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FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2015, 8PM Segerstrom Center for the Arts RenĂŠe and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall Pre-concert lecture by John Mangum, 7pm

VESPERS OF 1610 ENGLISH BAROQUE SOLOISTS & MONTEVERDI CHOIR Sir John Eliot Gardiner, Conductor and Artistic Director Francesca Aspromonte, soprano Francesca Boncompagni, soprano Mariana Flores, soprano Krystian Adam, tenor Nicholas Mulroy, tenor Andrew Tortise, tenor Alex Ashworth, baritone Gianluca Buratto, bass Robert Davies, baritone

Vespro della Beata Vergine SV. 206

Claudio MONTEVERDI (1567-1643)

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Versicle & Response: Deus in adjutorium Domine ad adjuvandum II. Psalm 109: Dixit Dominus III. Motet: Nigra sum IV. Psalm 112: Laudate pueri V. Motet: Pulchra es VI. Psalm 121: Laetatus sum VII. Motet: Duo Seraphim VIII. Psalm 126: Nisi Dominus IX. Motet: Audi coelum X. Psalm 147: Lauda Jerusalem XI. Sonata sopra "Sancta Maria; ora pro nobis" XII. Hymn: Ave maris stella XIII. Magnificat MONTEVERDI CELEBRATION SPONSORSHIP CONSORTIUM:

Colburn Foundation, The Segerstrom Foundation, Mrs. Sharon McNalley, and Mr. Warren G. Coy. Additional support from the Marcia Kay and Ron Radelet Endowment Fund for Great Orchestras and donors of the Dean Corey Program Fund. The Monteverdi Choir and the English Baroque Soloists would like to thank and acknowledge the following for their support of this tour: Dunard Fund USA; the Negaunee Foundation; William and Judith Scheide; Michael Cioffi & Monteverdi Tuscany Castiglioncello del Trinoro; and the American Friends of the Monteverdi Choir & Orchestras, Inc. | www.monteverdi.co.uk Exclusive Tour Management: Opus 3 Artists 470 Park Avenue South, 9th Floor North New York, NY 10016 | www.opus3artists.com

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score of vespers of 1610

MoNTeverDI: vespro DeLLA BeATA verGINe, sv 206 Just over four hundred years ago, an imposing volume of Italian church music in honor of the Holy Virgin was printed in Venice with music by Claudio Monteverdi, then (not very happily) in the service of the Dukes of Gonzaga in Mantua and better known as a composer of trailblazing madrigals and operas. The volume opens with a fine, rather old fashioned six-part a cappella setting of the Mass of the kind sung at the Sistine Chapel, which might help to explain the dedication to Pope Paul V. This is followed by a brilliant sequence of five vesper psalms following the opening invocation and interspersed with ravishing motets for solo voices, a sonata, a hymn, and a seven-part setting of the Magnificat—exactly what we shall be performing tonight. By the early 1600s, thanks to the evangelical campaigns of the new Catholic religious orders, the service of vespers had grown into a ceremony of major musical importance in Italy, even outflanking the mass in musical splendor and in the number of publications. For the past sixty years, musicologists and performing musicians have fought over the contents of the music Monteverdi included under the


When as a rookie conductor I first conducted the Vespers back in 1964, very little of Monteverdi’s music was then known, and performances of the Vespers were extremely rare. In my teens, I heard a BBC broadcast from York Minster with massed choirs and the LSO conducted by Walter Goehr. I remember being completely bowled over by the grandeur of the music—so different from any other music I’d heard by then, so eloquent and passionate, but not in a grandiloquent 19th century way. An idea, at first dimly formulated, began to grow: how to grapple some day with this amazing score, how to begin to do justice to this glorious seicento Italian music, how and where to perform it, with what forces, what voices, what instruments, in what deployment; and then how to pay for it? (Things don’t change…) The challenges were immense, but starting with a wonderfully understanding tutor, the anthropologist Edmund Leach, who allowed me time off from the History tripos at Cambridge to prepare for the assignment, I had advice aplenty from such experts as Denis Arnold (“perform all the Vespers music in exactly the order it was first printed in 1610”), Thurston Dart (“here is the 1610 print: now go and make your own edition”), George Malcolm (“aim for as un-English a choral sound as possible”) and Philip Brett (“don’t allow the mushy King’s Chapel acoustic to sap the music’s vitality”). Indeed!

Piecing together a mixed voice choir made up of choral scholars and young English singers trained in a totally different tradition, none of whom had ever sung a note of Monteverdi before (except perhaps the odd madrigal in a punt on the Cam) —that was the easy bit. But the smooth, polite euphony of the collegiate choral style of the early ’60s was a million miles away from what I imagined then to be the hallmark of Monteverdi’s style—vivid, passionate, multi-colored, text-orientated and rhetorical. I drew comfort from a contemporary description of the problems Monteverdi himself faced when he first arrived at St. Mark’s to take charge of “this most celebrated choir in Italy, feeling himself to be “foreign:” how he won “the compliance and support of the valorous singers, who with good will devoted themselves to embracing the manners of singing no longer practised by them.” Next I had to scour the country to find the only three players around of those treacherously difficult instruments—the cornetto—with very mixed results. All in all, it was a stern test of everyone’s good will and adaptability, and I am certain that our performance was more rough than ready. It caused a bit of a stir. For me it was a kind of epiphany. It led to my resolve to train as a conductor, to put the choir onto a regular basis as the Monteverdi Choir, to a glorious year spent learning investigative musicology from Thurston Dart (the Sherlock Holmes of textual analysis) and to two years’ gruelling but inspiring study with Nadia Boulanger in Paris.

about the program

title Vespro della Beata Vergine da concerto, composta sopra canti fermi—what should be included in performance and in what order? Is it just a haphazard compilation or are we entitled to speak of this as a unified “work?” If so, is it genuinely a single consistent piece of music, or did it come about more by accident than design? Scholarly opinion is divided: some say no, some yes, but then look to liturgical practice to bolster or qualify their position. Different hypotheses as to how to perform this music proliferate, some well argued so that what starts out as theory turns rapidly into quasifact and soon acquires the status of a new orthodoxy. It can be bewildering. Fortunately there is more than one way to skin a cat.

All through the ’70s and ’80s, regardless of the diversity of music I was conducting, it was always a joy to return to the Vespers. Each time and in different venues I found a growing audience clearly relishing the music. I became more and more convinced that the unusual printed placement of solo motets and duets (the sacri concentus referred to on the title page) between the five vesper psalms, far from being an error or a casual whim on the part of his Venetian printer, was part of an audacious pre-ordained plan by Monteverdi. Some scholars still dispute this and 3


about the programt

find it a strange concoction. To me it is key to its originality and success: a magnificent progression of music articulated and held together with constructional logic by the old-fashioned Gregorian cantus firmus, a unifying structural device serving as the spine of the work. The upshot is a sonic chiaroscuro—between the flamboyant (the psalms and canticle) and the intimate (the solo motets), the “public” and the “private,” and, as one contemporary put it, a demonstration of Monteverdi’s “various and diverse manners of invention and harmony.” Consider it for a moment as the sacred twin to his first opera L’Orfeo and you begin to see how Monteverdi brought the techniques of the opera house into church, fused them together with the church’s own ceremonies and rituals where the music could seek out its mysterious architectural spaces. Here was a paradigm for the way music drama was soon to develop in the hands of composers like Schütz, Purcell, Charpentier, and later, Bach and Handel. You could even say that the theatrical deployment of forces in such iconic 19th century works as Berlioz’s Grande Messe des morts and Verdi’s Missa da Requiem had their origins right here. These and other ideas crystallized when in 1986 I first conducted the Vespers in the three Italian cities where Monteverdi had lived and worked— Cremona, Mantua and Venice. Above all, it was the experience of performing it in St. Mark’s that convinced me that this is the place where the music fits most naturally and convincingly. The burnished sounds of Monteverdi’s concertato psalms seemed to complement the opulent mosaics of the Byzantine cupolas, while the divided choirs and brass instruments rang out with magisterial splendour. In one’s mind’s eye one could picture how on high feast days the basilica was turned into a unique theatre for expressing Venice’s own self-image—the choreography of the spectacle, the procession of the doge, senate and clergy all splendidly dressed, and the deployment of the musicians in its galleries, facing pulpits and on special rostra in the sanctuary as described at the time and shown in contemporary

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cLAuDIo MoNTeverDI

iconography, all contributing to a sense of awe. According to official legend, Venice was founded on the Feast of the Annunciation and the city assumed the virtues and attributes of the Virgin Mary—inviolate purity and an implied immortality. In time of war, invocations to her increased, as did the number of motets composed and sung to Marian texts. She was the “stella maris,” the star of the sea—a typically Venetian association surely not lost on Monteverdi, whose dedication to the SANCTISSIMAE VIRGINI is emblazoned on the title page of his 1610 print. No matter that Monteverdi’s style differs significantly from that of the earlier maestri of St. Mark’s, Willaert, and the two Gabrielis. In his Vespers we have the richest and most highly patterned mosaic in music hitherto composed, one which in performance in St. Mark’s becomes a feast for both the ear and the eye, so that you get the sense of being caught up in some spiritual dramma per musica. In “The Supper at Emmaus” that Caravaggio was painting around this time, Christ’s outstretched hand seems to project right out of the canvas into the viewer’s space. In the same way, the invisible “echo” soloists (in Audi coelum and the Gloria of the Magnificat) seem to seek out every inch of the basilica’s reflective surfaces before reaching out to the listener.


As historians, we are often feeding off scraps, desperate to find the one piece of evidence that might clarify the chronology or clinch the case. But in

reality things may not have been so clear-cut. The only documented visit by Monteverdi to Venice is for a couple of days much earlier (in 1595) on his return trip from Hungary (where he and his musicians had performed a vesper service for Duke Vincenzo on the eve of battle against the Turks), though it is always possible he returned there later to oversee the printing of the 1610 print as well as his various books of madrigals. News of the special features of music in St. Mark’s circulated via visitors’ reports and musicians’ gossip, so that it may have been on his radar screen. It is not altogether fanciful, then, to approach the Vespers as an imaginative creation of an idea of Venetian music if not an imitation or expansion of its actuality. Martinengo died in 1613: suddenly there was an opening as maestro di capella at St. Mark’s, the most influential musical post in Italy. What we know for certain is that on August 19, 1613, the procurators of St. Mark’s voted unanimously to appoint Monteverdi to the post that he was to hold right up until his death in 1641. Having first looked at what he had composed (the 1610 print) they then listened to his music and what he could achieve with the cappella of St. Mark’s at his prova “ to their total satisfaction”. This was on the Feast of the Assumption (August 15th) and the payslips to the musicians refer to a Mass, not to Vespers.

about the program

Returning to the 1610 print, there can be little doubt that in planning this, his first major publication of church music, Monteverdi and his printer Amadino had a vested interest in broadening its appeal as much as possible, searching for a wide market for the dissemination and performance of this music—both as a coherent liturgical sequence for any of the Marian feasts while making provision for individual movements to be extrapolated. Beyond that some scholars have seen it as Monteverdi’s calling card or job application—but to where? Rome? Certainly the prima prattica Mass seems tailor-made for the Sistine Chapel (and a manuscript copy survives in the Vatican library) while the Vespers were potentially attractive to any number of the college churches that featured elaborate music; yet Monteverdi’s visit to Rome in 1610 led nowhere. Mantua? Unlikely, since, apart from his exhaustion and illness following the production of his Arianna in 1608 and being passed over as possible maestro of the ducal chapel of Santa Barbara the following year, he could not wait to leave after “nineteen consecutive years.” Two years down the line, things had improved a little and in May 1611 there is a report of a solemn vespers “con bellissima musica di nuova inventione del signor Monteverdi” being performed in Sant’ Andrea, Mantua’s cathedral. Then barely a year later, he was dismissed rather summarily. That left Venice—always likely to be top of an ambitious musician’s list. In 1609, the procurators of St. Mark’s had appointed Giulio Cesare Martinengo as maestro of St Mark’s. So just as he may have been using the 1610 print not merely to impress, but to point certain things out to his Gonzaga overlords in Mantua, perhaps, given the news from Venice, Monteverdi was doing the same to the rest of the world—showing them just what they were missing. As Tim Carter put it to me in a recent letter, “...in other words, the 1610 Vespers bears several grudges and has numerous chips on its shoulders.”

No solid proof exists, then, that Monteverdi ever actually directed his Vespers in St. Mark’s, and I fully acknowledge, of course, that the Basilica is not the only fitting venue for experiencing this dazzling music that can work. Indeed, like Bach and his B minor Mass, it is quite possible that Monteverdi himself never heard it “complete” or as he dreamed it (and we know from his letters how he hated both composing against the clock and ill-rehearsed performances). Nor is that the only feature the Vespers share with the B minor Mass. The provenance of individual movements composed over several years before being assembled as a Missa tota (Bach) and Vespro della Beata Vergine (Monteverdi) suggest that both composers were aiming at a kind of summa—to encapsulate the full range of their invention and compo5


about the program

sitional skills. The two works, separated by around 130 years, thrive on the tension between old and new. Interestingly both composers use ancient Gregorian canti firmi as a binding thread—going back to the very foundations of Christian music making—and then adorning them with the most up-to-date styles and ornate textures of stupendous variety. Traces of the individual performing styles of both composers are there to be found in the very notation. Details of ornamentation and instrumentation that their contemporaries were apparently content to leave to the improvisatory skills of performers, Bach and Monteverdi define (though with variable precision), weaving them into the very fabric of their compositions. Returning with the Vespers tonight, I realize that this work is a touchstone of all that I find most valuable in exploring and reviving music of the past. It does not matter how much more recent music one conducts, the revelations and delights of this great music stay undimmed. The Vespers sum up so many of the best aspects of music of the past that I cherish—how important it is in any music to identify with Monteverdi in his urgent desire to communicate in music, to convey the widest possible range of colour and emotion, and how to relish fantasy and freedom of invention. The challenges one faces in preparing the music for performance are not quite the same as the ones I faced back in 1964—new generations of singers and far greater expertise in period instrument playing make things easier, yet harder now that everyone has become an expert! First comes the need to put in all the hard yards of research and wrestle with all the uncertainties and ambiguities, address the new thinking, the different theories and hypotheses—anything in fact that can throw new light on the music. Choices have to be made, but there are the same fundamental obligations— to establish a clear text, to ensure a unified stylistic approach to vocal declamation and an idiomatic participation of all those exotic obbligato instruments that play such a crucial role. Demystification and practice are, as usual, the

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main needs. When all is said and done, one still has to bear in mind that the music is to be performed—not as part of the liturgy, not to demonstrate a pet theory, but in concert—and to many, many listeners. (As Tim Carter says, “This music does not just look good on the page; it can be made to sound wonderful indeed.”) For that to happen it needs to be new-minted in the very instant it is sung and played. Given its potential to bring architectural space into play as a musical dimension one needs to consider how best to deploy the performers. That is one huge challenge. Another being how to maintain a purposeful overall control of the sequence of those fourteen mesmerising movements as it unfolds, making room for the complexity of its musical thought to register with the listener—the subtlety of its form and the staggering variety and beauty of its expression. —Sir John Eliot Gardiner


I. Deus in adiutorium

Deus in adiutorium meum intende. Domine ad adiuvandum me festina.

O God, turn to me in adversity. Make haste to help me, O Lord.

Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto. Sicut erat in principio, et nunc et semper, et in saecula saeculorum. Amen. Alleluia.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen. Alleluia.

II. Dixit Dominus

II. Dixit Dominus

Dixit Dominus Domino meo: sede a dextris meis, donec ponam inimicos tuos scabellum pedum tuorum.

The Lord said to my Lord, sit at my right hand, and I shall make of your enemies a footstool for you.

Virgam virtutis tuae emittet Dominus ex Sion: dominare in medio inimicorum tuorum. Tecum principium in die virtutis tuae; in splendoribus sanctorum ex utero ante luciferum genui te.

The Lord will extend your royal power out of Zion: you will rule in the midst of your enemies. Your people will be willing on your day of battle; from the day you were born, on the holy mountains, majesty was yours.

Iuravit Dominus et non penitebit eum; tu es sacerdos in aeternum secundum ordinem Melchisedech. Dominus a dextris tuis confregit in die irae suae reges.

The Lord has made an oath which he will not retract: you are a priest for ever, in the order of Melchizedek. The Lord is at your right hand and he shall crush kings on the day of his wrath.

Iudicabit in nationibus, implebit ruinas: conquassabit capita in terra multorum. De torrente in via bibet: propterea exaltabit caput.

He shall judge nations and heap up the dead; He will crush the rulers of the whole earth. He will drink from a brook by the way; And restored he shall stand victorious.

Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto. Sicut erat in principio, et nunc et semper, et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit; As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

t e X t S a N D t r a N S L at I o N S

I. Deus in adiutorium

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t e X t S a N D t r a N S L at I o N S 8

III. Nigra sum Nigra sum sed formosa filiae Jerusalem. Ideo dilexit me Rex, et introduxit me in cubiculum suum et dixit mihi: Surge, amica mea, et veni. Veniam hiems transiit, imber abiit et recessit, flores apparuerunt in terra nostra; tempus putationis advenit.

III. Nigra sum I am dark, but lovely, O daughters of Jerusalem. Therefore the king loved me and brought me into his chamber, and he said to me: Rise up, my love, and come away. See, the winter is past, the rains are over and gone. the flowers appear on our land; and now is the time of reckoning.

IV. Laudate pueri

IV. Laudate pueri

Laudate pueri Dominum: laudate nomen Domini. Sit nomen Domini benedictum, ex hoc nunc, et usque in seculum. A solis ortu usque ad occasum, laudabile nomen Domini. Excelsus super omnes gentes Dominus, et super coelos gloria eius. Quis sicut Dominus Deus noster, qui in altis habitat et humilia respicit in coelo et in terra? Suscitans a terra inopem et de stercore erigens pauperem, ut collocet eum cum principibus, cum principibus populi sui. Qui habitare facit sterilem in domo, matrem filiorum laetantem.

You servants of the Lord, give him praise: praise the name of the Lord. Blessed be the name of the Lord, now and forever. From east to west the Lord’s name is to be praised. The Lord is high above all nations, and his glory above the heavens. Who is the Lord our God, He who dwells on high, and stoops to look at the earth and sky? He raises the poor from the dust, and lifts the needy from the dunghill, So as to set him with princes, with the princes of his people. He gives the barren woman a home, and makes her a happy mother of children.

Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto. Sicut erat in principio, et nunc et semper, et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.


V. Pulchra es

Pulchra es, amica mea, suavis et decora filia Jerusalem. Pulchra es, amica mea, suavis et decora sicut Jerusalem, terribilis sicut castrorum acies ordinata. Averte oculos tuos a me, quia ipsi me avolare fecerunt.

You are beautiful, my love, fair and lovely daughter of Jerusalem. You are beautiful, my love, fair and lovely, as Jerusalem, terrible as an army with banners. Turn your eyes away from me, for they have overcome me.

VI. Laetutus sum

VI. Laetutus sum

Laetutus sum in his quae dicta sunt mihi: in domum Domini ibimus. Stantes erant pedes nostri in atriis tuis Jerusalem; Jerusalem, quae aedificatur ut civitas; cuius participatio eius in idipsum. Illuc enim ascederunt tribus, tribus Domini, testimonium Israel ad confitendum nomini Domini. Quia illic sederunt sedes in iudicio, sedes super domum David. Rogate quae ad pacem sunt Jerusalem et abundantia diligentibus te. Fiat pax in virtute tua et abundantia in turribus tuis. Propter fratres meos et proximos meos loquebar pacem de te. Propter domum Domini Dei nostri quae sivi bona tibi.

I rejoiced with those who said to me: let us go into the house of the Lord. And now we are standing in your gateways, Jerusalem. Jerusalem is built as a city, one united whole. This is where the tribes come, the tribes of the Lord. They come, as the Lord commanded to Israel, to praise his name. For there the judgement thrones stand, the thrones of the house of David. Pray for the peace of Jerusalem, And may those who love you prosper. May there be peace within your walls and prosperity in your citadels. For the sake of my brothers and friends, I will say: Peace be with you. For the sake of the house of the Lord our God I shall pray for your prosperity.

Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto. Sicut erat in principio, et nunc et semper, et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit; as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

t e X t S a N D t r a N S L at I o N S

V. Pulchra es

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VII. Duo Seraphim

VII. Duo Seraphim

Duo Seraphim clamabant alter ad alterum: Sanctus, sanctus, sanctus Dominus Deus Sabaoth: plena est omnis terra gloria eius. Tres sunt qui testimonium dant in coelo: Pater, Verbum et Spiritus Sanctus; et hi tres unum sunt:

Two seraphim cried to another: Holy, holy is the God of Hosts: the whole earth is full of His glory. There are three that testify in Heaven: the Father, the Word, and the Holy Spirit; and these three are one.

Sanctus, sanctus, sanctus Dominus Deus Sabaoth: plena est omnis terra gloria eius.

Holy, holy, holy is the Lord of hosts: The whole earth is full of His glory.

VIII. Nisi Dominus

VIII. Nisi Dominus

Nisi Dominus aedificaverit domum, in vanum laboraverunt qui aedificant eam. Nisi Dominus custodierit civitatem, frustra vigilat qui custodit eam. Vanum est vobis ante lucem surgere: surgite postquam sederitis, qui manducatis panem doloris. Cum dederit dilectis suis somnum; Ecce hereditas Domini, filli: merces, fructus ventris. Sicut sagittae in manu potentis: ita filii excussorum. Beatus vir qui implevit desiderium suum ex ipsis: non confundetur cum loquetur inimicis suis in porta.

Unless the Lord builds the house, its builders work in vain. Unless the Lord guards the city, the watchmen keep their vigil in vain. In vain you rise early and stay up late, toiling for food to eat. For He restores those he loves: children are a heritage from the Lord: offspring are his reward. Like arrows in the hand of the mighty, are the children of one’s youth. Blessed is the man whose quiver is full of them; he shall not be defeated when he meets his enemies at the gate.

Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto. Sicut erat in principio, et nunc et semper, et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit; as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.


IX. Audi coelum

Audi coelum verba mea, plena desiderio et perfusa gaudio. Eco: Audio! Dic, quaeso, mihi: Quae est ista quae consurgens ut aurora rutilat, et benedicat? Eco: Dicam! Dic, nam ista pulchra ut luna, electa ut sol replete laetitia terras, coelos, Maria. Eco: Maria! Maria Virgo illa dulcis, praedicata de prophetis Ezechielis porta orientalis. Eco: Talis! Illa sacra et felix porta, per quam mors fuit expulsa, introducta autem vita. Eco: Vita! Quae semper tutum est medium inter homines et Deum, pro culpis remedium. Eco: Medium! Omnes hanc ergo sequamur, quam cum gratia mereamur vitam aeternam. Consequamur. Eco: Sequamur! Praestat nobis Deus, Pater hoc et Filius et Mater, cuiusnomen invocamus, ducle miseris solamen. Eco: Amen! Benedicta es, Virgo Maria, in seculorum secula.

Hear, Heaven, hear my word, full of longing and suffused with joy. Echo: I hear! Tell me, I pray: who is she who shines like the rising dawn? Tell me so I may bless her. Echo: I shall tell you! Tell me for this woman, fair as the moon, favoured as the sun, fills with joy the earth, the skies, the seas. Echo: Mary! Mary, that sweet virgin, foretold by the prophet Ezekiel portal of the sunrise Echo: Even she! That sacred and joyful gateway through which death was expelled and life ushered in Echo: Even so! She is forever a sure medium between God and men, a cure for our sins. Echo: A medium! Let us all therefore follow her, By whose grace we may attain eternal life. Let us follow her. Echo: Follow her! May God the Father grant this, And the Sun and the Mother, Whose sweet name we invoke A comfort for the afflicted. Echo: Amen! Blessed are you, O Virgin Mary, World without end.

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IX. Audi coelum

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X. Lauda, Jerusalem

X. Lauda, Jerusalem

Lauda, Jerusalem, Dominum, lauda Deum tuum, Sion. Quoniam confortavit seras portarum tuarum benedixit filiis tuis in te. Qui posuit fines tuos pacem, et adipe frumenti satiat te. Qui emittit eloquium suum terrae velociter currit fermo eius. Qui dat nivem sicut lanam nebulam sicut cinerem spargit. Mittit cristallum suum sicut bucellas: ante faciem frigoris eius quis sustinebit? Emittet verbum suum, et liquefaciet eaflabit spiritus euis, et fluent aquae. Qui annuntiat verbum suum Jacob iustitias et iudicia sua Israel. Non fecit taliter omni nationi et iudicia sua non manifestavit eis.

Praise the Lord, O Jerusalem, Praise you God o Zion. For he has strengthened the bars of your gates, He blessed the people with your walls. He grants peace to your borders, and satisfies you with the finest wheat. He sends his command over the earth, His words run swiftly. He spreads snow like wool and scatters frost like ashes. He sends down hail like pebbles Who can endure this cold? He sends his word and melts the ice He makes his wind blow and the water flow. He has made known his word to Jacob, His laws and decrees to Israel. He has not done this for other nations; They do not know his laws.

Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto. Sicut erat in principio, et nunc et semper, et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit; as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

XI. Sancta Maria

XI. Sancta Maria

Sancta Maria, ora pro nobis.

Holy Mary, pray for us.


XII. Ave Maris stella

Ave maris stella, Dei mater alma, Atque semper virgo, Felix coeli porta.

Hail, star of the sea, mild mother of God, eternal Virgin, blessed gate of Heaven.

Sumens illud Ave Gabrielis ore, Funda nos in pace Mutans Evae nomen.

You heard that “Ave” from the mouth of Gabriel, preserve us in peace, changing the name of “Eva.”

Solve vincla reis, Profer lumen caecis, Mala nostra pelle, Bona cunctis posce.

Strike off the chains of the guilty, bring lights to the blind, drive out our evil, give us all that is good.

Monstra te esse matrem: Sumat per te preces, Qui pro nobis natus, Tulit esse tuus.

Show yourself our Mother through you may He receive our prayers, He who, born for us, consented to be yours.

Virgo singularis, Inter omnes mitis, Nos culpis solutos, Mites fac et castos.

Virgin past compare, meekest of all women, make us, purged of our sins, meek and chaste.

Vitam praesta puram, Iter para tutum, Ut videntes Iesum Semper collaetemur.

Grant us a pure life, prepare a safe journey for us that, seeing Jesus, we may rejoice eternally.

Sit laus Deo Patri, Summo Christo decus, Spiritui Sancto, Tribus honor unus. Amen.

Praise be to God the Father, and glory to Christ on high, and to the Holy Spirit, three in one. Amen.

t e X t S a N D t r a N S L at I o N S

XII. Ave Maris stella

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t e X t S a N D t r a N S L at I o N S 14

XIII. Magnificat

XIII. Magnificat

Magnificat anima mea Dominum. Et exultavit spiritus meus in Deo salutari meo. Quia respexit humilitatem ancillae suae, ecce enim ex hoc beatam me dicent omnes generationes. Quia fecit mihi magna qui potens est et sanctum nomen eius. Et misericordia eius a progenie in progenies timentibus eum. Fecit potentiam in brachio suo; dispersit superbos mente cordis sui. Deposuit potentes de sede et exaltavi humiles. Esurientes implevit bonis, et divites dimisit inanes. Suscepit Israel puerum suum, recordatus misericordiae suae, Sicut locutus est ad patres nostros, Abraham et semini eius in secula.

My soul exalts the Lord. And my spirit rejoices in God my saviour. For he has been mindful of the humble state of his handmaiden: from now on, all generations shall call me blessed. For the mighty one has done great things for me, and his name is Holy. He is merciful to those who fear him through all generations. He has shown his might with his arm; He has scattered those who harboured pride in their hearts. He has brought rulers down from their thrones, He has raised up the humble. He has filled the hungry with good things, and he has sent the rich away empty. He has helped his servant Israel, remembering to be merciful. Even as he said to our fathers, to Abraham and his descendants for ever.

Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto, Sicut erat in principio, et nunc, et semper et in secula seculorum. Amen.

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Vespers of 1610 Program  
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