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Tlw 'o rma l Lflll r ic ·r C r ''ll l ';tll y i s _in d eiJtvd t() 1/ ()ra u · / .;tpinrr· fc11· tlw ! JI' :IIIIil l_ll d es ign appc · arin .~ <Jll t lw c·c, ,· c·r l ';t:_:·r· rli th i s i ss ue. . Jr . l .apicrrc · is l 'l·c ·l ,;ll·r· d tc1 de' " flrk in archit<" ct u r !' and dc· s i.L:·nin~· . ;tnrl c· s r·c ·lltc ·s hi s \\'Ork \\·ith al·ti sti c ski ll , ('IIJTI 'I' I lli' SS , ;t ill I di spa tch.

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The wint r time 'rh e a ut umn ' ' The:: joyou day Have faded a

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T he Y. P. S. C. E. lw l d ;t sc)('ia l ;t l tlw h o m e o f \ 1i ss C hase· Sal tm la\ · r·\ l llltl .~ - . • r 01·. 1o, t hat tlw stran g·c-r s :t ,; rl o l d sill d ents mig ht l w co nw IJI' I tr-r ;w rj tt;Jillt r·rl . Bdorc t he c· ,·c ·IJin g· c lc ,sc·d thr · y< l ll ll.~- JW 1 ' /,Jc· 1-vc r c Icc! into ; ul ;~dJ' oi nin ,-• ,• I'I H>lll \\ -hc ·rc · tlw "Three F a t c· s" \l!' r e sr ·c· n. /\ftc·nl·;trrl s c·;t c·h jJ ·r son n :cc·i 1·c·d a sm ;tl l i':lJJ('i' ll<';tl·t r>ll whi ch 11·as 11riLtc·n a cotljJ I<"l l()rt c·ll i n"· ,- , h is m h c r fa te .

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Ch ri. t mas, with it s plea ures, I back to u once mo r e, A lt houg h it eern but y esterday ince it was he re before.

o f S ub crlp ci on:

One copy, p er sc h oo l y ear . . . . ..... . . .... . . .. ... ... 1.00 Single co pi e , eac h . ..... _. . . . . . . .. . .. . . ... ... . . . ... .15 All sub sc riptio ns arc co n · i der ed perma nen t until ordered disco ntinued and nrrcara ges paid. Ad dre ss a ll co mmuni cation to TH E NORMAL COUR IER

A nd thu .t he t ime is fleeting, lthoug h we note it not. And a yeax as we recall it, Seems a n othmg b u t J. j ot.

Entere d at til e Po s toffice at Peru, Ne br. , as S econd Cla ss Mai l Matt e r.

S CHOO L

D I RECTORY.

A nd life it elf, wh at is it ? But a day of tria ls sore. Then n igh t comes on, we leav e our car es, T o j oin those go ne b efor e.

P H I L OMA T HEAN . Soc iety ev er y Frictay.eve nin g duri n g th e sc hoo l term s at 1 o' clock . . A ll students ar c cord ia l ly l ll VIted t o JOin us 111 our literar y wor k , espec 1a lly those of th e hi g h er co ur se • • 0. P. PA LSTI NE, Pr eside nt.

And life's winter ti me is comin g, A lthough d istant it may seem. And t he joyo us days of s u m me r W ill have faded as a dream.

W E LLI NGTO NI AN SOC I ET Y . Soc iety eve ry Friday eyen i n g dur i n.g the school year . All s~udents who wish th e developm ent wh tc h earn est literary work al one can g tv e are corELIZABETH BRATT , Pres . dia ll y in v i te d to visi t u s.

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Merry Christmas and Happy N ~~ w Year.

A:nd in these our h appy sch ool d ays, L et us not forget the t ime, Tha t we may pa ss ou r tri a ls o'er, T o that promised l a nd s ubli me .

J UN I OR SOCI ET Y. Juni or societ y every Friday e ~en i tl g du r ing school y ear. Stude nt s and FRANK M ARTI N, Pres. fr iends are cord i all y in vi l ed to v 1s 1t !ts.

- S elected.

L EC T URE BUREAU. Or ani zed as a per man en t in sti t uti on o f th e sc h ool. It I s un de~ ~he auspiccsgo ft hc. Ph ll oma th ea n , Everett. W e l l in g toni an a nd J un ior soc!et 1es.LT he best lec tu rers o f today w i ll b e se cu red . J . J . Kin g, ch airman ; Lettt e M . ott, secr etary: A. J . Nea l , treas ur er .

I

Knocked Out Idols .

Y. M. C . A. Pres ident, P . M . W hi tehead .

C orr espo ndi ng Secretary , R. C. O rd.

Y. W . C. A. President, M i nni e Va nNostr a n .

BY SUPT.

Corr espondi n g Secre tary , Oli ve Criffi th.

ST AF F. P. M . W hite h ead, Fi rs t L ie utenant and Ac tin g Adjutan t. I NFANTR Y-COMPANY A. Hu gh Joy , 2d Li eu t. C h as. T ucke r , tst Serge nt.

COMP ANY B. 0 M Good 1 st· Li eut. Sr. N ea l W y ne. t st Li ent., J r . L . A . C hase, t St · · S~r g . and Ac t i n g •nd L ie ut . Sa m J . Stor m. t St Serg .

J.

M. GREEN WOOD,

Kansas City .

TH E NORM A L M ILITI A. PROF. H . B. DUNCANSON, 2d L ie ut en ant , Comma nder of C adets.

J. J. K ing . Cap t.

i com ing; pas d away; of umm r a day.

T he winte r ld a nd drear y I oming e'en at hand, And th li tt le parkl ing snowflakes E'er lo ng wi ll crown the land.

RD.

EVERET T SOCJE TY.. Every Friday eveni n g ~uring _the sc h oo l term ~ . N ew students are es ROBeRT G IFF I '<, Pres. pec ial ly invited to jo i n u s tn ou r li ter ary work.

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~LUTARCH , in hi s work on morals, d iscu s~es wh y the Gods quit speakin o-, but he fails to say they beca me tongue-tied. H oweve r, no such plea can be set up at thi s


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t im in d f ns o f c · rta in d u a t io na l id Is · th a t ~ re now to pp ling o v - r. f ,,. ,.viii IJ rn nt1o n d to s how t h d ri ft f 1 ulli s . n tim nt as it has fo rmul a t d its If in t h · m ind s of th o ug htful tea ch rs. T h -• tim · c nc was ~n this co unt ry wh n· th chil d r n in s tu lymg the s pe lling I sso n a nd r citin g it ra il y. ac t ua ll y s p II d th e wo rd s p ro n un c in ..., ac h sy ll ab ~e ~e pa rat ly, a nd r p a t · d t h p r no uncia tJ o n of a ll th e syll a b i s at t h nd o f t h~ wo rd . A n w s t ca me up w ho d .c la r I th 1s to h w ro ng a nd said t ha t t h c hil d r n ough ~ no t to pro no un c a ny sy ll a b les a t a ll , but Sim p ly ca ll t he I tte rs fo r m in a s y ll a b i . As a ~ s uit, th e chil d r n w re w a k in p r no un cmg wo rds c rrec tl y a nd d is tin ct ly, a nd nov.: th te nd e nc y is to go b a ck to t h ? ld -fas hJO necl way of sp e lling a nd p ro n u nc Jng . . By th co nj oin t us of th vo ca l o r g ans In na ming th e le tte rs a nd p r o n o un cin a ll th~ syll a b les, th e ye a nd th e vo ic uni te to ass is t ea ch o th e r in g ttin g th e wordf orm a nd th e written-form pro p rl y fi xed in ~he lea rne r 's mind. The ne w m e th o d fa il e d . In teac hing th e childre n h o w t o p r o n o un ce a_n cl sp ell , beca us e it di vo rce d th e jo int a ctio n of th e eye a nd vo ice. It was lik e teac h i n~ o ne _to s ing and to pro hi b it him fro m _LtSt~g hi s v oice in prac ticing . Th e o ld comb ma tiO n m eth od aid e d th e childre n n o t o nl y in l e~rning the pr o n o n cia ti o n of th e :vord, b ut I_n a ttac king n ew wo rds a nd w orkIng o ut the ir pro nuncia ti o n. Th e n e w h e lps

not a little bit. A littl ~ la te r a n o the r epid e mic s tru c k th e co_u ntry 1!1 th e wa y of throw ing o ut m e nta l a n t hmetic. It was d e cl a re d to b e unne cessary a s one of the commo n s cho o l s tudi e s. A kind of fifth- w h ee l to th e e duca tional wa~o n, . the new ins ig hte rs call e d it. All th eir a nthme ti cal t eac hing swung ove r t o the opposite extrem ~ . Th e whol ~ bu si n es s was to be counte d ou t by using shoe -p egs, bea n , and oth e r vegeta bl e s. Th e · childre n ~ere. t o learn a rithme tic b y m e ans of obj e ctive Illu~tr~tions, and a ll thou g ht w ork was t? b e ehmmated unle ss it could b e ''obj ec ttfi~d" into b ea ns, sh ee p, cabbage and othe r obJ e cts _of g as tronomic qu a liti e s. Inste ad of _lea rmn g the m u ltip licati o n ta bl e as s o m e thmg the ch ild of ave rage a bility will ge t in

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f g ra m m a r a a ·tlllh· n a \\' ; ~h c m1 r h · n s i n .. ·h ild r •n . tnt II i n · . n , r ·n , i , lub b rly i_ 1low, with m r · m ac h than a td, and t h r s I ·s · inf rm d r p - th at a ll th rra m m ar burn cl , a n d th at h · him If th to r h if th· o-r-t mnr r Enou h t s a y tha t th , · nH ·tO' nti n appea rs r ·m t · . T h hn g- u ;:,. id I i b ·~cl ­ ly di s lt ur ' U s t ill lin .. . . r in - 111 · sc ho I . . ·p lli n ·, t , h a I with uta. k tng f r b y u in · h · ,,. rd in th littl h ~t bby co lum n s in th r ' a I r . If a n ·thm mor was r ·qu ir d a · 'p r · a r d li t' ,,. uld answ r t h · 1 u r p o . Bu t thi . p la n had . n pay in · o r in it, a n d it i · dead . .\ r nv a l inth s p llin ·b k is n win fu ll \\' " p . W ha t les s o n ca n o n d r ·1 \\ f r 111 t h ? l s th e re s u c h a thin · a o- ttin · b a k into in the one's e d ucati o na l w r k h o p, a nd th oug h t m o ve m nls t h r ? J n thi s r a im o l d , _If th e r e b a th e m ys te r y ca n b mys te ry. By loo kin g d e p mto the n "d of the min d, its co n e p ts to b develop e d a·n cl fix e d, t h e m at ri a l of th o ug ht to be wove n into fo nn , a nd th e n to la st p e r ma ne ntl y, s o m s u c h inqui_r ie s a s th e se _will aid the tru e te ac h e 1· in g e ttmg a t th e thtns·s which th e c hil d m o st n ee d s to k_nO\~ . ~t 1s to g ive him a r a ti o n a l b ~ sis fo r ht s kn o wm g , not a shiftin g sand b a r 1n a mud dy str ~ am. R e a d e r, loo k fo r th e g ro und pl a n of hu man n a tur e in all yo ur thou g ht wo rk. }ou?"n al o.f Edu cati on . '-'C'~

T homas Carlyle. BV

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M.

fMO influ e n ce suffu s e d the a ge in which P l h e Jive d f r o m fir s t t o la st, m ore st ro n&·ly th a n th a t o f !h? m as C a rl y le . E:1 gl a n~ s ve ry way of thmkm g was at o n e tun e p t o fo undl y a ffe c t e d b y C a rl y le . H e intro du ce d th e E ng li s h p e o ple t o th e ~ r e a t G ~ r m_a n auth o r s, v e r y mu ch as L ess in g h ad mtt otrod uce d th e G e rm a n s t o Sha k espea re a nd

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\-vo uld ha b fiu nc ve n witho ut it. ut hi s in - po t ' h ga\'( us \\ a ll ·n st ·in . I ut Car· on 1 tte rs a nd a rt was p c uli ·lr, aJJd ly l ·'s styk lws inlr due ·d in t thi c untry was not eva nescc.: nt ·. ·J 1 · . . th f d . d l )' IS cJJ Sti11 Cl l\ a t ~1 roughly false nwthnd ()f, riting hisl ~)'· sc hoor~~ ofl~ ~cho l f_ h is t r y a nd .1 Itisam e thol. which has IiLLI· n:r,u·d tor . . · ga rd h Im Simp ly ast1 meant1m w may r _ th e ' dry light" which ft 11 a 1 1 r ~-~;; . hi s b k . c a g r at a uth r, a n I tr 'at w rks u nci ·r th var 111 (1 ula r, f ulorcd o oo s as li te ra ry s tud i s a nd not as I' ' I g nt~ .. _ I t~ 1 uq os is l'~· · ·x pn : s _sc~ rn °£f s~;~~- T hu s r egard~d, w sha ll fin d tha t n e s t f 1 I ·as ·t nd m 11 and acl m 1rati n I n a sty - ' w hIch v ry s b r c n.. tic a n th ·r. ;i v ·n th · ma n w · ·1clmi r then wou ldf ee l bound t d n v rth eless th ~ ~o n n.: n_, b _lt w hi c h a ll hi s d in g and w·tys mu t 1' a lmir b]~, continua ]] d e_ so _e r st c n t ic I S £ rc d a ~_cl _th ' h is t r ia n p r _ds l w rk _ th~~ Y es pi t h1m s If a nd hi s ru l T to P 1 In Cip l d . ut. a r l y l .'s Mira l c a u I S . _ aw h~Ihreh. Fo r o ut of th st ra ng )· a rgo n tru ly ' l cr ·a tu •·e f r m a ne. a. M nt hri Ic e seems t 0 h d 1. · d C 1 J h av tbc ra t I y ad 1 t- t of 1 umas. Thi s way f in cr t work w~nd a~~ e as u~do ubte d l y c nstru c t d a ? eca m E: v . n m r a l I a r - n t a t h m an n e:~ sp ke~ _u ex press 1ve med ium in whi c h t 15111 b ca m m r in c ssa n t Jn a rlyl ·· a_ . IS words of re mo nst ra nce a nd ad- la te r w ri t ings- in t h "Fr d r i k th r t mo?Itl o!"l. I t is a m a nne ri s m but a m a n- f r xa m I l . Th r ;:J.d r d a r n t tr~l t ne n sm mto wh. h , . . vid r IC a g rea t dea l of th ll1cll - su ·h hi st ry. I t is f l it tl v'tl u a n 111 J · ~a Ity of the ma n se ms to have ntc r cl. s tru c to 1: in t h 1 ss n s f th _ tim s a n t wholl y a·ff c t a t10 . n o r s u pe r fi cia . l.1ty . Ct Is1 not v nts 1t cl ·als wit h . I t n ly t 11 u s "'h~5 1, ar Y e s ow n soul se e m s to speak out in it Ca r ly le th o ug ht f th ti !n s a n d th e _ njn ~o re ~-ee l y a nd st: e nu ous ly tha n it wou ld in a nd t he 11 - n w h w re t h chi f c t Ol 5 n)' t or Inary E ng lish of soc ie ty a nd lite ra - t he m: r d s a rl y l Gcq uea th rn a ure. . . 0 to ng ue, says R ich te r, is e lo qu nt n _:·v Id eas t t he ,, orld, w hi c h h s tir r d ~~ save In Its ow n 1a nguage · a nd th1· s str a ng hJ s sto r m y loq ue n cc . T ha t fa ]se hoo t 1 da ng uage w hich he has ~ ad e f o r him s e lf 11 ~t c~n not pr va il ve r t ru th th 0 f~a~eall y ap pea r t o be th e na tiv e to n g u ~ s imu la cra. d o th wor ~ of r a lit ies, JS.;to lyle s powe rfu l ·a nd m e la nc ho ly e lo - a ft e r all -~ 1 sso n w h ic h G! a rt h ca n b e sal urY qu o nce. Ca rl yle is e nd owe d w ith a m a r- ha ve waite d _fo r up t o t he n ine te e nt h cent ]d velous powe r . of d e pictin g storm y s ce nes a n d the co m1ng of Ca r ]v] . a n d )' e t it wo_ u] · J ' · bJctt a nd r ugge d daring na tures. At times b e h a r-d t·o PO I!1 t t o a ny o th e r p hil osop ]ue st rang e , w ild, pier cing n o te s of th e pa the ti c ? utco n~ e of C a rl yl 's t eac hi ng . . Hi s "~o J1 , ~re heard th roug h hi s s tre nu o us a n d fi erce Js. tn hi s ~.l o q_u e n ~ e .. his p ow e r , h is P~ 5 ~~1 res h a~ t~ of eloq ue nce li ke the wail of a cl a ri on • his path os, hi s s ttrnng a nd 1He li ke plct the ~. n llmg b e tween the bl as ts of a sto rm. Hi s o~ htu!1a n ~ h ~ra c te r , w h e the r fa iLhf ul t~o of Isto ry of th e Fre n ch R evo luti o n is history hi st o n e on g 1:1 a ]s o r n ot a nd th e vel ·v read b Y 1·Ig h tnmg · . Of th is r e marka b le b oo k p oetry w h ich r uns throu g·l~ a ll hi s b est ,vrlst · Jo~n Stua rt .M ill s uppli ed the prin cipa l m a - w oa s • a nd .·so n1 et 1me s m '-a k e s e ve n1 t h e ]eeLdO ~e nal ; fo r Mdl a t o ne time tho ug h t of w rit- s~ mp ath e u c. rea d e r b eli eve t h a t h e ha s t o I ~g. a histor y of the R e volutio n him se lf, but w1th a g ' ntll n e p o t. giVmg up th e id ea, p laced th m a te ria ls h e ~~ had collect d a t th e s e rvice of Ca rl yle . Madam e De Stael. ~arlyl~ u sed th e m at e ria ls in h is o w n wa y . e I.s mdebted to no one fo r hi s m e th od of BY ST E LLA GR AH AM . makmg u p h is hr stor y. With all its d efe cts th b k . . e oo 1s one of the ve r y fi n e st our a ge re has producep . I t s ch a ract e rs sta nd out li ke N th e hi~to r y of n a t ro . fi d t h er e a. 1t n s, we n d ot. portraits b y R e mb randt. Its crowds liv e a 1wa ys .d so. m e 11a m e s w 111c · 11 s ta n ' and move. The picture of M irab ea u is clear as g lll Ing st a _ ' el 1 s. s ra. F I worthy of th e hand of th e g reat G e rma n n ranee the I1a m e o f l\11a da m e D e

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wa f r m . t f th h n s bri h t l v in sati na l " . ri d d~1r i n nc auth r ay f h r ·· h ably th m t r - m a rk abl ' w ma n rope has l r du. 'd . . ll i as "th fi rs t f f m I , and male author . ·· yr n sa y wo ma n b y h r If, and all th r s t put t th r in t Born a nd I r uCY h t u ed by t h c ult ur · a n 1 most lit ' ra r y pi v ry -a rl y s h o \\ d a and str n ·th f mi nd othe rs u nt il t h - pr im f I if . o· s h \Y A t nin e y - a rs f a .-::, f or ho urs n t h e l -ad in o· su bj t f th da ) , with th p hi loso p h rs, 0 State m n a nd a uthors, g ath re d in h r m o th r's a loo n. This earl y d rill was p a v in o· t h way fo r he r s uccess in aft e r life , f o r 0 sh e b ca m th q u e n of the Paris ia n sa loo n, a nd h r co n r a ti nal po we rs h av e p r o b a bl y n ev r bee n surpassed. . In o rd e r t o und e rs ta nd h e r writin gs a nd the m o ti ve s wh ic h p r o mpted m a ny d ecisive actions of h e r life , o ne must kno w so me thing of h e r char~ c t e r a n~ inm ost nature . Her unbo u nd e d fi lia l affec t1o n ble nd ed ·w ith an undy ing lo v e ~o r h e r nati ve la nd-especiall y he r nati v e city, form a ~m i qu e picture. Pat 1 ioti sm was a stro ng spnng of acti on; which co nn e cte d h e r life with some of the · most h e ro ic d ee ds of th e re volu ti on. H e r simp le abandonm e nt a nd th e fra nk ness of h e r nature ,. are worth noticin g . Th e y se em u nusual .m o n e of h e r position, and we re e x hibi~e d m h e r w riting s as well as he r co n ve rs a t io n. H e r un s - 1 ~ h 1 v f-r th 1'~ 1 xhi h ca used h e r t o save th e lives of s o man y of her fr ie nds from th e gall ows , cam e near being th e m e a n s of h e r losin g h e r own life. Some of th e mo s t prom in e nt me n of France at that t im e, \ve re save d by h e r · u ntirino- efforts. L a cre t e ll e , th e historia n, who 0 was libe ra te d from p ri:on th r oug h h e r age ncy, grows e lo qu e n t 111 h e r praises , in his work ''The H e r o ism of ·Wome n Durin a th e R eig n of T e rro r." N e ve r is woman° m ore

! OI

tha n wh n h accompli hes a r a t a ti n. B th h r o·. niu ar on e rated to fn e ndh ,, h had le at d herctual h i ht kno \\ n to f \ . of t u d I. d 11 , but one a rt-that 111 n bl d a h i 'i no· aa in t crime th mo t n e a n 111 t aluta r f o ntraband act . . Coppet. b m a omm o n as ·lu m fo r ~tnz u.u. ? olun t r nd ill\ olu nta r . h ! history ~ n~~ Ja r . no uo-h for the f_u ll ~ . mmem ration -.~f u h h pita bl de ·otiO n. . I n h -r na tur " e r co111bll1 d the tende rt h a rt of a ' om a n, a nd ~he !ntellect of a r a t stre no·th of 111Ind I hown, m n. o d . d t maintaini no· h r pr in c i p l e ~ un ng a ersi at th co t f he r own e de a nd the p rse. f h 1. fri nds he n nea rl th e cuti n o · 1 "h oi ' orl d was at tl: e f~e t of Japo eo n, she wo uld not "' ors hi p him, b_ecau e s~e could not do so in accordance '~' lth !1e r pnn .. 1 he beli eved in repu bhcamsm, and Cl t S. ' . . J f she pe rceiv d that I apo leo n s pnncip es . o re p u blica ni s?1 we re o nl y a n: e~n s by w hicl~ h e mig ht g ain the E mpe rOishi p. , S h~ be h e ' d th at men we re Tap oleon s fn~ nd.s , o nl y in so far as. the y \~ e re of use to him 111 acco mplishin g h1s. desires. .H ~r fi ne r na ture revolted a o·a mst s uch pnnCiples. At this time ~h e wri tin g of Mada me D e S tae l held en-ea t sway in France, N a polia n r ealizing tl~e powe r he r p e n m ig h.t wield a a ain st him , ba nished he r fr o m ·P a n s, th at cfty s o dea r to her. At a n y time d uring h e r te n years exile, if she had chose n t o concede he r principl es a nd uph old the rule of Nap oleon, he wo uld g lad ly h ave welcom ed her back to Pa ris. . T he prin ciple of uphold ing yo ur own id eas, eve n throug h ad ve rsity, which sh e h as so e xe mplifi ed in he r life, sh e expla in s f rth r \n h r ssays o n li te rature . In sp eaking of 1; e r tc mr tat io ns · to yie ld h e r opin ions in orde r t o g a in h e r free d om, sh e says, " But this feeble ness of the heart oug h-t ne ve r to effect o ur J·ud o·me nt of o-e n'd b b e ra 1 1_eas. T o ~ h ate v e r suffe ring the express ion of such 1deas can expose us, it i necessar y to bra ve it. W e ca n deve lo 1 ~~s ~fu ll y only th e prin ciples of which we are m tun a tely convin ced. O pini ons tha t you

?


/ 0 2

T!-JE 1\ OR JJ,fA l

wo uld sustain aga in s t your own conv ictions yo u ca n ne ve r p rofo undly a na lyze nor eff c ttv ly exp ress."

TH£

CO R IER.

BY ~f YR TJ. E

wa

urroundin s.

Deadwood and

RD D

th

·o f? 1J{ L COURIER.

~ 1\ ~ 0. •.

to w n )' u fa m inin n wi t h dif-

BV D. L . STO N R.

pra iri CON TI NUED ?

You may boast ab o~ t t he se ni ors , Wi t h t heir me n so yo ung a nd true, With their ladies yo ung a nd pleas ing . ( Not wit ho ut t he old ones too .) T hey a re ·ma rt ; we do not do ub t it ; But omehow it ca me to pass , Th at yo u quite forgot to me ntion Th a t we ha ve a t rc:unin g clas s. Which, t houg h not so versed in L a tin, Nor so filled as yet w ith lore, May some future time asto und you Wit h achie vements whi ch b efo reNever yet h a ve bee n acco mplis hed, Never would be broug ht to lig ht But for them th ey call th e trainer s , Who a re b a ttling f or th e rig ht. L et th e seniors then take warning, Not to fee l too proud and gay; Just r emember while yo u 're boasting, We may g rad ua t e some day . L et th e saymg old and truthful I n yo ur memory be h eld fast; "He la ug hs best who last does l a ug h ;" H e's senior b est who's senior last. Do you ever hold in memory Wh en yo u feel so big and "new" When commencement comes next s ummer' That you all may not get through? When we meet yo u on the sidewalk, With your h eads in air so high, With yo ur Mackintoshes spreading I n the wind that's floating by 'VIle ca n see by ever y motion Of your edifyin g frame, That althoug h th ey call yo u seniors, Y et you don't deserve the name. Yes, my enior fr ien ds t ake warning ; B uild your castles n ot t oo hig h, L e t t he winds of lif.e's r oug h future S catter them to earth a nd sky. Thoug h you soa r so hig h a t presen , Tha t yo u think your'r e on of , ight; B es t b e n'indful of the f ttf ure And b e car e fu l how yo u lig ht.

I ~ you ar fo r tun a te e n u o·h to

. r th~t

nte ' tiS · :-:. he n g 10n cl unn o- a h a vy ra in s to rm , t fortl'l . for th thun 1- r p a lsd a.fld w1th w o ncl r us v i o r ancl is c h o er'/ r e- e c h o e d from summ it to sum mit. r~va.t' st re am, gorge d w ith its n ,~, s u pp ly 0 0 £ •~ e r, com e s rushin o- down w ith th fo r ce th e sm~ll iaga ra, b~bblin g a n d boiling JikJoJ1g rap1ds a nd casting spray on th e pines a the banks. e

a.r Fortunately for th e min e rs th ere tJP' tS S m a ny ~uc 11 streams and th e powe r t I1L ·,..,e5· · · d In · p r1e d IS utilize workino- th e rn'" ·JI see H e r e an? there along th e road you ~~d for box wat.er w ays, sometime s extend' ~1tiaP

g r eat ch~tances and · bridg in g ,rnot.I peaks which a re far apart. d tbe In a recess of the m . , 0 u f]fl a,rt · 1 t ounta ms y 5 p . htt e ~wn ~f D e adwood the busin e s alleY stretchmg Itse lf d ' . ding ~ d all and th e c hur h Ovvn th e wtn rch e ei. h a c s and resid e nc e s pe if tb 0 th edwbc: y url t h h i hts looking ~~· de a.!l,,e

a

n

1a

· .

,

, ,P

pe

Vtn a g-a m e of 1<: VI •.Jo See 1<: , " a n d each h d ooo ~~ e h e mig ht l 'd . a chosen ~ f now· tl1 ll e his fac e fr o m hiS e Jeft (11' wonder the n th t h 1 h ::t-ve 1ot.l t a t e peop e c ul stre e · s ~ Unnamed h use S O· b e r d. and th e o t-.(oa. ( 1.1 11 e P r o m th d ·111 to a 0 ,o\.11, e epot on e steps oa t~ sto.ne p aved street which g rowsil1g ~ s as 1t ascends th e

. b e corfl mountatn,

it direction from L ad i Cr tal F a ir th r . ''"a ' a t th nta tion . f thi but nothin. · r pr ' ith th reaht wh r ca l ium ta l n wa ll and ceilinO" pa rk! d lik di m nd in th · t r h li ·ht. Th j urna l h r wa made on fo ot, it. b~ . no- .tm po 1'b l to ·e t ~ hor e over . th e I ut>. 1 d way o ,,·e ' r o-lad to stop m a mmr hant o n our r t urn a nd n:ad e a cursory tud f th urrounding s '"htl e " rested . Pp

id . . f

)ll St

Our Senior Class.

10

n ar call d

Wh e n th e o r e is tak n from th min s it is put in dump cars a nd s e nt to th cru shi nomill w h e r e it is pulve ri ze d a nd ·w as h e d . small str e am is running d ow n th e side of mountain .a nd h e re m e n are dipping up and stra ining th e water so that r~o. particl e whi ch may have e ~cap e d from th e mdl. above, m ay be los t, :w hde . o th e r~ are b e t:.dmg over and turnin o- th e mud with a n mstrume nt rese mbling a la r g e tin cooking spo o n. . The larg e st ~old mine l:e r~ h as t we ntyfiv e miles of r a ilroad trac k tn 1t; th e owner has also a -large store from wh ich his 1~1 e n are pa id with g ood s. S o m of the pnce s seemed fa bulous to m e a nd I th o u ·ht p r ., haps the r e w~s n ee d of ': ~lin e r's. U ni on, and th e imposm g -stone buddmg which h ad bee n e r ect e d across the way where the m e n mi g ht ta lk ove r the ir rj g htsand wron gs . From the crushing mill at L ead th e ore is sent by the narrow gauge track, to ~he smeltino- works at D eadwood. No e ng m e is n e e d ~d for this purpose and the bra kes a re tio-htened and retig hte ne d as th e cars de sce t~d to k ee p the m from gaining to g rea t spe e d . At th e sm e lting works oth e r waste matte r is removed and th e r e m a ining ore put in sac k s to h e sent to th e refine ry a t Om a h a. Some fi ve .mil-e s from - D eadw ood and in

Thi hant) lik e most oth er "a ~ad e of in 1 o· half dressed and s~t tra~ o·h t up 1 d d . tl1 beds w re built agamst th e an O\ n, . d · side of the ro om as btrths are faste ne 111 a a hip th e tabl e was a lso of home n:anufac ' B ·1d s th ese and a fe, cha irs, th at tu r . s . · re fu ed to stand ·u p xcept. '' Jth pe rs.ua s!On · tan ce th e re was ltttl e else Ill th e or a s1s ' · k d The me n lived in the ir wor ' an r oo m. . I b f d th h or e that great w~alth tmg ~~ e oun in the near future loo kmg a t thell shu~rou.nd­ in o·s as te mporary a nd no t worth t e1r tim e b to make better. Th e re are dese rted camps a lo ng the way wh e re h ouse and furniture were left as whe n occupi ed, whil e occupant I:a d mov: d a•~ ay with a ll he had cared to b e m cumber e el with, fasten ed in a bund le across his sh ou lde r. Sunday in D ea d:~ood is the .m ost bu~i ­ n es like day of a ny 111 th e wee k; 111 the dista nce you hear th e blasting go ing on as at any o th er tim e, while th e stree t corn r s ar crowded and eve r y dry goods box occtlpi ed, as you pass alon g you h ea r m e n betting o n the aft rn n 1R\1 ·arn e. Sprawled out o n one of th e most p~omi­ n e nt ho uses a re th e word s,. ''O ne Mmute H o us e " and below it a man climbin g o n a la dde r to the top of a b e e r g lass which is full and running over. Hum an n~ture seems rou g h lik e t~ e ru g g-ed mountams around, y e t h e r e t oo 1ts hid ing we find th e gold, for w ith kind h earte d hospitality the p e ople furni sh on e w ith a ll th ey have ~t;d s,eem to wish it were more , so th a t a VISitor .s stay is made p l easant, a nd pl easant memones remain long afte r h e h a s left the place.


T HE \

THE NORMAL COURIER.

~p

/MAR Y

. DEPARTMENT.

i\ Ii n •ra l

ompar ex r 1s s and 1 I y . ari ti s of f ds. t 5 ro n mica !. L ng th. ning f . days, mo rning or v n1n g I ng r. un n h riz n- ff u1 n I ngdJ f day a nd n ig ht r I g i a l. · ha ng s in t ~ mp r a tu r e. ha ng s. a us ·.s . f th ·s Pr va dJ n r w ind . 1 udin ss a nd t h r s ult. h n ' f~l l an d ra infa ll c mpa r d ' it z 1 . pr VI us months. oo og tcal. Th e s he lte r a nd p r tectio n f a n1• ma ls by ma n a n d od, S · a 1s. vv·If pr p a rat ·Jo n 0 f a ntm G 1 . Inte r s lee p of a ni ma ls. eo ogtcal. M' . Eff~cts of th aws o n f r oze n g r ound· d m e t a log tca l. Stu dy of iro n, its minin g, kind s afl us es.

R J/•...JL C

'RIER. ·

ical.

.· . ih· - r a nd ld - th tr m tntn g- , I r para ti n a n u

t~tdy

f

Th e Old Oa k Tr ee.

·tt

NATURE WORK.

January. FIRST YEAR.

B.OTA N ICAL, Hou se plants- the i r ne e ds- car given to th e m. Cond ition of out of doors pla n ts. What pla nts a re do ing-effect of warm days. Cond ition of buds. Forcing of t ree buds in d oo rs. Sap in trees. Ph ysiolog ica l. Kinds of clothing wo rn . K ind·s of food ea te n. Astronomical. T ime of r ising a nd se tting of sun. Leng th. of days. Brilliancy of s ta rs. Meteorological. D irection of th e wind. Exam in e fr os t crysta ls and snow flak es. D ep th of snow fa11. Number of snowy, rain y and sunny days. . . Zoological. Life in th e woo ds-ra bbtts, sqmrre ls. Crows, blueja,ys, woodpe ckers. Geological. Effect of frost on clay, sand, etc. Mineralog ical. Coal its formatio n a nd us es. ' SECOND YEAR .

t:.sV

t.

Botanical. Effect of fros t on t wtg s, buds a nd seeds. Life in buds. Dormant plant life . Physiological. Compare foods of Jan. a nd Jul y. Compare clothing worn m thes months.

°

Bota nical.

THI R D YEA R.

~ o rfl!ant condition of plants. · 1 r?ptcal fruits and trees. ys1o og1cal. S e nse of taste-org ans of taste· T ast e at'd e d by sme ll. Necessa ry fo ods. · d H of fastiflo unger-app e tite- e ffe cts V or ove r eating. alu e of reg I h b ' Astronom · I u ar a 1ts. tea . r~' Effe cts of s ' . . terl1P e un s positiOn on ture . jtl1 L e ng th f h .0 s adows compar ed VI h t ose In D e c Study of · Me teorolog ical. moon. Influ e te r· ~ V . ~ ce of storm on barornd GJ.ftd a n atio ns in te mp e rature an storm oo 1og ica l. . . trie' St . cottl1 1 ~ tur of a nima ls of cold G eolog ic:!. a pte cl to th e ir hom es. Ph

z

Erod '

.

W Jng 1

jce·

p o we r of mov111g je r5· f i ber ·s and g la c b

tim \\' as t a th sarn numb - r f Ia ) m i ·ht -m t b us. .'vV ,. r k b y lay and I It IS ve r cl iff r nt w ith th What .w uld y u t hi n!· if a ha n made tn yo u r l.i' s, a nd ) ou " r not t sl ep fro m spnng to a utumn ? T ha t i "hat th e oa k t re "' do s. H k p a wa k throuo-h the thr e ~ c aso n s of t h y a r, th mornin g of t he sp nn g, th noo n of t h s umm r , a n l the ev nin g of a u tumn. W ha t a lo ng t im in ,, hi ch to ,~ ork, and have no r est! T h re a re tim es wheiJ. we are tire d eve n . b efo re th e cl ose of a day, and have not do ne mu ch e ithe r. T he eve nin g time was d raw in o- near for th e old tree , a nd ni g ht wo ul d . s~o n be a t hand ; fo r th e g olde n brow n leaves we re flitterin g o ut in th e a ir, o ne b y o ne, piling . up he re a nd tj1e r e .. T he winds we re whi spe rin o- '•Good nig ht, go od night, d ear old tree. b \'f../ e will lull you to sleep, '"'e will ro ck you to slee p. Sleep swee tl y, fo r thi s is your three hundred a nd sixty-fifth nig ht. " Th ere stood th e old tree e n tire ly stripped of hi s leaves, left to r est during the whol e, long winte r, and t o drea m swe et dreams of his earl y d ays. W e have our dreams, who . kno ws but th e o ld tree does? Th e cloud s w ill s ift snow up o n him, a nd cove r hi s cr oo ke d limbs in fl eecy fo lds, and spread a w hite cove rlid at hi s fee t to keep them wa rm throug h th e long cold winter. It was th e nig ht befor e Christmas eve, that the oa k drea m e d a long beautiful dream. This is th e tim e, to o, t ha t we boys a nd g irls, me n a nd wo m e n have our pretti est 11 •

h n ·ou b ro\ old " hat pi asure will it think h o'~ t nderl) mamma ca red for H dr amed how ki nd! the z pher I him to sl p, a nd ' he n tl: chill y , ind ca m , h fo un d himself at ht s mothr' f et a nd h r falling leav s made a , a rm bla nket fo r him. T hen the snow cam to tuck th bla nket mor close!y a r und him. H remembered ho\v softly th e ra ins a wok him, "hi spe r{ng th at spring had co me. Hov' wa rm he had g rO\\ n, a nd how ha rd he tried to get the cove r off, just as a n y little baby would. H e at last succee d e d, a nd lo! hardl y before he was awar e of it, he v. as head a nd sh ot,dders above g round. The n how wond erfull y he g rew; not so fast, pe rh aps,• as some other baby trees but strong a nd f irm. H e thoug ht he was g rown now, a nd was the oldest, largest and stronges t tree in th e forest ; as his s umm ~t towe red above all th e other trees, so that he could be see n for out at sea. H e was really of g ia nt size, as compared to so me of th e younger trees, a nd he looked eve ry inch a mig hty se ntin el, keep ing watch ove r th e little vi ll age nestling in the quie t vall e y belo w. Th e people in the town were we ll aware of the g reat beauty of this old oa k, a nd its usefuln ess-but, we are foro·et 0 ting Mr. Oak's dream. _In his dream he th oug ht he stood as a mtg hty landm a rk for the sailors tha t a sto rm ca me upo n th e sea one day, a nd out upon th e wa~e rs was a large ship, fi ll ed with people, battlmg with th e waves. The p~ opl e ~n th e village saw the tr oub le a nd fea nng so me shi p was in dange r, som


THE 1VOR 1l /( j 1::./'i. .

1fi f th em sta rte.d ,vith ]a nt . k, a nd th e re g ro uped th In th e to pm ost ·bra nches, 111 0 I lig ht. In the g ray daw n of morning th e uld see a dim o bjec t in th e di s tance, a few ho urs la ter he d iscove red it was · " s hip of his dream. Th ere reall y ha d bee n a sto rm , a nd- yes he re we re the la ntern s· Gay fr o m the mas ts of tt1h1 . colors h P· The men we re now ta k ing dow n . 5 1 lig hts a nd as the breezes brought to hi m mu sic fr om the happ y hear ts o n the s hlf'd wh• spenng " It is to yo u, your. ma ke r a n these men tha t the people in yond e r s hiP a re smg mg th eir praise," he ind ee d that he had a prec ious duty 1n acting as hg ht house for the sailo rs. H e re me m; bered tt was Christmas mornin g . a nd tha hJ s Christmas d ream had rea ll y bee n tru e.

·r"J

-

E LISABETH LORD CON DIT·

-=--

Queer are th e s tories we h ear 11 ow ti. nd th en B ut the queer est w as told m e by W illie G ue n t1, T hat t h e winter 's lu nch of t h e b lack b ea r Is f ound in h is fat p aws a ll cover ed with h a ir. h th e woods , Al1 th e s u mm er h e rambles aro un d throu g

~o

E a t in g b e rries a rJ d g r ound nu ts a nd acorn s good, And w h en the fa ll comes J1is condition is pnme For his sleep and hi s di n n er , wh e n ev er ' t is tim e·

-

ver fro% e n la k e and rn oo rl a nd,

.

w- e re a morning i n Ju ue.

rd3C'Jer :Jf Litu.1 :un,

HERB E RT B R O WNE LL, G. W . ELLIS , B. A., A . M ., reacher of Ma the m atics and La tin.

M I SS F L ORENCE hl. W RIGHT, re 1C "1s r of Ora l an :I Wri tt en Arithme tic.

M I SS J ENNIE M c LAIN , B. S., Teache r of Unit e d S tates Hist ory and Geography. reach e r of Langu age and Grammar.

M I SS LILLIAN R . K ELL OGG, Telch er of ReadinJ , Dra tuing, Ciuil Go ve rnm ent and Book Kee ping.

MISS A N NA B . HERRIG, Tea~ hg r

I

of ?/in Jip le > ~f ln :tr!I Jt io.? and S .t,1ar 'nl! .?d J? t of Pmctice.

M ISS FLO R ENCE G . BENNETT , Prima ry and Kinde rga rte n.

MIS S MATTI E ELLIS,

h t J ~ ' ·Tr ue h u ma n tra inin g r eq uir_es \~se lf,fld s ho uld be d e veloped f ro m withr_n 1ted, ·ded unity of spirit a n_d fee lin g c ul trda a11 S1a0 d edu ca ted Into an Ind e p e nd e nt · ~n 1 jncl exp ress ion of th e unity of hiS 11 fee lings. "- F r oebel.

1

3 1 t'1

d tl

o ' '~'h~ ven' corn~r-stonc 0 f ~ust pe ·vJI .. t l l Jf • ds w ln encec to Ot tn o-rea t mill tl,at t assJiiJe ~h " ·l tJOn ~ of the~ tJn.nCip · 1es. " te 5 t dP.'s1,sr.~.~ t r~~"g'll o·re o- (1 t~ to c~ll fo rth the ;~er, ~/II' qua1:t1ty of tntell e ct ua l P~h. ··--} thc ~m te n sest love of t r u an e be

c:

M I SS MAR THA W I NNE ,

11

I

Mills.

Physiolo1~·

reache r of Chemistry . Physics and Astrot:omy.

rn e n fa r y in st ru ctio n , d ~ve l o ps a n s ]1J5 ~i­ a rl y hab its o f indu s try a nd be sto~ Jl fa~! 1 __. . cts w 111.~ ]1 W lc] asS· ,... te ntJ.o n upo n a ll s u bJe ta te th e la bor of t he -vv o rk1n g Fes!a!ozz z". 3-11

Hist:Jry an:l

ro1 :~. cher of 8JUn:J, G~oiOJ:J an:l Zo olojy.

~

R'1 ~toric . GJ, J r,l /

H . B . D UNCANSON . B . S . , A . hl. ,

F n r above , in God ' s ow n g-ard e n , r·ow t he whitest, p u r est fl o we r s; And t h ey .I{Cn tly ;,l1 ake tl rc i r p ct;.d s In to t h is d a d < world of o urs .

l

i\I .. PRI :-> CIPAL

MISS E LI Z A C . MOR GAN, PR ECEPT RESS

\·er hill s and va ll eys ba r e , I n t he coldness and the dark n ess . Float t h e !:.Oft fl a k es throug h t I rc ar r.

"- J

MA RY MORRISON .

w. N ORTO)l' , .\ .

Teacher of P;yc!Jolog ;·. Ethic s. Logic and the Sctance ami Art of Teaching.

ft

Sn ow-Birds .

S CHOOL .

F .t-\ CU L T V . A.

th e unde rsta nd in g is valua ble 0 alsO _ ,te ~ it r e -acts upon th e ch a ra cte r. e cha1 g 00 ceed s to a ce rta in · ex te n t fr o m th thr 55 fo r th e road to th e h e ad mu s t pa .~ th e h ea rt. C F Sc!dller. ca.t1°,e

~

Bu«incss M:mag-ers.

N 0 ..'< ~)1 A L

S TAT

Prepa ratory

1

11' 11

De p C~ r l m a nt .

FRAN COIS B OUCH E R , re ache r of Vocal and Instru menta l Mus ic.

!DILL A J EFFERY , Libra rian.

JOHN B L ANKENSHIP,

of ri1 ent ~s "It is no t m e re! y t rue all . e n lio·ht j y so fa.r' pro'

H e r olls h im self up f or a lon g wi nter's n a P I n an out t he way cor ner of D am e N at ure's ) ap, Naug ht careth h e for the wi nd a nd t h e w eather; Hi s food and his bedroom a r e a ll th er e t ogeth er .

10

J. J. KING. I. E . STANFORD, Busiuess Man age r.:: .

. h eJe. nd wJt " H e uni te s p rac ti cal app l1.catJO {o1~t 1·nes t-

A Queer Story.

1

Spec in l ra1es furnisheJ on nrrh c:lli<.)n

Gleanings.

~

I O

EDITORIAL.

D E., F f\ RT M ENT.

A d l•c rrl sl ng Rn cc .., . P .: r inch , si n g-le co lu111n. ::-.iug-le insertion . .. .. .. . . . . SOc.

Snow.

{e~

'1

B U 8 1N E.,88

'\'\>D

Hutter~d

C O UR.IRR.

Education.

1-'cc kin g away at the old withered seeds L iug-cring yet on thei r· ;,tal l<:-. , 'hc<·rily :-.ca rching- f<Jr t iny ~t ray crumb s Scattered about o n tire walk::.; D aintily perking- eac h little brown h ead, L ooki n g ;,o wise and :-.o ~>hy; P with a flutter of ;, n owy-whitc wing-s '\ nd away tlu·oug-h the gloo u ry g-ray ::.kY·

,(,

Hurry i ng, sku r r y ing, fl utter ing on, Over the meadows and mea d s P ausing to r est f or a m om ent or two On. a few ragged th1stles ancl we ~ ~Sj Chirping and chatteritlg" gaily eflmfif{i1 Tho u gh t h e wind pfpc>l n. plH}t\1 tuM Three or fou r ft"lerl~ n . ' As ·f · t Y swing on a spt·ay

RI ER.

T HE NoR tt-1AL

L

J :rn t o;·.

BOARD O F ED UCA liON. Hon. A. K. G oudy . . . S upt . Pub. I n s ., ex-v_tfici(l , L jncoln. Hon . J os . S . B a r t ley .. · .Sta t e 'l're a s . , ex-ojjicio, L in coln. Hon . B . E. B . K e nne d y·· .... O m a h a; t er m exp ires 1897. Hon . J. T. S pen ce r. . ··· D a k ot a C ity; t ei ·m ex p ir es 1895. Hon . Church H ow e. ·· ·· · · · · .Aub m·n; t erm expires 1895. Hon . W . E. M a j or s . . · · · · · · · · · · . P er u ; t e rm ex pi r es 1896. Hon . J. S . W est . . . . .. . ... B enk elm a n, t erm expires 1898. ,

OFF I C E RS OF 1'HE BOARD .

B. E . B . K e nr: e dy . . ..... · ... . .. . . .. . . . . . . . .. . Presi dent . A. K. G oud y ...... . . . ... · · · · · . .... . . .... , ... . S ecret ar y . J oseph S . B a rtley ... . ... .. ·· · ... . . . ... . .. . . . . Treas u r er. EX E CU1'J VE: COMM I'l"l' E E.

Church H owe.

vV . E. M a j ors .

A . W. N orton.

ITis conceded by all

who are conversant with this world's affairs, that a good education is the best equipage that a young pe rson sta rting out in• life can have. But just what we mean by a g ood education is is a matter of im portance to us, and de mands our most se rious thoug ht. V..Je see m to have a g reat ma ny notions of good edu cation, bu t many of them are decidedly vag ue. vVith the mass of people, a good educati on co nsists in th e abi li ty to answer a ce rtain number of questio ns in any branchof study: the pos:session of a requ isite a mount of technical kn ow ledge, accruing to one fro m th e stud y of boo ks or attendance at school. T he idea exists among th e mass of people, that the youth of the land need but to be let or leased to ou r public schoo l system to be molded or made into something. Im plyin g activity upo n the part of th e schoo ls, that is : upo n the teachers but mere passive ly a nd doc ility upon th e part of th e pupil s in th e schools. They see m to think that the pu pils are t o be fi lled with a somethin g-with the m a v.ag ue something , a nd the teachers are to do. th e fillin g . After a time they thinl<: the fillin oshould be completed, and if one happe ns t~ b e in process of fillin g a 1ittle too long, he b eco mes overfilled. H e is the n by so me mea ns converted into an ' 'Educated Fool " ' o r in oth er words, a n edu cation as th ey re gard it has impaired th e usefulness of th at pet so n as a me mbe r of society. Now the lac k of definite ness a nd unity of th oug ht a mong th ose, wh o su pe rintend our ptlb lic schools, has bevo . a . nd r)readve nture , 1n g reat measure, occasioned th ose in cadeq ua te • erroneous, mane noti ons, of edutation held by the mass of peop le. Against the m we


108

TilE \'OA JJAL COURIRR.

TI-lE N()} /11/Af_ C ( f( ! EN.

~ust prot st, and by a campa ig n

[ du at!On among th patrons of th p ul li e sch ls, ·.nunciatc:, cl a r, natura l, a nd truthfu l prin Clplts unde rlying the na tu r [ clu cation , th m a nst an du cation, a nd th e . nd o r aim fa n · lucatio n.

I fin iL Lo an .clu aLec! m n th affairs f any bu si ness a man I usi n ss. r 'CL and

Ad va ntages - Ho w Ut/lized?

..

Now in th first place, du cati n do s not consist a lp n in th e a bili ty to answ r a · ' r oc· o f the~ p 1 1 , \ t -day d tain number of qu stio ns in a ny branch or . l w ly l s iLi ns 111 . l'1f 3 11 upy1ng branch 'S of stud y, but it do s c ns ist in th e h s m t · a t a ri a n · w it h th " ffi "·el power of the mind to t~ i nk cl arly, logically w 'tl . . d ,lt1 WI 1 s Cl Ly, w1th th \· - rnm ·nt a n and persistent]y upo n any q u -sti n that I· · c rn11 . v ryt11ng 111 g n ' ra l, ar ]J Of I , ·t comes within the scop · of our ab ility o r x- ln g I . · J· t1,a 1 w 0111 , 1t may truthfull y b ' sal ' f pe rie nce. In a v ry s ho rt tim , we forg t t he h 0 · jtiS ~ a v \vasted th pnm · op J o rtun d many of the fa cts of hi sto ry, th e laws f th e 1r 1· anh0° 1 cs; \·\ ast J rh ir you n rn . e f natural philosophy, th ru les in arithm ti c , a nd \VO man h ood, a nd n w in th pnf11 e the constructions in la ng uage, th e e quations man h ood o r "'" manh d th v ra il rtt th? fl in chemistry, but th e thought we put . into who b . .· . ' · . inat1° Y I I 51St nt In dustry cl ·t !l11 . n d ' tiO ' thes subjects is not lost, but reso lves Its If a n e ne rg y h av O"a in d a li b ·ral e duca o( . b . h )l ofl into me nta l powe r, the g-reat end of an edu- a nd I1 av · a nse n to positions of hl g that cation. o: g r at sala ry. Th ey se m to forg t f11 efl I have heard a disting ui sh e d coi)ege pres- ~lme -te nths of th e successful , wea lth Y e(S, ident say : " 1 wou ld be unable to pass t h e In our land and n in -te nth s of th e pauP the . . college were I and calamity manufactur~ rs com e f~~: too entrance exammatwn to my · ' d , · 'el l marke · same class. We can n'o t em ph a siZ f se' subjected to the test and n g i Y . H ow we ~o u ld not for a mome nt, e nte rta Jdn mu~h , t h e importance , to the y oung . 0 eve( . t an ed ucate · c.unng a good ed ucatio n . No ma n e use · the idea, tha t thi s ma n was n o . d . 1112 ed 1ea ers h lived, posse sse d w it h tale nt for a nY on ti"e man for he is one of t e recog d f ful. toing d d ·c. . ' a n en owe d w ith sorne e xecLI j1P in the thinkin <T world, and at the hea . o o . . . f Amenca. abdrt)' wh 0 d 'd fol' ~ one of the leading untve rs tt\e~ .o' •While h e ta le nt· ' Th I · no t fi nd some usend f 0 r • e re 1s a l ways a dema be· The point he mad e was o~ 1~She knowledge goo n t hin ()' N ·t mllY ,t o· o matter w hat I re"' may have forgott_e n some d e nt in sch ool - In these days wh . . is so g de' he may have acqUire~ as a sftuh. m ental dis- .111 a11 th prof, 1e n cam p t 1t10 n 1aV ~ c· . b l b reason o IS nsl n mu t 1 ~ sv yet he ts a e Y d. t the af- q uate pre par t' . pete f· . . d th ht power t o Jf a lon,. tn orn r to com . ~;tl Bctphne an oug. . . ' d ri ·htfull y cessfu lly t 1o11 nl1 f irs of a ·reat HI titu t l n, an g . 1 f .• ·-1 at 1ers ti l 1 in educ" rovo ~ f a lead e r in the mte a .. \r I \1 , • d thQ C~ 1 (. a sum t11e posltlOn o t\ 1 1 l11 o11e ;(11' n Utrh o·h, }1 ( 11 lectual wo rld. ;£ ·· i · · ~ll'l l l far ' nouv iflg 11 \Je ht 0 1 b T p\ he t1LII t . f11· ~ chooi t dt r l pL: n wh r if1it11tJ fO( ~ . .., rt1 ,A, ~ r. opment of p ' ~ r; .m .nta1 nd 111 1. Thi: mp-tlt t i t du d t o- 11° \{ ~ i dea of e du at1 11 111 lud s all th a is b-st £ "tiot1 Joo t U 1 k at an ednc rClll)' the other, an d as a n1att · r u f f t ._ c.C l S a s dimoment a s '"'e wou ld n attl

witl .1

h

y

- PI d

I

h-

L

business pr 1 1t1 n. n \\' 1 a m a man I kin.~ f r a j b fin m n wh has a j b t I ·t. 1 u rant m the Pri vilc f w rkin rr f r him b · th h ur ) 0 many h ur · 1 r ua ' 'lta tipul t l workin al l f th I y r u h the day as i c nv nicnt for m . N \ w re it to my adv nta "" t < lab r. a t n h u r a day, an 1 ·h uld nly I b r. a· t \ three, four r II\'<.' h ur ada·. I h uld certainly b a r y f li ·h m n. m thin ducati n w h a \ W can s cu rc a cr od d ucati n b \\ rkingfo r it all th e t im s t s p ak nd with a ll th r ts 1n u t pe k r w can s cu ·e a f1 i:'>·m n t du ati n b) \ rJzin a for it th t\\ . thr r f ur h ur per da and usin 0 n third n f urth, r one fifth of th capa ity \ ith wh ich ,, a r endov\ ed That an education is an advantag to a nyone, admit· of no question. ·Th e b st th ings ar most advantageous, hence the best education is most ad va n tag o us. In matt rs of ducation a s in matters of commodity, · vve can all profi t by an adherence to th old adage: • •7h e b est, is none too good. " It would b e pro fitabl e for eve ry stude nt to ask hi msel f or herself the question: ''Am I obtainin <T all t h at it is p o ssible for me to obtain i~-::. this instituti on ?" I am granted .all that I can get, n ow am I getting all that the state grants by maintainin g this magnificent institutiQn.

and of t am for air-pump, d ' principl apparatu t. ral minor pi c · .T h alrn r -fitted and repatrs mad J tric machine th H ffpparatu , the el.ectricit . in putti 1w them 111 . ., ork111g

j

Notes From tile Physical Laboratorv

(r;I'"HERE h as latel y bee n put into the ~ L aborat ory for the use of the classes in Physics consi?e:rable ne~ a·pparatus. For work in e lectnctty, there 1s a Toeple r-Hultz machine rheostat, wheatsone bridge, galvanome~er, e lectroscope, r elay (telegraphic) instrume nt, a nd s everal different kinds of battery cells. A lso. an Atvvood machine,

rwo Eminent Physicians. BY F . H. BEEDLE .

TR ELER stood one e\ ening on '' lr~dian Hill" and watched the sun, as It . e red away out in the rolling lands to d tsapp . " ·d sunsets, sa1 e l t1e w t · "Talk about Italian . h 'there are no sunsets 111 I tal ·or anywhere ~e in the whole ' ide world, t!1at can c?m.~ colonng b . has th1s. .. 1 at• ,~,, 1• th such o·orO'eous If this ()' ntl man had remained 111 t e viCit:ity of p ru from the first of October untd the birth of the n w year, he would have .d ••there is no count ry in . the world sa1 , 1 where the autumn months are as 1rreproac 1able and incomparable as in the 1issouri valley. " Providence to e qualize the b lessin O'S of nature has sent the long and beautiful autumn, and earl y winter to aton for the heat of summer, and who can say that the vexation and discomfort' of the torri d season are not completely forgotten in the atonement ? · In more eastern states there comes in O ctober sometimes a little later, the season called " Indian S ~m.mer," when the sky is cloudless and the atr 1s balmy, and over the face of nature is thrown that indes ribabl h z whi h softens the autumn tints. For p e~·haps a fottn ight this ch arm ing atmosphen c condition lasts and then the wind sweeps down fro m the north a nd the se ntime nt ~ncl. poeti~y of autumn are at an end. B.ut 111 the M1ssouri valley the charm of '•Ind1an Summer" lin()'ers, when in the north, west a~d east the gales of early wint er are h ow lmg and th snow is fa llin Throug h O ctober and N ov - mb r a nd fa;·

CfJ\


II O

T!-JE

J\

THE

0 /0v! AL COURIER.

mto cembe r th del . lies, as if loath t I go I ss of harv sLs da l1 eav 1 r favor ·d r s Lin (r ~aac .£ !h~ occasJ nal Ourry of s n w a nd ~ yo nlppmg w ath r h r - and th T nl serv to make more d lig htfu l th . ·k y tu rn of th qlll c r warm au tum n su n a nd th sout hern breeze. '

Is t he Wes t Discontented ? Fa t .

°.

. h d all human improvement and are e \ , al l ad anc m nt of the race .

Form?

Tile Need of Educated Men.

~ \ ID T RR JO RDO m an ad tv dr to the a rad uating clas in L e1 nd

rticJe

~ CEM

R'

Forum co n ta ins

anv,/ o(Tlan

'~ . J 1 f o n tatus a n d F uture of tl e p tl1181 u Trag e M o v m c n t b y D ~~. M a r) ~ cl tO . ' . · d e n1e 0 f J acob ( Sl 1 1e t 11 n k s iti ze ns h q I S tl, 1 wo .m n o n on e o f two crrou n d. 5 · bO 3 1 . tel'' w h 1c h a 1. b ·-=-. e 1n be . a surd; a n d th at 111 s. 111,, ,, 1·jJ of j)art .· Y p eace the '· r evo l u tto n qu ~- ~t l y_~c~omp lis?ed . / b)' ~ C hl tSt la n mt ss io ns as , s ee n see Bra hm c.a n, " a nd · 'C hri s t ia n mtss . to · n 5 as·nte(' by .a miss io na r y," a r e t h e ti tles of rwo 1 es~In g art icles in t hi s F07~"U?n . , fo t'(fl . dr.h e ' Baltimo r e p la n" 'of cu r re ncY l et1lbe( Is tscu e d i t i. nu

\ ta ne ~c'vle w.

@fHE

Re~iew of ~evz'ews £ r ccmb-t· notes the I t1 n r turns fro m d iffe r ent parts ~f the country a nd fro m t he m draws the mference that g r eater incl epe nde.nc~ than usual has prevailed b oth in

thmkmg a nd voting th is year. · T he encr_oachme nt of Great Brit ia n upo n Venez_uela. m h e r G uia na cla ims is d e no un ced a s ~ vwlatwn of th e Monroe D o t . TJ Unrted States as t l c n ne . ·l e ' 1e stro n g re public of th e

A L a a / Study of

~~

At this. time a lso may be found rea I fo r · · ' Y. consu ltation prepar d t tw · ' . . m11pst r t a ll dis, o emment physicia ns D A.d . 1• unshine T h . ' r: 11 a n · ·. . Y at at th 1r b es t a nd ha p~~~~ out 111 th ts smi ling c?untry, that . d d . They ar tw fn s ky ld f Jll \ s ' an t h rough tJ d

1e ay they a r fr ]lic k ing .b a.d ut, up and down the va ll ys a nd h ili51 s where . . ver th e y can fi nd an' n t rance. ~ e IS a li vely patient who k e ps up with t. em, bu.t when he re tu rns fr m a c ns u ltatJOn- a little tired perhaps, he knows th a t he has taken a dose of m ed icin e to b e p a icl for on ly in shoe leather, and that he has had the best wh ich two g r at ph ysicia ns can offe r. D r. ~ir a nd Dr. Sunshine are s trictl y p rofessiOnal. They do not adve r tise. Th ey do not care whether you co nsu lt the m or any o~he r doctor, bu t they a re re ady to g ive s~ ffen ng huma nity the bene fit of th eir se rVIces. They are putting in the time in this beau tifu l D ecember weathe r a nd reve l in these days of warm th- a revel wh ich th ey p rescJibe for th eir patie nts. H appy a nd healthy the pe r~on who leaves h is roo m a n h our or two each clay 1 in this g lorious stretch of "India n S umm er " an d co nsults these e minent ph ysicia ns.

III

OR ~JAL COURIER.

~

M

. uccee

d

. os t peoole w o uld 5 bled VI 1 111 t1 gs 1'f th ey we re n ot tro L1 L

am i··

) Iti o n. -

Longfellow.

j(J j tP

tanford Junior ni rsity states s?me truths 'th t ev ry man and woman mJgh~ w 11 on ider. H peaks_ of the needs ot due t I men ar'ld \\ omen m a go' ernme~t by th people. The future of the republic xi s t in li s in the hands of int lligent, cu ltured n t mp rar isdom and streng·th do not go to g rumbl i n~=; men. If \ f times. make up a nation it can _have no ~ture. ft r trav lin g v r a Jar ·e part of the Fo 1 or kna es cannot g UJde the shtp of state a nd ta lk in a with all lass h fee ls state. that 9 - per For more that a century the common tn a mea. ur pr pare c to ce nt of N eb ra kans ar c nt nt d . man has ruled in Am er ica. H ow he has T he: state h as reach d it pr s nt co nd i- rul ed coming years will . telL More or l~ss tion in the last thirty ) ears. The re i a d is- weakness. misery and cnme have b.een wtth tri ct school wi t hin \\ a! king d istance of e \ ery u s anci where weakn ess is, tyranny ts four:d. r b rask a h o me ; th e r e a r 377 :-·: rade d ' •The essence of tyranny we hav e found, lies schoC' Is. abo u t 70 of \·v hich a re accredited to not in the strength of th e stro ng, but in the State U t'li v e rs ity ; th ere a re ten private weakn ess of the weak. " I n our free coun and d e n om in atio na l colleges, ten p rivate t ry are mill ions who are no t free, never will academies. a nd six private no rmal5; besid es be so lona as they remain what they a re. these are t he Sta te Nor mal a nd the -State The only remedy the n, is to fo llow the exam ple of our fathers, a nd bring in b etter Un ive rsity. T hese Improveme nt<; ha ve necessitated men . The grown up men are past help. ma ny mortgages _for the g reate r . part_of the The only way ~s to educate and train the populatio n ca me m to the s t~te w1th ltttle or ch ildren . \tVh e n this generation leave s to noLh ino· . By ha rd a nd pa t1e nt la b or they the next real education- training in individ have a~comp li sh e d all. The ir oppo rtunities u al power a nd ski ll , ~ broad thinking, the are m any a nd th ey ar in ln st to im prove probl ems of t he next generation will take ~lr of themselves. Coll ective ind ustrial th ~m-to ge t rich and if they c1 not a~, compli sh th is. as soon as th ey think th ey problems and inclivi lna1 probl em s a re Irre should the re ts some gru m bling . concilable. Educatio n must be broad, fitting me n H e co n cl ud es th a t there is some disco ntent in Neb raska- no t so mu ch with ind i- a nd wo men for success in life; must give vidual lo ts a s :vith the existing order of that reserve o_f p ow~r tha t brings strength, thin gs. In th e ir h aste to buil d up a sta te su ccess and v~ c tory 1n th e s truggles of life. care has always n ot b ee n exercised to g uard Su ch edu catton baings law and order. th e in te res ts of the peo ple. · They h'a ve '•Onl y h~ who has nothing to lose can fav or themselves to blame la rgely fo r this a nd disorder and misrule . " conscio us ness of th e fact is p robably wha t "A man shou ld have a r eserve of skill " '' H e must have intellige nce. " He m ust b e ra nk le s. " '•Out of s u ch b itte r ~x p e r ienc e s , howeve r, abl e to e ntertain himself and o th ers. The a nd out of th is k itJ.d of ra tio na l discon tent, schools are gradually meeting this de ma nd


/{ 2

THE

- g ivi ng wisd m a nd fi tn ss to th c Th . . mm n ma n. . Ya re b 111 g rap id ly pl ac d 11 a new basis. o n hig h r ducat i n will c ase to be a badge of cas t ''A ma n mu st hav a res rv f cha ra cte r and pu rp s · " ··H mu s t have a r -"serve of reputa ti o n." th e rs w ill "s t ·m u~ as ~e es te m urs lves, and li k ·w is e w · wdl stn v to ma intain the goo d p in i n of others. "When ev r y Am e rica n citiz - n ha s r "s~ r ves lik th es he has non - "d t beg f rs " ~tal favo rs. All he asks of Jeg isla ti n is th at It k ep ou t ~£ h is way. I-1 d ma nd s no form of sp era! g uardian ship o r pro t ction . He can pay as h go s. Th e man who cannot has no rig ht to go. £ a ll forms of gre~d, the gn~ed for fr ee lun ch es the de s1re to ge t som e thin g for n othin g is the most demoralizing, a nd in the long run, most dange rou s. Th e fl ag of fr ee dom has never floated ove r a na ti o n of dead h ea d s . " ' 'Education mu st ta ke th e form of r ea l patriotism." Problems of gove rnme n t mu s t be settled rig ht, otherwise they conti nu e to rise until they are. T he fo u?de rs of this rep ublic in t~nded that the wrsest and b est should legts late . For a time this was th e case, but graduall y the lt·g islators have com e to r eprese nt th_e people in their business life-to act as th e tr a ttorneys. So long as th e legis lators a r e to rep rese nt the people, a greater ?uty d evolves upon th e people. . . . "Rig ht thinking has bee n yo ur pnvdege , right acti ng is now yo ur duty; and at no time in the history o f the wor h duty b een r i r tive tha n n ow ."

•t · Jt IS · n o t 111 . sp · k in c:r r f h 1~ ) . •that s w ~ en ·s co m ·s into t11 · m uth.- Tu, k - 'f l1 · f r f; 1n . th · w ·II s · ·s n t1I 111 . g f the . .:> · hl,"" h ~ ·as.- .Japan. . 1 , onlr 6. Th e pi ·asurc; f d in ,..., ~~· h<'0 d ~ ~ t l nc th at w ill n ot w ··tr u t. - _fa pa" ·

~ ~ fJ _ full

.

earl),

c1 ·iz ·cl 011 It l:t th' f wat or, and 1 he· 1L up d t O 1 . fa r m which is n t ·:q 0 sl ak 1 ~g r jarring- £r m th tr t. vt:t tef ~ · 1. nnkl c v r th s urfac ~ f th : . L,b· coattn g fl y pod ium I wd · r, a ' }1Ir tl,e s ta nce:, wh ich s m "t im s us d { r n be pur p.os s f th t il t a n l \ hi h cfh fl ol ta in ed at aim s t a n y 'ap Lh · ·tr y's. , der, upon th urfac of th is at in o· f P0 '· crhr, I · o trGI 1 • ~a -k 1\~ J th p wd r d ch arc a l, a _s ch s rfl

ag

ac rn e , say a n in c h or two 111 le ng th. . ,jell . j( ~\ H av rn c; m ade this li ttle bl ack mar f tile th e charcoa l powcl r o n th surfac o the co nte n ts of th e bowl, lay . dov~ n uponso f11,~ flo o r cl os . to th e bow l, a stic k or be eJ' ot h r ·strat g ht object so that i t s ha ll Ji fl e ac tly paral le l with th e m a rie If th~fl th e h ap~ e n_s t<? b e p a rall e l with a cr~cl~ jo cl1e flo oi or . w nh :::.n y s tationary ob] ec I' room thts w ill s e rve as we ll. - Gl fe 'e L eave th e bowl n ndi turbecl {ox f r\1 t ho tr , nd t\ l \r r h pos1ti .~ t r\l!\ bl ac\~ 111 R.r\ With l' f th ob)eC t ·t , r n s 1 '' a l at·a\l 1 ' t} ei}. It 'II ' 11. 1 . d fr0 J1l of. '

1 £ un I to h ve rnove. cti 00 rt11 to w. ·s ., tl1at 1,. t ~ a in that dtre f the ett pos.lt to t hat of the moveme nt 0 r~: WI ·

Eastern Proverb • I. E xperience is th e looking g lass of th e intellect. -Arab.

A

leamed man without practice is a cloud w ithout water. -Arab. 2.

3· To lo ok a t a plum

o n e's thirst.-China .

is n o t to qu e nch

on tts axis. Iviflg\; tl1e T~e e arth, in simply .re vo else ~(J t~e earned wate r and eve rythin g wd er 1eO b owl a r ou nd with it but th e po Iittl e·A\o 10 ~ ' · d a J'" o £ s.ur ac~ ha s b ee n" l eft b e h 111 p a vg g tlJe ltne wdl always b e found eo fec tl >'ed l from east to w e st w hi ch is p e r roo"fJ11 proof th a t e verytl1 in o- e ls e h3-~?19')

o~he r way.- Franlifibrt ( Ger'l'l1 . t-wnal Journal.

.

· A :=-; J:: w

Y EAR '

GREETI

· :R. Warre.n r j .- \ - re -conducte db e f-Fi:.· ott, Ka nsa . . - . th e enior class is large they ha e 1 cted th irte n of their number to repren t th Ia Th eses. X

L oca l s . ·c .

Th e centur · tlll mh ~ r f o ur o re year · Yo u fo rtr · · d in y o ur t ee n ' . T o '.rim ~ ;:Li a nn · lo · e v o ur e ar And, whil he d c v a ·t a t e·· y ur p eer , C o n cei v > n ot ;,-h a t he m e au . If e'er l ife win l r fi e k w•th n o w Y o ur h ai t·' · d p s had w ~d b w e r Th at wi u!;Om e h ad an art w o uld k uow To mak e it c h ann, and w ar it o A s 'tw e r e a w r a th of n w r .

How to Prove tile Earth's Motion·

rr,;r:: I<

II

THE ~ OR . fAi:. ··c oURIER.

0/?Jl,f/JL CO l RIER.

If to s u c h fa ri es y ars mt t- t come May yours fall s ft and 1 w A s , s h aken by a b ee ' lo w h um, Th e R o c -leav e w a \ er w eetl y d u mb , D o wn to th e ir mate's b e lo w!

- Lowell.

Misses Wri g ht a nd Ellis \" ill sp nd th 1r 'acation in Omah a . Miss Mo lli e T y no n is d evotin g he r tim e to th e study of mu s ic. Tov . 2 8, so m e of th e stude nts e njo yed a call from W. N. D e lze ll. ·

Rev. Sparlin _g-. of Omaha, spoke a t the '

l\1. E. Church D e c. 12th.

Mr. O'Connell was a Norm a l vi_sitor <?.fl Wedn 'e sday, . D ece ri1b e r 19. Miss Grace J o nes, of th e cl a ss of '93 is here visiting w ith Miss May Vv y ne. 'We have b ee n fa rin g very sumptuously of late in th e way of e nte rtainm e nts.

N. B. Whitfi e ld will s ell you g ree n or dry Wood in cord or rick at bed-rock prices. W. H. Sparling of th e Episopal diocese of Nebraska le d th e morning exercises D ec. 13. The first division of the trainin g class have finished their work in the practice departm e nt. . . Miss H e rrig le ft D ec . I 9th for h e r home in. Saginaw, Michigan,_ where sh e will spend th e holidays. . On the ·morni1'l g of . D e c·.

r 9 the cha.pel

nna Borst, member of the class ?f '9.:j., h accepted a position as teache r 111 th e \ a! ntin schoo ls. Th class in st ron om . closed its work · . class in advanced at Thank g 1· rng Ph ic take its place. Th Phil o's o-a\ e th eir open session D ec. 14· It is needl ess t~ say they had a large and appreciati e a udience. M r. Spe ncer, of the board of education , took charge of the senior cl ass in school ma nao·e ment on W edn esday. b

The fi rst year class will devote two we~k s of th e new year to the stud y of physics, th e n ch e mistry be ta ke n up.

""ill

J. E. S.tev~nson, D.D.S., will be ~n his Dental Rooms over Abbott s Druu Store every Tuesday. 0 Quite a number ef the students ar~ anti cipa tin o· atte ndin o- the State Teache rs Assob cia tionb at Lincoln durin g the I10 I'd 1 ay vacati o n. The Che mistry class will work in two divisi o ns as it it is so large- abo ut eighty. Th e advanced Chemistry comes th e spring te rm. Miss A o·nes Bagley bade the orma l good bye 0 rove mbe r 29, and to o k the train for California where she is to make h er hom e. D ec. 10 Willis Rogge again resum es his work after being abse nt since Tha nksgivin g. His brother Edwin will not re turn again this year. C~a1:cell?r Crook, of th e W esl ey.an U ni ve rstty, d elivered a lec ture "Betsy and I are Ou~, " to th e orma l students on th e eve nin g of Dec. I 3· It was of a more serious nat ure th a n th e subj ect wou ld suggest.


115

Dr

TI-lE NORMA.t. C

THE \ R 1 L C()URIER. OUR!ER.

a nd th

· Itte r, a mi ss io n f g-a ve an address o n · . a ry n>m I ndi a . miSSIOns D • h d · · a With him a n umb . ec. I I . e e r of cu n os wh ic h he xpl a in d.

Presi·

n Tu esday mornin D d g , ec. 18, th e s tud e nts lis t · . ne to a very p i g 1ve n by J udge S as mg addr ss boa rd of e ducat i o~e n c e r, a me mbe r of th

Ernest Lo ngf 11 ' a son of the great Poet ]1as a to 1<e n f f ' r m mb ra nce of h1•s ather, at h is hom in Ma no lia, whi ch ~o n ey can n ot buy. I t is noth in g more nor ess tha n ''A n O ld C l ck o n th e S tairs" r ade fa m o u s by hi s fath e r . T h e cl ock was orm e rl y o wn ed by Thomas Gold A p ple ton and C a~ h'IS d eath t h e hei rs, of whi ch on e was' claptau~ Nath a n Appleto n, t hinkin g th~ ock was of parti c ul a r valu e to Ernest Long fellow on acco un t of his fa th e r's con~ection with th e a ncie nt t im e piece donated It to a s o n of th e poet, so th a t it now ' adorns a nook in th e stairs of his h o use at Mag - · nolia.-Ex .

Prof. Boucher gave hi rec ital D ec s th It ~ reg ula r m rHh l y Q. 't · was, as usu a l, w II a tte nd ed . Ul e a nu mbe r from A b d R'row nvill e a ttend ed . u urn a n Mr. Mi shl e r was ca ll ed h . o me o n acco u n t s g ra nd m othe r ec. 14 H . 11 T~ W l I refturn a nd ~·esum e his wo rk in th~ · rma a te r vacation.

of th e dea th of hi

Mr. D . D_. Mil es left fo r his h o m e Dec. 1 4·

Mr. M il es has bee n su ff e n.ng fr o m a I .

rara ytiC Stroke, bu t hopes to be ab le tO return to school afte r vacati on.

w.

A joint sessio? of the Y. M. a nd Y. C. A. was held m Philo Hall .. Sunday D ec. ~ 6 · Messrs. J. J. King and P. M. White-

ead,. delega.tes to th e convention, gave a very mte restmg report.

r~~e stud e nts wer pi as .d to not the : nnhn fac s of the Mi sses wyn ., ·I Ill I·~c h~ J tnson : ones and illilcn on Thu · m rmng W l tscay b k. '\ are a Way glad to welcome Y u ac to your Alma Mater. L M_iss Morg an will visit her niece in St. f ou;s. ~h e remaining membe rs of the Cahc nu. tyt wlll h remain in Peru until · after shmas, t ey will the n attend th e State T eac e rs 'A ssoc1·ation at · Lin coln .

Exchanges.

..

·Je

Th 11 -- " otlts 1 oi th u o· g y 11 is un k no w n . .. e tllted States.-Ex . En·gl d ·3 per· . t... h undredanA has. no cdl ege PbltSP mencan colleges pu -

f 0 0

1\v,.

pa.r()e( · ~·

B :X.

~p

Th . of tl1e t~e . e library and manuscripts ed ~)' t onan B }135 il'f· · ~ncroft have been pure / P riJ U niverstt . Y o f Chicago for $8 o, ooO· o,CY.JiC, 00

The $1·15' ()v 17 f an mted States spends f )1 e( r t e f h . o , ufl' 1·~· The Ep ~orth League social aft e r having schnually I or t e mamtenance <~rJlo S()a. b ee n postponed f or so me time . ' was h eld at oos Th" . the~ r 'd th p e nde d. f Is ts more than 1t::Ih'; e res1 ence of M . ' ·1 rs. Pa ns a bout seve n Fran or that purpose by d ..___..} J%· 0 ~ m1 es south of t ' . , ce and Germ a ny combin e · 5v· .:t'lfeeF",o' De 8 eve nmg Th ow ~ , on Sa turday c.. · e eve nmg was fine and a pl easCornell N ba ve 5ucc :Ji'; ant tlme was re ported. point .' · Y., stude-nts 113 ve ·(Of jto ed · ' which few, if any others c.:pif1 -c~J) In s ec · · ·g a ee' -~" Th~ senior class began their la bors in the-- cipline un?g, by manife s tln 0101 itt _-cil• tl o ~:::t~~~e~choo{ D(c. 3· Since then they the S ' Which COnsistS of a cO catJ~.f~' te rest s pea~:~fou~ Y working and the ir ·in}tft11e or ttself . -counte- consi ' . fo r .on thelr Sttng Of fo-u r seniors, .thf'B

u ·

;7

t~dents' Self-Governrnefl~e

..

will of the people i.t is im portant that t.he r ia n- th e people-should possess mtell i e n~e. T he free school i the promoter of that intelligence. which is to preser e u as a free nation. If we are to 1ave a nothe r cont st in th e near fu ture of our national existence I predict that the di idi ng line ' ill not be Mason and Dixon's, but that betwee n patri otism and intelligence on the one side, sup€rstiti9n, ambition a nd ignorance on the other.

Genlus .and ·Talent. - .E MERSON .

1(5)ENIUS looks to the cause of.l ife; it ~ proceeds from within outward, whilst talent a oes tram without inward. T ale nt fir{ds it~ models and methods and ends in societ y, e xists for exhibition, and goes · to . the soul onl y for power to work. G enius is its own end, and draws its means, .and the . style ot its architecture froll! within, going '"C'~ abroad only for audience and specta tors, as 1be .Free Schools. we adapt our voice and phrase, to the distance, and character of the ear we speak to. GE N . GRAN T. All your learning of all literature, would never en-able you to anticipate one of the · a re public like ours, w h e r e the citizen is thoughts or expr~ssions, and .yet each is the so vere ig n a nd the official the servant na tural and .famili-ar as household words. where no powe r is ex e rcised e xcept by ·tl:te

IN


oo NOT FAIL

TO

•••

VISIT

TA B LI H E D

E

I

02

r a F RA K H . BERTH A J

8 10 Cen tral A ven u e,

PERU, N E BRASK A TABOR , I OWA , MACED ONI A , I OWA.

BEEDLE . . . . .. . . ... . . . ... . .. . . ... . E DI T OR

H

NEBRASI<A.

1VL D 1F. A G X£\\ B ' SIX E SS :l l AKA

J . J.

:EE US . . .. .

Successor to T. W. TOLMAN.

ER :

I. E .

KI NG ,

TANFORD .

u re r taff T erm :s of Sub scrlpclon:

O•tc copy , p e r sc h oo l y e a r . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . .... .. . .. S l. OO ing le cop ies , e ac h ..... : .. . .... . . . . . ...... . . .. . . . . . .15 • Al l subscri pti ons ar e co n sidered pe rm an ent unt il orde r ed discont i nu ed arreara g es paid . A ddres s a ll co mm u n ica t io ns to TH E NOR MA L CO URI ER

~ nd

f vLRICH FREDRICKSEN $ DER~RBLif\BLB FOOTWEAR Ladles' and Gents' f urnishina Goods, Knit Underwear and ttosieru. 8r) Central Ave. ai!Tiost opposite Goldberg's.

Our Prices are Guaranteed THE LOWEST.

M .~

. NEBRAS~A CITY.

MEARS,

~

~

~

~

R. R. DUTTER & SON,

~Do not fail to g t

yo ur

meals at this house.

EVERETT SOCIETY. Every Frid ay eve nin g durin g th e sch oo l t erm s. N ew stud ents ar e es EDWAR D CLUT Z, Pres. Peci all y i n vi ted to j oin us i n our l i ter ary work .

Y. M. C. A. President, P. M . Whiteh ead. Pres ide nt, Minnie VanN ostra n.

0

f tl1 cit}"

e

Correspond i ng Secretary , Oli v e Cri ffi th .

THE NORM A L MILITIA . PRo F. H . B . DU NCANSO N, od Li eut ena nt, C ommand er of C adets. STAFF. P.M. Wh i teh ead, First L ie utenan t a nd A c tin g Adjutant. J . J. Kin g , Capt.

J3aggageman.

Passenge rs h a uled t o a nd frolll a ll parts 'l'runk hauling a s pecialty.

Cor respondin g S ecret ary, R. C. Ord.

Y. W . C. A.

PETE R CAREY_, gjra~ man and

PHIL O M A THE A N . Society every Fri day eve nin g duri ng th e sc h oo l t er ms at 7 o'clock. All Stude nt s ar e cord ia l ly in v ited to j oi n us i n our lit era ry wor k, especia lly th ose of th e h ig h er course ~ OiVA JOH NSTON , Presi de nt.

LECT UR E BU R EAU. Org anized as a pe rm an ent in st itu t i on of th e sc h oo l. It is un der th e ausPices of t he Ph i lomath ea '.'· Evere tt, .W ellin g toni a n a nd Juni or s o ci. ~ ti es. Th e best lecturer s o f today w t ll be sec UJ ed . J. J. Ktn g , ch airm an; L ettt e M . L ott , secretary: A. J . N ea l, trea surer .

P ER U , NEB.

A llbUrll, Nebr.

S CHOO L DIRECTORY.

JUNIOR SOCIETY. Juni or soc i etv eve ry Frid ay ev enin g durin g sc hoo l y ear. Stud ents and CH AS. M ARS , Pres. fr ie nds ar e cor dia lly in v ited to v is it us.

LARGEST AND

H. M. MEftR8 Talmage House

Entered at t il e Pos t ofjice at Pe ru , Nebr., as Second Cla ss Mail Matter.

WELLINGTONIAN S OCIETY. Socie ty eve ry Frid ay eve nin g durin g th e sc h oo l v ear. All studen ts who Wish th e de v elop ment w hich ea rn es t l i terary wo rk a lone ca n g i ve are cordtally in v ited to vi sit us. H AR VEY ~ Alli S, Pres.

Lumber, Coal a n d Wood, B rick, Lime, Cement, Hardware. TilE !JEST STOCK OF Genera l MerchatJdise.

~

Proprietors.

~

WI L L CARLE T01 •

T

M AE V A:-i VL EET , L roA M AIKA , M r::-1 ::\IE \ ANN O TR A N

J ®I ®ooJJ ~OL~LLAI®

Branch Gal/erie~ at _ _ _

No. 6

A SO TA TF. t::D I'l' R :

L.

AND

atourit~. Coasting Down the Hill.

. . to Please our· Customets, and allow none to go away Dissatisfied

. CAL L

OF '93 .

VOL. l II.

We take Special Paf/7 8

OITY,

CL.4S~

8Tf\ T5 NORMf\L 8Gfi OO L.

FOfi THf, FINEST f'HOTOGRRF'HS fll.,~ SIZES RND STYLES

H.

BY TH E

IN FANTRY-CO MP ANY A. Hu g h Joy , od Lieut . Ch as. Tuck er, r st Serg ent.

COMPANY B. 0 . M . G ood , rs t ·L i eut. Sr. N eal W y ne, r s t Li ent. , Jr. L . A. Ch ase•.rst Ser g . and Actin g ond L i eut. S:t rrl J . Stortn, rst Ser g. ·

Ther ' a tr lory in t he s peedin g of a hor se that nerves a u f ee l, O r t he wift a nd s ilen t m agic of a peda l-has tened wh eel; Or the r u hing a nd t h e f oami ng t h a t th e fl yi ng yachts po ess, Or the wa ying of t he pilot of a limited express; But t here ' n a ug ht to stir t he sens es, a nd ther e's nothing e ver will , L ike t he sta r r y winter eve nings wh en we coas ted down the h illDown the long a nd s lipper y hillA nd the st eep a nd g la rin g hillWith t h e clinging , and th e shriek in g , a nd t he l a ug hin g h oarse an d shrill! F a r a bove the p a llid valley , hung- the moon , so safe and hig hLike a b a ll oi ice it g littered in a fr ozen sea of sk y ; And the trees were dressed in silver, a nd the bushes stood a g low, And a million jewels nestled on th e bosom of the snow. Bnt the eyes that we w ere w atching , they were beaming brighter s till , As w e packed our load together to go coasting down the hill' Down the s nowy, icy hillAnd the long and d izzy hillWith th e sh outing a nd the c a lling , a nd the dange r of a "spill." With a mile of road before us like a polished blade agleam, On the ready tra ck we stated, in a short delicious dream. Through the f e nces, past the bridges, over " thank - e~ m a'am s" t o sp a re, y Le a~in g :rom them hke a p a nth er , in the cris p and bitmg atr; Past the still and lonely school-house , a nd the f ros t -en. fettered mtll, Thinking naught about the stopp'mg- w1' th a 1aug h d.t • every 111Down the ne'er forg otten hillAnd the white and g lowin g billJust a s tre a k of huma n lightnin down the hill ! g, we w ent flashin g d h A n d a m id the rush an c a tter, there wer e pressures of the hand,


THE .\ 'ON lJ L COURIER.

fl 8

THE NORMA L

That the bra in, amid its fre nzy , left t he hea rt o uo d rs tand; Th ere were confid e n tial clio g-in gs, t hat would n v r I ': beatowed, On a str~i?ht, pros aic journ ey, and a s tri ct ly 1 ·v 1 r ;~d Often spmt reached for s piri t , and w uld o cv r c ;].<; •, until With a pang of joy it cla sp ed it, in t h a t j o urney th e hillDown t he swiftly travelled hillAnd t he love·ill umin ecl hillWh en a life's divines t sec re t w as di sc v r d

by ~~

(J

wn

hr ill !

There we re m a ide ns in tl1 e party, that t -d ay a r MO h e r wivesAlso lads at present livi ng very pro pe r 1 us ines<> liv e<>; Th e re were some that now a lready , pay th n c' r e v a d ed de bt; Bu t t he re spirits co uld n ot pe ri s h- th ey a re s tn living yet.

wh,..r~

Wh ee we find th e m, I will warrant t h at their m m o ri cs quickly fill Wi t h the good old winte r ev e nin g s wh e n they coast d down the hillDown the cold and fros ty hillDown the warm a nd g leam in g hillWh ere we re born a h ost of pleas ures t h at a death can neve r kill!

Random Shots .

BY IRA E. STANFORD .

fM EBRASKA is n ot an old state, for' ; .\\ \ Pl lrememberth et' w ~h 1 ) , e l

OURIER.

our wa! as l)j](L \ <· I ugh Thert n hr ug-h sw.trn p: ;u ~ ( I up L 1 ~ , ravinc;s in 1Hir...,rnr ()f <'< \ • <·U pr . · 1 ,,ere . I' I t .t·-;. ''·I1r ... tit "'··se anuna br ' ''. wC;:r · c :nun ' 1. IH'd the 1 wont L fc ·t· d: whr·n ,,.,. ;q P' n< f the f th · kn Jll which r·<·l rps t· I 11 father favor ite g-ra1.ing pb('(·-; I rom our< yc ·u t a· w uld sav. " \\ <: mtr st c ra\\'1 11 ' 1dJcro on s ly ly as p;>ssild<·. ·· I n\rn '''< '. w u th . tnP· all f Jllrs. ;111<l slo\\'1~· :u h·an cL / kih· find wlwr · wr· mi•rhl p ·< ·p ,,·c r nnd u 'fa ther ,..., · T · th J1 d . a IJLI c k r cl o (' 1n s IH r L 1.. 1 n g · <1 11 w rrlc.l lraw th · I cc tl w ith st tdy 1ne l rd·forth n s oon e r had th o ld weapo n bC' 11 bLl~ ~ a c Io u I of smo l· · tha n Iown '' ll11 t .11 rn odtC. to hi s kn<:C's. then \\'ith a f ·w 51c.l ,,,,JI} O'~ . · h ·s h · w ulc I (a II l ll I c c art h an d no t w1t [ i n hi s

wn

I I o I.

Of

· ur:->

11 yoLl 11g 1 tl _t , ], a..Y

cl sc rib e th e ex it m e nt f 1 o. c· hunt rs . 13ut tim · we nt o n ( a s had ~e do . s) a nd w h n th e y u~ g .o-a m st ~roads! t· gu 1r I s kill n 1g h to 1 1 r ~ t h frorn ash~)' of a ba rn wit h two ot· t h r e s h-o ts o· ht th 0 g un. th y o- r w o ti s t ic and tbO Uo ts ~~ 1 ~ .. w r capab l f roa ming t h fa res o~ fll e . . ss as P 1a tn s With as g rea t succ ct B oo n -. to dete e( 11 _Fath e r 's quick e y e vvas n ot slo~d pro\11 e th1 s se lf- s tee m so o n e da v h e t nd at 't5 Dock a nd m · w' mi rrht tr~ o ut- h a f s 111·o· 1d \ . , r dJl (I I!!

·

h.'\ ·,y 1

v \t'

\ .1·

pr

' h \ 1; h -'th5t~l1 0

l)cHe

l

1 11 otw

t1jd

s\1°

Btltd o 1 .e wen 1t~ 0 fl ·o

whO

arl y h a d a q uarr e l to ·seee \V n "' ,,, \ e -bee r m th pra iri s constitut d ur fcarrI y th -' '·gun) a nd 1·:tway-d 0 ur nr 85 o( at 1e r ha v m g ove r 1ea r 5 5 oO t\\ro e~( hill -of-fa!·e. So, as y u ca n eas ily see , an

to-d<Jt . W, aptn ess

•\

,

1

l

L

nJ

15

n-ham and

th ma nipul ation of th e Winchester and th e Needle g un were e~se ntial to the prolongation of o n e's ex is te n ce. Not alon e for th e purpose of providing for th e physical want s, but for prote ction, as these then a rid plains abo und e d with a ll manner of four-footed beasts. Great herds of bison, e lk, antelope, d~e r, etc., co.uld be seen basking- in th e s unl1ght or graz111g on most a ny hill side by day. but one's sleeping hours we re mad e hid e ous by the prowling about of nocturnal carnivorates. or by the ye lping hilarity of coyotes in th e_ir attempt to re lieve one of further tro ubl e, 111 carin g for his cal ves or pigs. So, with 1n

Historic Reflections.

fathr~r

We n

thou o·ht h e would follow. a About t fl J5· werec quite out of si o- ht. f thiclceel~e~ttle 1 t1ree mil· es away was at::> so t·t 10e rrJ. 0 w0 d fjl tl 1& th e Platte riv e r ca ll e d t1·c1 oes a 5 o .ll1 Th ' d 0 0 eS av:J,,t . 1 e y w e r e principally s1an oeab le 11 1te (jllq0( Is ands form e d by th e c 1ant:> -e qu f <II t , th e riv e r chann e l · th e se we rovvth ~in11~~J)j)J and cove red w ith 'a n un d e r-o-r t::>de d 5 tr"'edv w~v 1·c and cottonwood vVe h ea e nte: 11 a.L JO~J th e Tow e h e ads. but h a d 11 0 ~ ]1 tt 1'J1 ~J' ~ol'~c pac e s, when a sort of a g r~trTl un 110 1 vife)Jc; e n o rmou s ears , hopp e d fr t uP tt. tJ~ 0 t of gave a few le aps, th e n sa rised·'0; at~ aro und as if somewhat sL:rPI a., rge · a..J'l th drsc 1 ur1• .e g un; a voll e y was th e g stdl sat th e re. Dock wok

5

· H. R E\

LLI::-.1

Principal Ha rlitl,,o-folt Public

A. B.

Chools .

PAPER I.

@fHtE

lif of a nation is analoo-ou th life of an indi, idual. lik th ) pa thr u ·h crise · are strength ned b · ,.i t ri ach i v d or retarded b failur · uff r d a nd mi tak s mad e. s th ) uth wh o ha ·one out into the ' orld to pro\ hi indi, idual xist nee. is "' ont, to r a ll th h m fireside and as that hom e ha b n pi a ant o r frui tfu l of " elfare to i\Th 11 I think f it ~ , . h. w 1t If, in u h a dea ree , ill these re minV f rn )' ca rl) - xp - n n 111 th rmal i nc becom landma rks of life; so . it is .0 1. n ...,0' Sc h· o I, '' 'fme·aln I h rI I w uld · p ur , ll e )r \\'ith t h stude nt of history. ! G r vo ll e y Into t 1 cas . '~ hd th y ' ou ld \ ith a 'i id imao·ination he tak es his afte 1 re a nd gaze at m 111 bl a nk a maze- stand_, upon so me spot which has rr:arked l f . . . it t l C s Th e n 10w m o rtt y m · 1t 1s to b the proo-ress of a nation, \\ hil e a. review of m n"td into a p~ivat Office by a critic . that nation's deeds, crises, and e mment me n calle _ a nd whtl a pl asa nt smile steals pass rapidly befor e him. . In imag ination take yo ur stand With ateac~1 ~~r face a nd h e r h a rt goes out with ove\ kindn es s a nd sy mpat hy a humanso ul poleon , under fhe shadO \\ of the Great ~II n)ea bl e of possess ing . s h e lays h e r hand P yramid, at Gizeh, and as h e inspires his ''F.orty IS ca[ ur s h ou ld e r a nd after addressino- troops with the lac onic speech. up o n Y~•My D ear Fri e nd " she procee ds a~ centuries are looking down upon you from ~ou as . , . Don 't you knovv you mttst 10\ve r those h eio·hts !" At once there flashes up on follows. b . 1 _ 1, ·111 d • siahts, eca use you are e nt1re y yow mind the meaning of th ese :'forty cen1 t::> 1 " ou Y _ hoot 1n g yo ut c ass. turies. " D) nast y after dynasty 1s recalled ove rs . l. 1 f . . as we t 11n < o 1t. how pat nar- to your memory, with the narn es of Menu~, TJ1en aaaJil ~ . d . . 1 f th e oraanizer and Kufut, the pyram1d 1 tl1 e state IS to r e n e r 1t posstb e or builder,0 uncle; whom the t oiling milli on~ cha ung m a rksm a n (not necessarily a suffered from cruel taskmas te rs. Thu s yobefore e ncounte rin oa a herd of voun~ the s ort) ~ early in the v~orld's history inaugurat~ng l P 1 to b e und e r th e dire ct observation of th e struaale betwee n P a trician and Plebian, JUC <S . 1'm e h'1m m . bb _ t ' ni zin a eye , t h at can d'tsc1p a SCI Ll 1 t::> · C h · h '11 betwee n capital and labor. th e manipulation o . t e sights, so . e w1 Th e ro yal Ram ess, First and Second, VI or VIII . w1th th e · · not b e uc.1 rin oa at Group and S ebi first with their architec · 1 t at th e S e mor n otch. Agam 111 our tural achievements w ill d emand n otic e; but SI<.;:,T l S of d ee pe st m e d'1ta t10n, . that o ld t h oug ht as the striking h ead la nds, only, of a shore J1ours of R obert Burns com e s to us: line, arrest the attention of ·the observer, so we pass hastily ov er th e inte rv e ning dynas "Oh if some powe r were giftie gie u s , To see (and hear) o urse lves as ot h ers see us. " ties, pa using under the Shepherd Kings to see the Isrea lites seek here a refuge from famine. Four centures la te r we behold this chosen people led by Moses, cross the dry H a nd in your subscript ions to the NoRMAL bed of the R ed sea, folluwed b y the hosts CouRIER. of the Pharoah ''who knew not Joseph. "


!20

THE NOR!I1A!_

f The tru e stude nt of hi s to ry will not l bor co nqu es ts o r po liti ca l r vo lu tiol1s a l

k 11 •

b ut see k for those ,a r·t so f peac - , tlnt ha v<.: eco me ~ l egacy to poste~; i ry or, have ertEd an, mflu e nc o n th e wo rl d's gr wth . l'd S. co ll oss1. a n l sp hi n;.; . g1' '{J t s py ram sr1 nt t h f f . ., th wa. c ~ rs o orty centu n es, t -·J l n t c f f ~ ~eR 111111 ng of he r civilizat i 11 but [ ~ Y eve lop d sc ience. art a nd c ns tru c tlo~ hard ly su rpassed by th laps of ag ·s. ~rom he ~, G~ec i.a n p hil so p he rs r -·c i v J th err e~rl y .rn sp lratJon; from he r, A rst tl ·, r "ad h1s pnm er of sc ie nce ; fr o m th - t m bs ~f th Ph a roa ~ s, th V netio n g lass bl we rs and th I ta l1 a n paint rs have ace pt d wo rth y ri va ls. Indeed the S phin x's riddl e has a l r ad y been read a nd P ythago ras, ew to n, Ca lli leo, Keple r, Proc to r. a nd Kirk wood hav , in turn, paid homage to he r shrin e. !h e ~tud e nt of G rec ia n H ist o r y h as but to 1magme him se lf stand in g o n th e ''Ac ropolis" and a panora ma of eve nts passe s before his view. The sce ne towa rd s th e north east is th e plain of Marathon: Th e li ste ning ea r ca n aJmost hear the war pean of Milti ad es a nd hr s ten thousand Gree ks as th ey charge upon the one hundred a nd twenty th o usa nd P e r sians and dri ve th em with grea t s la ug hte r to their ships. F a rth e r to th e n o rth on e ca n distinctly read from th e monum e nt a t The rmopy lae ' 'S tra n<Te r te ll t he L ace d ae' o d' to monians that we lay h ere in obe 1e n ce their orders." A ga in almo st und er th e shadow of the Acropolis: J

A king sat e on a rocky brow. . Which looks o'er se a born Sala.mts And Ships by thousands l ay b e lo~ 1 And men in nations-all we re hts . He co unted them at break of d ay ?" And when the s un set, w here were they.

brave Grt h om th 'i r '' all '' here de trro e t e 'l c\ N r~ thus re fro m and effeminenqr; r ' - · d v tage for the c?ming gen 1' tt n f men. From our vrew .on the Acropolis we be The

T

hold Athe ns rebud<.l cd. Fro m the theate r below w~ hear the appla use of the multitude as they !tsten to the tragedies of Aeschylus,

THE VOR WAL COURIER.

ro ;;, ! £/,'

sf

f. hn.c l -·s a nd E u ripid (·S a nd th . m di 5 I'I St '. ' -f l . . 0p 1lll ·s. JJ ,'I'!' \\·,· ~; lll th • 1.u O}• · t ·Jllt l) <·ars o f <'11 1HI 1·a ·m . . 1 ll C\·- .lJ cl ·s· I ·ns ~s h · J1s .. 1 • • . • f ·J ·~ 11 u t th · i llJJ nlta l )l • na rrati 011 . t H~ f ~ th e r o f I I is t n ·. H <' r w an 1 s t1 1I 1n 1111.1. f Jna · tJ· < 11, r co,r h e,, ni~. · th · c f t h , (j n : ·•PI ' JI.. . ,..., na f t .1 11 11p 1cs " a nd '' r ~ h J ·f of ora to rs :\ c· a r I y, .on t 1lal mcm ·· ral 1 night f 9 I )>• · 1 ar. ' \\. • I ISt ' 11 t lh ' tln 'tJl S\\' Cretb gum nt fo r t h . ' f I so ul, f r >m t h '_ J' . I 111 m n a I it)' t1 h.. Ip s fth · g r ' at' s tof r ·t an tGl , I s. c ra t ·s . . I ' r} r c l· I . . n ·a r ·r t us y ·t n t 1 d t l ~ t lat .h Ids us a bov . th , p la in , stan . cre n 1e 1111 p ·n s h - 1 1 · h t m num nt of r c1an _ Ius, t Panh . n un 11 n, ri va l ·d b f fa ult! 'SS d 1g ' ur· pas s I ~auty and a d rn d \\·ith u~di3S . I l c sc.u ptur Ir m t h - chi s 1 of Phi a nc roxne le s T' . thiS Im e a nd spac fo ri icl us to pursu e uJ' cou ntry's ) r a_ k tha t of I ho::;, ress furth r o r to ta e ,y a n o t r tl 1 . I we ;11" do in som f ' 1 C a tt r of w h1 c 1 e uture pa p e r. 0

Macaulay. / ] • l\I.

::. ·.: .

!2I

color d d scr ipt i co ntrO\ ers y ' hich he was ~e.~ t~ . .e_spouse. was fou n I n. H , a not ao d at dra ' ing or xplaining I . m eone oqu e nc . r .o·l a m1n . . I . I . I mpl x haracters. H e 10\;ed, . indeed to a ntJt 1 1 , w 11 1 at 1 nt Its ·If t ·ita ti 11 ·tnd r p ti ti n. picture cotrad ictor and pa radoxical characothin o- de li hted hin1 more than to . c u ld ha. ,· fa1'I d ' t c n- t r . veot ·o n \V ru f It thr \\ off an ~nimated description of S<?me y Its m a ni11 o-. 'i 'h e wh I t d ut in an atmo I h 1I . . p r o n \\ ho ha ing been shO\ n in t~ . fir~t of . . c. ar bn cr ht an 111 apab l 111 1 t Y d lu s 1 11 a tint f a w i I a k in in tance to po sess one set of qualrt1es m su mm e r N I d . xtr me p romin e nce, " as shown to ha e a · 1a c r fa1nt h z f do ubt a et of exactly a ntao·onistic qual iti es in /Fea red a n Y\ h r . Th ad mir r of i\ Iacb . quit eq ua l prominence. This ' as not deu ay had a ll th e mf rt in hi tudi that scribin~=; a compl ex character. It" as mere1a votary f t l1 R m a n a th li chur h ma It was to m bod y in ~:r a parade~. 1a ve. H h ad a n infallibl uid . H e had ] • 'solder cl ose" as Timon of thens, says, n.o nee d to .' x him s If \\'ith d ubt p cula''impossi biliti es a nd make them kis.s. " c n t ·rl . . tlo n o r abo _ _J_ c .ur 11 ab Jut c . rta1nt Th ere ' as something too much of a tnck ut eve ry t hm · wa , bey nd question one ~rea t sou rc of lVIacau la) s popu la rity. about this, alth ouo-h this ' ·as often done hat reso lute co n iction \\ hi ch read e r of a , ith so much po\v~r as to bewilder· the bet111 .ore inte l.l ctu a l c las s a re sp cia ll y in - ter judgme nt of the calmes t re~der.. B~t clin ed to distrust has th e a me cha rm for , h re Macaulay happe ned to be nght 111 hrs th e o rdin a ry re ade r, tha t it has for childre n, vi e \\ of a man or an event, he made ·his who ne ve r ca re to h ear a ny story if the convictions clear ·w ith an impressiveness narra t o r do e s not kn ow a ll abo ut itin ·such a and a brilliancy such as no modern writer has surpassed. Th e world owes him some~va Y as to re nd e r q uP.stion or co ntradiction thing for having protested by precept and Imp ossible. But althouo-h this wa s one of example against the abslll:d notl?n , t.hat the the ca us es of Macaulay'; popularity, it "as ' ·dignity of history" required histonans to 1:ot th e most substantial cause. The brilha n~y .of his styl e, the va riety and aptness . be oTave, pompous and dull. He was not of his dlustrations, and the animated man- a Gibbon, but he wrote with all Gibbon 's ne r in which he contrive d to set his id eas of d elio-ht in the picturesquen ess of a subject, 0 men, place s and events before th e reader- and Gibbon's resolve to fascinate as we ll as Macaulay's histor y th ese were among- th e source s of success to instruct his readers. tri es tqo much to be an historical portrait which his admirers must look with the g reates t satisfaction. It is of late some- gallery. Th e dam ages of such a style do what th e fas hion to dispa rao-e Macaul ey. not need, to be pointed out. They are amHe was a popular idol so long that in the ply illustrated in Macaulay's sparkling pages natural course of things it has come to him but it is something to know that their splento have his title to worship, or even to did qualities are far more conspicuous than faith, very generally qu e stioned. To be their defects. Perhaps very recent read ers unreasonably admired by one generation is of history may fee l disposed to be g rateful to Macaulay for having written without any 1o incur th e certainty of b e ing unreasonably disparage d by the n ex t. The tendency of profound philosophical theory to ex pound He told history like a story. He warmed late is to assume that b ecause Macaulay was ~ ~l h e we~1t along , and g re w enamored brillia nt h e mu s t n e eessa rily by ~up rfi · a s a 1 ·om n u~t d 1 f t hi s ch a racter and H e was dogmatic; he was full of prejud ice; fr ehe was in all respects a b e tte r advocate than angry with that other. No doubt judge. He was -wantin cr in the calm impar- qu e ntly thus did harm to the trustworthitial balancing faculty, wl1ich a historian of n~ss o~ his nan·tive, where it had to d eal th e hig hest class ought to have, but he was with disputed questions, although he probanot superficial. No man could make out a bly enhanced th e charm of his animated better and stronger case fnr any side of a style. But he did not set . out with a missio n

he


122

THE NORMAL COURIE R .

to expo und some th eory · as · to a race r a tendency, and therefore pledg d b for hand to bend all fac ts of the ph vsica l, the political and moral wo rl d to th.e duty of bearing witn ess for him, and proclaiming the truth of his messag e to mank ind . Macaulay was not exactly what the G rHe mans wo uld call a many sided man. neve r was an ything bu t the one Macaula y in all that he did or attempted. Bu t he did a g reat many things well. othin g- tl1at he eve r attemiJ ted was done bad !y. H e was as successful in th e composition of ap r tty valentine for a little g irl as he was in hi s history his essays, '~ Lays of Ancient R ome, " ~ n d his parliamentary speeches. In eve ryth 1ng he attempted he went ve ry near to that suc cess whic h true geniu s achieves. I_n everything he fell just short of that ac h1ev me nt. But he so nearly attained it th at the reader who tak es up one of Macaul ay's 1J OO J<S or speeches for th e first time is almos t sure to believe, under the influ e nce of the i_n stal: t impression that the g enuine in spira tw n f 1 ~ there. Macaulay is und erstood to have ·01 a long time thoug ht of writinQ" a romanlce.t If he had done so we may "feel sul.e . tl ad· ' many intelligent reader would 11a ve 1Je !J eve . t11at Jt· was almfi ost on the first perusal of It _t . Is on a level with Scott, an d on1Y as the ame impression gradually fad ed, a nd ~h e y t c that to read it ove r ag ain, have foun cfi ~ u any .r Macaulay was not a Sc ott in ctJon 0 · e10 qu ence, more than he was a Burke 111 loner a Gibbon in history. H e fill ed. for. ad tha·~ . · t.he publi time a 1arge r space 111 I c dm111and his men any other literary man: 111 Eng ~n ' ff d litera ry style of writing greatly a ~ cte I do wn' but his influence did not p1 erce deep ~hat of into public feeling and thoug ht, as period one or two oth~r men of the ~~~m e H e did undoubtedly d1d and does stl -iish feeling not impress the ve ry soul of En g as Ca1lyle has done. ~~

. J ry was the secon~ week m anua he students

As the week of prayer m the churches, .t eting· 'oined in the services and a unw n me .

~as h.eld in chapel· vVednesday-,

January 9·

"

THE

An E vening With Dlc/{ens . f'!1AIU, H I CK\\ '

OU.

H ig h t, in t h e lll i(!<,t f va a t i \ Vh _n o f o u r c y u ca n d asc, A n d p la n dai ly !>O nt n w r , 1Vith n o I '!:>!>O il S t b o t h ·r 1 h r c ca n1 c on ld d ay in J) u r t·c~tl cs -. , prog-rc :-.o., i v c .\l i:-.::. E \ Vh o ~>aid, i f I ri g h t ly I' C ll l ' ll lb C r, T h at s h e t h o t1g h t ::. h e 'd j u o., t a :-. k a n d s _c , I f I w U(d n 't w rit · S0 1n c v ·r.-.cs F o r fir~:. t prog r a m . · i ·t y n ig- h t , An <! s h 'd o tfn t it a III CJ n g- II r 1n r ic~ If I d id n ' t fa il o u tri g h t . I a s k e d h ·r i111 a g in h w m e k ly, \Vh at ~:> u b j ·c t ~:> h t h o u g h t w n ld be b e t ; A n d s h e s aid , " J n t ta l< wh a t y o ur ,~·a n t to, Wh at yo u lea v e w i ll d o f ort h r es t. " \ Vit h t hi s r <Lt h c r i n d fin ite 11 tio n f w hat r w as xpe cte d t o do O ve r la n d o r IILi d e r t h e oce a n , O r w h ic h , o r w h a t o r w lt o I s p e n t 111 y t i m e r e ca lli n g E ac h s t o r y I ' d e v e r 1·e ad Of t fi at E n g- li .-; IJ a u t h o r D i k e n ·, U n ti l I w a s w c llni g- h d ead. Th e n d r o p pin g- p e n c il a n d pap e r , I tum b le d a ll i n a h ea p , I w a s .·o t i r ed o f t hi nk in g-, A nd p e rh a p · I f e ll a s le e p. N o w , wh a t f o ll ow s , cl ea r f e ll o w Philos B e li e v e m e o r n ot, a s y o u will, But s tr a n g e r thin g-s h av e h a pp e n e d, And go o n h a ppe ni n g s ti ll. N o w soo n , t o b e p a rti c ul a r, I a w o k e with a n e r v o u s s ta r t 'W ith h a i r t owa r d th e p e r p e n dicu l a r, And a l o u d ly b e a tin g h ear t . I s a w a s t r a n ge o ld w o m a n \ Vit h a b ig w o od e n s p oo n iu h e r h a.nd, With a bas in of brims t o n e . a nd tre a cle P r e p a r e d to s uppl y th e demand . I s a t th e r e gaz in g a nd tre mblin g ' Sh a kin g w ith chillin g f e a r s F o r b e lieve m e , incre d;tl o u s P~1ilos , 'Twas ge nuin e o ld Mrs . Squ e e rs! I s hut my tee t h d own firml y , A nd s h o ute d in acce n t s b old "Yo u w o n t put th a t s tuff d o wn m e , 1c1!' ' . If y ou w a it tlll yo u ' r e a t h ou sand ye a r s o Sh e van1s · h e d , a nd I breat h e d m o r e fr eelY• A nd s at quite s till f o r aw hiie And th o' t o f th e dr e a dful d oses A nd puni s hm e nts on th e s a m e s t yl e , Th os e p oor wr t c h e cl b oy s in t h e s to r Y

R eive<1 a t Dot h b oy I all, . A11 d I f c1t It! · h o k in g t h e q u e e r se r And g lti n g· tid o f t h e m a ll.

-And Wh-il 1 -~at tl1 ere -doz ing f

. ORMAL CO URIER.

T h ink in g of t h i t hin g and t h a I hea rd a tt·im l ittl f t >. lc i , Cou1 e p it a -p a t , p at . p a t , pat . A n d t h e n a h c a ,· i r f ot s t cp Th at m o v d a t a g r a \' Cr p ace . A nd a l l of a u d d 11 b e i lc m e 111 ile d a wi11 so m c ly :.w c ct c hil d f a ce. Oh , if I co ul d 11l y d ~ t· ib c i t . · a c h 11 c f y o u -ce , A nd m a k Th at wodc rfttl v 1, i 11 of b eau t y As it th e n a ppea r e d t m e ! A Ch ild i ·It f o n11 · 1 n dc t·, A child is h f a ce so fn. i t· A loo k s ·w ec t a n d t 11 d' r, S uc h wavi n g go ld n h a ir. uc h tiny l itt le fi n g-e r Ci a pi n g t h e w r in ld d han d Of th e age d m a n b e ide h e r S o n c ar ru e did t h ey ta nd T h at I c o u ld s ec t he loy e li g h t S h in c h o m t h e p a tic 11 t ey es , An d h is la b o t·c cl b r e at h in g , Th a t so u 11 cl e d so IIIll Ch l ik e s ig h s . T he n t h e y m o ,·ccl s lo wl y o u wa rd , St ill l.J o un cl wit h a lo v i n g c la p, I·L r d ai nt y s u ow -w h ite fi n g e r s H e ld c lo s e i n h is t r e m b l in g g r as p . nu t ju .;;t w h e n di appear i n g I h e a r d, l ik e a s il v e r b e ll , H e l' voi ce , t h e n I kn e w of a s ure ty ' Tw as g r andfa th e r and l ittle N e ll. Th ey h ad s car ce ly le f t m y p r ese nce W h e n a m an, wh o m yo u w ell k n ow W a lke d u p t o m y s tud y t a ble , W i th.~ s hu ffl in g s t e p s a nd s lo w , And t a k in g a s h eet of p a p er, Th e p ape t· r e r11 e mb e r was mine , H e t ook a p e n a nd proce e d e d T o wr it e a v a l e nti n e . I w a t c h ed him aw hile in s ile nce H e was s uch a curiou s f e llow, Whe n t h e s ta r tling tru t h d a w n ed upon me T h e s t a n ge r was yo u n g S a mm y Weller! I s ly ly p e eped ov e r his s h o ulde r I w a t c h e d hi s awk w a rd p e n W r ite " Y o ur love s ick Pickwick ," then be vanished An d I was alo n e a gain. N ow th e day s e e m e d g radu a lly darkning, A child's cot s to od in th e room The ray s · o f th e s e tting s un s hone in And brig ht e n e d th e g a th e rin g g loom . The s m a ll ch ild is h f a ce on th e pillow, Th ose g r e a t wide e y es , I kn o w. 1' h ose p oo r little h a n d s so s le nde r, Wh a t w o r k c o uld th ey e v er do ! I s aw t h e go ld e n s u n l ig h t d :1n ce L ik e w a t e t· o n th e w a ll. An d r' k n e w it c o uld b e no oth er · 'l' h ~ n p oo r l it tle d y in g P a ul. I w a t ch e d a s Floy cam e t o him, _ . _ .·. E.i.s~ anu.s..w.e-r e r o und. h e r throw.u, . ._

· I2J

A n d h e h ow s h e loved her brother , \\ a fo n d ly c la ped in h er._own t The old n u rse t ood b e ide h tnl And wep t at h is last good by e. . \. n d h is fat her , wh o real.ly loved h tmd, D a h d t he t ears f rom h .1 • 0 w u prou eye. nd I h ea rd th e surg ing n ver A nd th o' t wit h P a u l t h a t day. Th at s oon t h e cold dark b illows, W ou ld b ear t h e s ou l a w ay . T h e r oom g r ew d ar k er an d darker. And t he v i io n van ished fr? m stght B u t an ot h er carne to r epl ace tt . And t he r oom was filled with hg~t. But w h a t ,~ a s t h e so urce o f t he. r a dtance, I won de r ed with vag ue surpnse If Ute light t hat shown so brig h tly Could come from those rou nd r ed eyes. F or t h e fi gure th a t s t ood b efore me Did h a ve Ule m ost curious loo ~ , . B u t yo u h ave all re ad the descnptlO~ I n Dicken 's most w idely r ead book. . ey es , I 'm sure you reme m b er , H ts "\'iTer e r ed as the setting s un , 'stance And they g azed with such s t e alt:~:erst Th a t I Know I should w a nt to His hair was peculia r in color. B t perhaps about that th e lea~t sald . Willu be recetved best b y som e Phtlsos So suffice it to say, !twas . re~. And then his long , lean , wnthmg body. H ' cold clumsy hands and lon g armsBu/~twould give you the night~are If I should go on describing hts charms I'm sure if I think of him longer I'll not be a ble to sleep. Th oug h I know, be he eve r so ' umble. There's no one jus t like Mr. H eep . Well, I bade f ar ewell to Uriah , And I'll do the s ame to y ou For I'm sure you' re w ear y listening And will b e glad when I say I'm through.

From the Furrow to the Crown. A paper gt· ven b efore the faculty and graduating S t f S classes h of the State Normal by Prof. Re es e , up · o c ools, F a lls City, N ebr.

that a poor man while cultivating IT hisis said garden, kicked a ragged, ugly clod, one piece of which rolled out on the ~Tass. He picked it up to throw at some. chickens when he noticed something peculiar about it. He picked the dirt off carelessly, but _ becoming more and more . interested he


1 24

THE

THE NO NMAL COURIER.

washed the lum and . b,-:au ty a nd b ·11 · p was s urpn sed at its n Ja ney He t k . dary, who found tl . . o Jt to a lap iands of dolla rs, 11:\/t was w : th th usplaced in the quee , ~s cut, p oli sh d, a nd A . . n s c1o wn . mtnt ster on ce narra t d I . urged h1's . . e t liS s t ry and co ng Jega tJOn t f II the obscu re furr o'Ws f ]'fo fc a re u y e~am in e 0 1 e or h um a n J w Is. After the se rm on ma ny of h ' . were mor b. . I S co ngr gat1on e. o se rvtn<::.> a nd cha ritab l Tl no 1onge r Judged pe 1 b . 1 y endeavore d to fi d .0 P e . '( th e ir dress, b ut sou l n ment In v ry hum a n beggin ~er ~~al th y man fo und a yo un g g ir l d g . ad . he was ragg d d ir ty a n. repu lsive , but he ta lked with h , r a nd sec urd~ d her a good home wh re cl a n su r roun mgs· a nd f li.·en d ly a1'd gav he r ne w 'd 1 ~as of life. She a tte nd ed t he pu b lic s~ oo ls and the n was se nt to co ll eg e . Wh n \ e was g raduated she was recog niz ed as t e mos t beautifu l a nd tale nte d la dy in t h land . She was adm ired a nd praise d by a ll wh o k~ew her a nd he r sm il e of a pp roba t io n was pnzed by rich a nd poor. T he m a n who exh~med a nd polis hed th is h um a n d iam o nd "':Ill surely have at least o ne b ri g ht sta r in h1s crow n of rejoicing . As gold, rubies a nd di a mo nds a re us ua ll y encased in worth less look ing ru bb ish so ma~y ?f ~h e choicest jewe ls of o ur race beg m life 111 u nsig ht ly g-a rb in th e low es t g rade of exi ste nce. Th e y a re fo un d in ever y commu ni ty a nd in e ve ry s ch oo l. . Th ~ y ma y be in t he deep est furr o \\' s, a n d 111 dt s mal, slim y, g loo my p lac es. . They k now nothing · of th e ir va lu e o r ca pa bil iti es, he nce are con tented a nd ofte n o bject to a ny cha ng e in ways of li vin g . Th ey have no aspirati on s,. no h ppes, n o h elp:• n o desire or ability to chang e t e\'C CQ\ :'1: ' ~o , conce f?l · co, ~~ ~lt\J· ta &b1\1t1 &~ ~t-an ~ s' o n . T h e vok · r nee is lou~ and is always hear itl 1ubl! p1aces. l tlllAu e ~l c s i j tin an [ ft -n . powet the .. .controls t t 1-. t111. y f nat:1 11 , 1,bB

os ible il

fr . c .g vcrnrn ~ nt an s ·If c ntr I broug:ht If S nr·cc - '"'sa. "' 1 Y t I1<.t l th rn . tSS ' S bC .,~ m. the furr ws l h, hi (l'h . t t tc of Clh~· l iZClt l nand vh iJ· Llw ir f~.. ., ·t ma !Je int e f urr w • t •l' l! ·lr 11c.:.t s w II c .1 ch th - k}'· I ft Thr ·' dau;rht ~ rs and n · s n w re dy rph a ns. • T h ld ·s t lau (T ht r had alrea. d e e. n .. g r<t<. . 1uat ;u. 1 fr m IJ •h h 1<rh . c hoolf an!Je un1v ·rs· 1t Y. ar~ <. 1 11ad a t ru nc pt ·l r1 o t 1· 1r g h St Ini SS! )n ( Jjf\- . h m ' as rf 'l'c 1 f was wh e re.: II d . tll "Y . wuc c s t ~tr n ra nc , Th ahl a lth wa s. p o r, I ut h r n b 1 . ed tO v a ll r stac l s a n d s h te rrnrn ef· car ., <.l ULI .I n rfl. f . [ r ull C'lt t h 111 by I1 r ''·eS Ii / ts. ~ath r t h n h av . t h ir sp h: haP' . so CJrcurnsc ri l d ·t n d a ll h 1 5 fo d oirl p ln ss blig h ted thi s n b l · a nd ta l nte l1iull ta ug ht . , . '/ ., Wit h g rea t est success a cJt ving• l SClo r l . .. se' ·fl . • co n m 1z d lid w n t 1n 0'. d d 1 tc~u~ht pri va te c las.s es a nd s uccee · ~y ed· g t v J~ g h e r s is t rs a t h o 'r u cY h u ni ve rsl. -able u.c at 1 ~ 11 a n d a id e d h e r b rot h e r to a desll Sttu · b us m · e ss c ircle s. · fl ·r al t 1o n 111 · Jj d lo 1o ro 1 re o ~ in th at ug 1 e uu cat io n is lik e ~ru e 11 othe e o se w h o p osse ss it d e s1re a ro.nc, t o e nJ.oyth tl Ja-no J'l~ is K s w ~e t " of cu lture . D . 0 ora. e th e ess e nc e o f s e lfis hn e ss. Th e 1g t11°~ 1 ma th n d o es n o t wa nts oth e rs t o 1.,-I .o'll)otJ d 1J'l a n h.e do e. s a n d co ns e q ue ntl y h e 1s ] II 0 pA pos1n . s b g hi.g h e t. e d ucatwn. . 111othe(Ief .· Y s ktllful m a n a o·e m e nt th 15 brot11 f Si s te r le d 11 co . ' d o saf 1 e r yo ung e r s is t e rs a n 0 jo t5 5c e ly p a st th e d a n <Yero us p· ivota l Pb -o~de 5 y o ut and o d 1 ~..er s h 1 on to th e hi g h est a n ~P' d afl e r es of us e fuln ess so fa ithful te d (a.J1J ove r o u 1 d ' . l·lar o ~~1 a c: ·' r an a d ~~:\.o· a sl ll1 rS . \I' r.

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ptions of mat )' u )' 111 rtl ~ e(f WI trifle elf o t . .1at m y . em th me r~st QJ1~iJ1 tC( ,l ~1111 - th ~ d tiny f milhon:· a g( ,v~i d1 td th here 11e 10o , . l' are places . vV ti ot1 t cho Sc90 ft~d determines th e d1r~c a psYe e0~t1 e 1 1 11 1 15£s r 1 the w rl l unci r th · yoke ows. Th e r eal teach e r 1 ~ a-ns th 9-ct tiJ~ . • philanthropist H e weldo ;:1!1d (J 0' / J ? su~ e r tlttOn and d spot ism and to drag and tio 1 · r 119- f( 1° lts b.n~h tc~ t huma n jewels into th e sl oug h n a v alu e of e v e r y wo th e pe rPe of d1ss1pat10n and crime whe re its victim s can never ~atch a g li mpse of th e b eauties of th e wor ld tn wh_ich they . Uv-~. T o . ro_a k e

- 11

m e thod. Th e r a ising of. e o( ~ g la nce of th e e y e th e srTltl J til11 e lh ay .make or ma.r ' the nJ al1 '

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read sorn fO\' r and \\'a cra z d ad · with d Sir to b ' a ·ail r b y \ n a ci. ent rou rr h t 11 ·i ·kn , · him IBnto s h I unci -r th , ate . Ir. ~g~ f r h I -'d th · · ung im pul i,· b )' g r u. p inr • nd in t ad 0~. ~ ~ pam m. t ot.hc. 1~an u rh . d r boy r r u ·h~ s a <q tain, J a m 'S ; arfi ld be a m n 0 th r ' at st nd b ·t 111 11 thi ri d ha c cr kn " ·n . Th ' \\' rl · d I "' n c 0 11 l y th usa nd c?un try . I n v ' r )· d i t . ·t Cit y, lJ. ys a nd ·Ir · is ar n c· . 111 in · m r kmd to th -' Ir pa r nts,. t a h rs a nd t Th e re is a hi g h r t nc f i,·iliz ti n m r ma nl :r: an d \\' ma n! o nduct. T he ra \\' hid and h i k o r) h a \ el i a 1 p ar d a nd th e nergy ~o rm c r l y spe nt in r p r of a nd p u ni h men t 1; n o \v t ur ne d in to ch a nn e ls of usefulness. Y o u no· p e p ie ha \ e hi<=>·he r a ims, nob le r re s olv e s; t h e y loo k b o nd th e range of se ns ua li t) a nd li ke th e eaale \\'i th his e ye o n th e s un , so; r a loft in in r llige nt ~ o nte m p l a t i o n of t h e b e a utiful , va st, sub lime 111 nature a nd m e ll ow a nd s wee ten th e soul by thi nkin .e: o n th e wo nd e rful goodn ess of God t o th e childre n of m e n. Th e wo rld to them · is co ns ta n t ly g row in g in size a nd beauty. Th e s e ch a nges ha \ e b ee n so sil ent and g ra du a l th a t th e re sults are see n, but th e cause is unn o ti ce d . Th e th o u san d s of fa ithful teache rs all ove r th e la n d are like th e s il e nt leav<:>n in the d oug h. L a bo: .a nd cap ita l, all classes. ~re eds , a nd conditions a re be ing broug ht Into cl ose r sy m path y. In Bish op Vin ce nt 's lect ure, "To m and h is T -a h r , 11 \V are remi:lde d ~hat cha ract e r-i s sh ape d b y eve ry ph ys1ca l, mte ll e ctua l, a nd m o ra l influ ence with ·w hi ch it h as t o d eal, wh ether it be g ood o r b a d. Tom's t each ers ar e leaion. Paren ts, brothe rs and siste rs rel atives, . ' ~ e 1 gh b ors, schools, stores, stre et, society mflu e nce , books, p a p e rs, pictures, a ssociates, et c., a ll h ave a hand in m ouldin o· human ch a r a cte r. Th e tru e sch ool teach er is a lea de r clim b ing up hi o·h e r a nd hi a her in the scale of inte llige nce o and morali~y. a nd 1<::?-~jl).g his £qllow~ r~. i.nt.Q ..hi~he r anc! -richer

f

125

0./1 1AL COURIER.

f thou a ht, ·an d in to a .pJ:~rer· !JlOral <::>

atm ph r . It ha b n said b s me that teach.ers are n I n · r born but that the) a re mad e. \;\ e kno ' th at th ere are pri ate institution where the ra\\ a ll d teach rs ' factori mat ri a l i dump d into th hopper and by m li ·htn in<:>· proc s in a term or. t\\'O th \ arnish -d article drops· from th rol l, a nd i lab 11 d 'teach r. " \ e know that this is not ) our idea of tl~ e .rea~ li '.e teacher. 'Y ur pr s nc h re in th1s mstltution speaks 1 ud r th· n " ords that you do not propose t b blind 1 ad ers of innocent, confiding \ outh, but that yo u a re here under the prot cti on and a uida nce of our g ra nd, lo \ eel, a nd honored<:> presid ent to matur~ our judgme nt, broad en yo ur vie " s ; rece1ve new encourao·ement and inspiration and to develop e y~u r po" ers for life's grandest achievement. T o trai n merican youth for th e responsibi lities of citize nsh ip is the hig hest missi on to which mortals ca n be call ed. The publi c teacher in A merica works unde r the stars a nd stri pes, the emble m of the. free , and with patri otism in her so ul , the h ighest and broapest intellige nce in her head, and with lo ve of countr y, human ity a nd G od in h er h eart, she tou ches b y her magnetic, stirring influ ence, every fibre of th e chil d's nature, a rouses and fans into activity ever y embryotic germ of progress a nd nobility a nd tun es the livi ng harp to vibrate in uniso n with the divin e mu sic of earth and h eaven. The sclzool keeper may b e s toical, but th e teacher has a hea rt th a t bea ts in reso on se t o eve ry pure emoti on of th e so ul. The t each r is in sy mpathy with h er pupils. She weeps \ ith tho who weep, a nd rejoices with th ose who rejo ice. S uch a teach er ~v iii be . ob ~ye ~ and foll owed. H er a pprovln ~. smile IS h1 g h :eward a nd he r disa pproval IS seve rest pumshment. The missi~~ of our public schools is to make g ood Citize ns. Thi s requires the d evelopment of all th e youth into the hig h est possJble _types of manhood and womanhood . The wotld presents e nou g h false sy n tax. None should be presented in the sch o~l room. As the cu,!tivation of _go od .. plants


TI-!E .\f)R/I I A L pre ve nts weeds from k. ment from the a ,-o un d ta Jng 1 th e nollri ~ h correc t Jrev' so t cu lti va ti o n o f erron eo us id·· as £1_10 01 e n__t ~ ~v d th o ug ht s and ' ll t 1 1 1 TJ 1 .1d Zin g lllm a n e n ·r gy a nd r1'm e 1e c 11 tl nothing but ·tl . h . la t sees and l1 ·a r s 1e n g t wdl I ., e sy mm ·tn cal. easy and s tron g rra cts bad th e c_hilcl_ th at co n e n ccessa nl y dwarf ·cl a nd dl.storted .

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. Child re n a r e e ndo , 1-Iabn . favo r s rtnd ·1· g-e ns. ' utJ 1zes dev e lop m f' nt I/"\. ll OW 1 d gc to· I>e o f v a Ju e must t k . . ·rh a e t 11e fo rm o f habi t. e reason we do n ot a. 1ways p ra t1.c what . h we teac In r fe re n c to r ea d in g. w ri ting . ]aws of health · .

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Y ung, ormed In co rrec t h ab its w hi c h arc now co nstan t! Y ma k'1n g ou r prac ti ce at van· . , ance Wi th o ur bette r judg m e nt . Y o un g 1 to e n te r t h e prof[Je0ple . s h o u ld b eve ry sow esswn of teach ing . Th e wo rk of t h e 1 ubl1c . teacl1 e rs s 11apes t l1e d es tiny o f 1: u man soulsandof na t 10 . 11 " . W e wou 11 c n o t sta r t· o 1 d 1 n.a ong an d a ngerous j o urney "it1 a /;)lfU Jd e w ho k no ws but 1ittl c m o re o1· nl e roacl th a n we do, yet too often we see e ll 1·1d re n o £ . seventeen yea rs, whose ed u cat io n JS sca rcel b 1. . , . f y .egu n, ass umin g th e r espo n sll: l Jt Y o leadmg oth e rs over roads w ith w h1 c h th ey them selves a rc n o t Clcquaint e cl. B e in g you ng once ouselves, we kn ow that youn g people think th ey kn ow exac tly h o w th e chi ld shou ld be h a ndl ecl a nd that th e va lu e of experie nce is much over rated. As y ea rs roll on, ho wev e r, th ey bec om e more . and more surprised and pre p lexe d Cl n d b eg in. to real1'ze th e fea r fu l r espo nsibi lity of shapll1g immortal minds. t You yo un g peopl e s!tould and we trus you wzl! in th e futur e, m ake mu ch b e tte r educato;s t han we older persons or e to-da}:. but y ou will find each da y that th e _m ag mtud e of your undertaking increases In ge o metric ratio and th a t the lon ge r you are faithful, progressi' e t eachers: th e . mor h umble and s pell b o u nd yo~ w1 \1 f "el. 111 th midst of the ra p id\ y inc r t;aS111 g bet Ut~lj~ ft lld s ublimities that are floo ling Ll wll h the im meas urable ca pal iliti s o ·hum an

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. · a d iiCtl\' Jd 11·o n<_l ·rf ul '' o rld. sho,,J 1 Th e chi . 1 1 w l11· 1 aug 1t 111 th e m id s r of the 1J11~) r o f n ~ Ltll'·tl 1· 1 · · · · tl ·1C 1 . ' ' an c 111 tl s tn ;tl a tJV JU CS 1 l<- lllfl Y I H' ·d I lzC 1 tl . . ' c l C() lllpr ·h ' IH.l a ncl u ll . I H. _.t.: r ·;tt for c (' s L h is J \\ n ;tn I th. \\'orld J ., tnm " l d unti l. an I n It :-, rand ·wild r d tl l pru . u r J s unt Lh . r ~ i s tl . . . dr us 1 . e-r1 'Ill)y ' IllS ::-, ~ l\' of th \\' rJ ·

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d .<1. 11ts o f "n o n . in clusLr)· Ju \·<tlt <. \ o 1 Jed . . 111 w ill l ) ou 1 s ·lwo 1 1. s th' e ·k e Y th;~i· 11 .- un o c k tu y o u t h .. tr ·'a s urc:s of tlt C tl .e v 1 sc and (j.t . ~' OL~ lo · r th e IJ 1:g ltt · t e.xi , , ·S~(ll te n11c.: e 011 ca nh. I ht s I ·y h ,,-c ,·c r to be of m tJ 1 areuscth 1•.Je t.k c j) t 1) IJ.·g .:,J t. b y cons t;tnt use. 1) .1vce · 11c1· ~ ttta ·1n m e n L S'·tll C' .;C c1 t _ lS . in ·-=-cr fo r l11g e imJn e dt 0 1· . . J io· hewa 1l·s f ] 'f 1vc a nd m o ,·c 111 th e_ 1 o .111 d 0 1 yo ur' ·Ito _e1· . Y ou pi'O s!'JCc ts arc IJ l· 1g·h r. 5· tO I) e ,:, 11 ·h D J ·· t) be 5 lii. rou n d e d.-:. b • f . o no c ex.p c ct 8 ''-p' eer. ,,r. ti m e s e.'c hi· IJi!l~ 1 t o Y n c. n. cls. It y <lll . n eo-ec I b las ts l=> · 1./ JOSitl o n ~1 n cl 1 1e .. yo t1 will 1Je PI' <1d\'.e drsJL y , wh v n th ey co nJ e, ,j ll tl·)' yo u1 . llltpa t o nw<:' t th e m. 1 J1e1'se y Jv·e' ·t·tll e B d y u ur· p a r - ~ · e eve r loya l t o yo u In yo t~ r e ~ts, yo ur t e a c h ers . ;tn d you~' t tll e 0 11 Go ldc: n with ot h e 1·s 3.cl 11 1 communit ii~ e.t yo ur li.~:ht so shJll ~u n1.~; lea d a ll wtom whi c h l1v e th a t Y our F at h e r lllflu c n ce, 0 love of GJ O ct' 1<ee·) art Jnf H ealven. pl. sP ·t l yo u in life , and hey o u r o m 1artl1lt,o ete~'Jl• JO Y. your passpor

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lj tl ~ l!jol',f~ tfvtaY rl;(

OR 'PIAL COURIER.

the mystc ·· . to n l :~~~us ~~:. 1 km~ s f !ant life teach , I sso n s Lh at Lh I nt- \\· s t m ·n . 0 . I .. 1 ·at t l the ,. a t r hand-\\'rttin · t Wo rl d' ll the d ·co ntc I j) cre of th

J27

\1 h e n a ma n tell s us he has searched the mar ri I \\ rid throu.~;h . and \Yit h scapel and ru ib l ha u ·ht for, but ha not found d. th n he has forfe ited all cl a im upon our ac ptanc of him a a ph il osop her no s 0 1'<1 . matt r \Yha t his ability as a disco ·ere r may P c ia li . t l . pa ti ·nc · P ' r \\'Jth un nqucrab l f I . I b . Th b t thing that he can do is to k.ln o-dom I·Illt O th I . P cr t t1 anuna hi di co ries over into the hands .of the 1·11 a. ·' \\' at ·h and n l nd interp re t ne bet te r qualified than himself to . 1a 1 w· u~1 o· 1t · f 1 t1cul·1t, .' f anima l !if , a IS und 111 · ;::, mak d e ductions a nd to dra' conclusions. · H. . . myr nd f() rm l C1 afie lcl \ . a t n u ('rh t f urn1· h am - H is d isco ' e ri es we re all right, but he \\ as pie ml 1 . wa ntin · in the \Yi sdom to interpret them f ialists f · J oym nt l wh I . ; th ' t· o. m t· h IJI ~r g I1 - b ) \\' at hll1 ari<:;ht. Warbl D ubtl ess this di ' isi o n of labor '~as the e.t S 111 tl1 '1 1· n · t - b u1' I..! ' l'll1 lO a n Agass1z . . o r D 1. 11 · .a 111 pry1no· Jilt the ,. r ' intention of th e C1~e ator. gi ing to one the hid 1 C n m ·\ S L I. I e f ) I' I C ItS . ~~ f' . abilit to obse rv e facts and to another the We h a 1·c 1l Jn · o- but o·ood ,,·ords f r ab il ity to inte rpre t th e m , a nd draw the ap. c n o t . S 1 pec1a wo .1 f 1sts ·1 anc1 can ~easi ly Ia · out imm e nse propria te lesson therefrom. · a II th · ves1t'< o r. t 1c .m • yet 111 ran o·e of· Jn\ h s hould th e re be any antagonisms lt.~atJU n, Ill hith e rto u ndiscovered fields b e tw ee n th e discoverer a n d th e interpreter? at~c untr ocl cl e n IJa ths. L et th e sea rch (YO e n They a re fellow-laborers and each imm e nse \V. 1 th t·n a l · t 1 zes t and Jnte . · c Jd e c n "e zea l:=. and ly ind e bted to th e other. Th e philosophiT l1e s e ;uc h ca nn ot b too e nthu s i- cal thinke r is under g reat obliga tiops to the •" 1•g·o . 1· • c1Stl c Or th o r ouo· il . b discove re r, for the facts that h e has furnished A ll h o n o r we sa) to t h e s r)ec ia li sts · but him , as th e ne cessary d ata for study and . l t I11s . ,,-e are 111 . 'd ut y Iwhe n ,,.e I1a'.e sa 1c conclusion. In a n e qual m easure is th e disJo un d to say more . fo r a mistak e is mad e covere r indebted to the devout thinker for by m a n y of Lh e s e h o n o re d specia li sts in that these valuable d edu ctions and le ssons. So they a re n o t co nte- nt t o can-y o n this searc lle t th e re bP. no more of th ese unseemly byt think it b e com es th e m to draw con clu~ je alousi es and antagonisms b etween persons Sto ns h o m th e se disco ve ri es that th ey are so important and h o nored. Let us have not qu a lifi ed to dra w. It d oes not follow s pecia lists in disco ve ring facts a nd special- · by a n y mann e r of means t!1at b eca use a ists in studying th ese discoverie s, and let person is a go od discov e rer of na ture 's se- each have th e du e m ee d of honor and concre ts, th a t, th e r e fore h e is a <:>o-ood inte r- fidence: pre t e r of th e th o u g ht th a t li es back of the m. But th ere are oth e r spe cia lists than those Ind eed it is more th a n d oub tful wh e thl~ r a we have mentioned. g ood discov e r e r is a lso a g·ood int rprete r · Th er e a re spec i a li~ ts in literature; they of what h e h a s discov e red. To di scove r and to inte rpre t a r e two v e ry distin ct thin a s who pore ove r musty volume s of forgo tten and d e mand two v e ry eli verse fa culti es, agel lo:e, and ransac~ old conv ~ nts a nd d ecaye d facylti es th a t r a ~ e l y m ee t in th e same pe r so n. nnns for the .ancJe.nt a nd ttme-vvorn books It. Is a rare ge nius th ~ t has la rge individu- and m a nuscnpts, 111 pursuit of some word a lity and large causahty, speakin o· phreno- tha~ ~he y are. hunting down with the most ~mtmng pe.rsiste nc y and the most unflao-logical! y. <:> ' Ing determmatibn. No India n hunter ev~r .Th e cl e Yout philosoph e r in his lon e study follo wed the .fleet-foo te d a nte lope w ith more \\'Jth th e r e cord of o th e r m e n's discove ri e s before him. clis co 1· e rs that h e h a s no ability d og~· e ~ obstll1acy of purpose, than these spe cJaltsts follow up a word to its fat t . ~o m ake hims e lf, is far more comp e te nt to head. m amInt e rpre t th e m than the ori ,r in a l discove rer And they thus put the w hole lite rary world h imse lf \r a s, or is. s

n

>


128

THE

7HE NORMAL COURIER.

under obligations to them. T h n thc r · arc: specialists. in_ the_nl ogy, specia list .; in m d icme, spec1alt sts m psycholog-y, a nd in eac h of these sp_ecialist_s _in th e d iffere nt d 1 artments, so rn med 1cme th e r is the occ uli s t, who g_i ves specia l a ttenti on t th y , th n there IS the one who g ives sp cia ! a lt ·n tio n to the lungs, a nd a ll di seas -s pc rt·l tntng t owe cou ld. g? n num ra ting th · th em. vast nu mbe r of spec J ~ ]J s ts in a lm s t 'V ·ry fie !~ of human activ_i ty, but w e will g iv · a t tentJOn to but one mor a n I tha t is th specialist in the departm - n t of t ach in r. w~ oug ht to ha v ' a nd d hav s p i~ l ISts 111 the differ nt bra nch s f stud y. ow no one can, in our sho rt li v s, lc:· rn all that there is to b know n o n a ny s ing ! · subject of stud y much less a ll th;1t may I ! e~rned on all subjects, so a d ivis ion o f la bor rs Imperative ly demanded. L .t ne pe rs n take one bra nch and anoth er, a nothe r a!1cl each become an e nthusia.st in his s p ~c t a l department and press it to th e full st ex t .nt of his ability, while g iving b ut slig ht a t_t .ntion to the ten th ousa nd s of other th1 n. .;s that mig ht invite his inquiry. . H e must not, of course, be a n t g n o r~ m u s on any subject, but ht:! shoul d, i ~ p oss t ~ l _, be an authority on some one subJ ect. 1 ht s can be done, howeve r, in one way onl y, a nd that is by becoming a specia list in th at o ne thing . _In d oing th! s he must shun }he te mptatiOn to turn aside to eve ry a~luJ wg study, and persistently and eve n ol?stmat ly push this one departm ent till con s lr.n l : a g rateful world shf\ll '~ ·J · &ff :. t · 0

hoof ·

Lil e ratur in Our Hi ab Til

: . F . I OU U.' .

In mos t f ur I I i.t! h . · ·h I., we finr~ . .~ so Cl L 1at th · <.: >ttrs1·s I study kt \' · . 11 hor· rangc:d as to .n·i\'C; the pug:ils 1u_1L • ~ :br:t. ug h hww k l gc of art th Ill ·u • . h n1· ~ a ti n 'L il I th · sciv n cc·s. \·iz : I) ta_n) enti<~l Istry and physi cs, c·ac h of " ·hi ·h IS t f the lc th ' ·c 111jJI(·Ll' c'l tH I fu ll icn·IOJ 111• t11 11 1'th r. . 11 ! l ·ll ·ctua l man o r \\' ma n, a n I ) d)' ol 1 ~ f m r · pn · i ·a! \·;_tl u • tha n th ' · t~ nef Itt 't"Lt ur ·, \\' hi ch has I>· ·n v ·ry s<td l}. I ·t ·cl . du;.~te ·1· . . 1cr f <l . 3I h T: are v ·ry lc w h '.~ h s ·h . raphJC wh ar. not a iJl . t g i ,· . a I .' o·'=' 1 ~nd·. sl· _' tel: of 11 m '1', \ j rg i I . r i\I tr~' ~£ th~ vII ' ' y ltl · ly . r ' J u., t , \' ' t' i)'l lt l11 a pa b . a 5 the). ta u, :\ th.:id, or P a rae! isc L st u ~ ]1 a~e apl t·oac 11 ur m r mod .rn ,,·n·t rs\tVh1.t tl·er, .e 8 1 ca re, L ng f ·I I w Oi k ~ n s, h ' e 5 old s mith a;, I t h 'rs \\ h . na me' ]1av I beco m - brio·ht 'I' a ncl rig h t r (l S tl:e)e ai1~ bee n pol is h~d I y th e sa nd s of tt ft:1t~t i'e ar sI1 a II bIaze 111 · th e firm a me nt o f t I1 e (1 ud t118)' 1 s~a rs of the fir s t ma a n itnc.l e , \V 1 1e tlt~f eJthe r fro m v rw o rk o r i ncl iffe re nc ;ies h~v fa il e d to fo rm very cl ose 10 1 fn e ncls hi p. 11tt' e re It wo u ld b e u ntru e to say t 11 e )' vet the . rl kn_ow] dg e of t hese write r s; a nd 'f frl\1t' ex tst l· l' ()' o 181 e . fi n . \\1 \in . t\ - n \ , l nro ~cCl\ \'i

I

ul h

'!

L

'

l

I { • th tt5 5Y 11 . m1n n~ t, "' h bl\1' . a nu . tl1e 5 l t11C r c ]y a s u r±ac . in 0 tJI 0j0' v~ e \ 1 n·_ l 1 this is fo r~, b y passin g greetl n g~-'egardd a.. ~eo 1 · tha r on 1s to the honor of wh1rl of life wi th th ose we rea 11 tt0 tl,e . -' 1 1 as e d ~ bem.g consulted as authority on th~t one pen or_s. N o clo u bt e a c 1 ~J 0 ve . J11eoe t ~ part1; ular subj ect, b ut not necessanly on g ra phrca l s k e tc h of tk e _a . '"'1d jt.l 5 9 ~ 0 any oth er. It by no means follows tha t be- write rs, but th a t h as p ossiblY ]'Jo:N' oClS(11 ·~ cause a man is authority on the subj ect of g ulf ex istin g- b e t we e n th e n1 · r frle £0( ~ri" 0 .. f ot.J t O c earth-worms that therefore he is a co mpewe must ~i sit t he h on~ es ~ -cles, t vi~ g o tent teacher of ethics nor because one ca n see th e m tn th e ir fa mil y ell r11L1 5 ctlJ'l 9-~ . . so () e s properly analyze th~ solar spectrum. t~a t t ru e apprecia t iO n of th e m. II r eti" cce 5 1o therefore he is a safe teac her of the d1 vine the se w rite rs con fi d e n tfa h) eir 50 ie~ t fl e But . thi s I ea t-~1 m o re of ' th e se c re t_ ~ fIeS· decrees, or natural depravity. fl'l a. d6es not abate one iota from the ment of attamm e n ts in lit e r a r y eli c jrh, a.d ,N'e( s0 being a specialist in some one thing . N L e t u s n ow visit Goids01 1:1 oul 11 e~ man can be a specialist in many thin g s and w_ould attract us v e ry lit~I ea~i.n e...1 · · but few can exc e l ev e n in one . hrm on th e st re e t, a nd I IJ11 ;::).

I r··_

(l ,

and i h·u!Jy d do~ ~ntitled

til /

°

i\

OR 1/AL COURIE R.

conservati\· fri ncl . \\'h In raphy, ayin g , •· ~u r ·ly thi not d se n ·in o· ur tim, a nd our ~ri n dsh~p. " 1 ut i ·t u hastd y ; ra th · r I t us r d hi . ilia " o r a pa rt f it with a r . If we can a v id th · 1 I ' a ant m m n childhood see n s. It is \ e r) tn t · th at n n • f u h ~\' or sha ll witn . s .· u h ha n · 111 ur )U V nil s urro un lin.-, : a \\' · find in '' ,,. t ~ubu rn . " Tru ·. it m · y b , w ha ll critiCise th e auth r fo r th li b ·rt · h a urn but in cha ng in th I a li t) f th viii these we co ns id r d in hi bi ; raph) a nd let us no w e nte r in t th sp irit of th P m : ~ver

" H o w oft e n h a v e I ble s sed t he co mi n g- day, Vi' h e n t o il r e mit ti n g- le n t its t nro t o play , An d all th e v ill ag-e tra i n f r o m labo ur fr ee, L ed u p th e it· spo r t s b e n eath t h e preadin g- t r ee. W h ile man y a pas ture ci t:c led in th e shade, The youn g- co nte ndi n g- as th e old ·u rve y e d ; And m a n y a g amb o l f r o lic k e d o' e r th e g-ro und . And sleig hts o f a r t an d f e at of s tre n g-th w e nt t:o u nd; A nd still, a s each r e p e ated p lea ut:e t ir ed, Succeedi n g- s p o t:ts the mirthf ul b a n d in pirecl; T h e d a n c in g- p ai r th at simply s o u g h t r e n o w n By h o ldi n g o ut t o t ire each o th e r d o w n ; The s wai n mis t r u s tle ss of l11s s 111ut t e d f a ce, W h ile ·ect:et laug hte r t itt e r e d r o un d t h e place; The bas h f ul vit:g-in's s ide lo n g loo k s of lo ve, Th e matt:Otl 's g l a n ce that w o uld these look s t:e p r ov e . The se were thy c h a nns .. ... . but a ll these c hat:ms have fl e d ."

Also notice the b rief d escription of the ''Villag e P reacher :" " bus t o relie v e th e w r etc hed was h is pdde, A n d e 'en his faili ngs leane d t o v it:tue's s ide; And ii:l his duty pro mpt at every call, H e w a t ched a n d w ept, h e prayed and felt f o t: all; A n d as a b ird each f o od e nde at:me n t t des 0 tempt i t s n ew-fle d ged offs p t:i n g t o the skies, H e t ded each at:t, rept:oved each d ull del ay, Allu r e d t o bdg hte t: wot:lds and l ed t h e way."

And so we find, all throug h the poe ~ , that he b ring s us face to face with memones of sports a nd pe rsons that each of us ca.n make our own, a nd b e fore the poem 1s nearly read throug h, Goldsmith has won a place in our h earts that never could have been secured in any way, other than makmaking . his acqua intance through . some of

"Fighting Fair."

~ N olci Ger_man officer, ';he!: brought a

'P \ prisoner lnto Napoleons pr esence, was asked how the war was goll1g; and, 1.10t knowinO" who his interrogator was, replied that n o~hin g could be worse; fo r the y~)U ng scamp of a general from Fra nce was vJOlattn O' all the rules of \var, and was always ve~y inconsiderately appearing in places where the enemy had no reason to expect him. Whereat Bonaparte laughed in his cloak, and continued his career of military discourtesy. Georg e Washins·~on won his fi rst wor~d­ wide fame as a md1tary commander, Wl th the '•Fabian" tactics- the g ist of which is a custom of appearing to the enemy un announced. Poor old Chi na wh ich is g etting so many hard raps nowadays, has just learned of this method. She complai ns that the Japanese do not " fi ght fair ;" that th ey attacked her soldiers _at Pi ng Yang, . on tbe fifteenth day of the e1g hth mon th, whi ch is a g reat '' ] oss D ay" in China, and fo und most of her soldi e r~ drunk!


THE TI-lE . NOR :I!A L COURIER.

FJO

EDI TOR I AL.

THE NoRMAL CouRIE R.

tO to ' n . 1 g 'n rail . I ct a o urt com e whe n th r ,,. . ur . to be a ro \\'d . I daY· ]Je d on f r a pt:c ~_· h. pea k m ) Gl i1 1 c<I pi c a r ast ni h e · . . P" and 11 it cr nptec ' 1·r th h a r e! . t k ind f \\. rk . " .. • bU~ jus, l r t I n a r o il , n e ur ar te t l't \·R o JC . p

N o R.o al R oad.

BUSINE,SS DE,Pf\RTM ENT. A d vertlsln g Rat es.

P er i nch, sing le column, sin g le in ser tion . . . . . .. .... SOc. Specia l rates furn is hed on application to Bu siness M anage rs.

J . J . KI NG, I. E. ST ANFO R 0 , Busin ess Man age rs .

STATE NOR.MAL

S CHOOL.

F ACU L TY. A.

w. NORTO N,

A. M.,

P R!. ' CJPA L, Teacher of Psycho logy, Ethics, Logto and the Setanee and Art of Teachl" fl

MISS ELI ZA C. MORGAN, PR EC£PTRESS, T1aoher of Literature, Rhetorl::, G ~ 11 e r:.t l Il l t orJ an:/ Phy'liotogy . H. B. DUNCANSON, B.S., A. M ., Tea cher of

B o t ::~ n],

GeoiOJY an:/ Zooton .

HERBERT BROWNE L L , Teacher of Chemistry, Physics and Astrono my.

G. W. E LLIS , B. A., A .M., Teacher of Math ematics and Latin.

MISS F L OR ENCE M. WRIGHT , Te1c.'ler of Oral an:/ Wri tten Arit hm etic.

MIS S J ENNIE McL AI N, B. S . , Teacher of United State s History and Geog raphy.

MISS MARTHA WI NNE, Teache r of La nguage and Grammar.

MISS LILLIAN R . K E LLO GG ,

, CJut . .f Gouernm .• n t and Book Ke eping. Te 1oher of ReadinJ, DrawtnJ,

MISS ANNA B. HERRIG, Tea ~h u

of Pr f.7 :ipleJ of

tn :~ r n t io .1

. t m :J '·~' t of Prac tice . a.7 i 8 f.?Jrtn

MISS FLORENCE G. BENNETT,

.

cl a red t h a t th e r e w as n o s u c h a thin g Gl]:bo( t e mpora n e o u s ora t o r y . H e r ega r d e d ea.~· as n ecessa r y t o 1 r od u c e a su c cessful sp tl1 e· . was t o pro du c e a s u c c es s f ul f e r, as It 5o I . . l ffor t jo5' c l a nt c. a n d th e g rea tes t o ra to nca e Iu.s li fe w e r e th e r e s ult s of s v s te m a tJ.C, ptl t a kin g p r t' p a ra tion. • , ha.J],

0 n thi .., v e ry subj ect, Th o m a s j\1 ~11 5 pa. 5c t h e fa m ~ u s K e ntu c ky o rato r, of t.l~;eoPie t a lk of

MISS MATTIE E LLIS,

11

Preparatory Departm ent.

1

stu dy

NI

1 ! NSl-IlP, JJn tor.

BOARD O F

EDUCATIO N.

A. K. Goudy .. . Supt. Pu b. Ins., ex-ufftcz'fl, Lin coln . Ho n. J os. S. Bartley . . .. State Treas., ex-~lfzcio, .L incoln . EI n. B. E. B. Kennedy .. .. .. Oma ha; ter m ex ptres 1897 . Hon. J. T. Spencer .. . .. Dakot a Ci ty- t e<m ex pires 1899. H on. ~hurch H?we . . . . . . . . .. Auburn: t erm exp!res 1895. H on. J · E . MaJors . ..... ... . . . . P er u; t er m expt res 1896. on. · S. West . ··· .. . . . . Benkelma n, t erm expires 1898. B E B K

A· K· G·

OFFICERS OF 'rH E BO A RD .

denr:.edy ...... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. P resident. J~sep.h s~~i~tl~· . . .. . . . .. . . . . . .. . . .... . . . . .. . s : cret ~7r: Y· . . . . .. . ... . . ... . . ..... . . ... Tr easu EXEC U T I VE C O MM I T T.EE .

Ch urch Howe.

W . E . Maj ors .

A.

{I mY geottJS rt· 11 cl 0 f the 5b·ect ~,\,c t 'l tJ \ 1}1~ jt• vVbel oi1 . e up eecP -e'~~ 1 ' 0 'l 5p J< I . t t

lt \,

-1\

~~n.

\1

!'Ln 1· _ / 111'\.. 1 ~ n l i11Y , ' l 1

I Mu /0,

W .

Norton .

etl ce'

m as toun din t· bu r t of cl~qtl bL1 ~~

· L

FRANCOIS B OUCH :mR ,

co

m e n t f i nd u -;t r y. [J 1t L parti c u lan z ' re . . l . n o o n e gc n1 us 1s t 11s h ·av c n - b rn g .l.t t In oto f r e quent ly a n d fa ll ac io u s l y a c r ib c th ~t JI Y th e rato ri ca l gc n iu s . I L ca n b e truth ~h e a n d C0 <1fi e n tl y asse rte cl, h o w e v e r, th a t 1·re qu t es t im o n y of r e n o "'n e cl o r ;nc· r s h as de· a n o th e r b e a rin cr. D a n ie l Vv . bste r ofte n e~·

g e 1.1e ra tt o n o n c e s a id t o a fri e nd:

Primary and Kin derga rten. /

Teacher of VQ~il ln n.1/n lP/1 11 Ill

O'Cniu s. not· ~ . . 'Lioll Wi t hsta n ding- t h · popu la r SU J P. ~ tJth a th a t th p ·r~o n f g ' n ius i ·nd wed " . rn g 1. f t tn l t lJnn . g , ItS . I1 avc n -oo po s es· or of s uccess \\' ith ut ·ffort. Th "' t t im o nY f s uccessfu l JJCU JJI · su i s ta nt ia t ·s t h is (ir t a . rr· firn n t io n. Th i h I Is t r u in e \ ry d epa

r?rt"l I · R · is no r oyal r a I t

\.\ \ 0\

l \

fr o m th e g roun d . m as t e r e d it fully I w nte ' ·s <J.c ' t 1 1 Tl1en I ta k e a wa lk, a ncI c o rn Ie t.J bjec t 5 rJ e~ ·ell and corre ct. In a f e w d ays jt. ff '"1d a n o t 11c r reo rumn · g an c1 r e c opY d 1·t o e ~'Alo · (,, 1t

ad d th e fin,i s hin cr tou c h es , r 0 1.1t11 ro J11f~tl18 r ' 0 mit 1 . ~ ctl , g ra ce ful p e ri o d s and com 111 Y ge' e~ th e n I sp e a.;: 1 1t · 111 · t 11e fi e ld s , 0 11un til 1e ,i(l'lL'·~ l aw n , and b efo re my tnll. ·r o r It 5 oOget l 0 0 an d deli v e ry a r e p c rf cc t. rh5 t ~(e 1 mo' ef' t a k e s m e s ix we e k s o r r wo 00 e pJ'

a

s p e ec h .

Wh e n

I

h ave

OR 71/AL COURIER. TJT

Discipline in School .

@

IPL.

!

fS are freq ue ntly h eard of

the n o-1d it of di ci plin e in the publ ic I l ool · Th e I· e 1· a cer ta m · c1ass o f peo p 1e 1 10 think a nd a cer tain class of teach e rs \\' . ,A rn e rt c a n ra t r u p n be in o· inte rwh o a re subservi e nt to th e thou a h t : that chil ~ ~gwed aft; \ ye· u·s a ,ro . u n the ubj e ct o f dr n a r e x pe t l . I -=> • . · c ec to obe y wtt 1out qu e stto n~ ~ e ro rn p tu or<lt r y o r xt m p ra n ou a d . 111 . a nd to do I . I l'1k·e a utomatoms, t 1e1 r \\ or< tnl P d c cl v r d t h a t th r \\'a s 11 0 uch a . o 111 t he m os t mech a ni cal wa . Instructions dr.ess. m e an ill g f o ur e ra te r) c io·ni fie d once ()' i e n to a class a re n ot to be m odithtn g . 0 f th e cc s i n a n whi I; conl~ r th Y . ' fie d . If t he tea ch e r b e so \\ e a k and inconwo Is 8- rt c n t to n a n d r sp ct. p a kin g o f ta n t as to cha nge h e r m ind , it is assu med rn<In c . I d ia n a p o I'IS acld I· ss- of I 76, \\'h ·tc h is tha t h er a u th ority will b e at a n e nd. H er h15 11·de c! as a m o d e I o f tr u e m e m o na · l orare"'a ' . I l1as g on e into t h e sch ool ~e rso n al infa llibil ity is a dogma of educa;::, c1 w IJIC•l t iO n. She ma k e s n o m is tak e s in subject to r Y CJ il · f as a spec im e n o c h a st e a n d e xa lted m atte r o r in a ny d e ta ils o f adni inis tra ti o n. books ' . . 'd I n ee . he <:(1 1 , t 1a t th e pop ul a r op ini o n S he mu st neve r all ow h e rself t o b e ca u a ht loqu e . . ~ ·t \\·as e.\ t m po ra n c o u \ as e n- n app •mg or to b e trippe d in h er w ork in ab n y h t l ' t. a wro n g. a n d furt h e r th a t it \\ a s n o t true w a ). If the re is untim ely q ue st ionir. g w·ely I f a n Y o f h 'ts a d clr.- SSPS - . , n o r c:I'd 1 1e or discussio n, the re is v igo rous a ppli.ca tio n 0 . 1 ·r tru e o f da n y sp e c tm e n of ora tory, of th e mark ing s yste m. Th e inquirin g h ill C I 1 • 1 had b ee n e e m ed worth y of pre s e r- child g e ts marke d fo r d e portme nt, a nd is wbi C1 • . . . . In Ill S o p1n1 o n tru e oratory must th e re b) t t;:: ug ht to hold his toi1 g ue. Em e rva tJOI1· b l. t dee p, su tm e ~ nd e te rn a l truths. son on ce said of the En g lish p e opl e, ' 'The re su "'ges . f . . ;::, · ra u o n o c o nstructin g o r compostncr God is pre ce de nt." Th e public school T h e ope . . . . 0 · h \Yhtch IS truly grea t IS prec ise ly t each e r's G od is s ys t e m. Childre n must b e a s pe e c • . . . .1 . to th a t wht c h enabl e s the pamte r to taug ht to do e ve ry tEin g m e chanica lly and s rni ar . o· r ea t em o uons b v colors. The to conform not only t o th e ge neral re g ulaexpres s 0 • . 0 . o f a g reat s p e ech is lik e the formu- tions of the school room, but also to the malon ~ . . • <Y of a great pa111t1ng. caprice s and whims of th e caprices that b e. !attn~ f l . ' ·PI I l( . I " I umec m ba 1t S[)ee c 1 In what has just be e n s ta ted we hav e on ly S p e a k ·111 .-o·. o 11s . . h 'c h h e nomtn a t e d Jam e s G. Bl a ine at v o iced th e thought of a ce rtain cl a ss. Jn W I . · 11 a ti in 1876 and \;~,r hicn h a d been re. Th e re is this consobtion t o a tru e N ormal C 111Cin ·t d to have been writte n very hastily, (natura l) teacher, no such complaints can pOI e · 1 b f · o n 1y u Po n th e n1 g 1t e ore the con ve ntion, justly b e mad e aga inst any true t rainin g school , nor can they b e fa irl y mad e a g ainst 11e sa 1'd 1'11 substanc e that h e did write that . as re porte d at the time, but th e writing It th e b e st products o f that sa m e training It school. Here the work is placed upon an0 twas a m e r e m e chanical operation. u 'd was no part of th e composition . The 1 eas othe r ·and a more natural and sci e ntific bas is which b e h acl. a nd w hich he utte r ed we re and in it is e mbodi e d th e b e st thou g ht of th os e which had b e en in his mind , h a d b e en the b est te ache rs of a ll ages. H e re t h e t urn e d over in his mind and had been com- end s sou g ht are fa r r eachin g, . a nd the m e th p ose d long before. ods utilized to attain th e se e nds are the re -


,

.!J2

IJ

Tl-JE . NORJUA~ CO 'RJFR .

THE

suit of the bes t expe rimenta ti on f th bes t th at hi s in flu nc \\'i ll b f ·It a l ng all h lp· teachers, of th best a nd m st a dva n d f I 1· U Ill S . h schools. Their pupils are enc uragecl to I le th 11 adcl r ·ss d s ubo rdin a t t ac r think for the mselves, a nd to x press th Jir telling t h m that th y s h ul d i~ a ll ad~ t hought with im pu nity. c -. p ra t wit h th 1 rin ci1 al , faJtl:f~)\ of th Ir w rk, a nd { ··I th r sp ns tbdt Y th e ir part of th , w rk . neral. l ast ly h said t t a ch rs in . you •·J o not li v . s t hat a ny ne s wg 0 es Items of Inter est. wa lk d \\' ll th s t r · "t wil l say , ·Th r,, ')-he a t "a ch ·r. ' I a man am n m 11 • cti· Prof. N orton and P rof. Du nca nson we r · s up rint ·nd ·nt 's talk was ' min n tly pr~re· elected to membe rsh ip in the ed ucati na l ca l a nd us ·ful and was th oro u :rhl y ap council, both from the Colleges ctio n. cia t -d . ·i(-

·/.·

·1.·

The State Associa tion recomm e nd ed the state s upe rinte ndent, the cha nc !l or of th e state university, a nd th e pres id nt of th.e state normal school, to b a board of I~~t.I ­ tute examin e rs, established by law. IIs is a~other moveme nt toward unify in_g . t 1e educational inte res ts of the s tat~ a nd 1 ~Il1 s ~~ be hoped that the recommendatwn WI acted upo n by our legislators. .

·1.·

·/.·

Prof. Norton was ~l'ected pres ide nt of th e academy of sciences.

*

~1.-

eve ning P rof. Boucher played Th_ursdad die nce of the assoc ia tion to a delig hte a u and responded to an e ncore. ·i!-

·X·

~r.

a ·X·

ge neral Prof. NO rton read paper at a facto rs meeting in the L ~?s ·111 g 011 '·So me of Tho roug hn ess.

.

* *

.

·* b fore G raduatw g Resume of Talk Give n e 1 by Supt. Classes of the State Norma ' Pe_arse, Beatrice, Neb: f . leasant words Prof. Pearse , afte.r a e \\ P a ctical man of crreeting, t alk ed 111 a very ~rilr t o W ner to the classe · H e s Q) _ ]} 1 \i)O 1tion . H e n e~t t~ , C 0 0 , ecur-e those who expect ton. i1, laid tr s n m nline 1 v !TI -1 11-

h

om

ne r.

I_H

cl profitably with the board of education, subordinate teache rs, and patrons. The principal should b e. a person in the c ommunitY. a nd shoutd. SO live

work I 1 santly

T h 'vV lling to nian ; ·a r stud yin o- ''. :in olog y" thi s term . This s ubj ect is _nco itS . • • mate n•a l a nd will repay th e 111qU1re r . 1nt rure · }Itera. ?'lY~tcr ·~ s. M uch of our classtc. officers Is ncb 111 mytho logical lor T he ir H. L·. are as fo ll ows : Preside nt, Mr. . Lott, a ms; v ice -presid e nt Miss L e ttie 0 nd· · ~eco rdmg s cretary , M' r. Sto ne ; cor: esp r Nfis5 111 g seer tary, M iss R e yman ; treasuJ e ' Ge yha rt. ·X·

udY

·X·

T he Philomathean-r.· soci t:ty w ill r!rrr· ''C urrent M easu re s" durin g the wtn · te r whtC · ]1 The q~es~ions of th e day, subjectshini<i.n~ are ag1tat1ng the minds of the . t rudle world, nationa l issu e s e tc will b e 5 rr1 efl• teSW d an d d e bated . The opinion of sta. d a.fl 1• scholars, a nd eli plomats will be rea (Tluc 1 by lookin g broad ly at these subje cts,eJ11berJ good will undoubtedly come to thC: rn go 0 of the society. Philo starts out vnth:Ost~fl~ corp~ of officer~ : M iss Non a 0 . M~ 5 5 p reside nt. 11r rd . ;· id nt N1t5 1 Vl ~ · ~ · 5 L u1u R 'bb · tft5 , rd'tn cretar) ; . "w.c. 5

I

• l

J

,r

1'

ll

ht

he111

n

d

nf r , Mr. . I

1 .1

r tC\r _' critl

1 ing•

~- ·X·

I

~fl

10 CI UTR ' • PI EM 1 If f _

in th 1 1- l ] rd b hind

ht'St te t J·-qullt -tl k tt . l n th :lbout how to

IV1 th •

·X·. ·i'c

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. •

nd

1'

~

0

d 1·ce' 0

v0 jfl

gre~t rite

!li'

~pJtl~flt~

m - a ee 5t, sayi ng : "~Th at thou 5 11 tPe·a.s' 1 t~e th e CouRIER and se nd unto a -r/ a- 05 a.l ,e4 . tO ~ tO 0 ~~ w hIch are in Nebraska, un d tl 0 d t1 G 0 regan, un to Wiscons ·tn dan1 ttlroeJ · States round about." A n A11 the voice that spake with me, ·

as it had b

Ha' e ) ou paid ) our sub cription to th

f ur

R:\!AL

" re good time. ·:\--

-~·

The follo win o- tabl t w ill be in teresting, as it shows th e 0grm~ th of the school d uring th e last fo ur years: 1891

1 92

1 93

1 94

Total atte nda nce, 456 435 49 1 556 Training C lass, 48 27 57 55 Senior Class, I 2 8 26 34 Practice Dep 't, 90 I04 I 24 I 84 Prospecti,,e training class, 70 to 74; pros-£ . se n ·to r c 1ass, 42 t o 44. Per ce nt . o pecuve gain in tota 1 atte n d ance, 24. 3 ·, in traimnQ" ~ class, 47 ; in senior class, 200. ~~

Locals.

The Y. P . s. C. E. are planning for a social. Miss Lulu Mears spent her vacation at Beatrice.

J. F.

Hosie is rapidly wmning Arapa hoe .

RI E R (

Ir. dl spent a fe \\ d ays lt1 Omaha durin o- the past '' eek. Januaf) 7, hancellor·Crook led the mornin . x rei s in chapel. Th Philo's ha\ e chosen for the ter m's work Curre nt tJ:easures. upt. R:-<.. ese,_ ~ f Falls City addressed t~e s nior and tramJng class. January I r' Prof. I ort?n sp oke at J ohns n, at the Farmers' Instttute. 1 Nothing need be sai.d of t h e musica e J anuary T6 .' it speaks for Itself. h D oll y Jack has g one to ~hica_go, w ere she will remain during the wJnter. 1 B Whitfield will sell you gre~n or dry wood i~ cord or rick at bed-rock pnce~. T he Greek class under th~ supervisiOn _of • Prof. E llis, have begun readJng the Anabts. of illness Af ter sev era l weeks · 1 Grace k a· I n able to resume 1er wor . · . d Hammon IS ag . Norton ' who is .at Vassar this l\11.ISS S uste 0 t the holiday vacatiOn at swego. year, spen The program for January I 8 was v:aried and largely impromptu, but was e nJoyed by all. The students have enjoyed many practica l talks from the platform in chapel, by Prof. Norton. ' C\

Lulu Collins and Georgia Jones, of Tevisiting friends at the

m h, have been

fame in Norfnal.

Vina Canon is taking a much needed rest this winter.

The seniors were changed January 25 and beo-an their work in the new groups ]ant:. uary 28.

Mr. Spivey, of Stella , visited the Normal January 24. Ja nuary 8, t1le. Political Economy class was organized.

The first year class are sorry to lose Misses Miles and Scovil from among their number.

Miss Lida Maika visited Miss during vacation.

Nell i~

Lore

May Elmore is teaching in the Talmage school during the absence of one of the teachers.


~'34

7l /F 1\

/ {/viAL COt RJF:R.

Pl ease w rit to th man ag - m nt a nd r qu .st . t h m to w rit yo u' fo r u l· sc n pt1on. Y su

scho Is, r p rts c h .rfully . . lv· In fifty· s ~ve n p11pil s in the; in tt: rnH.:diatc d ·partm nt. J cs-;i< · .\I<'L<"a lf. L Jt1ra and ( ~il b ·rt rra r e · ). ) . .'tan d lvy, I icl · 7\ c.:a l. · . · rcon. :\J ~Jud P hillips and J ohn 'hurc h .sl_ :nt part r ( th ·ir ,·acat ion in I ·ru, 1Sitll1 the , ormal.

J ames Veeder a nd wif att n led pray r m eeting . in c hape l W edn esda y ev ·ning , J anuary g. · Many of the teach rs and stud nts at~ende d the tat T eachers' ss ciati n lurmg vacation.

'!

TI-lE .\'0/\/l!AL C

Mrs. o ung , of -•noa, IS SjJ ndin u a ( w ..., weeks In Peru, visi ting h e r s is ter, Mis· May VanVlee t. ·

.

I

~rof. P earse, of Bea tric , add r ssccl t h ·

.J. E. Stevenson, D. D. s ., will be in h1s Dental Rooms over Abbott's

Drug Store every Tuesday.

T h e adva nced G e rman class h a s co m ple ted Cha misso, a nd the work has bee n a s o urce of much pl easu re to th e m. The v isitors in our mid s t S a turd ay, J a nu ary I9, we re Messrs. Shell e nbe rger, Yo ung , Misses vVilla Fish e r a nd Kitti e fyn o n. G illilan h a s h ad a severe attac k ~f th e s o r e throat, but h as recove ree a nd Is ag a in able to be a t hi s p lace of busin e ss.

]. P.

One of th e me mb e rs of the class of .92 has d ecided th ?. t co urting a nd n ot teaching h is profession and h as r ece ntly acted as JUryman.

!s

Misses Minnie E . H e ndryx and · H a nn ~ h Wallace a~1d Wm . :.\1ah.. a), f rn1er tl! )..

of the ~ orm

'[ j

r

1

·r jJ _ l)

1\ s ?\~

L

,

f~

0 S yracu se,

Miss Anna · Borst, who was s·udclen l y ca lled to fil l a pos it io n in the V a le ntine

n,os

o!

. One ?f th e add it io n a l and one t~f js 8 m t e res tl ng features o( th e OI J11 !flost · · 1ecture s d e ii· ve · r e d by th edt'-'e · 0 _Co u1se o f s 1x . · . ·1 1 be o . lt pt o m1n e n t m e n . Th e fir s t \.V, l SnJJ C' J a nu a ry j1 by Willi a m Haw le ?: author of the •Evolution of Dodd . ir

.

I

f the

Ma.ny of th e se niors sp e nt a p a rt 9 11 ~"1~ vacation w ritin a th e ir Th e s es. SoTJ11I ee)' ~ 1 rc a d t J1e m ~o0 ~rof. · orton. tile {J'o fl1 0 s ec- m e cl t o e nJ oy It fo r th ey c r1 111 e d afl, offi · 1 ·10 ate " d~ ce Wit 1 th e ir fac es il lwn . vestlo s~eme d r eady for m r th r o u o·h 111 t1

n.

peif

r.

te rm. w h e re

h .jd ft tJ1) o Pe - 1 \\ ,:-o h\rf 1 111 0 r 1• b -eJ1l b1e . ]J)' I tiJee .

. n\

j)' . lJ

e bras k a . l lted. the I orma l at the b eo·innin a of th e , d e 1·1g hte cl ow ith . o term · . S l1e was th e work and thmks she w I'll be wit · l1 us n ext yea r. •

I

1c · n th e r i ,. ·r h as b · n 5 t hat s kat ing· is in:poss ibl e ; The f ]~nken: d e n ts w h o F unci um to wa lk to f . 1v;t5 · , . . Th ete s I111 s 1a l-c s h a v { o u n I [a 1r 1c . 1a.~ es • . . 1 t 1l e n ot. e n o ug h 1c for skat ln .(r " V 11 Ol un t rl t h e la tte r part of va cat io n . t 1e

I

-ou ,..,'rh , 5 r11·

.

r

I

n, l nti. t. f :\ eb ra ka at , ·lnH ni o ll otcl t ry 1 1 a 1. 1-, a n 2 cs~a) .' L· jl ru ·_ 9,\\hteh, w rll cl II k ' d w rl t . a 111 · ld< a I n c nsi t nt ,,·it h th tim . 0 r ,,.n a n I l~ r i lo· , ,,. rk at n -hal f pri c . T ·e th xtr.tc tccl ::-. ,,· ith ut p-in .

Tu

l ~L rs.

. ! he los t is fo und . A ftc r f ur month s of d iligent search, Mr. S . A . Baug h ma n h a s been located at M ilfo rd e b. senw rs and train in g class in chape l J ;t n ua r y IO. It was a ! p rec iatcd by a ll.

~ 11o~t

I

\1 \ < T h e gu e sts as~ jn ed the y w e r e enterta e.

fJ1 e)

J]5 ~~'

11 cf

· 1 on · ]1 tl . huma ni P ~ci e tY.1 .. Wit hdre w to th e di ffe r e n t 5 1 ·ed 11 · f fl.c11 . Iu o . o Jl' ' num e rous aames ,ve r e 111 c <::> 1 be( 0 t tlJii

l

o

.-

11 uo

The r e h ave b ee n q u1t e a. 1 it stud e nts e nt e r e d ou r s c h 00 '0 cl . (J'0 un ttl rece ntly tha t th e 0

5

o of

!Jtl f].;

wo

r. E . l. r ,,. II h r~. r turn d t 1e t w r k · h --r h u: I)a n I I1a\'ln . rr . u ffi 1. nt) I recov ' r ·cl t · 1· ;:-. 11 Hi s . _, . ,~''sur . 1_1s ret rati n t l~ t1. ~, _ at~ ndm.\ phy 1c1ans a rt that 1t ,,·as fl s. Cr w ' 11 s 1·a r · I nur in - th t k pt th I 1· .-. . t .r a tv. clurin rr th .ry 1 rotract I cont1n uat1 n [ h is illn e s . \ II h r friend s we l_co m e h e r r 'turn \Yi th ,, arm r place 111 th e ir h arts f r h e r th an e e r b ef r .

-

m. Thi f !ina of pride is pit ·, ho ,re e r as t~ey g lanc . d r and see th Fir t Y ears n their hiah stool s and their b-td: . to . the time . ' hen the y. un~· and at in hi~:;h chairs.

Norma l ha. b<'en 1. \\ e "' ·lc m into ur mids t . ll -..llO\\ n . ~ · <~ c~t rrw :t and . tudi 1u : tu d ent , wh im1 r ,. a r ! vn <.ka ,. r in r t I t 1 m lv s s ·ts l m,tk, 'ffi b-i ·nt and bert r t ach r . will

I

R IER.

llen and Bratt of room I -+• ntertain d a fe, of their f ri - nd .on aturday 'ening, 26. O aint refreshment we re ac h ·u s t receivino· an. appropriate . ou ,. n ir. ach r ti r d to their re pect1 ·e ab d d larin o- th had pent a ' r"y pi a a nt ,. n n · a~d that th ~ Iis es ll e~ and Bratt ar r o al ente rtamers. n:ong th s - pr nt ''ere Mis~ 'Ioraan, the l\1Jsses J ffr y Ba mford, Mos.e s,. R eesor, R eyman, t uaht nborou.o·h, Ldl1an Bamford, At" at r, Gooz ~· A llen and Fl ora A llen. ot

~

bile Prof. orton; fa mil y and frie nd s out d ri ving th ey met with a ~erio u s s the part) was turmng a Th e class or '93 i sl o w ly climini hing· in accid e nt. corner the sudden appearance of a do g numb e rs. T wo m ore o f th a t m morab l caused the team to tu rn veq sharply, upiJr. C. S. class h ave bee n ma 1 o ne. e tti no· the wagon. Prof. orton sustai ned Jon -sa nd Mis s 'lay \i\) ne ,, e re unite d in a fr actu re of a rib, Mrs. Norton fore -a r m the ho ly .b o nds of m atrim o ny at th e ho m e . of th e bnd e , at hig h n oon o n Christma s day, a nd jaw, a n ~ he~ ~ oth e r, Mrs. S ampson, 1894, R ev. B. B ed 11 officiatin o·. I t \Va s a the most sen ous InJury of all, a very severe Ve ry qui et affair. only relative~ and a fe w bru isin o· of th e hi p socket. Mrs. Cro well fr ie nds b e ing pre s nt. Mr. a n d Mrs. J on s was' badly bruised about the face and lowe r left the n e xt m o rning for Auburn, thei r f u- pa rt of the spine. Miss Wo rt was u ni njured. All are doing 'wel l. T he team we nt ture hom e . The G eo m e try class has take n advantage onl y a few rods and s tnpped by the roadside. of th e pl easant weath e r for surveying. Th·e E ve rett S ociety wa s called .to order H eretofore the classes di~ not com mence at 7 p. m., Friday. ] a nuary 4, by the pre s isurveying until in the winter, but owing to d e.nt. R. E . G iffin. A large n umbe r of old the ru sh of wo rk this class b eaan la s t fall, m embers we re prese nt.. Mr. Edvvard Kl utz b and may b e seen out m easurin o· the hills was duly elected presi de nt o n the first bal0 any nice · day this w inter. They are lot, 0 . H. H e rni le wa? e lec ted first v i_c e a nxiousl y waiting for the time t o come whe n presicl ent, and Mrs. Jo yce second. These the y m ay survey the ' 'o·o ld mines'' at and the remainde r o f the. corps of officers Brownville, a nd w o nderin ba 0 which division a re a ble a nd energetic society worke rs. shall h ave the honor. The outlook for the E ve re tt t his term is A close obs e rv e r may notice an air of v ery encouraging . Wi th h e r large me m prid e on the faces of th e S e cond Y ear class, b e rship. of e fficient w orkers there is n o good s in ce the ir watch cha in s are adorne d with reas ~ n w~1 ~ she sh ould not ·e clipse her la st b rig ht n ew keys. The s e k ey s belong to t~rm_ s b~-Illrant record . A most cordial inth e b ea utiful n e w · table s that have lately VItati on JS extended t o all to attend the regutake n the p lace of th e ol d d e sks in t he lar wee kly m eetings. w -r


1] 6

THE N ORJT.! !/_ -

'j -PRIMARY

~ DEPARTMENT. Lesson on Quail. F IR ST YEAR .

I

our last lesso n w talk d abo ut t he h ·11 , how ma ny kn ow who has co m, t v1s1t us this morn ing ? M rs. Quail has co m · t visit us. Good Morn ing , cbi ld r n ; ' o d Mo rni ng , Mrs. Q uai l. us, wha t ca n Mr. Bluejay has bee n to s you say abo ut th e size of Mrs. ua il, as compa red to Mr. Blu eja y? S he is la rge r than Mr. Blu eja y. 0 £ wha t is he r su it made ? H er su it is made of feathe rs. What color is the s uit whi ch she wears? She wears a brown su it. Ho w ma ny know Mr. Q ua il whe n the y see him? I know Mr. Q ua il. T ell me about h is co ll ar a nd hat. M r. Q ua il wears a black coll a r a nd hat. What a re the pa rts of th e q uail ? T he parts of the quail a re the head, neck, tr unk, wings a nd ta d. H ow ma ny have see n Mrs. Q ua il 's nes t ? I have see n he r nest. T ell me of wha t she builds it a nd whe re. S he bu il ds h er nest in a tuft of g rass, on the O"rou nd . her nest of tall gra s ) 1 n

that h i htdd

h \Vhat ~

11 ·

k ·

1 t1 ' 1 1 nes t ? I thin k n t 18 retty. Let me tell you so methmg more about her nest. .Mrs. Quail does not li ve in h er nes t a lone. A_number of her neig h bors live ill th e nest With her. H er neig hbors do this until t he y have a nest ver v full of egO"s th e n Mrs. Quail tells them 'not to come ~~~ y more and she keeps the eggs warm so they will ha tch. About how many eags do the qua ils have in I? one n~ st.? T he quads some times have thirty _eggs ;n one nest. Of what color are the eg:gs . The egg~ are pure white. Can you th1nk of somethr ng about the si ze of the

!

c

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THE

·g rs .. Th e 'gfrs f :\ I rs . ua il ar about th 5 1Z >f a m a rb l ·. 1· ift ·n r t' e n ~)' tI IU "11., s a r · Il a t h · I fr rn 11 · n ·. ~- \\ ha ch d a 11 Ill fo r a ll th ·s · littl q u d hat \ f r m a n s t ? v\ <• ·a II t h ·m a ft ck· ck f q ua il s hat ·h · I fr m n ca ll ·d a c v ·y. T h : q ua il s li · in [ ab _ut fift · ·n t t\\" c n y . I w J]) t ·II y u how :\ f rs. M rs. ua il and h T fri ·nels P inct gr . I . . ld r f rJ11 a _un S ll~ 1 n g s h o u l I -r t s h u if ant ~ J rc l ' 1th th "ir h ·a d s ut, a nd th 1ng Ill s 11 ·a r, til y ? up . 8)' ~ a n Y u t ' 11 m ,,·h y the s it in thl in all ~h Y _s it in t ha t ,,·a y s t h ·y ca n se dJre t 1 ns . do? Ilat I.S n t hin cr t h qu a l.1· cart Th ·1 ;:., qu a 1 ca n r un s wift ly . ? She W J1 a t ca n h d ,.v hi c h y u ca n not· ''"'th ca n fl y. H ow Jo n d o s t h - qu a il staY fter us?: Th c q ua 1"1 s tay s "' 1t . h u a II yea r. ,~ I1 at a h ttl to il e t a nd a fe w s ips of _d lw toil c d o s M rs. Qu a il do? A ft r a ~J tt ~ 5 tO 11 and a f w s1ps · of d e w M rs. Qua l1 fti et tl.....,e ~" whea t fi eld a nd b r a kfas ts. At w l~ before do es. s h e brea kfast ? h e breakfas t 1 sunn se sa) 5· H . · o uai1 ow ma ny kn ow what Mr. ""' M r. Quail says , ''Bob W hi te . " ? 'fPe ~hat n o ise d o th e q ua ils make· vt qua ds w hi s tl e . uail 0 1d of ~~ you s h o ul d s a little b a bY ,~ov • 11 t, what w uld u lo?

OUTLINE . Eskimo Life .

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App a ra n 3· Clim a te (a) S un, I e 4· -as ns 5· ay a nd ig ht 6. V ege ta t io n 7· Anim a l . Pe rso na l p p a ra nce f P ople I. ta tu , F ea tures, olo r, H ir 2 . Dr ss (a) Pa rts (b) Mate ri a l (c) H ow Mad e (d ) Male a nd F e male. Hous es I. Na m e 2. Mate ri a ls 3 . How Buil t? 4 . Arc hi te ct ure 5 . Fu rni t ure 6. V e ntil a ti o n 7. Su m m e r T e nts (a) Care of. Food ble a nd A nim al I. V eaeta b . How obta ined? What weapons? 2 3 . How prepared ? W hat utensils? 4 . Do th e y lay up stores? Mod es of trave l r. On sledges (a) Of wha t m ade (b ) H ow made (c) Size, U se (d) Appeara nce (e ) D raw n by d ogs (r) H ow d rive n? (2) H a rn ess (3) Food a nd Care . 2. B oats (a) K inds of (b) M a t e rial (c) Us_e . O ccup a tiO n r. Vvo m e n (a) C a r e of houses 2.

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OR 1AL CO URIER.

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fen (a) Huntina (r ) Modes of _H unting and Capturi noa ·· Seal \Malrus Bear R ein-deer Wolf E ider-duck. (b) F ishin a (r) Mod~s of3· Childre n. V II. Amusements ofr. dui ts 2. Chil dren. 2.

Wizard Fros t . FRA .-R: DEM P STER SHERM AN.

Wond r ous t hings h ave come t o pass On m_Y s~uare of w indow g l ass ; L ookmg ln i t I have see n Gl-ass no lon ge r paint ed green,T r ees whose branch es never stir,Skies witho ut a cloud t o b lur ·Bir ds b elow t h em sailin g hi o-~ "' s'k y , Chu r ch pires poin t ing t o the And a funny lit tle t own "Where t he people, up a n d down Streets of silver, to me see m L ike t he peopl e in a d r eam D ressed in finest kind s of {ace I· ' Tis a pict ure , on a spa ce S car cely larg er th an the hand Of a t iny Swit zerland ' Whi ch the wiza r d fro~t h a s d r a wn, ' T wix t the nightfa ll and the daw n ; Q uick, a nd see what h e h as done, E re ' tis st olen b y the su n!

Good-Night . SI DNEY DA Y R E.

Good-n ig ht, pretty s un , go~d-ni ght ; I 've wa~ch ed yo ur p urple and g old en lig ht W hlle you were s inking a way. And sotue one h as jus t b ee n t ellin g me You 're m a ki ng, over the s h ining se a A~dth e r beauti fu l day; ' ' Th at , Just at• the time I a m brroin bo- t o sleep ,


l J8

THE

TJ-JE /'l0RJ11fAL CO 'RI ER.

Tb e ch ildren th er e a r e t a king a peep At your face ,- bcg-innin g to s ay "Good-morni.n g!" Just wh e n I s ay good-n igh t . beautiful su n , if t hey' ve t Jd m e r igh t , I Wish you'd s ay good-m ornin g fo r me 'To t h e li tt le o n es over t he s ea.

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A glitter in the winter s un, a r ow of s h i n i n g ti ps , And d rop.:; of w.1.tc r coming- d ow n in s low a n d s Jcm n drips. What is th is m usic r eg u la r- t his r yt hm wit h u ta flaw? 'Tis the icycles <1 -wcc p ing i n a J a nu a ry U1aw .

February. F r os t h old · t h e e a rth, ' now cove rs it ; But a r are blu e h eaven h o ve r s it; T h e winds t h a t blow a r e t h e wi n d s o f s pring ; I look t h ro ug h t h e s n ow, By fait h, and lo! F lowers a r e blossoming.

w rk cl, an? h ow litt l , sa tisf:lcti n th )f' f und in ti~< ' Jr h n r ,,.h ·n th<")' ·am · 1 Y u are s ull ·o n sti nw d ,vith thi : (C\c r for ~PI lau.sc , ,·is it th · rrra\·<·\·a rd. and sp nd a lJ ttl t1m c r ·fl ·ctin~r o n tl; c sma ll ·un unt of ~1 ace whi c h th c m ig h ti <'St ,1w ;1 Ill liSt ccupY 111 a v : ry s h ort t im e . Fo r a fit of l oastfuln ·ss, wall.;: throuO'I~ th alcovc:s vf a large libra ry a n cl r rn m~J ~ how v ·r y sma ll a 1 o ni o n )f th I arnill th rc ·ntom l ·d is yc urs o r v ·r ,,·ill e. Th_ •s , 1- 'Cip<·s . f o r t h , pr ·vc n t .J n ure , { fits a r ' n ot pa t nt ·d n r \\'il l a n bar 11 be m ad' f r th p r ·scription . arl y ad a r m o re r I ss u b ject t su h arwc l< a;Jl'l th Y a r h r by x h ort d no t t let th he b c. m c hroni. . If th -'y \\' ill f ll \V :ad aclvlc ab v g 1v n, th ·y will sca p 50 a fa t .- E x clzauo·e 0 0

A Va l ent in e. WI N N -E G . HAI{ 'l'LJZY .

Remedies f or Fi ts .

A winte r' s s un s h o n c !J ee rl c.·. ly O'er th e hill s of a village fai r, \Vhe r e I w as a s tud e nt see k in g F o r p rec ·iOUs gem s, a n d t'a J·c .

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. rr It pic tured a woma n s triV 111 "' T . rn ei1; o uplift her f e lloW ted She t e lls th at t e ars a r e vva~ On ye ars n e ' e r ours ag a t l1 ·

S h e bids u s to l ook s 111 1'lil1 g 11d• o, eri Oull te A s life's l eav e s are c

VOR l!AL CO 1 fER .

T o l'Cj i e in h • fa ir whi ' p age,. F o r g-o , uu1 1 t il'.:d l> •f r.:.

. · u h ll1 0 11~hts a,.. th~·,..' pnH· d o111f rtin T my l I'll aud \\' ' ari•d :- 1 Ul. An d t h ' o ull o k f life . 'Clll<:d bri htc r . I 1·e u s 'f u l as a wh 1 '·

t h )' ca n1 to 111 ~ 11 "V al ntiue ." Th;tt ,,. ' 11 kn o w11 . r o ulallt i day . \Vh · u --if ld supc r::.titi 11 · ;H ' f 11 wedAll hearts sh uld be happy a n i rray .

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da to da) until fina lly a t utlin f th s tor can:e to her. It that fr quent int rruptlOn J:ad mad h r t r Ii connected. and "·~s d lffi d nt ab ut 1 lacina· it before the pubhc. T he tit! · "a ch en from LonO"fello'

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1(5)H RLE DICh.. E N dauo·hter !~as ~ ·i ,. n us som amu ing, as well as. mA tl ,..i 1· w e ll •d up withiu m e · t r tin · r mi nis nc s of h r f~ther. H e I ,,. u ltl wt· itc a \ ·alc utiue : Jd m allo" · d him elf to be 1nterr upted T lh · t il r, wh ,.. .· uls ar lo ud d '"hi] w ritino·. If deeply intere~ted_ 10 a By t h u g h l · that dar k c u 111 iuc. b ok he would take h is meals 111 Jle nce, Seck u ot i n l ife it · ·t o rm and hade ; 11 ith r ·peakino- nor see min<::>· ~o h~ar those lc th brig h t '-POls i u · tcad though f ew , around hi m. 1 t one t ime while l:11s daughR c 1n 111 bt r th at h o u ri · brig-hte · t \Vhc n c l u db ur ts the sun ·hin thro ugh . te r "as rec , ering from a se\ ere tllnes.s sh.e '"aallow cl t spend man · hours · 111 hts Our liv es a r c ju ·t \\'hat we lll akc t h e m; study a nd " atch him a t his \\ ork. One. ~ay They a r c u seful 1· u o t as ' "e wi 11; as she Ia u pon the sofa, her father .wn tmg But uul c. ·s t il y ar larg-ely th e f nuer God ' s p ut·po _c w e do n ot fulfil l. rapidl y at his des k, h e su dde.nly Jump.e d from his cha ir, rushed to the m11-ror a nd l.n.d ulo·ed in some most e xtraordinary fac1al « -<::.. HIPS that P ass in the N igh t," b) M iss co ntortions. H e re turned t o his desk , wrote CS!J H a r r a d e n , is the n o v e l of th day. f u r iously fo r a fe ,, m inutes, and. the n re-. Al t h o ug h M iss I:<I a rrade n m et , ith !itt! e n- peated the sce ne ~efore . th e m trror, afte r courageme n t fro m h e r p ublis h ers , he r b ook wh ich he w rote qUletly tdl luncheo:1 . He has b ee n w e ll r ce ivecl . I t v;a s c o m me nce d h ad thro\\ n h imself so com p letely m to th e whil e sh e was r cov r in o· fr o m a s e\ e r e c ha racte r that h e was creatin g that h e not illne ss an d was yet t oo ~ ea k t o write for o nl y became u nconscious of his sur~oun~ · mo re tha n h a lf an h o u r a t a tim e . S he had in bo·' but im personated in act ion and 1mag1no d efi ni te p lan in mind a t firs t but just n ation that uniq ue characte r.


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PERU, NE B RA S I<.'A. Vo L. Ill. TH! S .!S THE ONL Y N OR!IJA L SC/! 00 1~ ,>:"ON T IIF T RA I N I NG O F T E A CH ERS / N N EIJ N / I S A"/1.

No. 7

P UB LI F R \ N K H. DERT H J

T h e location is in the mid s t o f a. t l1ri v in g COIIl!nullrt y . s u r·r fJltJI!ktl IJy inOu <· ncc·., of tlw IIH>'-t wh 1 1-'0 III T he gro~tnd s , which co mpri s e s ix acres of b ea utiful n at ura l WtJOd land, rJvcrlrJC>k th · . I i,.., ... o ll r·i H i v c r· and vall m any mtles . The buildings a r e l a rg e , p l eas <l11t a nd commotli o u s , f o ur in nu111 hcr , n,m.,i ., ting o f h · m a in !-.C it stori e s and b ase m e nt, Mt . Ve rn n I a l l , a do nn ito r y f r la d i s , a two ~-otory li b rary , a n d <L b o i le r· mo h ou se, wit h a large wo 1·ks h o p attac h d. Every d e partme n t of the s c h o l is w e ll e pri p d w i th :l J! pl ian ·~-.. fo r gi v i n g- th · h '~-o t iu !:> tr u ti 11 in r espect iv e ly . Th e Che m ical and P h y s ical L a b o rato r-i e s a r c w e ll f urn is h d wi t h a ppl iance' ~-or> t h ;t t ·a <"lr 111 mb r c la sses p e rforms his ow n ex p e 1·irn e uts , acq u i r ing fa c il ity in 111a n ipul atio n , and a p1·a · tica l l<u >w le tJ g b e purs ue .

M~~~o~~~,g~~~~ ~~~o\~f:~~~/csr~~~t~~~da~~~t~ 1 ~a~i :~~ ::r~;11 t !: t s ~ 0~: ~~~ \ ~! ~:~~-\~~~

•• nt ., o f Kat 11 ral Hi ·t ry A n A s trono m ical L abo rato r y is f urn is h e d wit h a n e qu al rially JJI Oll nlc d l l!:s o p ·. T h e Eleme nta r y a n d R e v iew classes h av e a ce ss t t h ca bi n ·ts , th e l a b o r a t u 1·i s a n d u lJ s • 1-v-t t .· also suppl ied wit h a ll n ece ·s ary h el p s f o r e n ab lin g t h 111 t 111 a l< rnpl l 111a1:o t r·y of ~-o u uj , ts \ ~ 1 ' a u d t h e m faci l ity a n d s k ill in ill us t r at io n. ' ' 11 f r gi v i T h e library c onta i n s m o r e t l1an :;e v e n th o u s a n d v o lum s a n d 1 a 1n phl e t s , all s I c t c d 'th 11 ~e stude n t s all h ave t h e f r eest acces s t o t h e s e b o k s . 'l' h e R adi n g H 111 is f u r ni s h ed w'i\1h all 1t h g t· at t ar a z m es, Scie ntific a n d P r o f e ss io n a l J o u r n a ls , a n d a la r ge numb e r of daiJ y a n d w e e k ly p a p r s. l e a d in g 1\[

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O n e o p y , p e r ·c h oo l v a r . . . . . . . .. ....... . . . . ... . . 1.00 in g l c cop ies , ac h . . .. .15 All s ub ~ crlp ti ,.. n s n rc co n si d ered p erm a n ent un til orde r ed di sco n t i nued anJ arrenragcs p a i d . A :l J r ess n il co mmuni ca t io n t o T HE N oR,II AL C OU RIER ·

Ent e re d at th e Post office a t Pe ru, Neb r., as Second Class Mail Ma t te r.

Cours es of S tudy:

SCIIOOL DIRECTORY.

~here are ~wo co urs es of s t u d y - a n El e m e n tary a n d a H ig- h e r c u r s . On C0 11t pl c ti n g- t h e E l . which_ compn s es a t h oro ug h r ev iew of th e c 111111 0 n En g-li s h b r a n c h e s t g-et h · ··w it h a o u r s c i n t h 111 _ .n t~ ry s tructwn <7nd pract ice i n t -:! ac h i n g-, uncle t· t e ac h e r s s k i l le d in t h e a t:t of 1· i t ic is m, t h e s t u Ie n t s a 1-c ,.T?.1111 c 1p l g r ade cer tificate good f o r t w o y e a l·s . G r a d u ates f r o 111 <J n :JCCI d i t d Hig h f-: J·. u l- 0.1 1 cl I t: i tiO.I l' \' r t--u~ t ed a .u second grade _ce r t ifica t es, ca n 1·e v i ·wan d t a k e t h e t r· a ini n g in o n e y e ar. · C.t c •c r. · lto ld ll , On com ple tmg t h e Hig h e r , Co u r. ·e , t h e s t u d e n t is g-ra n t e d a D ip lo u1 a, w h ic h is a P 1·o f ess io n a l St t . . good fo r three y e a rs ; a nd u pon e vide n c e of s u ccess as a t e ac h e r f o 1· tw o y e a 1·s ad diti o n ·d D ' 1 .a e e r t d'i at 1 ' ' f o r lif e u 1 ·t · 11 f P 0 111 a I S "" t" Lntecl ...,. , n ess 1 15_ a owe d t o l a p s e by r eas o n o 1c av in g t h e fJJ·ofcss io n . G r ad u at e s f 1·o ,n acc r e dit e d "'I·I i n· ' "' c an~ C olleges are g tve n cre d i t fo r th e ir a tt a inm e n ts , b u t t h ey a r l.! ex p ec t e d t o ta k e t h e P r ofc :ss io n a l . o h Sch o l s p H~ PRACTI CAL SCH OOL.• Th is is th e o n ly i n s ti t u ti o n i11 t h e s ta te w i t h a ca J·c f ull y o 1 · o· a ui z~~lll e . r acb cal Sch o o l , i n whic h e v e r y o n e g r a d u a tin g :tro m e ith e r c o urse m u s t t a k e prac ti c e in th ; _ t' c 1 a nd g r ad s tr u c tion _, un~e r t h e s u p er vis io n o f e xpe ri e n c e d a n d s kill e d c r itic te a c h e r s . ac u a w ork of iukjlrd ln pnv a t e f a JUil ies , a nd i n c lu b s , is m o d erat e i n cos t , r a n g in g f t·o 1n tw o t o th n:: e a nd a h a lf d 11 W Bo ee . o ars p r J~~~ & M . R . R. p a s s e_s thro u g h t h e tow n. m a ki ng t h e sc h ool c o nv e ni e nt of a ccess fr o m m os t p a rts f tl P r· . _ p~TES. Th e r e 1s m uch g re ate r d e m a ll d f o r th e g r ad u a t e s f t·o m th e sc h oo l than w e a r e a blo t Ie tnt · at~~Clha a_nd F a <? u lty a r e g l a d to c o rres p o n d with Sc h oo l B o a rd s a nd t o put th e m. in co mmuni cati~ e -~ s~ppl)-. . w o a t e see km g e n g a g em ent s to t e ac h. n WI 1 o r adudo~N~~ANCE_). Stu de n t s ~an e n t e r a t <~.n y t i m.e , but th e b est tim e i s in S e pte m b e r. A m at ri c ul a ti o n f f COUl~~s ~:1:~u 1 re_d o n e n t e nn g f o r th e fi r s t tim e . This i s a ll t h a t i s 1·e qu ire d exc e pt th a t st ud e nt s o f tl:ee -lii cr~'" break~ge . m g 1 n th e L a. b o r atol'ies, a r e r e qui red to pay a l a b o r a t o r y fee o f o n e d o ll a r a t e rm an d f or actt~ ;J Gra du a t es r eturn fo r a pos t- o- r a du ate . d emand. o c o urs e , comple t e o r p a rt ia l , pu r s umg such studies a .:; t heir t as t e s or n eect -

PHIL O MATH EA N . Soci ety e ve r y F ri d a y .eve nin g du_rin g th e sc h ool ter ms n t 7 o ' c loc k . . All student s a r e c o r d 1a ll y m v 1ted to JOin u s in our li ter a r y w or k . espec1 a lly those o f th e high er cours e i'I O NA J OHNSTON , Pr esi d ent. E V E RETT SOCI ETY . E very Frida y ev.e l~ ing durin g th e sc h oo l t e rm ~. l'' c w stud ent s ar e es Pec iall y invit ed t o JOin u s 111 o ur lit erary wor k . EDW ARD C LUTZ, Pres. WELLINGTONIAN S OC IETY. Society every Frid ay e ye nin g dur i ng th e sc h oo l ye ar. All s tu dents who w is h the de v el o p~e!'t wh1 c h ea rn es t lit erary wo rk a lone ca n g i ve a r e cordially invited to VISit us. H ARVEY SA MS, P r es. JUNIOR SOCIETY. Juni or soci e tv every F_r id ay e':'e !tin g d urin g sc h oo l vear . Stu de nt s and friends are cord i a ll y In v it ed t o VI Sit u s. C-HA S. M ARS, Pres . LECTU R E BURE A U. Orga niz ed a s a perm a n ent in stituti o n o f th e sch ool. It is unde; !h e au s Pic es o f th e Phil o math en':'• Ev erett. W e llin g toni a n and Junior s o c~et1 es. The best lecturer s o f t o d ay Will be se cure d . J . J. Kin g , ch a irm a n; L etti e M. Lott, secr etary: A. J . N ea l , treasurer.

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Catalogue and Prices Furnished on Application.

STAFF. P . M. Whiteh'ead , First Lieutenant and Acting Adjutant.

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GRACE D . CULBE RTSON.

;

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M A :'o £1!

CAR R U :

Tell J\te Little Snowflake.

95 .

INFANTRY-COMPANY A. Hugh Joy , 2d Li eut. Chas. Tu c k er, 1st Serg ent.

CO MPANY B. 0 . M . Good, tst ·Li eut, Sr. N ea l W y n e, 1st Li ent. , Jr. L . A . Ch ase , S e r~. and Acting 2nd L ie ut. Sa m J . S torm. 1st S erg.

IS\

T e ll u1 little now fl a k e, dan c ing in th e sky, f t h l a !id yo u a m e fro m , up a b ov e s o hig h . I the re j and l au crh ter a ll th e long day t h r o u gh, Th a t y u bri u n- uch ple a ure d o wn t o earth with you ? I , ur land o'erfl o win•.,. with ri c h b eauties r a r e, T h-at y o u at t er ' r o u nd yo u uns hine ev' r ywhere? Has y o ur fair god ·mo th e r - yo n g r ay g l oomy cloud , Wi th t h e g ift of f ai rie s l a t e ly b een endo w e d? o rn e, yo u tin y s nowfl a k es, a n swe r m e, I pray! the h om e en c h a nte d th a t yo u l e ft to-day ? D o e s ome fair y mus ic r each y ou r tin y ear, T h a t y ou s kip a nd dance s o , all th e ''!a y down h e r e ? A r e y ou listen ing for each n o t e and trill, T h a t yo u are s o s ile nt, a ll the w a y so s till ? '\'\h e n y our journ ey's ende d, and your dancing o ' er, D o yo u not h ave lon g in gs for y our home of y ore? N estle d in so closely on your down y b ed, Do y ou not f eel lo n e ly, a nd th e l ong nig ht ' s dread Can it b e the v o ices of th e c hildre n nea r To y our lonely co r ner, co mfo rt brin g a nd c h e e r ? Or do es y et th e mus ic th a t b e wic h e d the air, R e ach y our tiny ear now, w rappe d in s ilen c e there? I s it thi s th a t m a k es you scatte r s uns hin e s till, A n d with joy and gladness, all the moments fill ? Oh, you tiny snowflake, could you speak to me, B e autiful, e n chante d , mig ht yo ur s tory b e . Y o u c ould tell of f a iries dwe lling up on hig h, Of y our home so che erful, up in yon g r ay s ky. But the many questions th a t I lon g to kno w, vVould r e main unanswered, e ' en if asked I tro w, So I sit enraptured as you pas s me by, On your way s o s ilent, down to earth from sky.

011 , you little snowflake , clad in robes of w hite, K ee p on tripping, dancin g thro ugh th e d ay a nd night. You are w e lco m e ' m o n gs t u s , for y ou bring goo d che e r Things look bri g ht a nd happy w ith your f a ces n e ar. ' When th e field's are he a p e d with " s ilent d eep a nd white , Then sad th o ughts a nd g loomy take t h eir onward flight And we s ay, "fair s nowflakes, th a nks to you w e raise You dispelled o ur s adn e s s, joy now fills our d ays. " '

Profile for Peru State College Library

1894-1895 Normal Courier issues 5 & 6  

1894-1895 newspaper issues 5 and 6 for now Peru State College, Peru, Nebraska

1894-1895 Normal Courier issues 5 & 6  

1894-1895 newspaper issues 5 and 6 for now Peru State College, Peru, Nebraska

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