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Field Guide to Amazonian Bats

Key to Amazonian bat families

1a. Noseleaf or flaps of skin on face.

Phyllostomidae (p. 24)

1b. Wrists and ankles with suction cup. 1c. Rudimentary thumb with reduced claw almost entirely embedded in propatagium. 1d. Tail emerges from dorsal surface of the uropatagium. 2a. Upper lip drooping, split frontally; feet/claws very large. 2b. Chin with bumps or folds of skin; upper lip not split, feet/ claws not particularly enlarged. 2c. Enlarged muzzle; glandular sac present in tail or FA (sometimes vestigial in females). 1e. Tail enclosed and extending to the edge of pointed uropatagium. 1f. Tail extending well beyond the edge of the uropatagium. 2a. Short legs and slim wings; fur quite short and oily. 2b. Ears large, funnel-shaped; depressed face; fur ranges from yellowish to orangish; tail equal to or longer than body length.

1a

1d

22

1a

1e

Thyropteridae (p. 72) Furipteridae (p. 76)

Noctilionidae (p. 78)

Mormoopidae (p. 82)

Emballonuridae (p. 86) Vespertilionidae (p. 96)

Molossidae (p. 106)

Natalidae (p. 118)

1f

Field Guide to Amazonian Bats  

Do you think identifying bats in Europe or in North America is difficult? Well, try it in the Amazon The planet’s green lung is home to the...

Field Guide to Amazonian Bats  

Do you think identifying bats in Europe or in North America is difficult? Well, try it in the Amazon The planet’s green lung is home to the...

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