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www.counterterrorbusiness.com | ISSUE 42

EVENT SECURITY

SURVEILLANCE

URBAN SECURITY

BIOMETRICS

AUTHENTICATING OFFENDERS

Could standardising biometric databases across the UK and Europe empower police officers to quickly identify terrorists?


COMMENT

COUNTER TERROR BUSINESS 5

www.counterterrorbusiness.com | ISSUE 42

LOCKDOWN RESTRICTIONS At the time of writing, the UK and much of the world has been in lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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EVENT SECURITY

SURVEILLANCE

URBAN SECURITY

With police patrolling the streets to ensure the public obey lockdown measures, flights banned, the use of public transport significantly down, and mass gathering prohibited, the pandemic has in many ways thwarted terrorist action.

BIOMETRICS

AUTHENTICATING OFFENDERS Could standardising biometric databases across the UK and Europe empower police officers to quickly identify terrorists?

But as people rely more on technology to work and communicate, the threat of cyber attack rises. Cyber criminals are not restricted by lockdown and have been capitalising on the emergency by sending out “phishing” attacks with malicious links or files. This could allow the hackers to steal sensitive data or even take control of a device for further attacks. As such, the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) has launched a ‘Cyber Aware’ campaign, as well as a way to report suspicious emails. Further coverage of this is on page six. Once normality is restored, the security concerns of a country in mass transit will return. This issue of Counter Terror Business features two interviews with top event security experts - David Stewart (Commonwealth Games) and Paul Williams (The O2) on measures to secure major events.

Follow and interact with us on Twitter: @CTBNews

Meanwhile on page twenty-two, James Stickland investigates how a standardised biometric database could help quickly identify terrorists and, critically, help stop attacks before they happen. Angela Pisanu, guest editor

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ISSUE 42 | COUNTER TERROR BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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www.frequentis.com

Counter UAS solutions: Mitigating safety and security threats

If used in accordance with present regulation, unmanned aerial systems or vehicles – UAS/UAVs (i.e. drones) can be a great asset. However, not all drones are here to serve us. As UAV traffic increases, airports, law enforcement, and air navigation service providers (ANSPs) face new safety and security challenges. How do we ensure quick response times and appropriate action when it comes to drone incursions that threaten safety, security, and business continuity? When a rogue drone disrupted British airport Gatwick, in December 2018, hundreds of flights were cancelled after it refused to cooperate with air traffic control (ATC). German airport, Frankfurt, recently suffered a similar incident, forcing up to 70 aircraft to divert. How could this be avoided and how do we ensure serious harm is prevented? Frequentis, along with defence and security sensor specialist HENSOLDT, has created the next generation of integrated counter UAS solutions so that incidents, like those at Gatwick and Frankfurt, can be dealt with swiftly and effectively. A dedicated consulting team creates the concept of operations, including roles, responsibilities, procedures, KPIs, operational requirements and best-fit third party sensor/effector systems and technology, based on best practice, developed with customers, regulators and authorities.

A system that fuses Ait Traffic Management, UAS Traffic Management, Drone Detection, Visual Reports, and Blue Force Tracking into a common air / ground situation, ensures common situational awareness in complex drone incidents. Thanks to integrated communications and incident management, all organisations can work together on the same goal, focusing on the procedures, and minimising response times in the event of drone incursions. Watch how organisations and systems are integrated, to enable full visibility and reduced response times in drone incidents. Click here to read our whitepaper: Frequentis-Counter-UAV-White-paper

www.linkedin.com/company/Frequentis

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COUNTER TERROR BUSINESS MAGAZINE | ISSUE 42

www.twitter.com/Frequentis


CONTENTS

CONTENTS CTB 42 Supported by

6 NEWS Major security and defence review postponed due to pandemic; NATO to deploy experts in fight against COVID-19 disinformation; Counter Terror Expo rescheduled for September due to coronavirus pandemic

8 URBAN SECURITY Pilar de la Torre, project manager for the European Forum for Urban Security, discusses the forum’s PRoTECT project and the role of municipal authorities in protecting public spaces

13 EVENT SECURITY Counter Terror Business talks to Paul Williams, head of Security at AEG Europe, about the difficulties in protecting event spaces like The O2, and how to achieve better event security

22 BIOMETRICS James Stickland comments on the rise of cyber crime and terrorism, and how a standardised biometric database can greatly stem this tide

24 SURVEILLANCE Is a total moratorium on CCTV facial recognition a necessary measure? When used responsibly and properly, perhaps not says the BSIA

Supported by

16 EVENT SECURITY Counter Terror Business talks to David Stewart about security planning for the 2022 Commonwealth Games, safety within the ‘last mile’, and stadium security

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EVENT SECURITY

27 POLICING Counter Terror Business talks to Caroline Graham about Project Servator deployments and what the public can expect at East Midlands Airport

30 HOSTILE VEHICLE MITIGATION Paul Jeffrey, chairman of the Perimeter Security Suppliers Association, writes about permanent solutions for full perimeters, including entry point protocol

SURVEILLANCE

URBAN SECURITY

BIOMETRICS

AUTHENTICATING OFFENDERS Could standardising biometric databases across the UK and Europe empower police officers to quickly identify terrorists?

Counter Terror Business magazine // www.counterterrorbusiness.com ISSUE 42 | COUNTER TERROR BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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CTB NEWS POLICY

Major security and defence review postponed due to pandemic

A major review into security, defence and foreign policy has been paused due to the coronavirus pandemic, the government has said. The government announced plans to conduct the Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy in December 2019, which is reported to be

Integrated Review. There would be no point in conducting an in-depth review of the nation’s defence and security challenges to an artificial deadline, especially at a time when Whitehall is rightly focusing on tackling coronavirus. “We look forward to engaging with the Department when the Review restarts, with the added element of the consequences of the pandemic to be considered. We will still report in due course on the Committee’s inquiry into how Government should conduct the Review and hope that this work will inform the process in the future.”

CLICK TO READ MORE

CYBER SECURITY

CORONAVIRUS

NCSC launches national reporting service for suspicious emails

Border Force prioritising checks on medical equipment

As the country continues to rely more on technology while staying at home during the coronavirus pandemic, the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) has launched a cross-governmental ‘Cyber Aware’ campaign, which offers advice on protecting passwords, accounts and devices, as well as a way to report suspicious emails. The ‘Suspicious Email Reporting Service’ will make it easy for people to forward suspicious emails to the NCSC – including those claiming to offer services related to coronavirus. The organisation has also published specific advice for the use of video conferencing services, with top tips on setting up your accounts, arranging a chat and protecting your device. NCSC Chief Executive Officer Ciaran Martin said: “Technology is helping us cope with the coronavirus crisis and will play a role helping us out

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“the most radical reassessment of the UK’s place in the world since the end of the Cold War”. The review promises to cover all aspects of international policy from defence to diplomacy and development. Most of the review was due to be completed later this year, with recommendations implemented over several years, but it is now not expected to start until 2021. Tobias Ellwood, the chairman of the Commons Defence Select Committee, said: “We welcome this delay of the

of it – but that means cyber security is more important than ever. “With greater use of technology, there are different ways attackers can harm all of us. But everyone can help to stop them by following the guidance campaign we have launched. But even with the best security in place, some attacks will still get through. “That’s why we have created a new national reporting service for suspicious emails – and if they link to malicious content, it will be taken down or blocked. By forward messages to us, you will be protecting the UK from email scams and cyber crime.” Minister for Security James Brokenshire said: “Criminals are seeking to exploit our greater use of emails, video conferencing and other technologies for their advantage. “It’s despicable that they are using the coronavirus outbreak as cover to try to scam and steal from people in their homes. We all have a part to play in seeing they don’t succeed. “I encourage everyone to follow the Cyber Aware advice and to use the Suspicious Email Reporting Service. They provide important new ways in which we can protect ourselves as well as our families and businesses.”

CLICK TO READ MORE

COUNTER TERROR BUSINESS MAGAZINE | ISSUE 42

To make sure medical equipment reaches the NHS frontline quicker, the government has said that Border Force will be prioritising checks on their shipments. The new process ensures critical shipments are flagged to Border Force in advance by the NHS so that officers can stand ready to process them as soon as possible. Border Force officers then process the shipments quickly, whilst continuing to conduct thorough security checks. The process has been in place since the beginning of April, with Border Force working closely with suppliers, the NHS and HMRC to ensure all relevant shipments are flagged. All shipments remain subject to the same controls including checks against illegal immigration, prohibited and restricted items and revenue fraud. This follows the Treasury announcing that it is waiving import taxes on medical equipment crucial to the fight against coronavirus – reducing red tape to ensure equipment gets to frontline health workers faster. Home Secretary Priti Patel said: “I will do whatever necessary to help the national effort to tackle this virus, that is why Border Force are prioritising medical equipment so that it can enter the UK as soon as possible. This will ensure that the NHS and frontline workers can get the equipment they need as quickly as possible so they can continue saving lives and fighting the virus.”

CLICK TO READ MORE


CTB NEWS CORONAVIRUS

NATO to deploy experts in fight against COVID-19 disinformation

Two experts in countering disinformation will be deployed by the British Army to combat the spread of harmful, false and misleading information about the COVID-19 pandemic. The experts will advise and support NATO in ensuring its citizens have the right information to protect themselves and its democracies are

protected from malicious disinformation operations used by adversaries. Defence Secretary Ben Wallace said: “NATO can play a key role in the international fight against COVID-19, and Allied solidarity is more important than ever to ensure both the security and the health of our almost one-billion citizens.” During the video conference with NATO defence ministers, Wallace also underlined the importance of NATO continuing its core work of defence and deterrence against enduring threats and any that might emerge as a result of the crisis. In Estonia, there are 800 troops deployed as the framework nation of the enhanced Forward Presence initiative which provides reassurance to NATO Allies. In Lithuania, the Royal Air Force is contributing to the NATO Baltic Air Policing mission, protecting the airspace of our Allies. The UK will continue to work with

EVENT PREVIEW

Counter Terror Expo rescheduled for September due to coronavirus pandemic Counter Terror Expo and co-located shows have been rescheduled to take place on 8–10 September 2020 at London ExCeL following the shutdown of large scale events during the coronavirus pandemic. All exhibition bookings and visitor pre-registrations for these events will be transferred automatically to the new dates. Tracy Bebbington, Event Director at Clarion Events said: “Counter Terror Expo and its co-located events will be postponed until September, following the uncertainty caused by COVID19. The decision has been made after careful deliberation with our partners at Informa, in the interests of our collective audience and attendees. The Clarion team will be in immediate contact with all our valued exhibitors and stakeholders to limit any disruption that this may cause, and to ensure that we deliver events of the highest calibre for the industry.” Now in its 12th year, Counter Terror Expo is the UK’s leading networking event for security professionals from industry, infrastructure, government and policing. It’s where they come to discover new ideas and technology to improve security and aid in the fight against terrorism. In partnership with its sister events the World Counter Terror Congress, Forensics Europe Expo and Ambition, CTX brings together the world of security, preparedness, resilience and response under one roof. The key themes of Counter Terror Expo 2020 are protecting people; protecting Infrastructure; and policing and specialist operations.

CLICK TO READ MORE

its Allies in NATO, partner countries and beyond, to galvanise a stronger global effort; to coordinate public health measures; to increase the resilience of the most vulnerable health systems; and to restore business confidence and protect jobs. In an example of NATO Allies working together, last week 250,000 items of PPE, including 50,000 N-95 face masks; 100,000 surgical masks; and 100,000 protective suits, were delivered from Turkey to RAF Brize Norton in Oxfordshire. NATO’s Rapid Air Mobility process, which makes it possible for Allies to move essential items by air between each other as quickly as possible, helped to facilitate the delivery. Wallace expressed gratitude to Turkey for the delivery and to Germany, which has also sent 60 ventilators to the UK in a further show of solidarity.

CLICK TO READ MORE

Evolv is making security human again Evolv Technology, leader in human security, is dedicated to making the world a safer place to live, work, learn and play by helping protect innocent people from terrorist attacks, mas shootings and similar violent acts. Evolv’s AI-based, free-flow weapons-screening and threat detection systems work at the pace of life to accommodate thousands of individuals and groups per hour – screening 50 million people to date in a rapid, undisruptive manner while preventing more than 5,000 weapons from entering a range of public and private facilities. Evolv Express™, the first freeflow smart weapons-detection system, screens more than 3,600 people per hour, 10X faster than traditional metal detectors. And, Evolv Edge® delivers the only high-speed smart checkpoint system that detects a wide range of metallic or non-metallic items of interest, screening

more than 800 people per hour. We provide security screening that’s intelligent, unobtrusive, and incredibly accurate. Evolv’s customers include hundreds of iconic entertainment venues, schools, international airports, stadiums, corporations, hospitals, large-scale events and national landmarks around the globe. Led by a team of security industry thought leaders with a track record for delivering firstto-market products, the company holds more than 100 patents. FURTHER INFORMATION

https://evolvtechnology.com @evolvtechnology

ISSUE 42 | COUNTER TERROR BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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URBAN SECURITY

Pilar de la Torre, project manager for the European Forum for Urban Security, discusses the forum’s PRoTECT project and the role of municipal authorities in protecting public spaces

SECURITY AND PROTECTION OF PUBLIC SPACES O ver the years, strategies to protect public space against terrorism have strengthened and evolved, mainly focusing on protecting critical infrastructures. However, terrorist attacks are evolving as well. As a result of new contexts and opportunities, public space has recently become an attractive target for terrorist attacks. To illustrate, the latest terrorist attacks in European cities such as London, Paris, Manchester, Stockholm, Berlin, Brussels, Barcelona all targeted public areas. These areas are considered as ‘soft targets’; crowded public spaces as metro, shopping centres, sports stadiums, bars, restaurants, clubs and commercial sidewalks, that are easily accessible to the public and an easy target for terrorists with high negative societal impact. Soft targets are targets because attacking them can aid terrorist organisations to obtain their goals, such as threatening the safety and quality of life of the public. Following the resolution of the European Commission, in the Action Plan to support the protection of public spaces, which states

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that ‘local and regional authorities are also important stakeholders in the protection of public space’, PRoTECT project aims to raise the awareness of municipal authorities on their role in protecting public spaces and provide them with tools, good practices, access to technology concepts, and the knowledge to tailor them to their needs to better prevent this kind of threat and to act more effectively in case of attacks. A VISION FOR URBAN SECURITY The European Forum for Urban Security (Efus) has more than 30 years’ experience, working with 250 local and regional member authorities from more than 16 European countries, in the promotion of a balanced vision of urban security, combining prevention, sanctions and social cohesion, to obtain recognition of the role of local and regional authorities in drafting and implementing national and European security policies. It has the capability to foster the exchange of experiences between authorities for the benefit of long-term security and to support local and


URBAN SECURITY regional authorities in the conception, implementation and evaluation of their local security policy. As such, it adds value in its participation in the PRoTECT project for the protection of public spaces against terrorism threats, as well as other initiatives such as the Partnership on Security in Public Spaces of the Urban Agenda for the European Union. The later is one of 13 Urban Agenda partnerships, in which the cities of Nice and Madrid and partners of PACTESUR project that is coordinated by the city of Nice and which aims to empower cities and local police forces to better address current vulnerabilities in public spaces. IMPORTANT ACTORS IN THE PROTECTION OF PUBLIC SPACE Terrorism is a reality in many European countries and a continuous threat to a number of European cities. It seriously threatens the safety and values of democratic states and the rights and liberties of their citizens. Acts of terrorism bring about long-term negative effects for cities and high social costs. Not only from a financial, but also from a psychological point of view in the sense of an increased feeling of insecurity among locals and visitors. It is the duty of cities to be responsible for the safety and security of their citizens. Local authorities play a key role, in terms of the immediate response in cases of a terrorist act and crisis management, as well as in being aware of the vulnerabilities their public spaces might have in order to be able to adopt appropriate measures to prevent and mitigate terrorist attacks and their consequences (European Commission, 2017). The EU Commission is thus committed to reinforcing the involvement of these stakeholders by promoting dialogue and exchange between national, regional and local authorities and supporting the development of operational projects. Local authorities in Europe have taken a number of steps needed to protect

and prevent their citizens against terrorist attacks. Some municipalities across Europe have made progress in counter terrorism and have adopted measures to prevent and prepare against a terrorist attack in public space. However, in examining the role of cities in the protection of public spaces against terrorism, further steps in this direction are to be taken.

Development of common guidance and the exchange of good practices are indispensable elements of sustainable and effective solutions. In correlation with these considerations, local authorities can play a significant role in the improvement of the protection of public spaces if they are able to: identify and mitigate vulnerabilities of their public spaces, have the specific skills to do so, have knowledge about existing solutions both technological and human-centred that meet their needs, and foster coordination and cooperation between key stakeholders.

public protection by putting in place an overarching concept where tools, technology, training and field demonstrations will lead to situational awareness and improve direct responses to secure public places before, during, and after a terrorist threat. The five EU cities (Eindhoven, Malaga, Larissa, Vilnius, Brasov) are being supported by the Dutch Institute for Technology, Safety and Security (DITSS), the Lithuanian Centre for Cybersecurity (Lietuvos Kibernetiniu Nusikaltimu Kompetenciju Ir Tyrimu Centras) (LT), the Meleton Asfaleias Centre-KEMEA (GR), the Romanian police Inspectorate (RO), the Spanish Ministry of the Interior (ES) and by networks as the European Network for Law Enforcement Technology Services (ENLETS) and Efus. The project aims to provide cities beyond the project with an actionable perspective on the protection of their public spaces and other soft targets, by equipping them with good practices and access to technology concepts, and the knowledge to tailor them to their needs. It aims to build a closer, permanent collaboration between municipal authorities and law enforcement agencies via existing networks (ENLETS, Efus). Expected outcomes are risk and cost reduction related to the protection of public spaces for municipalities and Law Enforcement Agencies (LEAs) and implementation of a pan European technology capability assessment tool for cities. The project has been implemented for more than a year and already has a series of tools which are being tested by the partner cities to facilitate the protection of public spaces, providing city partners with tools to conduct both a vulnerability self-assessment and technology assessment in their municipalities.

TOOLS TO PREVENT AND INTERVENE MORE EFFECTIVELY PRoTECT project seeks to strengthen local authorities’ capabilities in

VULNERABILITY SELF-ASSESSMENT The PRoTECT project is based on the EU Vulnerability Assessment Tool (VAT), developed by the DG HOME (2019), E

PROTECT PROJECT SEEKS TO STRENGTHEN LOCAL AUTHORITIES’ CAPABILITIES IN PUBLIC PROTECTION BY PUTTING IN PLACE AN OVERARCHING CONCEPT WHERE TOOLS, TECHNOLOGY, TRAINING AND FIELD DEMONSTRATIONS WILL LEAD TO SITUATIONAL AWARENESS

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URBAN SECURITY

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URBAN SECURITY  the objective of which is to support actors engaged in counter terrorism strategies at the national level to assess the vulnerability of a specific public space. PRoTECT has developed a Manual of the VAT addressed to Municipal staff that is responsible for safety and security in public space and other local stakeholders involved in the security management of public spaces. It aids them in identifying vulnerabilities as a result of the risk identification and risk analysis processes. The areas identified as public space have to be areas where regular and/or incidental masses of public come for an activity. The activity at the main site can lead to other congested areas around the main site (e.g. an access road to a sports venue). These surrounding sites should also be taken into consideration when conceiving a security plan for the main site. In the project, the main site, together with the surrounding sites associated with the activity, are called the Public Space of Interest (PSOI). The manual provides the steps that have to be taken, to do a vulnerability assessment as part of the security management process. Users of the tool will be able to identify the following elements necessary to assess vulnerabilities of a PSOI: characteristics of the site, existing security measures, potential threats, consequences and probabilities. These elements will contribute to analysis and take measures in terms of technologies, infrastructure and human resources. TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORK In order to ensure that the most adequate and fit solutions are selected to respond to the specific needs in a city, a technology evaluation framework (the EU TEF) has been developed. This tool is derived from previous EU H2020 projects. The EU TEF is meant for municipal staff responsible for safety and security in public space and other relevant stakeholders, such as municipal police, urban planners, security department or crime prevention units, event organisers, tourism and transport operators etc. The TEF aids municipalities in the whole process of building on specific vulnerabilities and gathering potential technologies, evaluating these for specific vulnerabilities at a specific public space of interest against terrorism. It consists of eight steps which aid in focusing on relevant vulnerabilities from their own EU VAT results, deciding on relevant criteria, setting up the terms of reference for technology requirements, evaluating the (technology) results and performing demonstrations in their cities. The EU TEF provides an overview of how to go from one prioritised vulnerability to asking the market for solutions to protect a public space of interest against a terrorist threat.

ACTS OF TERRORISM BRING ABOUT LONG-TERM NEGATIVE EFFECTS FOR CITIES AND HIGH SOCIAL COSTS. NOT ONLY FROM A FINANCIAL, BUT ALSO FROM A PSYCHOLOGICAL POINT OF VIEW CONCLUSIONS In this context, the involvement of local and regional authorities through targeted guidance (provided both by private sector actors and peer local authorities) on the protection of public spaces plays a key role in the operationalisation and implementation of good practices and thus in the development of effective solutions. Based on the assumption that for efficient protection of public spaces it is necessary to involve a wide range of stakeholders from the local level, PRoTECT develops a tailormade methodology outlined in four steps: vulnerability assessments; identification of needs in terms of technologies to launch a request for solutions; evaluation, validation and verification of technological solutions to mitigate vulnerabilities with the support of a hypothetical scenario; and hold demonstrations of proposed technological solutions. Through the proposed PRoTECT methodologies, local authorities will be able to engage in a decision-making process that involves other relevant local stakeholders usually not present in the local security strategy. This relationship has already been established throughout the Vulnerability Assessment Workshops and will continue during the Technology Evaluation Workshops. The methodology of this project will be translated into knowledge, attitudes, and skills for local actors in the protection of PSOI. Local security actors will also be able to coordinate the process by themselves. This implies the identification of site attributes, involved stakeholders and actors, considered vulnerabilities, threats and potential consequences, the applicable regulatory framework that will have to be preconsidered by the potential participants of the request for solutions process in order to foresee the technological solution(s) and how these could be used for preventing and/ or strengthening the response capacity of municipalities in a corresponding incident. In the long term, expected outcomes are to be seen in the following four areas. EXPECTED OUTCOMES The first outcome relates to research. The outcome expected is that municipalities, one of the actors responsible for citizens’ safety, will be able to influence the research community and that industry technological solutions will respond better to their

needs complying with the legal and ethical framework in place. In this way, technological solutions from industry will be more sustainable and easier to exploit. The second outcome hoped for is the transfer of knowledge. The work of PRoTECT has built actions and allowed lessons to be learned in different categories of PSOI, such as commercial areas, main squares, places used for specific events such as concerts, festivals, demonstrations or cultural events and concerning the preparedness against different threats such as attacks with sharp objects, firearms, and Improvised Explosive Devices (IED) among others. These lessons learnt will benefit local authorities beyond the project in enhancing their knowledge on the protection of PSOI and will contribute to the spread of good practices. The third expected outcome is cooperation and awareness raising. In the long term, PRoTECT will foster cooperation with a wide range of stakeholders involved in security at the national and European levels to increase the awareness of managing authorities, local authorities and beneficiaries. The final hoped for outcome is cost reduction and technology adoption. The evolution and/or transformation of problems related to urban security makes it necessary for public policy makers to continually adapt their response capacity to terrorist threats. However, the decreased resources to carry out actions call upon the need for municipalities to adopt the best fitting technologies to be able to do more, and better, with less. PRoTECT equips them with tools to effectively evaluate the solutions by themselves and thus reduce the costs for such solutions to be put in place. A CALL FOR SOLUTIONS A call for available technological solutions (termed Request for Information or RFI) will be launched as part of the project. The selected ones will be evaluated on the ground by the five partner cities: Brasov (RO), Eindhoven (NL), Lariseon (GR), Málaga (ES), and Vilnius (LT). L

This article includes the contributions of: Tatiana Morales (Efus), Puck va Brink (TNO), Patrick Padding (National Police of Netherlands), Peter van de Crommert (DITSS),George Kioumourtzis (DITSS), and Ioannis Chasiotis (KEMEA).

FURTHER INFORMATION

www.efus.eu/en

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www.evolvtechnology.com

Prevent shooters or bombers from entering your venue without sacrificing the visitor experience Imagine the day when walking into a stadium, events venue, or other iconic tourist site without stopping or emptying pockets is normal, as it used to be Today’s era of viral violence brings mass vulnerability. Despite this, various venues screen for today’s threats with yesterday’s technology; unfortunately, most opt not to make the tradeoff between safety and visitor experience. Evolv solves this “protection paradox” by leveraging AI to instantly differentiate benign objects from concealed threats. Introducing the newest innovation from Evolv Technology, Evolv Express™, the world’s first freeflow weapons-detection system able to screen 3,600 people per hour, proven to be 10X faster than metal detectors. With Express, there is no need to stop, empty pockets or remove bags. Using a new patented method of threat detection, Evolv’s Cortex AI™ software platform, Express delivers the only frictionless weapons-detection system, preventing active shooters and bombers from entering your venue without sacrificing the visitor or employee experience. And, the machinelearning component of Cortex AI gets smarter over time keeping you ahead of the threat landscape. Because Express is smart enough to differentiate between weapons and benign objects, it reduces nuisance alarms by up to 85% over traditional detection methods, almost eliminating the need for

secondary screening such as pat downs or manual bag searches, drastically reducing human contact. Targeted image-aided alarm resolution provided by the Express allows guards to spend less time searching a person’s body or their belongings, enabling focused searching at all times. It also allows a “no touch” policy to be introduced, where guards direct the person to open their own bag and remove certain items for closer inspection, again enhancing the experience for both security and the visitor. Evolv’s systems have screened more than 50M people and prevented 5000+ weapons from entering venues. It is our mission is to make it safer for everyone to live, work, learn and play because we refuse to submit to the notion that mass shootings and bombings are the “new normal.” Evolv systems are used at stadiums, schools, workplaces, hospitals, entertainment venues, tourist locations, and places of worship that need to clear hundreds to thousands of people per hour. Its technology restores peace of mind for institutions and events including the BRIT Awards, Gillette Stadium, Lincoln Center for Performing Arts, Seattle Space Needle, The Biltmore Estate, Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, L.L. Bean, and hundreds of other iconic venues and events.

www.evolvtechnology.com

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EVENT SECURITY

Supported by

Counter Terror Business (CTB) talks to Paul Williams (PW), head of Security at AEG Europe, about the difficulties in protecting event spaces like The O2, and how to achieve better event security

CTB INTERVIEW: THE O2 AND EVENT SECURITY CTB: WHAT ARE THE CURRENT DIFFICULTIES WITH BALANCING PROTECTION AND VISITOR EXPERIENCE, ESPECIALLY GIVEN DIFFERENT APPROACHES TO HIGH FOOTFALL SCREENING AT DIFFERENT SORTS OF SITES AND VENUES? Good security will give confidence for fans to visit the venue and for businesses to invest and grow. Keeping our fans, staff, partners and performers safe is our priority. It’s important to us that our visitors enjoy a memorable experience, we have to consider the visitor experience when designing security operations, our measures will need to be proportionate and appropriate – security should facilitate business and not hinder unnecessarily. The design of security should be firstly riskbased; we will regularly assess the likelihood and impact of security threats and implement protective security measures to mitigate those risks. There are many ways of delivering security, with many solutions and technologies to choose from, during this risk-management process, I will consider how the security feature may affect the visitor experience and how the visitor may react to our measures. A challenge for venues is the screening process; a security practitioner will want to lessen the chance of threat items entering their premises, and there are many areas to consider when designing search areas, where to queue, how to search and what to look for, can often be challenging. Security practitioners will need to keep up with event industry trends; visitors now favour a more immersive, creative and convenient experience, security designs will need to consider how crowds move and gather within an event space. Sponsored

brand activations and commercial offerings are central to the fans experience. We want our guests to be enjoying themselves in our loungers and on our concourses, not standing in a cold and wet queue waiting to pass through the security checkpoint, whilst also ensuring we maintain our security regime to prevent any prohibited items from entering the building or performance areas. Technology solutions also recognise these challenges and are accelerating technology developments to meet the needs of the industry. Some promising technology solutions are emerging on the market; programmes such as the Home Office High Footfall Screening Trials are vital to ensuring these technologies are well-developed and fit for use in the private sector. CTB: THE O2 IS ONE OF THE LARGEST CAPACITY VENUES IN LONDON, AS WELL AS ONE OF THE MOST RECOGNISABLE. AS HEAD OF SECURITY AT THE O2, WHAT MEASURES ARE IN PLACE TO ENSURE THE SMOOTH RUNNING OF EVENTS? The O2 employs a variety of personnel to keep everyone safe and secure, our Guest Relations teams, stewards and security staff is visible, trained and excited to look after our guests. We have a team of search dogs who work full-time at the venue; they’re always busy and have an important role in protecting the venue. The monitoring of our staff and visitors is a key security feature; we have a comprehensive smart-CCTV system with a variety of analytic programs, our recently upgraded access control and vehicle management system ensures validated persons can freely move around the building zones designated to their profile and needs. E

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www.titan-vision.com

Titan Vision Critical Infrastructure Device (CID) is the next generation of threat protection Titan CID is the first layer of protection for your sensitive or vulnerable remote surveillance sites from the threat of cyber attacks or malicious interference. Reducing the attack surface with the flexibility to be deployed at your remote sites as well as on your corporate networks Titan CID protects against internal and external unauthorised access with multiple layers of security to defend your assets against the most persistent of attackers. A key tool as part of your overall threat management policies. Bespoke operating system that does not require any updates or security patches. Centralised policy and device management from a single pane of glass. Zero touch deployment once configured and deployed, the Titan CID will operate independently or as part of the overall corporate landscape. System encryption to the exacting standards as detailed by the UK and US governments, all communication is encrypted to AES 256. Public and private security key for additional device authorisation. www.facebook.com/titanvisionuk

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In addition to the high-level cyber security protocols, Titan CID is also a multi-layer Surveillance Management System. NVR manager for managing and storage of fully encrypted mirrored paired system recordings; Alarm manager for receiving events or passing commands to connected IDS system’s; Cause and Effect manager for system actions; Communication manager for WAN/ LAN or Cellular correctivity; GPI/O connectors. Cyber attacks are no longer a Hollywood story line. Businesses rely completely on live communication and secure data, using Titan CID will give you the peace of mind that your corporate data is being protected end to end.

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COUNTER TERROR BUSINESS MAGAZINE | ISSUE 42

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EVENT SECURITY

 Our sophisticated Security Operations Control Centre monitors the estate 24/7, and is the central command centre for responding and managing incidents. We work collaboratively with law enforcement, security services, authorities and industry professional; we talk, share and learn – continually assessing and enhancing our operations. There are the security measures you can see and of course; the ones you can’t, when necessary, we will employ specialised solutions and teams to advance our protection operations. We employ a dedicated counterterrorism team who focus on disrupting terrorism by using an assortment of tactics. They’re a specialist team who are highly trained and motivated to identify suspicious activity. CTB: GIVEN HOW REGULARLY EVENTS ARE RUN AT THE O2, HOW IMPORTANT IS IT THAT ALL STAFF ARE AWARE OF THE POSSIBILITIES OF AN ATTACK AND ARE EQUIPPED WITH THE RIGHT KNOWLEDGE OF HOW TO REACT? It’s really important to us that our staff are comfortable within their roles, good leadership, training and resources and equipment is essential, we want our staff to be feel encouraged and empowered to ‘do the right thing’. We recognise the need to have sufficient preparation to respond to major incidents and we’ve recently committed to the design and introduction of our on-site training academy. This will ensure all staff have the knowledge and training required to help themselves and others in the event of a serious incident. As a matter of routine, all of our staff have completed the counter terrorism awareness training and have attended the regular police terrorism briefings we host. We have a plan for how we will respond to a terrorist incident, all staff complete our eLearning module as-part of their induction process, this module educates staff on the threat of terrorism, how they can help prevent or deter an attack by reporting suspicious circumstances and by following security protocols, and importantly – how they should react or respond to such an event.

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Our frontline staff will attend regular simulated exercises; these exercises are incredibly valuable, and they prepare the teams as zero responders and help us test plans to ensure they’re effective. Equally important in our Readiness and Testing Programme is the exercising of our continuity and recovery plans with the strategic leaders in the business. CTB: A LOT OF NEWS COVERAGE LATELY CONCERNING CROWDED PLACES HAS FOCUSED ON MARTYN’S LAW AND THE GOVERNMENT’S RESPONSE TO ITS ROLLOUT. IN YOUR OPINION, WHAT WOULD INCENTIVISE LARGE SCALE CROWDED PLACES TO FURTHER ADOPT PROTECTIVE SECURITY MEASURES IN THE FUTURE? The concept of strengthening protective security in public places and spaces is a welcomed debate; the current model does require a holistic strategic review, good advice and guidance are abundant from authorities and agencies, from understanding current threats, to how to design a security riskmanagement process to solutions for risk mitigation. What’s probably lacking is the expertise within organisations to design and deliver protective security, more so in the small-to-midsize businesses, who may not have a security professional within their organisations. The current proposal from the Martyn’s Law campaign appears very reasonable to me, the suggested recommendations are a good framework for achieving protective security. Like us, I expect the larger venues are already aligned with the proposed approach and are afforded good technical advice from Counter Terrorism Advisers. CTB: WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF SECURITY AT VENUES? Some suggest the ‘Information Age’ is over, and after 25 years, the digital era is evolving to the ‘Experience Era’. This trend is certainly evident in the live entertainment sector; fans now expect an immersive and creative experience and for venue and security professionals, this translates to a likely change in fan behaviour, including how fans move

and gather within event spaces. Crowd movement predictions will need to be flexible, where we position our teams to monitor and steward crowds will also need to be considered and adaptable. The emergence of smart-venues adopting mobile phone technology to engage with fans (for a more secure and seamless ticket entry process and commercial offerings) is likely to include the feature of venues and fans having a direct-communication link. This feature will enable venues to enhance their guest services offerings and will likely include fans reporting ‘security-related issues’ via an app on their phones. This will give the venue stewarding team the opportunity to resolve any issues which are affecting the fans experience. In my experience, fans are not engaging with stewards as often as they may have previously; they prefer to ‘to give feedback or ask for assistance’ via their mobile phone (we’ve noticed and accepted this trend within customer services, with social media platforms becoming the preferred method to contact services). Venue operators will need to consider how to manage direct digital feedback during an event to meet the customer’s expectations. This may result in a review of the number of stewards required to service and monitor guests. Security teams should support this direct engagement model; it will enable a-more targeted service of dealing with poor behaviour more efficiently, it will give the means to talk and direct guests during emergencies, and it will allow the guest to tell us when they notice suspicious circumstances. The use of surveillance technology such as facial recognition may progress as a preferred solution to identify bad people, whilst FR will probably have use in enhancing visitor experience for entry into hospitality areas; the use of FR for security purposes is less certain. I expect it will be a few years until we see FR being used in UK venues as security solutions need customer approval – also referred to as ‘policing by consent’. Venues will likely wait for public confidence and approval, and government regulations before using this surveillance method. The balance of the risk-reduction value FR offers against the privacy concerns is weighted towards ‘not of sufficient value’, as watch-lists of persons will probably be of low-grade crime and/or nuisance individuals. Should the authorities agree to share images of serious offenders or wanted terrorists with venues to upload to their FR watch-lists, then this may sway public opinion and rebalance the value with privacy. L

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EVENT SECURITY

CTB INTERVIEW Counter Terror Business (CTB) talks to David Stewart (DS) about security planning for the 2022 Commonwealth Games, safety within the ‘last mile’, and stadium security

LARGE-SCALE SPORTING EVENTS CTB: MAJOR SPORTING EVENTS CAN BE AN IDEAL TARGET FOR TERRORISTS, AS HIGHLIGHTED BEST IN PARIS IN 2015. SINCE THEN, HOW HAVE SECURITY CONSIDERATIONS CHANGED AT LARGE-SCALE SPORTING EVENTS? DS: Obviously, in the UK our most recent incident was at the Manchester Arena in 2017 and this, whilst not a major sporting event, had a similar profile. Many major multi-sport events will use venues that are normally used for concerts etc, so really, the main focus is always driven by the threat and risk assessment for each individual venue and event. As such, there haven’t really been significant

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changes in the approach but just a greater acknowledgement that there is always a potential threat and then on a case by case basis, consideration has to be given to how to mitigate the risk posed by that threat. The biggest challenge for major sporting events is trying to ensure that the event is safe and secure but without it feeling like it is defined by security. We always have to consider appropriate security measure but the security should ideally be secondary to the event itself. Technology is moving on apace with new mass screening devices being actively tested at venues and what we are now seeing is technology being used in conjunction with


EVENT SECURITY

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closely with their local police forces and, through that, with experts at CPNI. The main emphasis however remains unchanged – security profiles at major sporting events must be compared against current threat and risk assessments and developed in conjunction with local law enforcement, utilising suitably trained and equipped personnel. CTB: YOU ARE CURRENTLY PROVIDING MAJOR EVENT SECURITY TRAINING IN SUPPORT OF FIFA 2022 WORLD CUP. WHAT WERE YOUR THOUGHTS ON PREVIOUS/RECENT LARGE TOURNAMENTS (FIFA WORLD CUP 2018 IN RUSSIA, RUGBY WORLD CUP 2019 IN JAPAN ETC)? WHAT WORKED AND WHAT MIGHT HAVE BEEN DONE DIFFERENTLY?

THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE FOR MAJOR SPORTING EVENTS IS TRYING TO ENSURE THAT THE EVENT IS SAFE BUT WITHOUT IT FEELING LIKE IT IS DEFINED BY SECURITY

suitably trained resourced to provide security layers. So, for example, there may be some mass screening ‘walk through’ type equipment in the ‘last mile’ as pedestrians are walking to a venue. These devices will not pick up a pocket knife but will detect large metallic objects that could potentially cause harm so that interventions can take place further away from the main external ‘crowded place’ where spectators are queuing to gain entry. Also in the last mile we can have specially trained behavioural detection officers. These can be police officers or security personnel who are looking for people who are displaying certain signals or behaviours that may call for further investigation. Last year I attended a concert at the Manchester Arena and, on the approach I passed police officers with explosive detection dogs – another option for consideration and a valuable visual deterrent. At the turnstile I was then subjected to a pat down search and a scan with a hand held metal

detector. These are very effective measures with the main failing being on the human aspect of the security personnel not undertaking the search with sufficient rigor. As such, suitable training and supervision of those carrying out the searches is crucial. A recent development following the Manchester Arena attack has been discussion of ‘Martyn’s Law’ which, although not yet enacted, is proposing that every public ‘venue’ should include some kind of search and screening regime. My own experience of attending sporting and music events is that most have a version of this already in place (to some extent) but, as with all security processes, there also has to be a balance against anything that results in excessive queues and thereby extends the crowded place vulnerability to areas where no search has been undertaken. During many discussions with many venue operators however, it is clear that they are taking seriously the potential threat of a terrorist attack and working

DS: All major international sporting events obviously will identify the potential risk from terrorism, but the profile of each can be significantly different. In a Commonwealth Games or Olympics – style multi-sport event, there is little threat of confrontation between spectators, so the main risk is one of the event becoming a target either because of the scale and volume of spectators or with a view to damaging the reputation of the host nation. The same can be said of most single sport events, for example Rugby World Cup, where again, fan violence is not something that has ever been seen as a significant risk. The FIFA World Cup (and it’s regional variations (EUFA/CONCOCAF etc.) unfortunately bring the risk of significant fan violence and the planning for these events takes on a whole different range of threats. It sounds very simple but the critical aspect of any of these type of events is in the planning and the development of the protective intelligence function. In Russia, for example, the authorities identified the threat from their own hooligan fans and acted to mitigate this (apparently successfully). The next World Cup in Qatar 2022 will be somewhat unique. As opposed to the normal host country where geography and distance between cities can be used as a form of control (in terms of confrontation between fans), the reality is that the 2022 model will be more like an Olympic (city-based) event than a country-wide World Cup. Qatar has limited experience of hosting competitive international football events. In December 2019 they hosted the World Club Cup and it is through de facto ‘test events’ such as these that their plans can be assessed. Although Qatar regularly scores as amongst the safest countries in the world in the Global Terrorism Index, hosting the World Cup brings a new E

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EVENT SECURITY  and previously unheralded dimension. At a time of stability in the Middle East, the potential CT threat to such an event would be credible, but the added factors of a blockade of Qatar by Saudi Arabia and the UAE and a generally volatile broader Middle East political environment at present, bring additional potential threats. However, my experience in Qatar and the investment being made by the country in expertise from previous events, along with a robust approach to protective intelligence, will go a long way to ensuring a safe and secure event from a CT perspective. CTB: ACROSS EUROPE, STADIUM SECURITY COULD BEST BE DESCRIBED AS INCONSISTENT, WITH INSTANCES OF POORLY POLICED FAN SEGREGATION AND FLARES OFTEN SEEN IN EUROPEAN COMPETITIONS. HOW CAN SUCH INCONSISTENCY BE IMPROVED? DS: In my 30 years in the police, this was one of the major challenges. In the UK as a whole, there is now a consistent approach to both policing and security of football matches however, even with this robust approach, there are still regular

COMPARED TO THE AREAS INSIDE THE ‘RED LINE’ OF A VENUE, THE LAST MILE CAN BE SEEN BY SOME AS A SOFT TARGET

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instances of flares and pyrotechnics inside stadiums. The only answer to this is through coordination between clubs (or national Associations), the police and security authorities and the broader justice system of the courts. In addition, engagement with fan groups to try, wherever practical, to ensure self-policing is of value. At the World Club Cup in Doha in December, fans of the African champions managed to bring flares into one of their qualification matches. This again was a first for the Doha police and security officers and, while it would have been nice for it not to have happened, the learning from this will be invaluable for them moving forward. At the same event this coming December, I am certain that enhanced security measure will be implemented. For the World Cup, FIFA produce a manual that outlines the security requirements – both in terms of physical and procedural operations. The lessons learned from previous events are also shared and this information is added to the protective security plans for the event. However, the simple fact is that, if groups make a concerted effort to disrupt and event, either through violence or pyrotechnics (or organised crime etc.) then the response needs to be appropriate, including the justice system dealing swiftly and harshly with offenders. It is only through the consistent approach to planning, prevention, mitigation and response that things will improve and the ability of authorities to be allowed to take a learning approach as opposed to a ‘blame game’ will play a big part in the overall improvement.

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CTB: HOW IMPORTANT IS IT TO RECOGNISE THE CRUCIAL PART THAT AREAS OUTSIDE OF THE GROUND PLAY IN THE SAFE ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE OF SPECTATORS? DS: The common terminology for this area is ‘last mile’ – not to be taken literally, but usually reflective of the zone between transportation hubs at a venue and the turnstiles. This space during a major event, in effect becomes a ‘crowded place’ and attracts the associated risks. We see this week in and week out in the Premier League (or other football competitions) and this is an area that tends to fall under the responsibility of the police, as opposed to private security contractors. Compared to the areas inside the ‘red line’ of a venue (where search and screening takes place) the last mile can be seen by some as a soft target. Nowadays however the work to secure the safety of people in this area is becoming much more sophisticated. The use of specially trained Behavioural Detection operatives is now commonplace. Portable (or permanent) technology such as HVM or CCTV adds both physical and visual deterrence. The advent of Artificial Intelligence software to CCTV also provides more options, along with more traditional resources such as explosive detection dogs. However, much of the focus in the past was on the time leading up to entry to the venue but the horrific attack at the Manchester Arena will ensure that, moving forward, the same emphasis is placed upon the egress of spectators, until they have fully dispersed.


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What is crucial for event organisers is that the security operation goes far beyond the geography of the venue and the actual duration of the event. CTB: BASED ON YOUR EXPERIENCE OVER A 12 MONTH PERIOD AS INTERIM DIRECTOR OF SECURITY FOR BIRMINGHAM 2022, ARE THE EVENT AND CITY IN A GOOD PLACE IN TERMS OF EVENT SECURITY PLANNING? DS: Bearing in mind that Birmingham was a last-minute replacement for Durban as the host for the 2022 Commonwealth Games, the security planning for the event is in a very good place (in my humble opinion). The Commonwealth Games Federation have an individual contracted as their ‘Security Advisor’ and, as soon as Birmingham was awarded the Games, this individual ensured that the necessary early strategic plans were in place. By the time of my appointment as Interim Director of Security in October 2018, the Home Office and DCMS had already established a Security Board to provide high-level oversight of early plans. My first job was to progress with the development of an agreement with West Midlands Police around roles and responsibilities. The outcome of this was an agreement that, as had happened at the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, the Chief Constable of WMP would retain ultimate accountability for security of the Games, with the police responsible for areas in the public domain and the Organising Committee responsible for the venue security from the ‘red line’ inwards. Early engagement also took place with the UK Military who have in recent major events, played a crucial role in supporting both police and Organising Committee. Support from government has also been excellent with both the Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure providing specific advice on search and screening options and the National Cyber Security Centre also engaged at an early stage. The event will also obviously have a wider impact on Birmingham and the West Midlands and the Head of Resilience for Birmingham City Council has also been engaged from the outset, along with partners in other areas, such as Transport for West Midlands and British Transport Police. One thing that those not involved in mega sport events will not be aware of is the crucial work that is undertaken inside an Organising Committee with other functional areas. Key internal stakeholders include Venue Operations, Sport and Transport. The final security plans cannot be completed until the venue plans are at an advanced stage (where to search

and screening lanes fit at a venue) the sport schedule is complete (the length of time between sessions can dictate the type of search to be undertaken depending on flow rate of spectators per hour) and the means of getting both spectators and competitors to and from a venue are known. Fortunately for Birmingham 2022, the Organising Committee have employed a team of vastly experienced professionals in all of the above areas. The West Midlands Police planning team are now co-located with the Organising Committee Security Directorate and, with a permanent (and experienced) Director of Security now in place, swift progress on this hugely complex event can be achieved. L

He is now the Managing Director of Taynuilt Associates Ltd which provides consultancy and training services across all aspects of security, risk and crisis management, including clients in the UK, Europe and the Middle East. David spent 12 months as the Interim Director of Security for the Birmingham 2022 Commonwealth Games and is currently providing training relating to protective intelligence and major event security to government agencies in Qatar. David is a Fellow of the Security Institute, Fellow of the Institute of Strategic Risk Management and is a Visiting Speaker at the University of St Andrews.

David spent 30 years in the police, rising to the rank of Chief Superintendent.

www.taynuilt.org.uk

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SECURITY

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BIOMETRICS

DIGITAL POLICING James Stickland comments on the rise of cyber crime and terrorism, and how a standardised biometric database can greatly stem this tide

IS A STANDARDISED BIOMETRIC DATABASE THE KEY TO CRIME PREVENTION?

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key message that came out of a recent National Police Chief Commissioner (NPCC) meeting is that cyber crime is growing – not just in the UK but on a global scale. It is estimated that $10 billion will be spent on cyber security globally by 2027 in order to combat the rising tide of threats. Almost every crime today has a digital footprint, including escalating terrorist related incidents, thus it is essential that improving digital policing services is given the highest priority. However, in England and Wales, the number of officers dropped 15 per cent between 2010 and- 2018, and despite £970 million in police funding, key figures are concerned that it remains insufficient to adequately protect citizens. In the face of increasingly dangerous and frequent threats, police departments must be well equipped. Police forces should look to take advantage of the latest technology amidst

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limited resources, to enable officers to perform their job more efficiently. Biometric technologies such as facial recognition and fingerprint analysis are widely being regarded as an innovative solution for digital policing to keep pace with increasingly sophisticated cyber crime and terrorist related incidents, whilst keeping costs low. As the threat of terrorism increases across Europe, with Britain worst affected, remotely authenticating potential offenders will be hugely beneficial for police forces. Standardising biometric databases across the UK and Europe can empower officers to quickly identify terrorists and, critically, help stop attacks before they happen. With recent concerns over UK terrorists being released from prison and committing further offences – whether here or abroad – biometric authentication could prove invaluable in providing an international


COMMONWEALTH BIOMETRICS safety net. By identifying when a person of interest crosses into a country, police officers would be able to respond immediately and appropriately, and are far more enabled when granted access to a consolidated central biometric database. According to a recent report, 10 European Union national police forces have already called for laws interconnecting facial recognition databases across the globe. It was formed to expand on the Prüm System, an EUwide initiative which already connects DNA, fingerprint, and vehicle registration databases for mutual searching amongst countries. In the fight against borderless crime, it will be essential for governments and police forces to come together to manage data and share threats, with supporting biometrics to enable profile matching. This standard based approach – working with federations such as the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) – would greatly enhance the speed and accuracy of digital policing. The global border protection market is predicted to grow to $168 billion by 2025, and e-passport gates are already being widely used and accepted in the UK and elsewhere. Not only does it make international travel easier for the individual, but also allows greater efficiency in identifying threats moving between precincts. By using biometric authentication, border agencies will be able to save on costs associated with a

BIOMETRIC TECHNOLOGIES SUCH AS FACIAL RECOGNITION AND FINGERPRINT ANALYSIS ARE WIDELY BEING REGARDED AS AN INNOVATIVE SOLUTION FOR DIGITAL POLICING TO KEEP PACE WITH INCREASINGLY SOPHISTICATED CYBER CRIME AND TERRORIST RELATED INCIDENTS, WHILST KEEPING COSTS LOW physically manned border and instead invest money in further digital innovations. While passports, ID cards and other forms of identification can be manipulated or forged, biometric authentication enables police officers to accurately identify a suspected criminal - regardless of what name they have assumed. This not only keeps citizens safe, but also protects the officers themselves, as they are able to identify the individual at hand and understand the threat level they may pose. With biometric authentication, police officers will no longer walk into situations blind. Currently, the level of public trust around the storage and use of biometric data is very low, as seen in the South Wales court case. However, there are techniques that can now deliver seamless and secure authentication without the fear of data custodianship. A technique called ‘sharding’, which breaks apart data and distributes it between multiple locations,

e.g. the device and server, is far more secure and ensures that the police is not the custodian. A better understanding of the public’s expectations as well as clearly communicating the usage and benefits is the only way biometric acceptance can be achieved in the future. Overlooking the importance of biometrics when fighting cybercrime and international security will prove detrimental. Given the costs now associated with policing and border control, enhancing digital policing capabilities is essential to maintaining the balance between security and cost, without compromising on either. L

James Stickland is Chief Executive Officer at Veridium.

FURTHER INFORMATION

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SURVEILLANCE

CCTV & FACIAL RECOGNITION Is a total moratorium on CCTV facial recognition a necessary measure? When used responsibly and properly, perhaps not says the BSIA

COULD SOME SURVEILLANCE HELP CRIME DETERRENCE? C rime deterrence is not an exact science, nor is using one security method over another. In general, the public and businesses need to be equipped to evaluate their own personal circumstances, especially with CCTV as a heightened news topic. The British Security Industry Association (BSIA) as the voice of the professional security industry offers its members the opportunity to come together collectively to improve the industry. BSIA has been at the forefront of creating standards and codes of practice since the advent of video surveillance technology. Some examples include: privacy masking guide, chip and PIN guide, BS 8418, IEC 62676, Cyber Secure It, Cyber Security Guide, as stakeholder in the Surveillance Camera Commissioner’s Buyers Toolkit (privacy impact assessment), and submission of evidence to the select committee examining the relationship between the citizen and the state during the readings of the Protection of Freedom’s Act. In previous BSIA research it was determined that only one in 70 cameras in the UK are owned by the government for the purpose of public safety, the remainder are privately owned and operated under the scope of the operational requirements of the owners. When the report was published it allayed previous fears that UK was ‘sleepwalking into a surveillance state’ - comments made by the Information Commissioner. The public sentiment towards video surveillance is now that it is generally owned and operated by private enterprises, and when used to prevent or solve crimes this was being done for the greater good of society. A number of high-profile cases have been solved or helped through the use of evidence extracted from video surveillance systems. This evidence was extracted by the police using standard methods developed by the BSIA and Home Office to ensure consistency and acceptance into the criminal justice process. In the UK these cases have included preventing mainland IRA activity, finding missing persons, and according to leading police authorities after the 7/7 bombing, the second attack was prevented with substantial help from the video surveillance footage. That footage had to be manually retrieved from 1,000s of

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discrete video surveillance recording systems, and then multiple formats reviewed by police officers and forensic experts in order to create a sequence of events, and to trace the movements of the terror suspects. In the UK, corporate entities have to operate within the legal framework laid out in company law which requires a consideration towards corporate and social responsibility, they also have to comply with UK Employment Law, GDPR, Protection of Freedoms Act and Equality Act to protect people from exploitation. Many corporates are now taking an approach to employee well-being; generally video surveillance in the workplace is used for process management, safety and security of employees and not to watch employees. WHAT ABOUT THE USE OF AI TECHNOLOGIES? There is a large public focus on privacy, data and its use across all platforms and publicly accessible places in the UK. There may be some misunderstanding around this subject and it also may not be clearly communicated as to what AI technology is and how it is being used. It is therefore the industry’s responsibility to explain its capabilities and provide recommendations as to how it may be best used. The actual use should be governed by ethical, legal and standardised frameworks and if such frameworks are yet to be developed, there has to be a wider consultation which involves engagement with stakeholders and government. At this stage, the use of facial recognition in South Wales was ruled by a judge to be legal under GDPR. Generally, if the public are supportive as was the case with general video surveillance, due to the industry explaining how it can be implemented and the police putting it to good use, it is more likely that the technology will be accepted as a benefit to society. In the UK, in the event of an incident or criminal investigation, the police have a legislative framework already available to them which can enable access to the video surveillance recordings from any video system in the UK whether publicly or privately owned with a clearly defined legal justification.


COMMONWEALTH SURVEILLANCE

The advent of facial recognition may have challenged the existing legal framework, because the technology makes it easier and faster to automatically find specific individuals in live or recorded images saving police time, enabling a faster response and solving crime more quickly and effectively at a lower public cost. The private electronic security industry largely self-regulates through standards and codes of practice developed by the BSIA as a trade body, standards bodies and other interested parties. These standards are to ensure the effective and ethical use of video surveillance for the operator’s purpose. AUTOMATED FACIAL RECOGNITION Similar to other security measures or digital tools, Automated Facial Recognition (AFR) can have both positive and negative uses. The BSIA supports this technology when it is used correctly guided by an ethical and unbiased judgement. With that said we believe a standard is necessary to provide guidance on its usage and ensure discriminatory practices are eradicated as we cannot and will not support technology used for these purposes. Private operators who form the majority of owners of the video estate have been using facial recognition when combined with access control to improve the security of educational facilities for many years. Public acceptance of the use of the face as a method of authentication for the payments system is already here. Any technology can be used in a way which may become detrimental

A NUMBER OF HIGH-PROFILE CASES HAVE BEEN SOLVED OR HELPED THROUGH THE USE OF EVIDENCE EXTRACTED FROM VIDEO SURVEILLANCE SYSTEMS to the individual, for example, a mobile phone may be used to view/ monitor a person without their consent. However, there are laws which protect the public and admonish those who abuse communications technologies. Videos posted on YouTube can be easily downloaded - altered - and re-uploaded to contain deep fake technology. Soon the public may not be able to determine the truth at all when using digital technology. In the professional video surveillance domain, the potential for the abuse of the technology may exist, however current standards and legislation do prevent such abuse. As progress is made towards the effective harnessing of video surveillance for the greater good of society, influencing standards and challenging the current ethical and legal frameworks is necessary to test their suitability. The industry is supportive of the challenge and is lobbying the relevant authorities to improve existing or create new frameworks for the safe use of AI with video surveillance data. IS A TOTAL MORATORIUM ON CCTV FACIAL RECOGNITION A NECESSARY MEASURE? The BSIA is aware of the Private Members Bill which started in the House of Lords prior to the UK elections. This calls for

a moratorium on the use of all facial recognition technology in public places until the ethical and legal frameworks have been examined. It is unknown whether this bill will continue. BSIA is against the misuse of any technology and where it has a negative impact on the individual and are calling for the creation of relevant ethical and legal frameworks for the safe use of facial recognition in public places. This should also be underpinned by a standard which may define the scope of use, the legal framework under which it has to be operated, privacy impact and ethical considerations. In the meantime, BSIA supports the best use of technology within current frameworks that improve the security and safety of the world we live in with greater explanation and transparency. In conclusion, it is easily seen how much this technology can benefit when used responsibly and properly. For more information visit the BSIA website. L

This article first appeared within Government Business magazine.

FURTHER INFORMATION

www.bsia.co.uk

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COUNTER TERROR BUSINESS MAGAZINE | ISSUE 42


POLICING

Counter Terror Business talks to Caroline Graham about Project Servator deployments and what the public can expect at East Midlands Airport

CTB INTERVIEW: PROJECT SERVATOR DEPLOYMENTS

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roject Servator aims to deter, detect and disrupt a range of criminal activity, including terrorism, while providing a reassuring presence for the public. Counter Terror Business (CTB) talks to Caroline Graham (CG) about Project Servator deployments and what the public can expect at East Midlands Airport. CTB: IN THE LAST TWO YEARS THERE HAVE BEEN MORE THAN 1,500 ARRESTS AS A RESULT OF PROJECT SERVATOR DEPLOYMENTS. HOW IMPORTANT IS IT FOR LEICESTERSHIRE POLICE TO BE TRIALLING THE SCHEME AT EAST MIDLANDS AIRPORT? Leicestershire Police are really proud to be trialling Project Servator at East Midlands Airport, helping keep this community and the people who pass through it safe. With approximately five million passengers using the airport each year it is important for us to reassure these visitors and deter criminals from carrying out any activity at the site. Although Project Servator is not a response to a specific threat, the threat to the UK from terrorism

is ‘substantial’, meaning an attack is likely. The tragic events at Streatham High Road in January 2020, Fishmongers’ Hall in London in 2019 and London and Manchester in 2017 remind us that attacks can happen at any time or place without warning. This means we all have to remain alert and vigilant when going about our daily lives. Our highly visible deployments will help spread this message of vigilance within the airport community. CTB: WHAT TRAINING IS INVOLVED FOR POLICE WHEN IT COMES TO PROJECT SERVATOR? As part of Project Servator, police officers are specially trained to identify individuals who may be planning or preparing to commit a crime. This can range from someone shoplifting to an individual who is planning a terrorist attack carrying out reconnaissance at an iconic site – the tell-tale signs that bring them to officers’ attention are the same. Their state of mind is often demonstrated by telltale signs that specially trained police officers and security staff can look out for and then take action. E

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Armour Comms: Be wary of using free apps – you might get more than you bargained for! It all starts off innocently enough, people use free, social media messaging apps for organising their personal lives. Then it slips into use with people from work. Before you know it meetings are being arranged and sensitive data being shared on an app owned by a multi-national social media company that could very well be sharing (or selling) your metadata, for profit. While WhatsApp uses the Signal protocol for its encryption, it is susceptible (like similar applications) to attacks, using flaws in SS7 that allow an attacker to mimic a victim’s device. WhatsApp depends on the integrity of your mobile phone number to identify you, but this can be faked at the SS7 level because of vulnerabilities in that. As a result, hackers can control normal voice and SMS services to and from a mobile, intercept calls, read SMS messages, and track a phone’s location. Some of our clients have been victims to industrial espionage and lost contracts worth many thousands. They now only use secure apps such as Armour Mobile for communicating sensitive client information. Apart from eavesdroppers listening in to your potentially sensitive conversations, where they may gain

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commercially valuable information, one of the biggest dangers is the interception of two-step verification codes. For those that are likely to be targeted due to the work that they do (government, military/defence, handling commercially sensitive information like intellectual property, company secrets, financial transactions, sales deals, etc.), this is a relatively easy hack, and one that you wouldn’t know about until it was too late. With any free app you don’t really know who has access to your information. And you certainly don’t know who will have access to it in the future as organisations are acquired and personal data becomes a lucrative asset to be traded.

COUNTER TERROR BUSINESS MAGAZINE | ISSUE 42

If you would prefer that your sensitive corporate conversations remain private you should take positive steps to ensure that they stay that way. That means using security applications that you control, so that you know exactly where your data is being held and who has access to it. AND you need to educate your staff so that they are not using insecure apps ‘under the radar’. When Armour Mobile provides a highly engaging alternative, why take the risk with free apps! FURTHER INFORMATION www.armourcomms.com


POLICING  CTB: WHAT CAN THE PUBLIC EXPECT TO SEE AS A RESULT OF THESE DEPLOYMENTS? Project Servator deployments are normal police deployments, but they are unpredictable, so the public can expect to see them pop up anywhere and at any time. The public should not be surprised or alarmed if they see them and weren’t expecting to. We encourage the public to talk to the officers involved if they want to find out more. The number of police officers and assets involved will vary from deployment to deployment. Not all aspects of the deployments will be apparent. For example, in addition to uniformed police officers, there will be plain clothes officers present, along with CCTV, ANPR and other measures that may not be visible to the public. If there’s a Project Servator deployment in the area, there’s nothing to worry about. As part of their activity, those involved will talk to the public and local businesses to let them know what they are doing and remind them to be vigilant and report any suspicious or unusual behaviour to police. Officers may also hand out leaflets explaining what Project Servator is or put Project Servator posters on display. Working with the community is a vital part of making Project Servator a success.

THE ROLE OF THE PUBLIC IS REALLY IMPORTANT IN REPORTING THREATS OR SUSPICIOUS ACTIVITY. WE RELY ON THE PUBLIC TO BE OUR EYES AND EARS

CTB: YOU SAY THAT PROJECT SERVATOR ‘WILL ADD ANOTHER LAYER OF SECURITY TO OUR EXISTING POLICING METHODS’. CAN YOU EXPAND ON THIS? Project Servator was developed, tested and refined over a five-year period by experts at the Centre for Protection of National Infrastructure (CPNI) in partnership with the City of London Police. The Project Servator logo depicts a police officer, police dog, and three other people, which could represent a member of the public, a security officer, or member of retail staff. This portrays both the collaborative ethos behind Project Servator and the use of different police assets. We have great relationships with staff, security and passengers around the airport site and we are using Project Servator as a way of building on these relationships to disrupt a range of criminal activity and create a network of vigilance against those intent on committing crime, including terrorism. CTB: PROJECT SERVATOR ALSO ENCOURAGES THE PUBLIC TO LEARN HOW TO SPOT THE SIGNS OF SUSPICIOUS BEHAVIOUR. GIVEN THE CURRENT SECURITY CLIMATE AND RECENT ATTEMPTED TERRORIST ATTACKS, HOW IMPORTANT IS THE ROLE OF THE PUBLIC IN REPORTING AND REACTING TO THREATS?

The role of the public is really important in reporting threats or suspicious activity. We rely on the public to be our eyes and ears. They have a key role to play by reporting anything that doesn’t feel right, for example an unattended item or someone acting suspiciously. We ask the public to report suspicious activity immediately to a police officer or their local

police on 101. Suspicious activity is anything that seems out place, unusual or doesn’t seem to fit in with day-to-day life. If it’s an emergency, you should always call 999. L

FURTHER INFORMATION

www.leics.police.uk

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HOSTILE VEHICLE MITIGATION

PERIMETER SECURITY Paul Jeffrey, chairman of the Perimeter Security Suppliers Association, writes about permanent solutions for full perimeters, including entry point protocol

PHYSICAL PROTECTION AGAINST HOSTILE VEHICLE ATTACKS T hese days, Hostile Vehicle Mitigation or HVM is a very common type of specialist security protection used primarily to keep distance between a threat vehicle and its target. This mitigation can be seen in many forms covering both entry point and static perimeter, as well as perimeter extension, to create improved stand off from the main target infrastructure. While the perimeter is one of the key locations for security measures to be introduced, it should be noted that perimeter security should always be regarded as just one of a series of layered security measures designed to protect sites from attack. With the ever expanding levels of protection, the potential targets have become far more wide ranging and now include sites that historically would never have been considered at high risk of attack. This is primarily due

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to the fact that security measures are aimed at protecting vulnerabilities and rarely address the underlying threat which simply moves to the next most accessible target. Our role in the security industry is to provide suitable protection where needed while still being conscious of the impact of the measures introduced on other elements. These elements would include employees as well as the public that are put at increased risk as a result of the measures and other infrastructure more likely to be impacted as a result of greater stand off at a protected site. An example of these considerations is - if a threat and risk assessment leading to an Operational Requirements plan (ORP) has been completed and the need for entry point vehicle security barriers (VSBs) to protect against a vehicle borne improvised


HOSTILE COMMONWEALTH VEHICLE MITIGATION

explosive device (VBIED) forms part of the operational requirement, then there is clearly a real threat of an event. The installation of VSBs will consequently create the location where the event is expected to materialise. It is likely that this location will include the need for operational security presence and will almost certainly be closer to public space and infrastructure. This potential risk to third parties comes with a duty of care to mitigate the consequential impact on others and should be carefully considered wherever possible. These enhanced threats to others are one of the reasons that any measures to increase protection to sites must be appropriate and proportionate to the threat and should always consider any third party or environmental impact resulting in their use. Static perimeter security systems can now incorporate high levels of forced entry protection, impact resistance against hostile vehicle attack and intrusion detection at both ground and aerial level (drone attack). It is important for system designers to fully understand what is expected from a perimeter’s resilience, whether this is deterrent, detection or delay to enable guard force intervention. For larger sites with big perimeters, it is often more practical to designate high security areas within a site and focus on the protection of these areas rather than to try and support high level protection around the full site perimeter. Entry and exit point controls have additional complexities to those found on the static perimeter as they must incorporate a continuous operational

IF A VEHICLE IS DENIED ACCESS THERE MUST BE A FACILITY TO ALLOW THE VEHICLE TO LEAVE WITHOUT HAVING TO ACCESS THE SITE protocol to enable a controlled flow of vehicles (and pedestrians) through. Typical solutions would include VSBs deployed in a format to enable controlled entry/ exit while still being able to deny access. Outside the general security requirements needed, some considerations often missed include vehicle turnaround. If a vehicle is denied access there must be a facility to allow the vehicle to leave without having to access the site. Traffic flow is another consideration. The introduction of vehicle control measures will generally slow access to the site and this can result in traffic congestion backing up onto highways. Aesthetics must be thought about. Some solutions are deliberately designed to be unwelcoming (eg Roadblockers) while others are designed to be more acceptable to the users of the facility (eg Bollards). Visibility is another consideration. Guardhouse controls need to be operated by staff that have full visibility of the control point to be effective; and guard force protection. There are a wide range of products for static perimeter and entry point protection and careful selection is essential to maximise the benefit to the solution. The ORP should identify

suitable levels of resilience for each element of the solutions and these will include impact testing, forced entry, detection parameters and operational capabilities. Any perimeter security system designer should fully understand the different standards in use covering security products. Obviously, any security system is only as good as the operational protocol and training given to the guard force. The implementation of a secure perimeter is often a complex process and can be eased by the use of specialist consultants to help identify and manage the risks within the operational and budget constraints. In addition, there is always plenty of help available for this from the regional CT SecCo’s, CTSA’s or direct from CPNI (see links below). It is always worth keeping abreast of the latest government security advice as there are many relevant guidance documents available that would support security planning and good staff training is essential (eg ACT – Action Counters Terrorism). A review of relevant resources provided by CPNI is time well spent!. L

FURTHER INFORMATION

www.pssasecurity.org

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SECURITY IN A BACKPACK Rapid deployment. High quality images. Fast decisions. Introducing the new, robust and powerful ThreatScan®-LS3. Designed in collaboration with first responders, this is a small, lightweight and compact unit that’s designed to be rapidly deployed. High quality, real-time X-ray images (305 x 256mm), materials discrimination, pan, zoom, DeepFocusTM, 3D Emboss, measurement and annotation all enable rapid and accurate decision-making. The complete system fits in a backpack and is also suitable for robot integration.

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The complete x-ray security solution

3DX-RAY Ltd is a global market and technology leader in line‑scan x-ray imaging systems for security inspection, having supplied systems worldwide directly and through partners, agents and distributors. The company’s systems combine high image quality with ease of use and competitive pricing. Portable, mobile and fixed systems are offered to meet a wide range of inspection needs and 3DX-RAY’s quality management system is certified to ISO 9001:2015. The portable ThreatScan® systems allows bomb technicians to perform rapid and accurate threat assessment in a wide range of operational scenarios. Each system consists of a generator, a detection panel and an imaging station as

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standard. The detector panel is lightweight and incredibly thin, and is available in a large format imaging area of 600 x 460mm, or a compact imaging area of 462 x 273mm. The complete system can penetrate up to 34mm steel at 120kV while producing high quality, sub‑millimetre resolution images. ThreatScan® can be used to inspect suspect bags and packages in mass transit areas as well as general security inspection by first responders such as police, military and private and government security agencies. Specialising in x-ray inspection. When it matters most, 3DX-RAY Ltd has the insight you need. FURTHER INFORMATION

www.3dx-ray.com

COUNTER TERROR BUSINESS MAGAZINE | ISSUE 42

ADVERTISERS INDEX The publishers accept no responsibility for errors or omissions in this free service Arrmour communications

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Cognitec Systems

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Dupree International

Energetics Technology

Evolve Technology

20,21

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7,12

Frontier Pitts

IFC

University College London

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Visual Management Systems

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