Joshua Bell, violin

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Joshua Bell, violin WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2021


ABOUT THE PROGRAM BEETHOVEN: VIOLIN SONATA NO. 2 IN A MAJOR, OP. 12 Wednesday, February 10, 2021, 6pm PST

VIRTUAL CONCERT

JOSHUA BELL, VIOLIN Peter Dugan, piano PROGRAM Violin Sonata No. 2 in A major, Op. 12

Ludwig van BEETHOVEN (1770-1827)

Allegro vivace Andante, più tosto Allegretto Allegro piacevole Violin Sonata No. 3 in D minor, Op. 108

Johannes BRAHMS (1833-1897)

Allegro Adagio Un poco presto e con sentimento Presto agitato Baal Shem, B. 47: II. “Nigun”

Ernest BLOCH (1880-1959)

Scherzo-Tarantelle, Op. 16 Henryk WIENIAWSKI (1835-1880) Nocturne in B-flat minor Op. 9, No. 1

Frédéric CHOPIN

(arr. Bell/Stephenson)

(1833-1897)

Program subject to change

General Management for Joshua Bell Park Avenue Artists

The Philharmonic Society’s 2020-21 season is made possible through the generous support of Donna L. Kendall and the Donna L. Kendall Foundation Anonymous Howard and Judith Jelinek The Segerstrom Foundation Sam and Lyndie Ersan

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Beethoven’s first three sonatas for piano and violin duo (all ten of his violin sonatas were designated “for Piano and Violin”) were dedicated to one of the musicians with whom he studied in Vienna—Antonio Salieri, of theatrical and film fame. (When told of the speculation that Salieri had poisoned Mozart, Beethoven was indignant and dismissed the notion out of hand.) The Sonata No. 2 in A contrasts markedly with its siblings of the Opus 12 set: Nos. 1 and 3 are incisive and dynamic, reflecting the bold spirit of the firebrand from Bonn; No. 2 is a blithe spirit, full of quicksilver, buffo charm. The opening of the Sonata tells everything about its stance. With the violin busily supplying staccato chords, the piano plays, fast and soft as you please, a pert little idea made of a series of six ascending half-steps outlining the A-major chord—certainly more a motif than a full-fledged theme. Reaching up to the high keyboard where it began, the piano then reverses the original direction and sweeps down in descending steps, this time outlining dominant harmony. The mood of the movement does not remain as antic as this opening suggests, but the materials are determinedly lightweight, even with the presence of the unexpected loud accents, the syncopations, and the breathless pauses that are typical of more serious Beethoven essays. The work is wonderfully designed even while being delicious fun. As an example of the latter, notice very close to the beginning, when the violin plays the first four pairs of half-steps and the piano answers low on the keyboard with the remaining three pairs: a pair of comedians, one stand-up, one sitdown. The union between the two instruments is deftly handled throughout, and if the piano is lord of this domain, the violin still comes into its own on many an occasion. The middle movement is not really a very slow one, but it is in a minor key (A minor) and purports to be “serious and expressive.” The piano introduces the main theme (as it does again in the third movement), but the


ABOUT THE PROGRAM procedure becomes democratic in an “I take the melody first, then it’s yours” manner. The tempo marking for the finale, Allegro piacevole (fast and charming, or amusing, etc.), tells it all about the lighthearted, breezy, syncopated, and endearing music that Beethoven concocted to end his exhilarating Second Sonata for piano and violin. BRAHMS: VIOLIN SONATA NO. 3 IN D MINOR, OP. 108 Brahms’ third and last sonata for violin and piano is a full four-movement work, but remarkably compact and varied in its range of expression. It opens in an introspective but troubled frame of mind, with the violin musing obsessively over a repetitive melodic pattern. The piano restlessly ruminates far below until it grabs the theme to project it out with heroic strength. The second theme, announced by the piano before being taken up by the violin, is a lyrical tidbit of small melodic range with an insistent dotted rhythm. Where the weighty mystery lies in this movement is in the development section, in which the piano intones a low A, dominant of the key, for almost 50 bars beneath relatively serene motivic deliberations from the violin above. All seems to be well during the recapitulation, but no sooner is the first subject reviewed when another development section breaks out that is as harmonically volatile as the previous development was stiflingly stable. Its passion spent, the recapitulation continues, but with the piano plumbing another pedal point, a low D, at the bottom of the keyboard. Balancing the dark mysterious mood of the first movement is the Adagio, an openly lyrical aria for the violin, accompanied throughout by the piano. Noteworthy in its unvaried repetitions throughout this movement are the deeply affecting falling intervals and passionately expressive outbursts in double thirds, reminiscent of the gypsy manner. The third movement Un poco presto e con sentimento is teasingly ambiguous in mood. More subversive than sentimental, it stands somewhere between an intermezzo and a scherzo. It opens with a playful hops of a minor third, but the

minor avouring is undercut by ickering allusions to the major mode. Its almost gypsyish volatility of mood, however, soon leads it into more hefty and passionate expressive terrain. In other places, though, an almost Mendelssohnian aura of fairyland magic hovers over the proceedings, especially the wispy ending that softly and slyly blows out the candle on this enigmatic movement. There is nothing ambiguous, however, about the Presto agitato last movement. While dance-like elements are present in its principal theme in 6/8, the thick scoring of the piano part prevents any spirit of lightness from taking hold in this turbulent and dead serious sonata-rondo. The dark clouds do break momentarily, however, for the simple chorale-like second subject, announced first in the piano. A range of textures, from throbbing syncopations to eerie unisons, ensures variety in the continuous development of ideas pulsing through this movement that lends massive end-weighting to the sonata as a whole. —vanrecital.com BLOCH: BAAL SHEM, B. 47: II. “NIGUN” For the Swiss-born American composer Ernest Bloch, cultural and artistic identity were intrinsically linked. Bloch, born in Geneva in 1880 to Jewish parents, found his musical voice in a series of large-scale works known as his “Jewish cycle.” These included Psalm settings for voice and orchestra (1912–1914); Israel, a symphony with five vocal soloists (1912–1916); and his most famous work, Schelomo for Cello and Orchestra (1915–1916). “What interests me is the Jewish soul,” Bloch wrote, “the enigmatic, ardent, turbulent soul that I feel vibrating throughout the Bible...it is all this that I endeavor to hear in myself and transcribe in my music; the venerable emotion of the race that slumbers way down in our souls.” (G. Schirmer would publish the “Jewish” works emblazoned with a Star of David, placing the composer’s initials in the center—thus affirming Bloch’s cultural identity in the public consciousness, as well.) Following the “Jewish cycle,” Bloch’s oeuvre would continue to nod to the composer’s Jewish heritage. In 1923 came Baal Shem: Three Pictures of Hassidic Life for Violin and Piano. 3


ABOUT THE PROGRAM Bloch composed the work in memoriam his deceased mother. The second piece in the Baal Shem triptych is titled Nigun—literally, “improvisation,” or “melody.” Per Kabbalah, melody represents a spiritual medium, empowering the faithful to achieve a state of transcendence; song is consequently a vital component of Hassidic worship. Bloch’s Nigun captures this reverence for song in its oratorical violin writing. The work begins on a dramatically charged note; Bloch instructs both pianist and violinist to play fieramente (“fiercely”). Harmonic gestures and melodic flourishes immediately evoke Jewish folk music—many ears will quickly detect the telltale grace notes and augmented seconds in the work’s opening measures. Above rumbling tremolandi in the piano, the violin intones its first utterance like a cantor calling the faithful to prayer. Here, as throughout Nigun, the violin conjures a vocal expressivity with its semi- improvisatory melodic character, its rhythmic freedom, and, on its first entrance, the composer’s instruction that the violinist play on the fourth (lowest) string, coloring the tune with an especially dusky quality. These features permeate the entire work, which reverberates from start to finish with a take-noprisoners dramatic power. As the work proceeds, the violinist’s melodic ornamentation, double-stopped melodic figures, and increasingly virtuosic flourishes seem to approach religious ecstasy. After its most fervent declamation, Nigun ends with a meditative amen. —musicatmenlo.org WIENIAWSKI: SCHERZO-TARANTELLE, OP. 16 In 1855 Wieniawski wrote the Scherzo-Tarantelle, Op. 16. His intention was to play it with his younger brother Joseph. There are some disputes over what the construction of the piece is actually supposed to be. After having performed it several times with his brother, Wieniawski supposedly wrote an orchestra version of the piece. The question arises however as to whether or not the two brothers had the intention of playing the piece together with the orchestra accompaniment based 4

the parting of the two careers. Supposedly the construction of the piano part for the ScherzoTarantelle has been rewritten to be easier in order to accommodate the lack of a consistent pianist. Therefore, he had to simplify the music to accommodate the lack of a consistent pianist. The claim that the piano part has been simplified stems from the shorter piano and violin arrangement versus the longer violin and orchestra version. One major telltale splitting of the piece is the title itself. A Tarantelle is a lively dance in 6/8 that was believed to heal victims of a spider bite from a tarantula. The word scherzo stems from the Italian meaning a joke. This explains the joking spidery fingerings that are in the violin music.

—marshall.edu

CHOPIN (ARR. BELL/STEPHENSON): NOCTURNE IN B-FLAT MINOR, OP. 9, NO. 1 Invented by the Irish composer John Field, it was nonetheless Frédéric Chopin that greatly popularized the nocturne—a short one-movement composition for the piano evocative of the ethereal visions of nighttime. His opus 9, published in 1833 and dedicated to Madame Camille Pleyel, consisted of three nocturnes composed between 1830 and 1832. With the exception of a solitary Nocturne in E minor, composed in 1827, but not published until after the composer’s death, the opus 9 nocturnes represent Chopin’s first foray into the genre pioneered by Field. The Nocturne in B-flat minor, first of the set, begins with a delicate but supple melody over a gently rocking accompaniment. This dream-like section, and its reprisal at the end of the piece, frames a tender central episode in D-flat major. Beginning with a touch of solemnity, the melody of the episode acquires a unique beauty in its persistent sidestep into the key of D major and equally agile return to D-flat. A new, but related, melodic idea over an austere accompaniment of fifths precedes the return of the opening B-flat minor melody.

—classicalconnect.com


ABOUT THE ARTISTS JOSHUA BELL, VIOLIN With a career spanning almost four decades, Joshua Bell is one of the most celebrated violinists of his era. Having performed with virtually every major orchestra in the world, Bell continues to maintain engagements as soloist, recitalist, chamber musician, conductor and Music Director of the Academy of St Martin in the Fields. In a moment when COVID-19 has shut down the majority of live performances, Bell has joined the movement to bring world-class performances online. On August 16, 2020, PBS presented “Joshua Bell: At Home With Music,” a nationwide broadcast directed by Tony and Emmy award winner, Dori Berinstein. The program includes core classical material as well as new arrangements of beloved works, including a West Side Story medley. The special features guest artists Larisa Martínez, Jeremy Denk, Peter Dugan, and Kamal Khan. Additional performances during the summer of 2020 included an Independence Day concert with the U.S. Air Force Band, a concert for the Tanglewood Online Festival with pianist Jeremy Denk, and a virtual program for the Saratoga Performing Arts Center with pianist Peter Dugan. In July, Bell gave virtual performances with soprano Larisa Martínez as part of the Casals Festival, and for the Virtual Verbier Festival with pianist Daniil Trifonov. In 2011, Bell was named Music Director of the Academy of St Martin in the Fields, succeeding Sir Neville Marriner, who formed the orchestra in 1959. Bell’s history with the Academy dates back to 1986 when he first recorded the Bruch and Mendelsohn concertos with Mariner and the orchestra. Bell has since directed the orchestra on several albums including Vivaldi’s Four Seasons, Voice of the Violin, For the Love of Brahms, and most recently, Bruch: Scottish Fantasy, which was nominated for a 2019 GRAMMY® Award. Bell has performed for three American presidents and the sitting justices of the Supreme Court of the United States. He participated in former president Barack Obama’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities’ first cultural mission to Cuba, joining Cuban and American musicians on a 2017 Live from Lincoln Center

Emmy nominated PBS special, Joshua Bell: Seasons of Cuba, celebrating renewed cultural diplomacy between Cuba and the United States. Born in Bloomington, Indiana, Bell began the violin at age four, and at age twelve, began studies with his mentor, Josef Gingold. At age 14, Bell debuted with Riccardo Muti and the Philadelphia Orchestra, and made his Carnegie Hall debut at age 17 with the St. Louis Symphony. At age 18, Bell signed with his first label, London Decca, and received the Avery Fisher Career Grant. In the years following, Bell has been named 2010 “Instrumentalist of the Year” by Musical America, a 2007 “Young Global Leader” by the World Economic Forum, nominated for six GRAMMY® awards, and received the 2007 Avery Fisher Prize. He has also received the 2003 Indiana Governor’s Arts Award and a Distinguished Alumni Service Award in 1991 from the Jacobs School of Music. In 2000, he was named an “Indiana Living Legend.” PETER DUGAN, PIANO Pianist Peter Dugan’s debut performances with Michael Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony were described by the Los Angeles Times as “stunning” and by the SF Chronicle as “fearlessly athletic.” He is heard nationwide as the newly announced host of NPR’s beloved program From the Top. He has appeared as 5


ABOUT THE ARTISTS a soloist, recitalist, and chamber musician across North America and abroad. This year he makes his debuts at Wigmore Hall and the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and can be heard as the piano soloist on a new release of Ives’ Fourth Symphony from Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony, a recording which the New York Times named one of the top classical albums of 2019. Prizing versatility as the key to the future of classical music, Mr. Dugan is equally at home in classical, jazz, and pop idioms. A sought-after multi-genre artist, Mr. Dugan has performed in duos and trios with artists ranging from Itzhak Perlman and Renée Fleming to Jesse Colin Young and Glenn Close. The Wall Street Journal described Mr. Dugan’s collaboration with violinist Charles Yang as a “classical-meets-rockstar duo.” Mr. Dugan has been presented in chamber music recitals by Carnegie Hall, Chamber Music Society of Palm Beach, Music at Menlo, Moab Music Festival, and recently in recital with Joshua Bell at the Minnesota Beethoven Festival. He was the 2019 featured recitalist for the California Association of Professional Music Teachers, and has soloed with the San Francisco Symphony, Houston Symphony, Kansas City Symphony, New World Symphony, and Mid-Texas Symphony. His debut album with baritone John Brancy—A Silent Night: A WWI Memorial in Song—pays homage to composers who lived through, fought in, and died in the Great War. Brancy and Dugan toured this program across North America in commemoration of the centennial of WWI, including performances at The Kennedy Center, Alice Tully Hall, Stanford University, the United States Naval Academy, and the Smithsonian Institute. Together Brancy and Dugan won first prize at the 2018 Montreal International Music Competition and second prize at the 2017 Wigmore Hall International Song Competition. Mr. Dugan advocates the importance of music in the community and at all levels of society. As a founding creator of Operation Superpower, a superhero opera for children, he has travelled to dozens of schools in the greater New York area, performing for students and encouraging them to use their talents—their superpowers—for good. Mr. Dugan holds Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from The Juilliard School, where he studied under 6

Matti Raekallio. He resides in New York City with his wife, mezzo-soprano Kara Dugan, and serves on the piano faculty at the Juilliard School Evening Division. Mr. Dugan is a Yamaha Artist.


UPCOMING EVENTS

*PLEASE NOTE: All 2021 concerts will have virtual viewing options. In-person opportunities will be announced on a concert by concert basis.

FEBRUARY LAGUNA BEACH MUSIC FESTIVAL SALON WITH CONRAD TAO, PIANO Thursday, February 11, 2021, 6pm PST Virtual Concert

Join us as we kick off the Laguna Beach Music Festival with a special livestreamed Salon performance from the home of our 2021 Festival Artistic Director, composer and pianist Conrad Tao. Selections to be announced.

ASTOR PIAZZOLLA AT 100
WITH PHILIPPE QUINT AND MEMBERS OF THE JOFFREY BALLET

Philippe Quint, violin
 Members of the Joffrey Ballet*
 Additional artists to be announced
 Tuesday, February 23, 2021, 8pm PST Co-presented by Irvine Barclay Theatre Concert sponsored by Steven M. Sorenson MD
 Additional support provided by the Ibex Foundation *Appearance courtesy of the Joffrey Ballet, Ashley Wheater, Artistic Director Multi-Grammy-nominated violinist Philippe Quint and members of the world-class, Chicago-based Joffrey Ballet celebrate the centennial of tango legend Astor Piazzolla in a performance of music and dance.

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UPCOMING EVENTS BROOKLYN RIDER

APRIL

Brooklyn Rider offers eclectic repertoire in gripping performances that continue to attract legions of fans and draw rave reviews from classical, world, and rock critics alike. Program to be announced.

ALISA WEILERSTEIN, CELLO AND INON BARNATAN, PIANO

Saturday, February 27, 2021, 7pm PST

MARCH

SMETANA TRIO

Tuesday, March 2, 2021, 7pm PST Virtual Concert
 BEETHOVEN: Piano Trio in D major, Op. 70, No. 1, “Ghost” NOVÁK: Piano Trio in D minor, Op. 27, “Trio quasi una ballata” DVORÁK: Piano Trio No. 4 in E minor, Op. 90, “Dumky”

Thursday, April 8, 2021, 8pm PST Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall* Select Beethoven Cello Sonatas

BRENTANO QUARTET

Friday, April 9, 2021, 8pm PST Venue TBD* HAYDN: String Quartet No. 6 in D major, Op. 17 BARTÓK: String Quartet No. 5, Sz. 102
 BRAHMS: String Quartet No. 2 in A minor, Op. 51

JERUSALEM QUARTET WITH PINCHAS ZUKERMAN, VIOLIN AND AMANDA FORSYTH, CELLO GEORGE LI, PIANO

Thursday, March 4, 2021, 8pm PST
 Virtual Concert BEETHOVEN: Andante Favori BEETHOVEN: Piano Sonata No. 32 in C minor, Op. 111 LISZT: Piano Sonata in B minor, S.178

YEFIM BRONFMAN, PIANO Sunday, March 21, 2021, 3pm PST Virtual Concert

BEETHOVEN: Sonata in D major, Op. 10, No. 3 DEBUSSY: Suite bergamasque BEETHOVEN: Sonata in F minor, Op. 57 (“Appassionata”)

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Wednesday, April 21, 2021, 8pm PST Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall*

BRUCKNER: Adagio from String Quintet in F major, WAB 112 DVOŘÁK: Sextet for Strings in A major, Op. 48
 BRAHMS: Sextet for Strings No. 1 in B-flat major, Op. 18

JEAN-YVES THIBAUDET, PIANO

Saturday, April 24, 2021, 8pm
PST Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall* DEBUSSY: Préludes Books 1 and 2


UPCOMING EVENTS MAY 2021 Laguna Beach Music Festival COUNTERPOINT
 Festival Artistic Director: Conrad Tao, piano Caleb Teicher, dancer
 May 2021 Locations in Laguna Beach*

DANISH STRING QUARTET Sunday, May 16, 2021, 3pm PST Samueli Theater*

Grammy-nominated Danish String Quartet makes its second appearance in the 2020-21 season with a performance showcasing its players’ masterful technique and heartfelt expressivity. Program to be announced.

Duo program with music by Bach, Gershwin, etc.

2021 Laguna Beach Music Festival ITS BRILLIANCE ALMOST FRIGHTENED ME Festival Artistic Director: Conrad Tao, piano May 2021 Locations in Laguna Beach*

Laurence CRANE: Prelude No. 1
 BERG: “Traumgekrönt” from Seven Early Songs
 SCHUBERT: “Gretchen am spinnrade” (Gretchen at the Spinning Wheel) Eric WUBBELS: gretchen am spinnrade
 Ruth Crawford SEEGER: String Quartet
 BEETHOVEN: String Quartet No. 16, Op. 135

SERGIO ASSAD, CLARICE ASSAD, AND THIRD COAST PERCUSSION

Sergio Assad, guitar
 Clarice Assad, piano/voice
 Third Coast Percussion Friday, May 28, 2021, 8pm
PST Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall* In an exploration of global music traditions, legendary guitarist Sergio Assad, along with Clarice Assad’s spellbinding vocals and the rhythms of Grammy-winning Third Coast Percussion, will take audiences on a vast musical journey grounded in familiar stories.

JUNE 2021 Laguna Beach Music Festival CHANGE THIS THREAD ON WHICH WE MOVE Festival Artistic Director: Conrad Tao, piano May 2021 Locations in Laguna Beach*

Caroline SHAW: Entr’acte (Westerlies arrangement) DEBUSSY: Violin Sonata in G minor
 GESUALDO: selected Madrigals
 Other works to be announced.

AUGUSTIN HADELICH, VIOLIN AND ORION WEISS, PIANO

Monday, June 14, 2021, 8pm PST Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall* BEETHOVEN: Violin Sonata No. 4 in A minor, Op. 23 DEBUSSY: Sonata in G minor, L. 140
 COLL: Hyperlude No. 5 for Solo Violin
 YSAŸE: Sonata No. 6 in E major for Solo Violin BRAHMS: Sonata No. 2 in A major, Op. 100 DEBUSSY: L’isle joyeuse, L. 106 ADAMS: Road Movies

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UPCOMING EVENTS RENÉE FLEMING, SOPRANO

Thursday, June 17, 2021, 8pm PST Renée and Henry Segerstrom oncert Hall* In a rescheduled performance from the previous season, four-time Grammy winner and legendary soprano Renée Fleming appears in a program of beloved songs and arias.

TICKETS & INFORMATION 949.553.2422 PHILHARMONICSOCIETY.ORG All artists, dates, times, venues, programs, and prices are subject to change.

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DONORS The Philharmonic Society of Orange County gratefully acknowledges the following donors for their generous support of the Fund for Music during the past twelve months. These contributions make up the difference between the income generated from ticket sales and the actual cost of bringing the world’s finest orchestras, soloists and chamber ensembles to Orange County and inspiring 100,000 K-12 students each year with quality music programs. Gifts range from $60 to more than $100,000, and each member of the Philharmonic Society plays a valuable role in furthering the mission of this organization.

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RICHARD AND VICKI LEE

HONORARY LIFE MEMBERS Frieda Belinfante in memoriam

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List current as of January 29, 2021 The Philharmonic Society deeply appreciates the support of its sponsors and donors, and makes every effort to ensure accurate and appropriate recognition. Contact the Development Department at (949) 553-2422, ext. 233, to make us aware of any error or omission in the foregoing list.

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DONORS DONORS TO THE PHILHARMONIC FORWARD CAMPAIGN The Philharmonic Society’s campaign is the first of its kind in the organization’s history. It will grow the Society’s endowment—providing greater opportunities for the presentation of the world’s leading orchestras and other musical performances while expanding our educational and community outreach—and also establish a current needs fund for organizational sustainability and flexibility. We are proud to recognize those who are helping secure the Society’s future with a gift to the Philharmonic Forward Campaign. We are grateful for their support, which will help fuel the Society’s growth and provide a legacy of incomparable music and superb music education programs in perpetuity.

$1,000,000+ Mr. James J. Brophy Donna L. Kendall and the Donna L. Kendall Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Robert Sebring Anonymous

$500,000+ Richard Cullen and Robert Finnerty James and Judy Freimuth

$250,000+ The Davisson Family Fund for Youth Music Education Margaret M. Gates—In memory of family Mr. and Mrs. Milton S. Grier, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Douglas H. Smith

$100,000+ Pete and Sabra Bordas David and Suzanne Chonette Karen and Don Evarts Milli and Jim Hill Marlene and Chris Nielsen Richard and Deborah Polonsky Diane and Michael Stephens Anonymous

$50,000+ Mr. Douglas T. Burch, Jr.* Dr. and Mrs. Richard D. Campbell Erika E. Faust* Mrs. Joanne C. Fernbach Joan Halvajian Elaine and Carl Neuss Marcia Kay Radelet Mr. and Mrs. Philip E. Ridout Ms. Dea Stanuszek Dr. Daniel and Jeule Stein

$25,000+ Mr. William P. Conlin* and Mrs. Laila Conlin Mr. and Mrs. Donald French Mr. and Mrs. Peter Fuerbringer Mr. and Mrs. Noel Hamilton Dr. and Mrs. Chase Roh

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Mastrangelo Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Michel Charles Mosmann Carl Neisser Joan Rehnborg Dr. and Mrs. Henry Sobel Dr. and Mrs. Julio Taleisnik Marti and Walter Unger Gayle Widyolar, M.D. Sandi Wright-Cordes U.S. Bank Anonymous

Up to $24,999 Eleanor and Jim Anderson John W. Benecke *Deceased Mr. and Mrs. Jim Burra Ana and Ron Dufault Hung Fan and Michael Feldman First American Trust Kimberly Dwan Bernatz Mr. John D. Flemming and Mr. Mark Powell Duke Funderburke Carolyn and John Garrett Karin Easter Gurwell Maralou and Jerry M. Harrington Mrs. Alice E. Hood Huntington Harbour Philharmonic Committee Marina Windjammer Group Judith and Kevin Ivey Ms. Lula Belle Jenkins Doris and Jim Kollias Mrs. Elizabeth C. Kramer Mr. and Mrs. Richard Lewis Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Madracki

LEAVE A LEGACY Estate gifts allow our long-time subscribers and donors to leave an enduring legacy that helps ensure the long-term financial strength of the Philharmonic Society of Orange County. Please consider including us in your will, as either a percentage of your estate or a fixed amount. Doing so will support our commitment of presenting world-class programming and music education that enriches the cultural life of Orange County for generations to come. For more information, please contact 949.553.2422, ext. 233, or email Support@PhilharmonicSociety.org.

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DONORS LEGACY CIRCLE MEMBERS Mr. and Mrs. James Alexiou Dr. and Mrs. Julio Aljure Diane and John Chimo Arnold Estate of Edra E. Brophy* Mr. James J. Brophy Mr. Douglas T. Burch, Jr.* Mr. William P. Conlin* and Mrs. Laila Conlin Pamela Courtial* Mr. Warren G. Coy Richard Cullen and Robert Finnerty Mr. Ben Dolson* Camille and Eric Durand Trust* Karen and Don Evarts Erika E. Faust* James and Judy Freimuth Ms. Carol Frobish*

The William Gillespie Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Milton S. Grier, Jr. Mr. Edward Halvajian* Ms. Joan Halvajian Ms. Marie Hiebsch* Mr. and Mrs. James R. Hill Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Hull Mr. Leonard Jaffe Judith and Howard Jelinek Dr. Burton L. Karson Donna L. Kendall Hank and Bonnie Landsberg Mrs. Carla Liggett Dr. William Lycette Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Michel Mr. and Mrs. Bart Morrow Mr. and Mrs. Michael D. Nadler Eva Cebulski Olivier

Mrs. Frank M. Posch* Marcia Kay Radelet Marjorie Rawlins* Mrs. Ladislaw Reday* Elaine M. Redfield* Mr. Richard M. Reinsch* Mr. and Mrs. Stephen L. Salyer Mr. and Mrs. Robert Sebring Mr. H. Russell Smith* Ms. Dea Stanuszek Diane and Michael Stephens Vas Nunes Family Trust* Betty M. Williams* Anonymous

*Deceased Bold type indicates gifts of $50,000 or more. Please call the Philharmonic Society Development Department if you have included either the Philharmonic Society or the separate Philharmonic Foundation in your will or trust so that we may honor you as a member of the Legacy Circle. For more information, call (949) 553-2422, ext. 233, or visit: www.PhilharmonicSociety.org/SupportUs and click on Planned Giving.

ESTERHAZY PATRONS The Philharmonic Society is proud to recognize our dedicated patrons who have made a multi-year Esterhazy Patron pledge. We are grateful for their support, which has been largely responsible for enabling us to present the world’s most acclaimed symphony orchestras, chamber ensembles and soloists. Mr. and Mrs. James Alexiou Mr. and Mrs. Darrel Anderson A. Gary Anderson Family Foundation Mr. Gary N. Babick Ms. Tricia Babick Mrs. Alan Beimfohr Mr. and Mrs. John Carson Cheng Family Foundation Mrs. William P. Conlin Mr. Warren G. Coy Marjorie and Roger Davisson Mr. and Mrs. Jack Delman The Dirk Family Dr. and Mrs. Christopher Duma Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Emery Catherine Emmi Sam and Lyndie Ersan

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Freedland Margaret M. Gates—In memory of family Mr. William J. Gillespie Mr. and Mrs. Milton S. Grier, Jr. Maralou and Jerry M. Harrington Dr. and Mrs. Howard J. Jelinek Mr. and Mrs. Mark Chapin Johnson Drs. Siret and Jaak Jurison Donna L. Kendall Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Venelin Khristov Mr. and Mrs. Roger Kirwan Capt. Steve Lutz and Shala Shashani Lutz Professor Robert and Dr. Adeline Yen Mah

Mrs. Michael McNalley Drs. Vahe and Armine Meghrouni Mrs. Michael D. Nadler Elaine and Carl Neuss Mr. Thomas Nielsen Milena and Milan Panic Helen Reinsch Barbara Roberts Mrs. Michelle Rohé Mr. and Mrs. Stephen L. Salyer Elizabeth Segerstrom Mr. and Mrs. Douglas H. Smith Mrs. Eugenia D. Thompson Mrs. Elaine Weinberg Mr. and Mrs. George Wentworth Bobbitt and Bill Williams Anonymous

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BOARD OF DIRECTORS OFFICERS Donna L. Kendall Chairman, CEO John Flemming Vice Chairman

Sabra Bordas Vice Chairman

Kimberly Dwan Bernatz Immediate Past Chairman

Stephen Amendt Secretary/Treasurer

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE John W. Benecke Development

JoAnn Fuerbringer Orange County Youth Symphony

Elaine P. Neuss Artistic and Marketing

Sabra Bordas Nominating

Jane K. Grier Member at Large

Douglas H. Smith Foundation

Hung Fan Laguna Beach Music Festival

Jean Felder President, The Committees

Jim Brophy

Margaret M. Gates

David Troob

Gary Capata

Wesley Kruse

Kim Weddon

Joanne C. Fernbach

Barbara Roberts

Kathryn Wopschall

PRESIDENT AND ARTISTIC DIRECTOR Tommy Phillips 16


ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF MARKETING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS Jean Hsu Chief Operating Officer / Vice President of Communications Marie Songco-Torres Senior Marketing & Public Relations Manager Jennifer Niedringhaus, Marketing & Public Relations Associate

DEVELOPMENT Halim Kim Senior Director of Development Kevin Kwan Loucks Director of Business Development and Strategic Partnerships Leah Heit Development & Special Events Coordinator

ARTISTIC OPERATIONS Kathy Smith Piano Technician

FINANCE Roan Alombro Vice President of Finance Jessica Cho Finance Associate / HR Administrator

PATRON SERVICES Jonathan Mariott Director of Patron Services Angelica Nicolas Marketing & Patron Services Associate Randy Polevoi Musical Concierge

ORANGE COUNTY YOUTH SYMPHONY Johannes Müller Stosch Music Director & Conductor Cathy Olinger General Manager & OCYSE Conductor Danielle Culhane Operations & Personnel Manager

EDUCATION

Sarah Little Vice President of Education & Community Engagement Heather Cromleigh Director of Volunteer & Education Services / Board Liaison

Moni Simeonov Coordinator of Strings Mathieu Girardet Coordinator of Winds Tristan Chilvers Assistant Manager & Librarian

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THE PHILHARMONIC SOCIETY OF ORANGE COUNTY ABOUT US Founded in 1954 as Orange County’s first music organization, the Philharmonic Society of Orange County presents national and international performances of the highest quality and provides dynamic and innovative music education programs for individuals of all ages to enhance the lives of Orange County audiences through music. For more than 65 years the Philharmonic Society has evolved and grown with the county’s changing landscape, presenting artists and orchestras who set the standard for artistic achievement from Itzhak Perlman, Gustavo Dudamel, Yo-Yo Ma, and Renée Fleming to the Berlin Philharmonic, Vienna Philharmonic, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, and many others. In addition, the Philharmonic Society celebrates multi-disciplinary performances under its Eclectic Orange brand and embraces music from a wide range of countries with its World Music performances. Its celebrated family concerts introduce children to classical music with creative and inspiring performances, instilling music appreciation for future generations.

The Philharmonic Society’s nationally recognized Youth Music Education Programs, offered free of charge, engage more than 100,000 students annually through curriculum-based music education programs that aim to inspire, expand imaginations, and encourage learning at all levels. These programs are made possible by the Committees of the Philharmonic Society comprised of 700 volunteer members who provide more than 90,000 hours of in-kind service each year.

As a key youth program, the exceptional Orange County Youth Symphony and String Ensemble provide top-tier training to the area’s most talented young musicians through multi-level ensemble instruction, leadership training, touring opportunities, challenging professional repertoire, and performances in world-class venues. The Philharmonic Society also promotes life-long learning by connecting with colleges and universities to conduct masterclasses and workshops and providing pre-concert lectures to introduce audiences to program selections.

949.553.2422 | PHILHARMONICSOCIETY.ORG

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