" binding strips

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AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

PHOTOGRAPHER ADAM ALBRIGHT

intermediate


DESIGNER LISA DEBEE SCHILLER MACHINE QUILTER KIM NORTON OF A BUSY BOBBIN (ABUSYBOBBIN.COM)


Add adorable detail with straightstitched “fur.”

appliqué and embroider blocks 1. Using two strands of red embroidery floss, featherstitch along each seam of the Square-in-a-Square blocks. To featherstitch, bring your threaded needle up at A (Featherstitch Diagram), form a V shape with the floss, and hold the floss V in place with your thumb. Push your needle down at B, about 3⁄ 16" to the right of A. Come up at C, inside the V shape and about 1 ⁄4" below A, to secure the stitch. For the next stitch, insert needle at D (about 3⁄ 16" to the left of C) and bring it out at E to form and secure another V shape. Continue in same manner for the length of each seam. A C D E

assemble blocks

G

1. For one block, gather an assorted aqua print 71 ⁄ 2" square and four nonmatching aqua print triangles.

2. Sew aqua print triangles to opposite edges of aqua print square (Block Assembly Diagram). Add remaining aqua print triangles to remaining edges to make a Squarein-a-Square block. The block should be 101 ⁄ 2" square including seam allowances.

H 71⁄ 2" sq.

AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

F

I J K

FEATHERSTITCH DIAGRAM

BLOCK ASSEMBLY DIAGRAM

3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 to make nine Square-in-a-Square blocks total.

66

B

2. Referring to Appliqué Placement Diagram, arrange one each of appliqué shapes A, B, and C on a Square-in-a-Square block. Pin or baste pieces in place.


B C A

5. Using two strands of variegated aqua floss, stem-stitch two teardrop shapes and three detail lines on the B bow appliqué to make an appliquéd block. To stem-stitch, pull threaded needle up at A (Stem Stitch Diagram). Insert it back into fabric at B, about 1 ⁄4" away from A. Holding floss out

of the way, bring needle back up at C and pull floss through so it lies flat against fabric. Continue in same manner, pulling with equal tautness after each stitch.

6. Repeat steps 1–5 to make nine appliquéd blocks total.

APPLIQUÉ PLACEMENT DIAGRAM

3. Working from bottom layer to top, use threads that match individual appliqués and small slip stitches to hand-stitch each piece in place. Turn under seam allowances with your needle as you stitch (see “Tips for Needle-Turn Appliqué,” right). 4. Referring to photo, opposite, use two strands of black floss and straight stitches to imitate fur along the tails and chins of the A dog appliqués as desired. To make a straight stitch, pull threaded needle up at A (Straight Stitch Diagram) and push it down at B. Continue in same manner to add desired number of straight stitches.

G F C E D A B

TIPS For

Needle-Turn Appliqué Use this traditional technique to turn under appliqué seam allowances as you stitch. ●

Clip inside curves and points to within a thread of the marked lines, making clips closer together in the tightly curved areas. Try to make your clips on the bias grain of the seam allowance, which means your clips often will be on the diagonal, rather than perpendicular to the marked lines. This directional clipping prevents fabric from raveling while you’re working with the edges.

Use a straw or milliners needle for best results. The extra length of these needles aids in tucking fabric under before taking stitches.

Work with a length of thread no longer than 18" in a color that matches your appliqué piece.

Work in a clockwise or counterclockwise direction, whichever is more comfortable for you. With the point of your needle, sweep the seam allowance under about 1" ahead of your stitching, and secure the fabric with your thumb. Use the drawn line as your guide for how much fabric to turn under.

At inside points, make your stitches close together to prevent thread from raveling where you have clipped into the seam allowance. Secure a deep inside point with a single stitch.

STRAIGHT STITCH DIAGRAM

C

B

A B C

A

STEM STITCH DIAGRAM

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61⁄ 2×441⁄ 2"

11⁄ 2×301⁄ 2"

F 11⁄ 2×321⁄ 2"

G

DB

E C

COUCHING STITCH DIAGRAM

7. Repeat Step 6 to secure 1⁄4"-wide

61⁄ 2×321⁄ 2"

red rickrack atop the seam between the inner and outer borders to complete quilt top.

finish quilt 1. Layer quilt top, batting, and backing; baste. (For details, see Complete Quilt, page 101.)

QUILT ASSEMBLY DIAGRAM

assemble quilt top

4. Cut and piece aqua floral 61⁄ 2×42"

1. Sew together appliquéd blocks in three rows (Quilt Assembly Diagram). Press seams in one direction, alternating direction with each row. Join rows to make quilt center. Press seams in one direction. The quilt center should be 301 ⁄ 2" square including seam allowances.

strips to make: 1 2—61 ⁄ 2×441 ⁄ 2 " outer border strips 1 2—61 ⁄ 2×321 ⁄ 2 " outer border strips

2. Use two strands of red floss to featherstitch along each seam between blocks. 3. Sew red-and-white stripe 11 ⁄ 2×301 ⁄ 2" inner border strips to opposite edges of quilt center. Add red-and-white stripe 11 ⁄ 2×321 ⁄ 2" inner border strips to remaining edges. Press all seams toward inner border.

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AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

5. Sew short outer border strips to opposite edges of quilt center. Add long outer border strips to remaining edges. Press all seams toward outer border.

2. Quilt as desired. Kim Norton machine-quilted around the dog appliqués and then stitched a free-hand swirl design in the block backgrounds (Quilting Diagram). “The inner border needed a bit more than just straight-line quilting, so I created a zigzag to fill the space,” Kim says. In the outer border, Kim stitched a feathered vine using hook (double) feathers to give it a little more detail rather than ordinary feathers. 3. Using diagonal seams, join redand-white stripe and aqua floral 21 ⁄ 2×42" binding strips to make a pieced binding strip. Bind quilt with pieced binding strip. (For details, see Complete Quilt.) APQ

6. Pin the 1⁄ 8"-wide red rickrack atop the seam between quilt center and inner border, curving rickrack gently to turn corners; trim and turn under ends so they abut. Using two strands of red floss, couch rickrack to secure it. To couch, work small stitches back and forth over the rickrack, stitching across the same rickrack angle each time (Couching Stitch Diagram).

QUILTING DIAGRAM


FABRICS are from the Remix collection by Ann Kelle and Flannel Solid Basics, both from Robert Kaufman Fabrics (robertkaufman.

CO O OPTION

SCRAP-O-METER

Quilt tester Laura Boehnke cut her Scottish terrier appliqués from flannel to add texture. Instead of needle-turn appliqué, she fused and machine-blanketstitched them in place. (If you’re fusing, do not add a seam allowance when cutting and be sure to reverse the pattern if you want your finished appliqués to face right, as shown.) Laura added a second row of machine blanket stitches to each dog’s tail and chin to replicate the straight stitches designer Lisa DeBee Schiller sewed by hand in the original quilt. Laura let the sideways jog of each blanket stitch land on the background instead of the appliqué (photo, above right).

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intermediate

DESIGN ER TINA LEWIS OF TINA LEWIS DESIGN MACHIN E QUILTE R NATALI A BONNE R OF PIECE N QUILT (PIECENQUILT.COM)

CITR

US

E EEZ QU

S


PHOTOGRAPHER CAMERON SADEGHPOUR

Set the table for summer with a curve-pieced table runner. Bright white sets off citrus-color segments, and a facing edge instead of binding furthers the clean, crisp look.

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materials ⁄ yard white print (pith in blocks, background, facing)

1 78

1

4" square each of pink, yellow, orange, and green prints (blocks)

1

12—7×10" pieces assorted prints: 3 pink, 3 yellow, 3 orange, and 3 green (blocks)

1

13" square each of dark pink, dark yellow, dark orange, and dark green prints (peel in blocks)

1

15⁄ 8 yards backing fabric

1

20×56" thin cotton batting

1

Sharp, thin pins (See “Perfect Pins” on page 12 for a recommendation.)

Finished table runner: 12×48" Finished block: 12" square

Yardages and cutting instructions are based on 42" of usable fabric width. Measurements include 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Sew with right sides together unless otherwise stated. Press seams in directions indicated by arrows on diagrams. If no direction is specified, press seam toward darker fabric.

cut fabrics Cut pieces in the following order. Patterns are on Pattern Sheets 2 and 3. To make templates of the patterns, see Make and Use Templates, page 98. Be sure to transfer all dots from patterns to templates, then to fabric pieces. The dots are matching points used when joining pieces. From white print, cut: 1 4—1×42" facing strips (If you’d rather use a double-fold binding, cut 4—21 ⁄ 2×42" binding strips.) 1 4 of Pattern I

8 of Pattern G 4 each of patterns B, D, F, and F reversed From each pink, yellow, orange, and green print 4" square, cut: 1 1 of Pattern A From assorted pink 7×10" pieces, cut: 1 1 each of patterns C, E, and E reversed From assorted yellow 7×10" pieces, cut: 1 1 each of patterns C, E, and E reversed From assorted orange 7×10" pieces, cut: 1 1 each of patterns C, E, and E reversed From assorted green 7×10" pieces, cut: 1 1 each of patterns C, E, and E reversed From each dark pink, dark yellow, dark orange, and dark green print 13" square, cut: 1 1 of Pattern H 1 1

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assemble blocks

4. Referring to Diagram 5, lay out the three pink segments and two white print G pieces; be sure the end of G with the slight curve is at the bottom. Sew together pieces to make pink center unit.

1. Layer a white print B arc atop the pink print A piece. Insert a pin through center matching points to align them (Diagram 1). Pin together matching points at each end, then pin generously in between, gently easing edges as needed to align (Diagram 2).

B A DIAGRAM 1

DIAGRAM 2

DIAGRAM 3

3. In same manner, join a white print D arc to pink print C wedge to make middle pink segment (Diagram 4). Then add white print F arc to pink print E wedge and white print F reversed arc to pink print E reversed wedge to make the outer pink segments. D

F

C

E

D

Fr

F C

E

G DIAGRAM 5

2. Sew together curved edges to make pink corner unit (Diagram 3). Clip into white print seam allowance as needed to allow it to lie at, being careful not to cut into seam line. Do not clip pink print seam allowance.

DIAGRAM 4

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5. Matching the dots, pin and stitch curved edges of a white print I piece and dark pink print H arc (Diagram 6). Sew H/I unit to top edge of pink center unit. Add pink corner unit to bottom edge to make a pink block. The block should be 121 ⁄ 2" square including seam allowances.

I

H

DIAGRAM 6

6. Using remaining A–I pieces, repeat steps 1–5 to make yellow, orange, and green blocks.

assemble table runner top Referring to Table Runner Assembly Diagram, lay out blocks in a row, alternating block orientation as shown. Join blocks to complete table runner top. Press all seams toward top of row.

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AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

TABLE RUNNER ASSEMBLY DIAGRAM


Clip

finish table runner Instead of binding, designer Tina Lewis used a skinny facing strip and turned it entirely to the back of the table runner, creating a smooth finished edge. To use her method, complete the following steps. (If you prefer to use traditional doublefold binding, use 21 ⁄ 2×42" binding strips and refer to Complete Quilt, page 101, to finish the table runner.)

Trim to 1⁄4"

DIAGRAM 7

1. Layer table runner top, batting, and backing; baste. (For details, see Complete Quilt.)

DIAGRAM 9

1⁄4"

2. Quilt as desired, keeping stitches at least 1 ⁄ 2" away from edges of table runner top. Natalia Bonner machine-quilted in the ditch around the thin white print areas and stitched pebble shapes in the assorted print A pieces (Quilting Diagram). She quilted ribbon candy patterns in the citrus segments of each block and skinny back-andforth lines in the assorted dark print H peels. She filled the white print backgrounds with a dense pebbleand-swirl design.

Overlap

2”

DIAGRAM 8

QUILTING DIAGRAM

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AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

Clip

3. Trim batting and backing even with edges of table runner top. Fold one edge of table runner top out of the way; pin. Referring to Diagram 7, use a rotary cutter and acrylic ruler to trim away an additional 1 ⁄4" of batting and backing. Fold, pin, and trim remaining edges in same manner. Remove pins. The table runner top should extend 1 ⁄4" beyond the batting and backing all the way around.

DIAGRAM 10

4. Using diagonal seams, join white print 1×42" facing strips to make a pieced facing strip. Turn one end under 1 ⁄ 2"; press. Turn one long edge under 1 ⁄4"; press. 5. Beginning with folded end, place prepared facing strip along one edge (avoid a corner) and against right side of table runner top (Diagram 8); align raw edges. Using a 1 ⁄4" seam allowance, start sewing 2" from


CO O OPTION folded end to join facing to table runner top. Stop stitching 1 ⁄4" from the corner; backstitch and clip threads. Remove table runner from under the sewing machine presser foot.

6. Referring to Diagram 9, clip into facing strip just up to end of stitching line, being careful not to cut table runner top. Pivot facing strip, aligning its raw edge with next edge of table runner top. Beginning at clipped corner, sew together as before. Sew around table runner, turning each corner in the same manner. 7. When you reach the starting point, unfold long edge at beginning of facing strip. Lap facing strip raw end over facing strip folded end. Refold facing strip long edge, encasing raw end (Diagram 10). Finish sewing to starting point. 8. Trim corners of facing and table runner top at an angle, being careful not to cut into stitching (Diagram 10), to reduce bulk. 9. Turn long folded edge of facing strip to back, folding exactly on facing seam line. Hand-stitch facing to backing. To miter corners, hand-stitch up to a corner; fold a miter in the facing. Take a stitch or two in fold to secure it. Then stitch facing in place up to next corner. Finish each corner in the same manner. APQ

Quilt tester Laura Boehnke opted to create citrus shapes out of prints that include pears, oranges, birds, poppies, tiles, and brushstrokes. For variety, she alternated between medium- and large-scale prints for the C and E segments. A textured print in various colors works perfectly for the lemon, orange, and lime “peels.”

FABRICS are from the Valencia collection by Laura Gunn for Michael Miller Fabrics (michaelmillerfabrics.com).

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SCRAP-O-METER PHOTOGRAPHER ADAM ALBRIGHT


DESIGNER KIM DIEHL

FABRICS are from Folio Basics collection by Color Principle for Henry Glass & Co. (henryglassfabrics.com).

Stitch a tiny yet vibrant table topper showcasing machine-appliquéd flowers, yo-yo flower buds, and an easy-to-piece border.

intermediate

materials 1

18×21" piece (fat quarter) green print (stem appliqués, yo-yos, border, binding)

1

9×21" piece (fat eighth) each burgundy print and pink print (appliqués, yo-yos, border)

1

1 yard total assorted bright prints (appliqués, yo-yos, border) (Designer Kim Diehl used eleven 9×101 ⁄ 2" pieces.)

1

18×21" piece (fat quarter) cream tone-ontone (appliqué foundation, border)

1

18×21" piece (fat quarter) backing fabric

1

18×21" batting ⁄ "-wide bias bar (optional)

1 1 4

1

Freezer paper

1

Water-soluble glue stick

1

Water-soluble, acid-free liquid fabric glue, such as Quilter’s Choice Basting Glue (beaconadhesives.com)

1

Perle cotton Nos. 12 or 8 for stitching yo-yos

1

Clear monofilament thread

Finished quilt: 141 ⁄ 2×161 ⁄ 2" Yardages and cutting instructions are based on 42" of usable fabric width. Measurements include 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Sew with right sides together unless otherwise stated. Press seams in directions indicated by arrows on diagrams. If no direction is specified, press seam toward darker fabric.

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cut fabrics Cut pieces in the following order. Patterns are on Pattern Sheet 4. To make a template of Pattern A (yo-yos), see Make and Use Templates, page 98. Designer Kim Diehl used freezer paper on the wrong side of the fabrics to prepare pieces B–D for machine appliqué. To use this method, complete the following steps.

1. Lay freezer paper, shiny side down, over patterns B–D. Use a pencil to trace each pattern the number of times indicated in cutting instructions. Cut out freezer-paper shapes on drawn lines.

2. Apply a small amount of watersoluble glue stick to center of dull side of freezer-paper shapes. Position shapes on wrong sides of designated fabrics, leaving 1 ⁄ 2" between shapes. Cut out each shape, adding 3⁄ 16" seam allowances to all edges. Clip curved seam allowances as necessary, stopping a thread or two away from freezer paper.

3. On each shape, beginning on a gently curved edge, use tip of a hot dry iron to press seam allowances onto shiny sides of freezer paper; let cool. (You don’t need to turn under any edges that will be covered by another appliqué.) From green print, cut: 1 4—21 ⁄ 2×21" binding strips 1 6—1×41 ⁄ 2 " strips 1 2—1×31 ⁄ 2 " strips From burgundy print, cut: 1 4 of Pattern B From pink print, cut: 1 4 of Pattern B From assorted bright prints and scraps of green, burgundy, and pink prints, cut: 1 35 of Pattern A 1 1 of Pattern C 1 24 of Pattern D 1 104—11 ⁄ 2 " squares From cream tone-on-tone, cut: 1 1—101 ⁄ 2×121 ⁄ 2 " rectangle 1 22—21 ⁄ 2 " squares

prepare stem appliqués

seam allowances are visible from the front, trim them slightly so they don’t show.)

3. Apply small dots of liquid fabric glue about 1 ⁄ 2" apart under pressed seam allowance of tube. Press with a hot dry iron, heat-setting glue and anchoring seam allowance, to make a long stem appliqué. 4. Repeat steps 1–3 to make six long stem appliqués total. Using green print 1×31 ⁄ 2" strips, repeat steps 1–3 to make two short stem appliqués.

make yo-yos 1. Thread an embroidery needle with perle cotton; tie a knot at one end. Holding an assorted bright print A circle with wrong side up, turn raw edge a scant 1 ⁄4" toward center. Bring needle up through fold from wrong side of fabric to bury knot between the layers. Take 1 ⁄4" running stitches near folded edge around circle, ending stitching next to starting point (Diagram 2); do not cut or knot thread.

1. Fold a green print 1×41 ⁄ 2" strip in half lengthwise with wrong side inside; press. Stitch a scant 1 ⁄4" from raw long edges to make a tube (Diagram 1). If desired, trim seam allowance to 1 ⁄ 8". (Kim left her seam allowances 1 ⁄4" wide to fill out the look of the stems.)

DIAGRAM 2

DIAGRAM 1

2. If desired, insert a bias bar into the tube. With the seam allowance centered, press tube flat. (If your

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AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

2. Gently pull threaded needle to gather folded edge until it forms a small gathered circle. Flatten gathered circle with your hands. Insert needle into gathered opening, just to one side of the center, and bring it out on back. Knot and clip thread, keeping gathers taut, to make a yo-yo.


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sewing machines

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3. Using remaining assorted bright

101⁄ 2×121⁄ 2"

print A circles and green, burgundy, and pink print A circles, repeat steps 1 and 2 to make 35 yo-yos total.

4. Referring to Quilt Assembly Diagram, position 13 yo-yos and all B flower, C circle, and D leaf appliqués on foundation. When you are pleased with the arrangement, remove pink print B flowers and yo-yo atop C circle. Baste remaining pieces in place with dots of liquid fabric glue as before.

41⁄ 2" 41⁄ 2"

appliqué quilt center

31⁄ 2"

1⁄ 2"

1. Fold cream tone-on-tone 101 ⁄ 2×121 ⁄ 2" rectangle in half vertically and horizontally. Press lightly to make an appliqué foundation with placement guidelines; unfold.

2. Dot seam allowance of two long stem appliqués with liquid fabric glue about every 1 ⁄ 2". Referring to Diagram 3, position stems on foundation vertical placement guideline, about 1 ⁄ 2" from guideline intersection. Turn foundation wrong side up and press with a hot dry iron to heat-set stems in place.

3. Repeat Step 2 to position short stem appliqués on horizontal guideline and remaining long stem appliqués diagonally as shown.

AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

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DIAGRAM 3

5. Set up your sewing machine with monofilament thread in needle and neutral thread in bobbin. Adjust for a tiny zigzag stitch (1 millimeter width and length) so the left-hand stitch is two to three threads inside appliqué edge and the right-hand stitch is on foundation fabric right next to appliqué edge. Reduce top thread tension so no bobbin thread shows on right side.

G

A

FA R

B M T O FA

RI

C

M


B B D D

C

QUILT ASSEMBLY DIAGRAM

6. Zigzag-stitch around stems, appliqué pieces, and yo-yos. Remove freezer-paper shapes from appliqué shapes by carefully trimming away excess foundation fabric from behind stitched appliqués, leaving 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. With your fingertip, gently loosen and peel freezer paper away.

2. Align marked assorted print squares with opposite corners of a cream toneon-tone 21 ⁄ 2" square (Diagram 4; note direction of marked lines). Sew on marked lines. Trim excess fabric, leaving 1 ⁄4" seam allowances; press open attached triangles. 21⁄ 2" sq. 11⁄ 2"

7. Replace pink print B flower appliqués and the yo-yo atop C circle. Zigzag-stitch around them. Remove freezer-paper shapes from appliquéd quilt center.

assemble and appliqué Square-ina-Square blocks 1. Use a pencil to mark a diagonal line on wrong side of 88 assorted print 11 ⁄ 2" squares. (Set aside remaining squares for corner blocks.)

sq.

DIAGRAM 4

3. Align marked assorted print squares with remaining corners of Step 2 square (Diagram 5). Stitch, trim, and press as before to make a Square-in-a-Square block. The block should be 21 ⁄ 2" square including seam allowances.

DIAGRAM 5

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CO O OPTION Quilt tester Laura Boehnke created a garden of blues and purples for her variation on Fantasy Garden. Using only these tones emphasizes the green stems and leaves and makes the large flowers in each corner pop. Laura omitted the yo-yos in the border but kept them in the quilt center. For the border blocks, she incorporated a diminutive floral and mottled prints.

FABRICS are from the Thyme With Friends collection by Kris Lammers and the Shadow Play collection, both from Maywood Studio (maywoodstudio.com).

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Quilt Comfortably The GraceHoop² is the top-of-the-line quilting hoop. It can be adjusted in height, rotation, and quilting angle so you can work in maximum comfort. Quilt in your own way from the most comfortable seat in your home. Get into your comfort zone. Call (800) 264-0644 for special pricing. *Lamp sold separately *Stain optional

Elevate

Pivot

Rotate


4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 to make 22 Square-in-a-Square blocks total.

5. Center a yo-yo on each Squarein-a-Square block; baste in place using liquid fabric glue (Diagram 6). Machine-zigzag-stitch around each yo-yo.

DIAGRAM 6

make Four-Patch blocks Sew together four remaining assorted print 11 ⁄ 2" squares in pairs (Diagram 7). Join pairs to make a Four-Patch block. The block should be 21 ⁄ 2" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make four Four-Patch blocks total.

DIAGRAM 7

assemble and add border 1. Referring to Quilt Assembly Diagram, page 83, sew together five Square-in-a-Square blocks to make a short border strip. Press seams

open. The strip should be 21 ⁄ 2×101 ⁄ 2" including seam allowances. Repeat to make a second short border strip. ®

2. Sew together six Square-in-aSquare blocks and two Four-Patch blocks to make a long border strip (Quilt Assembly Diagram). The strip should be 21 ⁄ 2×161 ⁄ 2" including seam allowances. Repeat to make a second long border strip.

3. Sew short border strips to short edges of appliquéd quilt center. Add long border strips to remaining edges to complete quilt top. Press all seams toward border.

The new AutoPilot Mach 3 continues to excel as the leading system of choice with the reputation for being user friendly and easy to learn.

AutoPilot Mach 3 * Touchscreen gestures * Sewhead interface * Right click menus * Undo * Fonts * Sliding panels * Innova Sketch. ® * Eight point morph * Quilt photo background * Pin favorite tools and features * Customize color scheme, visual and audible cues * Work on multiple projects * Multiple Pattern Pads * Settings auto save * Optimize and preview pattern stitchout * Auto adjust multiple row gap and offset * Draw patterns onscreen * Increment settings for nudge and rotate * Sewing time display * Stitch count * Pattern data interface * Increased speed * And MANY more new and exclusive features! ®

finish quilt 1. Layer quilt top, batting, and backing; baste. (For details, see Complete Quilt, page 101.) 2. Quilt as desired. Kim hand-quilted her quilt, outlining the appliqués and yo-yos to emphasize their shapes. In the center of each pink flower she stitched a teardrop leaf, and in the quilt center background she stitched 1 ⁄4" in from the seam lines. She stitched in the ditch along each seam in the Square-in-a-Square and FourPatch blocks (Quilting Diagram). 3. Bind with green print binding strips. (For details, see Complete Quilt.) APQ

Enjoy the rewarding results brought to Innova and longarm quilters around the world by ABM International Inc. Learn more at www.innovalongarm.com 1 888-99Quilt

QUILTING DIAGRAM

®

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85 Since 1947


DESIGNER KAREN SNYDER OF ANNA LENA’S (ANNALENA.COM)


advanced

tapestry Beautifully woven textiles of Swedish origin inspired this intricate quilt.

choose your method “Don’t be daunted by the number of squares in this quilt,” designer Karen Snyder says. “Cutting may take a little time, but it’s a great way to use up odds and ends of fabrics from other projects, making it a fun reminder of quilts that have gone before. As I wanted a totally scrappy look, I didn’t do any strip piecing, but there is a distinct design to this quilt.” The instructions that follow are for strip piecing. If you’d rather sew individual squares together, see “Piecing Tapestry Square by Square,” page 92.

materials PHOTOGRAPHER ADAM ALBRIGHT

1

13⁄4 yards total assorted tan prints (strip sets and squares) ⁄ yard total assorted purple prints (strip sets)

1 5 8

1

31 ⁄ 3 yards total assorted brown prints (strip sets and squares)

1

11 ⁄4 yards total assorted red prints (strip sets and squares)

1

1 yard total assorted gold prints (strip sets and squares)

1

11 ⁄ 8 yards total assorted cream prints (strip sets and squares) ⁄ yard total assorted orange prints (squares)

1 1 4

⁄ yard dark brown print (binding)

1 5 8

1

35⁄ 8 yards backing fabric

1

65×84" batting

Finished quilt: 57×751 ⁄ 2" Yardages and cutting instructions are based on 42" of usable fabric width. Measurements include 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Sew with right sides together unless otherwise stated. Press seams in directions indicated by arrows on diagrams. If no direction is specified, press seam toward darker fabric.

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cut fabrics

11⁄ 2" 11⁄ 2×42"

Cut pieces in the following order.

11⁄ 2×42"

From assorted tan prints, cut: 1 30—11 ⁄ 2×42" strips 1 104—11 ⁄ 2 " squares From assorted purple prints, cut: 1 9—11 ⁄ 2×42" strips From assorted brown prints, cut: 1 66—11 ⁄ 2×42" strips 1 36—11 ⁄ 2 " squares From assorted red prints, cut: 1 21—11 ⁄ 2×42" strips 1 24—11 ⁄ 2 " squares From assorted gold prints, cut: 1 15—11 ⁄ 2×42" strips 1 8—11 ⁄ 2 " squares From assorted cream prints, cut: 1 6—11 ⁄ 2×42" strips 1 354—11 ⁄ 2 " squares From assorted orange prints, cut: 1 40—11 ⁄ 2 " squares From dark brown print, cut: 1 7—21 ⁄ 2×42" binding strips

assemble segments A–G 1. Referring to Diagram 1, sew together two assorted tan print 11 ⁄ 2×42" strips and one purple print 11 ⁄ 2×42" strip to make Strip Set A. Repeat to make nine A strip sets total. Cut strip sets into 234— 11 ⁄ 2"-wide A segments. 11⁄ 2" 11⁄ 2×42" 11⁄ 2×42"

STRIP SET B DIAGRAM 2

3. Using two assorted brown print 11 ⁄ 2×42" strips and one red print 11 ⁄ 2×42" strip, repeat Step 1 to make 15 C strip sets, cutting them into 380 C segments (Diagram 3). 11⁄ 2"

STRIP SET C DIAGRAM 3

4. Using two assorted gold print 11 ⁄ 2×42" strips and one brown print 11 ⁄ 2×42" strip, repeat Step 1 to make six D strip sets, cutting them into 156 D segments (Diagram 4). 11⁄ 2"

STRIP SET D DIAGRAM 4

5. Using two assorted brown print 11 ⁄ 2×42" strips and one tan print 11 ⁄ 2×42" strip, repeat Step 1 to make six E strip sets, cutting them into 152 E segments (Diagram 5).

11⁄ 2×42" 11⁄ 2" STRIP SET A DIAGRAM 1

2. Join a tan print 11⁄ 2×42" strip and a brown print 11 ⁄ 2×42" strip to make Strip Set B (Diagram 2). Repeat to make six B strip sets total. Cut strip sets into 156—11 ⁄ 2"-wide B segments.

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STRIP SET E DIAGRAM 5


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On the back of the quilt, designer Karen Snyder used leftover 1½" squares to piece her initials, the year, and Nås (the name of the Swedish town where the quilt hangs). ALLPEOPLEQUILT.COM

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Top of Quilt

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1. Referring to Quilt Assembly Diagram, lay out segments A–G and assorted tan, brown, red, gold, cream, and orange print 11 ⁄ 2" squares in 94 diagonal rows. Each diagonal row (except rows 1 and 94, each of which consists of a single cream print square) should begin and end with a cream print square.

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The Quilt Assembly Diagram is in two parts, right and opposite. If you’d like to print out both parts and tape them together, visit AllPeopleQuilt.com/307.

8

assemble quilt top

7

STRIP SET G DIAGRAM 7

6

11⁄ 2"

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7. Using two assorted red print 11 ⁄ 2×42" strips and one gold print 11 ⁄ 2×42" strip, repeat Step 1 to make three G strip sets, cutting them into 78 G segments (Diagram 7).

4

STRIP SET F DIAGRAM 6

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6. Using two assorted brown print 11 ⁄ 2×42" strips and one cream print 11 ⁄ 2×42" strip, repeat Step 1 to make six F strip sets, cutting them into 152 F segments (Diagram 6).


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29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66

2. Sew together pieces in each diagonal row. Press seams toward brown print squares and away from cream print squares. 3. Join rows to make quilt top. Press seams in one direction. 4. Trim edges of quilt top

1

⁄4" from points of squares. (Or wait to straighten edges after quilting is finished.)

finish quilt

1. Layer quilt top, batting, and backing; baste. (For details, see Complete Quilt, page 101.)

2. Quilt as desired. Karen machine-quilted an allover Baptist Fan design over the quilt top.

3. Bind quilt with dark brown print binding strips. (For details, see Complete Quilt.)

ALLPEOPLEQUILT.COM

91




CO O OPTION

The featured quilt is assembled in diagonal rows that form 105 horizontal bands of color (53 horizontal rows of 40 squares each and 52 horizontal rows of 39 squares each). A cream square begins and ends each diagonal row (except rows 1 and 94, which are only one square each). To assemble the featured quilt using only 11 ⁄ 2 ″ squares, cut: 1,716 from assorted brown prints 880 from assorted tan prints 506 from assorted cream prints 234 from assorted purple prints 560 from assorted red prints 398 from assorted gold prints 40 from assorted orange prints Referring to Quilt Assembly Diagram on pages 90 and 91 for color order, lay out squares in 94 diagonal rows to form the following horizontal bands of color:

FABRICS are from the Wildflower collection by Judy and Judel Niemeyer for Timeless Treasures Fabrics SCRAP-O-METER (ttfabrics.com).

44 rows of 39 brown squares each 22 rows of 40 tan squares each 8 rows of 40 cream squares each

Quilt tester Laura Boehnke reproduced the scrappy appearance of Tapestry in a smaller, less daunting version. Her 19×371 ⁄ 2" table runner is perfect for someone who prefers a quicker project than the

6 rows of 39 purple squares each 14 rows of 40 red squares each 8 rows of 40 gold squares each

original quilt. Tapestry features assorted brown prints in almost every other square, giving it a rustic look. To brighten her table runner, Laura used light or white prints instead of the dark squares. APQ

2 rows of 39 gold squares each 1 row of 40 orange squares

92

AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

Cool it down! Use cool colors for a table runner using the pattern at AllPeopleQuilt.com/308.


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mystery row quilt 4

th

In each 2016 issue of American Patchwork & Quilting® magazine, we’re providing instructions for one row of a year-long row-quilt adventure. We’re already halfway done!

DESIGNER PAT SLOAN (PATSLOAN.COM)

ROW OF SIX

FABRICS are from the Hometown Girl batiks collection by Pat Sloan for Moda Fabrics (modafabrics.com).

about Row 4 To make Row 4 of the American Patchwork & Quilting 2016 Mystery Row Quilt, designer Pat Sloan used one of her favorite blocks—the Churn Dash. She used sashing to expand the 94

AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

length of this row so it would be the same length as her first three rows. Because row quilts often are made of designs that have different numbers of seams, some rows may end up

longer than others, depending on sewing accuracy. In this case, sashing offers a built-in fudge factor, allowing you to make adjustments that won’t be noticed in the finished quilt.


materials for Row 4 For a list of materials to make the entire quilt and links to instructions for rows 1–3, visit AllPeopleQuilt. com/rowquilt. ⁄ yard cream circle batik (blocks, sashing)

1 1 2

together unless otherwise stated. Press seams in directions indicated by arrows on diagrams. If no direction is specified, press seam toward darker fabric.

cut fabrics for Row 4 Cut pieces in the following order.

⁄ yard each navy batik and red sun batik (blocks)

1 1 8

⁄ yard each aqua swirl batik and multicolor swirl batik (block centers)

1 1 8

Finished quilt: 601 ⁄ 2×631 ⁄ 2" Finished Row 4 block: 9" square Finished Row 4: 9×60" Yardages and cutting instructions are based on 42" of usable fabric width. Measurements include 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Sew with right sides

From cream circle batik, cut: 1 2—31 ⁄ 2×91 ⁄ 2 " rectangles 1 12—37⁄ 8 " squares 1 6—2×21" strips From navy batik, cut: 1 3—2×21" strips 1 6—37⁄ 8 " squares From red sun batik, cut: 1 3—2×21" strips 1 6—37⁄ 8 " squares From aqua swirl batik, cut: 1 3—31 ⁄ 2 " squares From multicolor swirl batik, cut: 1 3—31 ⁄ 2 " squares

assemble Row 4 1. Use a pencil to mark a diagonal line on wrong side of each cream circle batik 37⁄ 8" square. 2. Layer a marked cream circle batik square atop a navy batik 37⁄ 8" square. Sew together with two seams, stitching 1 ⁄4" on each side of drawn line (Diagram 1). Cut pair apart on drawn line and press open to make two navy triangle-squares. Each triangle-square should be 31 ⁄ 2" square including seam allowances.

DIAGRAM 1

3. Repeat Step 2 to make 12 navy triangle-squares total.

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mystery row quilt 4. Using red sun batik 37⁄ 8" squares

31⁄ 2"

Row 4

31⁄ 2×91⁄ 2"

5. Sew together a cream circle batik 2×21" strip and a navy batik 2×21" strip to make a navy strip set (Diagram 2). Repeat to make three navy strip sets total. (If you don’t need to straighten your strip sets after cutting, you may need only two strip sets.) Cut strip sets into twelve 31 ⁄ 2"wide navy segments. Each segment should be 31 ⁄ 2" square including seam allowances.

31⁄ 2×91⁄ 2"

instead of navy batik, repeat Step 2 to make 12 red triangle-squares.

Row 5 (instructions in October 2016 issue)

DIAGRAM 2 Row 6 (instructions in December 2016 issue)

6. Using red sun batik 2×21”strips instead of navy batik, repeat Step 5 to make twelve 31 ⁄ 2"-wide red segments. QUILT ASSEMBLY DIAGRAM

7. Referring to Diagram 3, sew together four navy triangle-squares, four 31 ⁄ 2"-wide navy segments, and one aqua swirl batik 31 ⁄ 2" square in three rows. Join rows to make a navy Churn Dash block. The block should be 91 ⁄ 2" square including seam allowances. Repeat to make three navy Churn Dash blocks total.

31⁄ 2" sq.

8. Using red triangle-squares, 31⁄ 2"wide red segments, and multicolor swirl batik 31 ⁄ 2" squares, repeat Step 7 to make three red Churn Dash blocks.

9. Referring to Quilt Assembly Diagram, lay out Churn Dash blocks and cream circle batik 31 ⁄ 2×91 ⁄ 2" rectangles in a row; rotate red Churn Dash blocks 90º so seams nest with blue Churn Dash blocks. Join pieces to make Row 4. Press seams toward Churn Dash blocks.

MAKE IT YOUR OWN! Any block that finishes at 9" square will work in Row 4. If you want to find a substitute for the Churn Dash block, choose from among the 9" blocks in our block library (AllPeopleQuilt.com/ blocklibrary).

SHARE YOUR PROGRESS: We’d love to see your version of our 2016 Mystery Row Quilt! Share it on Instagram and Facebook using the hashtag #APQRowQuilt. Visit AllPeopleQuilt.com/rowquilt to see versions made by staff members. DIAGRAM 3

96

AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016


#millionpillowcasechallenge

A SMILE STORY Noa Pogany, 11, who learned how to sew last year, made 100 pillowcases to donate. She and her mother, Allison, delivered the pillowcases to the pediatric intensive care unit of a local hospital. “These pillowcases were going to be the only things to brighten up these kids’ rooms,” Allison says, “and show the kids and their parents that people outside of the hospital were thinking about them.”

Smiles Guaranteed. For people who love to sew or quilt, it’s so easy to lift spirits and bring smiles to hospitalized kids, homeless families, and others in need. Simply join American Patchwork & Quilting® magazine’s 1 Million Pillowcase Challenge and make and donate one, two, or more pillowcases. You’ll create just as many smiles. Join the movement today. Find complete details, download free patterns, and be sure to record your donations online at:

AllPeopleQuilt.com/millionpillowcases


back to

basics cut bias strips Strips for curved appliqué pieces and for binding curved edges should be cut on the bias (diagonally across the grain of a woven fabric), which runs at a 45° angle to the selvage and has the most stretch. To cut bias strips, begin with a fabric square or rectangle; if necessary, square up the left edge with an acrylic ruler. Make a cut at a 45° angle to the left edge (Bias Strip Diagram). Handle the diagonal edges carefully to avoid distorting the bias. To cut a strip, measure the desired width from the 45° cut 45º edge; cut parallel 45º to the edge. Cut enough strips to total the length BIAS STRIP DIAGRAM needed.

make and use templates MAKE TEMPLATES A template is a pattern made from extra-sturdy material so you can trace around it many times without wearing away the edges. Acrylic templates for many common shapes are available at quilt shops. Or make your own by duplicating printed patterns on template plastic. To make permanent templates, purchase easyto-cut template plastic, available at quilt shops and crafts supply stores. Lay

98

Refer to these tips and techniques whenever you need information for your projects.

the plastic over a printed pattern. Trace the pattern onto the plastic using a ruler and a permanent marker to ensure straight lines, accurate corners, and permanency. For hand piecing and appliqué, make templates the exact size finished pieces will be (without seam allowances). For piecing, this means tracing the patterns’ dashed lines. For machine piecing, make templates that include seam allowances by tracing the patterns’ solid and dashed lines onto the template plastic. For easy reference, mark each template with its letter designation, grain line (if noted by an arrow on the pattern), and block or quilt name. Also mark the matching point of each corner on the seam line (these may be indicated with dots on the printed pattern). Cut out traced shapes on the outside lines. Using a pushpin, make a hole in the template at each corner matching point. The hole must be large enough to accommodate the point of a pencil or marking pen. Verify each template shape and size by placing it over its printed pattern. Templates must be accurate because errors, however small, compound many times as you assemble a quilt. To check the accuracy

AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

of your templates, make a test block before cutting the fabric pieces for an entire quilt. USE TEMPLATES To trace a template on fabric, use a pencil, a white dressmaker’s pencil, chalk, or a special fabric marker that makes a thin, accurate line. Do not use a ballpoint or ink pen; the lines may bleed if washed. Test all marking tools on a fabric scrap before using them on pieces for a quilt. To make pieces for hand piecing, place a template facedown on the wrong side of the fabric and trace. If desired, mark the matching points on the corners of the seam lines. Reposition the template at least 1 ⁄ 2" away from the previous tracing, trace again, and repeat (Diagram 1).

the distance by eye when cutting out the pieces with scissors. For hand piecing, add a 1 ⁄4" seam allowance; for hand appliqué, add a 3 ⁄ 16" seam allowance. Because templates used to make pieces for machine piecing have seam allowances included, you can use common tracing lines for efficient cutting. Place a template facedown on the wrong side of the fabric and trace. Mark the corner matching points through the holes in the template; they should be right on the seam lines. Reposition the template without leaving a space between it and the previous tracing, trace again, and repeat (Diagram 2). Using a rotary cutter and ruler, cut out pieces, cutting precisely on the drawn lines.

DIAGRAM 2

foundation piecing

DIAGRAM 1

To make pieces for hand appliqué, place a template faceup on the right side of the fabric and trace. The lines you trace on the fabric are the sewing lines. Mark cutting lines 1 ⁄4" away from the sewing lines, or estimate

To make precisely pieced intricate blocks or units, you can sew together fabric pieces on a paper pattern or foundation. Some quilters find this technique (also called paper piecing) to be freeing because precise cutting isn’t required and grain line direction doesn't matter. However, it requires you to think about piecing in a different way.


Featured Fabrics Visit your local quilt shop for these featured fabrics! Free patterns available at allpeoplequilt.com/millionpillowcases

1

2

NEW! Travel Size

3

4

NEW! Travel Size

5

6

NEW! Travel Size

7

8

NEW! Travel Size

9

10

NEW! Travel Size

11

12

NEW! Travel Size

FreeSpirit Fabrics

Moda Fabrics

Robert Kaufman

Timeless Treasures

Northcott

Paintbrush Studio

1. Noe by Erin McMorris 2. Dream Weaver by Amy Butler

3. Burly Beavers by Andie Hanna 4. Morningside Farm by Darlene Zimmerman

5. Stonehenge Kids Monster Mischief by Linda Ludovico 6. I Spy... in the Amazon by Cheri Strole

7. Sew & Sew by Chloe’s Closet 8. Coral, Queen of the Sea by Stacy Iest Hsu

9. Field Day 10. Felicity

11. Nature Trail 12. Butteries Are Free by Ro Gregg

View these fabrics at AllPeopleQuilt.com/featuredfabrics


back to basics To foundation-piece, you stitch fabric pieces to a foundation paper with the marked side of the paper facing up and the fabric pieces layered underneath. The resulting pieced unit will be a mirror image of the foundation paper. To illustrate the process, Diagrams 3–7 show the right and wrong sides of a unit as it is being constructed. To make a foundation paper, trace desired pattern onto tracing paper or the foundation material of your choice, including all lines, numbers, and dots. Repeat to make the desired number of foundation papers. Cut out the traced foundation papers roughly 1 ⁄4" outside the dashed outer lines. Roughly cut out fabric pieces that are at least 1 ⁄ 2" larger on all sides than the area they will cover on the foundation paper. (For this example, green and pink rectangles were cut to cover the triangles on the foundation paper.) With right sides together, layer the green position 1 rectangle atop the pink position 2 rectangle; align a pair of long edges. Place a foundation paper, marked side up, atop the layered rectangles, positioning the paper so the aligned rectangle edges are 1 ⁄4" beyond the stitching line between positions 1 and 2 and at least 1 ⁄4" beyond the foundation paper outer stitching line (Diagram 3). To check placement, pin on the line between positions 1 and 2, then flip the pink rectangle open. Make sure the

100

foundation paper) to about ⁄4" beyond next stitching lines (the line between positions 1 and 3, and the line between positions 1 and 4). Roughly trim pink rectangle to the foundation paper edge. (You will trim it later on the dashed lines when you trim the entire unit.) With right sides together, align a pink position 3 rectangle with the long trimmed edge of green piece. Turn stitched layers over so the foundation paper is on top. Sew on the stitching line (Diagram 6). Turn stitched layers over so foundation paper is on the bottom. Press pink rectangle open. Roughly trim pink rectangle to the foundation paper edge. 1

2

1

3

4

DIAGRAM 3

rectangles completely cover positions 1 and 2 and extend at least 1 ⁄4" into adjacent positions. If they don’t, reposition and recheck until they do. Working with marked side of foundation paper up, use a small stitch length (1.5 millimeters) to sew on the stitching line through all layers, extending stitching past the beginning and end of the line by a few stitches (Diagram 4).

set in seams The key to sewing angled pieces together (setting in seams) is carefully aligning marked matching points. Here, we use diamonds and a square—a common type of set-in seam—to illustrate the process. Whether you’re stitching by machine or hand, start and stop sewing precisely at the matching points (dots on Diagram 8); be sure to backstitch to secure seam ends. BY MACHINE First make an angled unit by sewing two diamonds together between matching points along a pair of edges (Diagram 8).

2

1

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DIAGRAM 8

4 1

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4 DIAGRAM 4 DIAGRAM 6

Turn stitched layers over so the foundation paper is on the bottom. Press pink rectangle open. Referring to Diagram 5, trim green rectangle (not the

In same manner, add a pink position 4 triangle. Trim all fabric layers and foundation paper on the outer dashed lines to complete a foundationpieced unit (Diagram 7). Remove foundation paper with tweezers or the blunt edge of a seam ripper.

Then, with right sides together, pin one edge of the angled unit to one edge of the square (Diagram 9). Align matching points at each end, pushing a pin through both fabric layers to check alignment. Machine-stitch precisely between matching points, backstitching at seam ends. Remove unit from sewing machine.

2

3

1 4

DIAGRAM 5

AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

DIAGRAM 9

DIAGRAM 7


Bring adjacent edge of angled unit up and align it with the next edge of the square (Diagram 10). Insert a pin in each corner to align matching points as before. Machine-stitch between matching points. Press seams away from set-in piece (the square).

then pin remainder of the seam (Diagram 12). Hand-sew seam from inside corner to open end of the angle, removing pins as you sew. Press seams away from set-in piece (the square).

DIAGRAM 15 DIAGRAM 14

DIAGRAM 13

DIAGRAM 16

DIAGRAM 12 DIAGRAM 10

complete quilt BY HAND First make an angled unit by sewing two diamonds together between matching points along a pair of edges (Diagram 8). Then, with right sides together, pin one edge of the angled unit to an edge of the square (Diagram 11). Use pins to align matching points.

DIAGRAM 11

Hand-sew the seam from the open end of the angled unit to the matching point in the corner. Remove pins as you sew and backstitch at the corner to secure stitches. Do not sew into the 1 ⁄4" seam allowance and do not cut your thread. Bring the adjacent edge of the square up and align it with the next edge of the angled unit. Insert a pin in each corner to align matching points as before,

Cut and piece backing fabric to measure at least 4" bigger on all sides than the quilt top. Press seams open. With wrong sides together, layer quilt top and backing fabric with batting in between; baste. Quilt as desired. Trim batting and backing fabric even with the quilt top edges. Binding for most quilts is cut on the straight grain of the fabric. If your quilt has curved edges, cut binding strips on the bias (see Cut Bias Strips, page 98). Cutting instructions for the projects in this issue specify the number of binding strips or a total length needed to finish the quilt. Instructions also specify enough width for a French-fold, or doublelayer, binding because it’s easier to apply and adds durability. Join strips with diagonal seams to make one continuous binding strip (Diagram 13). Trim excess fabric, leaving 1 ⁄4" seam allowances. Press seams open. Fold one end of the binding strip under 1" (Diagram 14); press. With

wrong side inside, fold strip in half lengthwise and press (Diagram 15). Beginning in center of one edge, place binding strip against right side of quilt top, aligning binding strip raw edges with quilt top raw edge (Diagram 16). Begin sewing the binding in place 2" from the folded end. Stop sewing when you’re 1 ⁄4" (or a distance equal to the seam allowance you’re using) from the corner. Backstitch, then clip threads. Remove quilt from under the sewingmachine presser foot. Fold binding strip upward, creating a diagonal fold, and finger-press (Diagram 17). Holding diagonal fold in place with your finger, bring binding strip down in line with next edge of quilt top, making a horizontal fold that aligns with the quilt edge (Diagram 18). Start sewing again at top of horizontal fold, stitching through all layers. Sew around quilt, turning each corner in same manner. When you return to the starting point, encase binding strip raw edge inside the folded end (Diagram 19). Finish sewing to the starting point (Diagram 20).

Turn binding over each edge to the back. Handstitch binding to backing fabric, making sure to cover all machine stitching. To make mitered corners on the back, hand-stitch up to a corner; fold a miter in the binding. Take a stitch or two in the fold to secure it. Then stitch the binding in place up to the next corner. Finish each corner in same manner.

DIAGRAM 17

DIAGRAM 18

DIAGRAM 19

DIAGRAM 20

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COME TOGETHER: To unify the two block types, Amanda Murphy (amandamurphydesign.com) stitched geometric designs in the backgrounds and filled the remaining portions with tightly quilted pebbles.

AMERICAN PATCHWORK & QUILTING | AUGUST 2016

FOUR IN ONE: Angela Walters (quiltingismytherapy.com) treated the four blocks as one, stitching a series of nested boxes in the center and a mix of curved and angled quilting in the remainder. FEATHERED FUN: “I instantly thought of traditional feathered wreaths when I saw this block combination,” says Leah Day (leahday.com). She stitched wreaths in the Snowball blocks and a paisley design in the Shoo Fly block backgrounds.

American Patchwork & Quilting® (ISSN 1066-758X), August 2016, Vol. 24, No. 4. American Patchwork & Quilting is published bimonthly in February, April, June, August, October, and December by Meredith Corp., 1716 Locust St., Des Moines, IA 50309-3023. Periodicals postage paid at Des Moines, IA, and at additional mailing offices. SUBSCRIPTION PRICES: $29.97 per year in the U.S.; $39.97 (U.S. dollars) per year in Canada and overseas. POSTMASTER: Send all UAA to CFS. (See DMM 507.1.5.2). NON-POSTAL AND MILITARY FACILITIES: Send address corrections to American Patchwork & Quilting, P.O. Box 37508, Boone, IA 50037-0508. In Canada: Mailed under Publications Mail Sales Product Agreement No. 40069223; Canadian BN 12348 2887 RT. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: American Patchwork & Quilting, 2835 Kew Dr., Windsor, ON N8T 3B7. Better Homes and Gardens is a registered trademark in the United States, Canada, and Australia. Better Homes and Gardens marca registrada en México. © Meredith Corp. 2016. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.

PHOTOGRAPHER CARSON DOWNING

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FABRICS are from the Handcrafted 2 collection by Alison Glass for Andover Fabrics (andoverfabrics.com) and Kona Solids from Robert Kaufman Fabrics (robertkaufman.com).

quilt it three ways Consider three different quilting designs for finishing Shoo Fly and Snowball blocks. Then see Pattern Sheet 1 for quilting diagrams and tips for stitching each design.


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2017 August Quilting Sewing Craft

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2017 August Quilting Sewing Craft

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