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TRAINING

Teacher CPD would boost pupil attainment and earnings

Providing teachers with a right to highquality training and development would boost pupil attainment and earnings, and may tackle retention problems in the profession, a study from the Education Policy Institute (EPI) has shown. While continuing professional development (CPD) can be important to ensuring teacher quality and progression, there is currently no formal entitlement to high quality support offered by the government. Teachers in England currently participate in less CPD than their international counterparts, while the quality of CPD programmes on offer often fails to meet government standards. The new report, commissioned by Wellcome, finds that a well-implemented policy of 35 hours a year of high quality

CPD for teachers would lead to significant benefits for pupils, including an extra two-thirds of a GCSE grade – improving their lifetime earnings by over £6,000. The EPI cost-benefit analysis demonstrates that in total, a CPD entitlement programme costing £4bn would generate a net societal benefit of around £61bn through higher earnings – a benefit 19 times the cost. However, these considerable gains are dependent on the policy being rolledout effectively on a national scale. In the immediate term, a policy of CPD entitlement could also significantly improve retention, leading to up to 12,000 extra teachers remaining in the profession a year. A retention boost of this scale would help to ease the Department for Education’s recurring recruitment problems. Typically, it falls short by around 3,000 teachers a year. The government is currently exploring plans for improving the CPD offer for teachers as part of its long-term plan to tackle learning loss experienced by pupils as a result of the pandemic. Education Secretary Gavin Williamson announced this month that training and development for teachers would be “central” to the government’s wider

education recovery plan, which is currently being led by the Education Recovery Commissioner, Sir Kevan Collins. As the government formulates this longterm programme to support both pupils and teachers, this study provides timely evidence of the high returns generated from wellimplemented, high quality teacher CPD. The report found that professional development can be crucial for teachers, but the quality of programmes is mixed and England lags behind other countries. Secondary school teachers in England spend on average just 43 hours a year on CPD – well below the OECD average of 62 hours a year. Despite teachers in England undertaking less CPD than their international counterparts, they still do more than the proposed entitlement of 35 hours each year. However, it is likely that the majority of CPD currently being provided in England does not meet the criteria for high-quality CPD. A recent Wellcome CPD pilot showed that just 11 per cent of CPD taken up by teachers met the government’s quality criteria. CLICK TO READ MORE

TECHNOLOGY

International use of digital education to be examined Education experts at Leeds Beckett University are leading a new international project to harness and further develop the advancements in digital education that have been seen during the Covid-19 pandemic. The collaborative team – made up of partner universities and schools in the UK, Netherlands, Germany, Portugal, Belgium and Hungary – will pool together new research and insight from each country to collectively strengthen the inclusivity of the education systems across Europe through digital learning opportunities. Professor Mhairi Beaton, of the Carnegie School of Education at Leeds Beckett, and one of the leaders of the project, explained: “It is extremely important that we make sure that all children are included in an excellent education. COVID-19 has had a dramatic effect on education worldwide - and the use of digital technology has expanded vastly across all stages of education. “It is very exciting to be working with our partners across Europe – whilst we are geographically different and have differing educational policies, we are facing many of the same challenges. By working together and pooling our knowledge, we can improve education here in the UK and make it a truly 21st century education for all children.” The team will collaborate with

young people, parents and teachers across Europe to find out what has been working, and not working, for them, in terms of digital learning. Rachel Lofthouse, Professor of Teacher Education at Leeds Beckett, and coleader of the project, said: “We have seen many instances of creative digital education developed by teachers during the pandemic. Rather than starting with a blank slate, we want to acknowledge this innovative practice and develop them further - providing not just guidance for digital practice, but resources to support changes in thinking, understanding of

dilemmas and possible ways to develop solutions within digital practice.” The key aims of the project are to increase educators’ abilities and confidence in providing effective and inclusive digital learning opportunities and to support educators’ abilities to manage change in their working practices. It also aims to help the wider community – including parents, carers and other family members – to understand and support educators and young people in digital learning contexts. CLICK TO READ MORE

Issue 26.3 | EDUCATION BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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Profile for PSI  Media

Education Business 26.3  

Business Information for Education Decision Makers

Education Business 26.3  

Business Information for Education Decision Makers

Profile for psi-media

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