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CAMBERWELL SOUTH PRIMARY SCHOOL

Student Engagement & Well-Being Policy

Produced in consultation with the school community To be read in conjunction with Effective Schools are Engaging Schools – Student Engagement Policy Guidelines

Term Four, 2009

Principal: Brigid O’Keefe School Council President: Katrina Ketsakidis


Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

Table of contents 1 SCHOOL PROFILE STATEMENT........................................................................................................................ 4 2 WHOLE-SCHOOL PREVENTION STATEMENT................................................................................................... 5 AN EFFECTIVE LEARNING COMMUNITY................................................................................................. 5 3 RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES....................................................................................................................... 7 GUIDING PRINCIPLES........................................................................................................................................... 7 EQUAL OPPORTUNITY ........................................................................................................................................ 7 THE VICTORIAN CHARTER OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES ACT 2006 ......................................7 STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES........................................................................................................................... 8 BULLYING AND HARASSMENT.............................................................................................................................. 9 DEFINITIONS........................................................................................................................................................ 9 TYPES OF BULLYING............................................................................................................................................. 9 RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE COMMUNITY.....................................................................................11 STUDENTS’ RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES.................................................................................................... 11 PARENTS’ AND CARERS’ RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES...............................................................................12 STAFFS’ RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES......................................................................................................... 13 4 SHARED EXPECTATIONS ............................................................................................................................... 14 PRINCIPAL, TEACHERS, STAFF.......................................................................................................................... 14 PARENTS ........................................................................................................................................................... 15 STUDENTS.......................................................................................................................................................... 16 5 SCHOOL ACTIONS AND CONSEQUENCES........................................................................................................ 17 PREVENTION AND EARLY INTERVENTION – CREATING A POSITIVE SCHOOL CULTURE................................17 1.CLEARLY DEFINING AND TEACHING THE SCHOOL’S VALUES, BELIEFS AND EXPECTATIONS .......................17 2.PROVIDING STUDENTS WITH THE SKILLS AND ATTRIBUTES TO BE PRO-ACTIVE AND INFLUENTIAL MEMBERS OF THEIR CLASS, SCHOOL AND LOCAL COMMUNITY.........................................................................17 3.IMPLEMENTING BEST PRACTICE TEACHING, BASED ON ENGAGEMENT IN LEARNING THROUGH INQUIRY. .18 4.ESTABLISHING, IMPLEMENTING AND EVALUATING SCHOOL- AND SYSTEM-WIDE TRANSITION PROCESSES TO TRACK STUDENTS PROGRESS ...................................................................................................................... 19 5.ESTABLISHING CONSISTENT SCHOOL-WIDE PROCESSES TO IDENTIFY STUDENTS AT RISK OF DISENGAGEMENT FROM LEARNING................................................................................................................... 20 6.ESTABLISHING CONSISTENT SCHOOL-WIDE PROCESSES AND PROGRAMS FOR EARLY INTERVENTION IN BEHAVIOUR ....................................................................................................................................................... 20 LINK FOR CYBER BULLYING – DOCUMENT OF PROCESSES FOLLOWED FOR PREVENTION AND EARLY INTERVENTION................................................................................................................................................... 20 ........................................................................................................................................................................... 20 INTERVENTION – A TARGETED RESPONSE FOR INDIVIDUAL STUDENTS .........................................................21 SUSPENSION AND EXPULSION........................................................................................................................... 23 DISCIPLINE PROCEDURES ................................................................................................................................. 23 SUSPENSION....................................................................................................................................................... 23 GROUNDS FOR SUSPENSION.............................................................................................................................. 23 EXPULSION......................................................................................................................................................... 24 GROUNDS FOR EXPULSION................................................................................................................................ 24 PROCEDURES OF THE SUSPENSION AND EXPULSION OF A STUDENT ..............................................................24 6 APPENDIX...................................................................................................................................................... 25 SUPPORT PROGRAMS AND STAFF......................................................................................................... 25 FORMS / TEMPLATES................................................................................................................................. 25 SUPPORT PROGRAMS AND STAFF......................................................................................................... 26 ROLE OF THE STUDENT WELFARE COMMITTEE.............................................................................................. 26 ROLE OF VISITING PROFESSIONALS ................................................................................................................. 26 GUIDANCE OFFICER (G.O.)............................................................................................................................... 26 SPEECH THERAPIST (S.P.)............................................................................................................................... 26 PROGRAM /STUDENT SUPPORT GROUP (P.S. G.)..........................................................................................26 REFERRAL TO THE COMMITTEE....................................................................................................................... 27

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Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

THE REFERRAL PROCESS AT CAMBERWELL SOUTH .........................................................................................27 THE INTEGRATION PROGRAM.......................................................................................................................... 27 7 REFERENCES................................................................................................................................................... 32

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Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

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School profile statement

Camberwell South Primary School is located in Glen Iris, one of Melbourne’s eastern suburbs, in the City of Boroondara. Established in 1925, the school has achieved a unique identity in the local and wider community. Our school has an ongoing commitment to the achievement of excellence and the maintenance of an environment where learning is valued and supported by all. As a community of learners, we strive for educational innovation, best practice and learning experiences that foster the skills and attributes that equip students to be significant contributors to tomorrow’s world. Learning potential is maximised by recognising and accepting individual differences and providing stimulating relevant educational experiences. We are a learning community that focuses on helping students to grow into the adults of tomorrow who are: flexible, resilient, caring and kind . They are thinkers, global citizens, inquirers, self responsible, collaborative, healthy, knowledgeable and principled. The school is organised in multi-age groups based on the VELS levels. Substantial research supports our belief that learning is developmental and this structure provides greater opportunities for individual growth and development. Specialist programs in Music, Art, Physical Education and LOTE play an important role in the balance of the Educational program. Integral to and supporting the enhancement of learning and social development across the school are support programs, enrichment programs and intervention programs. Excellent facilities and playground spaces provide for an ideal environment for our students. During the last few years there has been a steady increase in enrolments. Our students are predominantly English speaking and drawn from the residential suburbs of Glen Iris and neighbouring Camberwell. The school has a Student Family Occupation of 0.11, indicating a primarily professional parent community. The school has a very supportive parent community and a very active and interested school council. Many parents work in classrooms, involve themselves in school activities, and assist with fund raising and a huge range of volunteer activities. It is a warm and inclusive community that enjoys working together for the ongoing advantage of the children in its care.

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Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

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Whole-school prevention statement

Camberwell South’s philosophy and policies reflect the values of Australian Schooling: respect, excellence, inclusiveness, integrity, responsibility, pride and optimism. We are committed to a Learning Community where all members can achieve their true potential; where all members are both supported and challenged, thus creating the relationship required for successful learning. The aim is to provide a challenging and motivating learning environment that provides students with opportunities for participation and for gaining a sense of achievement. This is a place where:     

norms are developed which explicitly indicate how we wish to be treated – as a class, member of staffor member of the whole school community. Positive relationships form the basis of how we interact with each other there is an opportunity for continuous learning for all members of the community effective teams underpin effective learning programs planning for Effective Learning and Teaching implicitly reflects the guiding principles our belief is that six major constructs underpin learning and teaching across all key-learning areas

AN EFFECTIVE LEARNING COMMUNITY Support

Challeng e

RELATIONSHIP Learning for Deep Understanding  Inquiry  Collaboration  Communication  Self Responsibility  Human Development

The school is a harmonious environment where students are eager to learn; staff show a commitment to their professional learning; and relationships between staff and students are respectful and positive. The environment for learning and teaching is safe, caring and supportive, and engages students in learning that has value and meaning beyond the instructional context, connecting them to the wider community. The 2009- 2012 Strategic Plan confirms the school’s belief in the commitment to goals and targets that focus on achieving and maintaining high standards in learning, engagement and well-being. We understand the importance of an inclusive curriculum that promotes 5


Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

positive social values and behaviours, enabling all students to acquire knowledge and skills; value diversity; and build a culture of learning, community and engagement. The whole school emphasis on embedding the Thinking and Inquiry Process has directed resources and expert personnel to maximise the capacity of all teachers to develop and implement a challenging curriculum that is relevant, meaningful and which engages students in active learning. A P-6 approach to and focus on social competency and student leadership sees consistent practices throughout the school: • • • • • •

Social circles and circles of shared concern establish procedures in all classes. School and class norms provide the positive framework for how we treat each other as a class, staff and community. Restorative Practices are part of the school culture and daily routine. Student leadership programs feature at all levels. Consistent review of P-6 social skills programs meet current and emerging needs of the students in our care. Strengthening effective home/school communication supports common understandings and is the most effective support system for all students.

Early identification of vulnerable students is encouraged and supported. The Student Welfare Committee, which represents all levels in the school and includes the Integration Coordinator and Guidance Officer, is able to establish educational, emotional and social support for vulnerable students, and monitors and evaluates their progress. Camberwell South recognises the importance of transitions during education. Our understandings of our students - both as learners and individuals - are sensitively communicated to ensure smooth and positive transition processes during primary school. Our school works with local feeder kindergartens and secondary schools to maximise the opportunity of any student entering or leaving our community. Newer members, parents and students, are supported through the introduction to and establishment of parent and student social networks for harmonious integration into the culture of our school.

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Rights and Responsibilities

Guiding Principles Camberwell South values the right of every member of the school community to fully participate in an educational environment that is safe, supportive and inclusive. All members of our community are entitled to, and expect to, be treated with respect and dignity.

Equal Opportunity The Equal Opportunity Act 1995 sets out the types and grounds of discrimination that are unlawful, and aims to promote community recognition and acceptance of the equality of men and women, and the equality of people of all races, regardless of their religious or political convictions, their impairments or age.

The Victorian Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities Act 2006 Human Rights are the basic entitlements that belong to all of us because we are human beings. The Camberwell South community values each person equally, fairly and reasonably regardless of our differences, whether these are in appearance, background, race or gender. The Charter sets out a list of 20 rights that reflect the following four basic principles: Freedom, Respect, Equality, and Dignity. It outlines a vision of human rights for all Victorians and affirms that all people are born free, and are equal in dignity and rights. The Charter requires public authorities, including government schools and their employees, to act compatibly with human rights and to consider human rights when making decisions and delivering services: • • • •

the right not to be discriminated against the right to privacy and reputation the right to freedom of thought, conscience, religion and belief cultural rights

Along with the entitlement of human rights comes a responsibility to respect other human rights. All Camberwell South staff act compatibly with the Charter and give proper consideration to human rights when making decisions. Staff will: • • •

encourage compliance with the Charter support others to act compatibly with the Charter, and respect and promote human rights

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Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

Students with Disabilities Camberwell South complies with The Disability Standards for Education (2005), which makes more explicit the obligations on schools and the rights of students under the Disability Discrimination Act (1992). The standards cover enrolment, participation, curriculum development, student support services, and harassment and victimisation. As an education provider, the Camberwell South community will make ‘reasonable adjustments’ to accommodate a student with a disability. An adjustment is a measure or action taken to assist a student with a disability to participate in education and training on the same basis as other students. An adjustment is reasonable if it does this while taking into account the student’s learning needs, balancing the interests of all parties affected, including those of the student with the disability, the education provider, staff and other students. In determining whether an adjustment is reasonable, we take into account information about: • • • •

the nature of the student’s disability his or her preferred adjustment any adjustments that have been provided previously any recommended or alternative adjustments

This information might come from the student, an associate of the student, independent experts, or a combination of these people. The Principal and/or delegate ensures that the student, or an associate of the student, has timely information about the processes for determining whether the proposed adjustment would cause unjustifiable hardship to the provider. They ensure that these processes maintain the dignity, respect, privacy and confidentiality of the student and the associates of the student, consistent with the rights of the rest of the community. Camberwell South must also consider all likely costs and benefits, both direct and indirect, to the provider, the student and any associates of the student, and any other persons in the learning or wider community, including: • • • •

costs associated with additional staffing, providing special resources or modifying the curriculum costs resulting from the student’s participation in the learning environment, including any adverse impact on learning and social outcomes for the student, other students and teachers benefits of the student’s participation in the learning environment, including positive learning and social outcomes for the student, other students and teachers, and any financial incentives, such as subsidies or grants, available to the provider if the student participates

The DDA and the Education Standards do not require changes to be made if these would impose unjustifiable hardship to a person or organisation. 8


Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

Bullying and harassment Harassment and bullying is when someone, or a group of people, upset or create a risk to another person's health and safety - either psychologically or physically - or their property, reputation or social acceptance on more than one occasion.

Definitions Harassment is any verbal, physical or sexual conduct (including gestures) which is uninvited, unwelcome or offensive to a person. Bullying is repeated oppression, physical or psychological, of a less powerful person by a more powerful person or group.

Types of bullying There are three broad categories of bullying: 1. direct physical bullying e.g. hitting, tripping, and pushing or damaging a person’s property. 2. direct verbal bullying e.g. name calling, insults, homophobic or racist remarks, verbal abuse 3. indirect bullying - this form of bullying is harder to recognise and often carried out behind the bullied student’s back. It is designed to harm someone’s social reputation and/or cause humiliation Indirect bullying includes: • • • • •

lying and spreading rumours playing nasty jokes to embarrass and humiliate someone mimicking encouraging others to socially exclude someone damaging someone’s social reputation and social acceptance

Cyber bullying is a form of bullying which is carried out through an internet service such as email, chat room, discussion group, online social networking, instant messaging or web pages. It can also include bullying through mobile phone technologies such as SMS. It may involve text or images (photos, drawings). Cyberbullying – prevention and

intervention

Camberwell South Primary School aims to provide a safe and friendly environment for students and staff and to encourage care, courtesy and respect for others. All persons have a legal right to protection from harassment, either explicit or subtle, under the Commonwealth Sex Discrimination Act and the Victorian Equal Opportunity Act. As a community we promote positive proactive social and emotional behaviours and responses in accordance with our school norms and the practices of Restorative Justice. Concerns of harassment and bullying are responded to in an appropriate and timely manner according to a Staged Response.

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Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

If a student sees another person being harassed or bullied it is expected they will report it to an appropriate person such as a teacher or their parent/s. Students are explicitly taught the language of intervention and the affirmative role they can take as a bystander.

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Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

Rights and Responsibilities of the Community Students’ Rights and Responsibilities Regarding learning, students have a right to: • • • • • • • •

learn in a fun way learn all the subjects that are required be provided with a variety of learning experiences and opportunities learn without disruption have assistance with learning have a recess and lunch break from learning use laptops, books and other resources when these are required in the learning program borrow books from the library

Regarding treatment, students have a right to: • • • •

be respected be listened to and have a turn to speak be treated as they would treat others choose who they wish to play with

Regarding safety, students have a right to: • • •

feel safe at school play in the playground and feel safe have safety rules that are clearly explained and followed through

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Regarding learning, students have a responsibility to: • •

make sure that everyone has the opportunity to learn without disruption look after all of our books and resources and to share them with others

Regarding treatment, students have a responsibility to: • • •

listen to others and respect their ideas treat others in the way they wish to be treated include others in the playground and in the class

Regarding safety, students have a responsibility to: •

play safely and follow the school and classroom norms


Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

Regarding equipment and resources, students have a right to: • • •

be provided with facilities and equipment that are safe and clean have safe places to store their property expect their things will be safe at school

Regarding equipment and resources, students have a responsibility to: • • •

look after all the equipment they use look after their property ask permission from other people before they use their things

Parents’ and Carers’ Rights and Responsibilities Parents and carers have the right to:

Parents and carers have a responsibility to:

expect that their child will be educated in a safe and supportive environment in which care, courtesy and respect for the rights of others are encouraged

support the school in maintaining a safe and respectful learning environment for all students

express a concern about the wellbeing of their child at school and to expect that the school will respond

ensure the school is informed when the well-being of their child is affected

expect the highest possible development of their child’s potential at school be fully informed of their child’s progress

promote positive educational outcomes for their children by taking an active interest in their child’s educational progress and modelling positive behaviours as stated in the school norms ensure their child’s regular and punctual attendance engage in regular and constructive communication with school staff regarding their child’s learning and act upon it inform the school of their child’s particular needs

• •

expect the specific needs of their child to be accommodated as far as reasonably practical within the school

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Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

Staffs’ Rights and Responsibilities Teachers have a right to: •

expect that they will be able to teach in an orderly and co-operative environment

Teachers have a responsibility to: • • •

expect that students will demonstrate behaviour that is respectful and cooperative inside and outside the classroom context • •

• •

work in a supportive working environment where contributions are valued and respected access support for management of student behaviour

be respected as a professional by peers, students, parents and the greater community

be informed, within Privacy Requirements, about matters relating to students that will affect the teaching and learning program for each student

• be offered valid opportunities for Professional Learning

• • • •

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engage in professional behaviour with peers, students, parents and the community seek support and early intervention for students in their care

• •

know the content they teach know their students and how they learn plan and assess for effective learning create and maintain safe and challenging learning environments use a range of teaching strategies and resources to engage students in effective learning

• •

be informed of and regularly updated in the management of

maintain professionalism and confidentiality within the working environment maintain open channels of communication work as part of a team

fairly, reasonably and consistently implement the engagement policy resolve, to the best of their abilities, problems that occur in the classroom follow school management procedures and develop consistency in teaching and learning approaches, demonstrating commitment to the school’s teaching philosophy teach relevant social skills

participate in professional learning, practice drills and to skill students in their care in effective safe school environments


Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

discipline, medical alerts, occupational health and safety issues and other areas of the school organisation that contribute to a safe school environment

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Shared expectations

Camberwell South Primary School has a responsibility to provide an educational environment that ensures that all students are valued and cared for, where they feel that they are part of the school, and where they can engage effectively in their learning and experience success. The school norms of: • • • • • • • •

treating people as individuals working together helping others caring for others being friendly using manners at all times listening to each other respecting each other

are accepted practice of all our community. These are inclusive of the Australian Government’s nine values for Australian Schools: care and compassion; integrity; doing your best; respect; fair go; responsibility; freedom; understanding, tolerance and inclusion; and honesty and trustworthiness.

Principal, Teachers, Staff The Principal, teachers and school staff are responsible for providing an educational environment that ensures all students are valued and cared for, feel they are part of the school and can engage effectively in their learning and experience success. The staff at Camberwell South has consistent expectations of themselves and their colleagues, setting and maintaining a high standard of competence in practice. The Principal, teacher and staff will: 1. provide opportunities for all students to learn. This is demonstrated by: • • • • •

maintaining a safe and challenging learning environment accepting responsibility for the provision of high quality teaching and learning knowing the students and how they learn best having high and consistent expectations of all students accessing resources and personnel to assist with furthering student learning

2. treat students with respect, courtesy and dignity by: 14


Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

• • • •

developing and providing appropriate, relevant and challenging curriculum that gives all students the opportunity to achieve success in their learning fostering a learning environment which promotes positive relationships, the sharing of concerns and the language of positive conflict management treating all students fairly, without bias and making all decisions based on the students’ best interests consistently implementing whole school prevention and early intervention strategies

3. maintain professional relationships with parents, guardians and caregivers through: • • •

communicating and consulting with parents when making decisions about a student which impact on the education or well-being of a student listening to and taking appropriate action when responding to parent concerns working in collaborative relationships with students’ families and communities, and respecting the range of cultural contexts and backgrounds they may represent

4. value collegiality with other teachers and staff by: • • • • •

treating each other with respect valuing the input of others sharing expertise and knowledge supporting each other, particularly those new to the profession sharing information relating to the well-being of students.

Parents Parents of Camberwell South can expect that their children will work in an environment that supports their cognitive, social and emotional development. The School Community can expect the parents of Camberwell South Primary School to: • • • •

reflect the school norms and values and demonstrate positive and appropriate behaviours towards all members of the school community respect the differences (culture, gender, beliefs, behaviour and learning) of all families and staff be involved in the learning process and progress of their child support their child’s regular and punctual attendance at school

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Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

Students The students of Camberwell South can expect to come to school to learn and to play in a safe and supportive environment. The school community of Camberwell South Primary School can expect the students to: • • • • •

treat each other, their teachers and the community with care and respect, and behave according to the school norms and values participate fully in their learning program and respect the rights of all other students to learn recognise inappropriate behaviour and respond with appropriate action attend school punctually and regularly increasingly take responsibility for their own learning

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School Actions and Consequences

Prevention and Early Intervention – Creating a Positive School Culture Camberwell South has ensured a rigorous and consistent emphasis on Student Engagement: a feature reflected in the implementation of the 2009-2012 Strategic Plan and the previous school charter. Acknowledgement of the importance of qualitative social, academic and emotional development is the core curriculum. Best practice teaching and learning and a holistic belief that all students, given the best possible opportunity, will succeed at school provide the foundations for a broad and inclusive developmental learning program. Relationship building and the engagement of students in a positive and thriving school culture is supported by: 1. clearly defining and teaching the school’s values, beliefs and expectations 2. providing students with the skills and attributes to be pro-active and influential members of their class, school and local community 3. implementing best practice teaching, based on engagement in learning through inquiry 4. establishing, implementing and evaluating school- and system-wide transition processes to track students’ progress 5. establishing consistent school-wide processes to identify students at risk of disengagement from learning 6. establishing consistent school-wide processes and programs for early intervention in behaviour

1. Clearly defining and teaching the school’s values, beliefs and expectations •

• •

Feature, share and value whole-school norms as the standards of engagement. Adopt a whole-school approach to the culture of positive classrooms through social circles, class meetings and communities of shared concern Encourage a culture of supporting classmates and peers in both learning and play. Promote prompt and regular attendance at school.

First 2 weeks Social skills.doc

2. Providing students with the skills and attributes to be pro-active and influential members of their class, school and local community • • •

Specifically teach students group work skills and provide opportunities to develop in a range of group roles and responsibilities. Value active student voices in the classroom, specialist programs and at decisionmaking levels within the school. Provide a range of opportunities for students to develop their understanding of themselves in alternative learning environments. o Excursions o Buddy programs 17


Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

o Camps and sleep overs o Interschool events o Extension and enrichment programs

Social Skills Program Program 2010 SENIOR UNIT LEADERSHIP PROGRAM?? Link to Cyberbullying Prevention Program 3. Implementing best practice teaching, based on engagement in learning through Inquiry • •

Understand our students: their relative strengths and weaknesses and preferred learning styles, and scaffold programs accordingly. Empower our students to take increasing responsibility for their academic and social learning.

Link to two year Inquiry Overview

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Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

4. Establishing, implementing and evaluating school- and system-wide transition processes to track students progress •

Facilitate a successful transition into, within and beyond Camberwell South. o Kindergarten to Prep o Year 6 transition o Within school transitions o Transition into the school at level other than prep o Information for families

• Link to school transition documents:

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5. Establishing consistent school-wide processes to identify students at risk of disengagement from learning • • • •

Whole-school assessment timeline supports learning programs. Ongoing assessment including teacher jusgement & obsevations Home / school communications, including wiki’s email, diaries and verbal Administer student attitude to school surveys P-6., discuss with staff and student cohort

6. Establishing consistent school-wide processes and programs for early intervention in behaviour •

Collect and collate information from kindergartens/previous schools/previous classes Collect information in the playground and the classroom. • each and practice the principles of Restorative Justice. • School actions and consequences are linked to Restorative Practices and school management processes • Communicate and understand protocols for accessing the Student Welfare Committee and personnel. • e-cases: monitor and follow up patterns of non-attendance or poor punctuality. Behaviour flow chart[1].doc

Link for cyber bullying – document of processes followed for prevention and early intervention. .

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Intervention – a targeted response for individual students From time to time, student learning, behaviour and attendance may indicate a targeted response is necessary. The systematic collection of evidence - including learning and attendance data, anecdotal evidence and discussion with the student, other teachers and parents - may lead to support mechanisms being adopted. This could facilitate one or more of the following targeted intervention strategies: • • • • • •

Institute one-to-one discussions with the student involved, to establish an understanding of the circumstances of the behaviour. Involve parents to support their child in correcting the area of concern. Collect data to support intervention procedures. Involve other school personnel, visiting professionals, Welfare Committee. Develop a Learning Improvement Plan in consultation with the family for ongoing management of the student’s progress. Ensure support for student and teacher in the establishment and maintenance of inclusive and consistent classroom and out-of-class strategies.

TARGETTED RESPONSE: SCHOOL ACTIONS or Short Term Response 1. Teacher–student discussion. 2. Teacher may seek further input from other staff. 3. Refer to tests, incident books, e-cases, etc. 4. Classroom teacher or Welfare Representative contacts parents. 5. Refer to Welfare Committee, discuss with Welfare Coordinator. Iinput of visiting professionals as recommended by Welfare Committee 6. Further testing/data may be required. 7. Convene a meeting of student support group – including parent, teacher, student, other staff members. 8. Develop and implement Learning/behaviour/attendance Improvement Plan. 9. Regularly review LIP in accordance with school procedures. 10. Inform other staff on a needs basis.

For academic, behavioural and social concerns that evidence indicates as longterm or urgent In these instances, more structured and targeted intervention is required. In such cases, the involvement of the Principal, Welfare Coordinator, parent and Student Welfare Committee will be sought as a first action. • • • •

Discuss the student’s behaviour or learning with the child to establish the circumstances and how they feel. Communicate with parent/s, Principal and or Welfare Coordinator. Refer to the Welfare Committee for advice/support (if not already accessed). Seek involvement of visiting professionals and possibly establish a connection with wider community agencies. 21


Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

•

The Program Support Group is responsible for development/review of flexible academic/behavioural/attendance plans which explicitly teaches and/or builds replacement behaviours and practices.

SCHOOL ACTIONS for Long Term or Urgent Response Some or all of the following will be applicable. School Actions 1. Class teacher collects data/information. 2. Inform Principal & / or welfare coordinator 3. Teacher, Welfare Coordinator or Principal makes contacts with parent/s. 4. Teacher submits referral form to unit representative or Welfare Coordinator. 5. Contact Guidance Officer. 6. Convene Student Support Group Meeting with student, parent, teacher, Principal or advocate, and support staff as required. 7. Develop Learning/Behaviour Improvement Plan. Develop measurable goals for Learning/Behaviour Improvement. 8. Regularly review goals according to school procedures.

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Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

Suspension and Expulsion Discipline procedures Camberwell South has established programs and practices that encourage students to be self responsible, to accept responsibility for their actions, and to participate fully and positively in their education. When considering formal suspension or expulsion, schools are required to follow the procedures listed in section 4.3 of the DEECD guidelines published in Effective Schools are Engaging Schools Student Engagement Policy Guidelines. In all cases, the students parents, the Principal and the Welfare Coordinator will be involved.

Suspension Children are only excluded from school in situations where all other measures have been implemented without success or an immediate suspension is the only appropriate action in response to the student’s behaviour. In a staged response, a range of options will be considered: • • • •

withdrawal of privileges temporary withdrawal from the class & / or playground(supervision to be organised by Principal/assistant Principal) immediate communication with parent/carer and Behaviour Learning Plan goals activated or reviewed in-school suspension, with appropriate and meaningful work provided for the student to continue their learning away from the class and the playground

Grounds for suspension The Principal may suspend a student if, while attending school or travelling to or from school or engaged in any activity away from the school (including travel to and from that activity) the student: • • • • • • •

behaves in such a way as to threaten or constitute a danger to the health, safety or well-being of any person commits an act of significant violence against a person causes significant damage to, or destruction of, property or is knowingly involved in theft of property possesses, uses or deliberately assists another person to use prohibited drugs or substances fails to consistently comply with any reasonable and clearly communicated instruction from a staff member consistently behaves in a way that interferes with the well-being, safety or educational opportunities of another student/s consistently engages in behaviour that vilifies, defames, degrades or humiliates another person based on age, gender, impairment, physical features, race, religion, sexual orientation or political belief 23


Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

Expulsion The Principal is responsible for student expulsion. This responsibility cannot be delegated to any other person in the school. When expulsion is unavoidable, the Principal is responsible for demonstrating that expulsion is the only appropriate measure and that all other measures consistent with a staged response have been implemented in good faith, and without success.

Grounds for expulsion The Principal may expel a student if, while attending school or travelling to or from school or engaged in any activity away from the school (including travel to and from that activity) the student: • •

does anything for which they could be suspended exhibits behaviour is of such a magnitude that - having regard for the need of the student to receive an education compared to the need to maintain the health, safety and well-being of other staff and students the school and the need to maintain the effectiveness of the school’s educational programs - an expulsion is the only available mechanism

The Principal, in determining whether to expel a student, must ensure that expulsion is appropriate to: • • • • •

the behaviour for which the student is being expelled the educational needs of the student any disability or additional learning needs of the student the age of the student the residential and social circumstances of the student

Procedures of the Suspension and Expulsion of a student Procedures for Suspension and Expulsion Ministerial Order #184 took effect on 1 July 2009. Procedures before, during and following suspension and expulsion are provided in the Student Engagement and Well-Being Guidelines for Schools.

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Appendix

SUPPORT PROGRAMS AND STAFF 1. Role of the Welfare Committee 2. Role of Visiting Professionals 3. Program/Student Support Group 4. Integration Program FORMS / TEMPLATES 1. Referral form - Student Welfare Committee 2. Individual Learning Plan template 3. GO referral form 4. Speech Pathology referral form - teacher/parent 5. Student Absence Learning Plan template

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SUPPORT PROGRAMS AND STAFF Role of the Student Welfare Committee The Student Welfare Committee works specifically to assist students in their social, intellectual and emotional development. It meets fortnightly. Membership comprises the Welfare Coordinator, Integration Coordinator, School Guidance Officer and a representative from each level’s team. The key functions of the committee are: • • •

to maintain ongoing communication with staff regarding the welfare of students to communicate with, and support, the welfare of staff and the parent community to coordinate all support agencies, both within and outside the school

Role of Visiting Professionals Guidance Officer (G.O.) The Guidance Officer is in attendance for one half a day of each week. The G.O. attends fortnightly Welfare Committee meetings held each two to four weeks, and provides support and guidance at all levels of our community. Specifically, the G.O.’s role is inclusive of the following: • • • •

working as a main support person for the well-being of both students and staff providing advice, guidance and support to parents and teachers regarding the intellectual, social and emotional development of students conducting relevant assessments to assist in the support of students and provide reports for the welfare team providing assistance and support to staff and parents in support group meetings when requested

Speech Therapist (S.P.) Camberwell South has the services of a Speech Therapist for one day a fortnighton a systems needs and priority basis. The S.P. also provides support and guidance for parents, teachers and students. Due to the limited availability of S.P. time in the school, the role is most focussed on the assessment of students and the provision of effective strategies to enable parents and teachers better assist students in areas of deficiency in languagerelated learning.

Program /Student Support Group (P.S. G.) A P.S.G. comprises the principal and/or delegate, parents, classroom teacher, Integration Aides and professionals who have been supporting the school and/or the family. It aims to: 26


Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

• • • • • •

develop an understanding of the child or young person utilise data collection and monitoring systems that will inform decision-making identify a child’s learning, social, emotional, behavioural and environmental needs, and the support resources the student requires for improvement involve key specialist learning and well-being support staff develop an Individual Learning Plan with a child’s classroom teachers/s and ensure support to implement the plan support referrals to community support agencies for specialist interventions delivered in partnership with the student support group/school strategies

Referral to the Committee Teachers and parents are able to seek advice from the Welfare Committee, and the referral process allows for fair and equitable access to the committee. In some instances, the Principal or the Welfare Coordinator will prioritise the work of the committee. A compliance with confidentiality is an expectation of all work of the committee.

The referral process at Camberwell South • • • •

Teacher discusses concern with level team representative, other welfare representative, Principal or Assistant Principal. Welfare referral form (4) is lodged. Discussion and recommendation/s are made at the next committee meeting. Subsequent support is activated as required.

The Integration Program • • •

In accordance with the Equal Opportunities Act, Camberwell South provides equal educational opportunity for students with disabilities. The Principal and/or delegate, the Integration Coordinator, are responsible for the transition, and the academic, social and emotional development, of students integrated into the Camberwell South educational community. Each integration child and their family are supported by a Program Support Group. It will meet at least once each term.

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Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

FORMS -1. Referral to Student Health and Well-being Committee

REFERRAL TO STUDENT HEALTH AND WELL-BEING COMMITTEE Students Name:

Age :

Year Level

Teacher Referring Student: …… …………………………………………… 1. WHAT ARE YOUR CONCERNS?

2. HOW LONG HAVE YOU HAD THESE CONCERNS?

3. FROM WHOM HAVE YOU SOUGHT HELP / ADVICE?

4. DOES THE CHILD PRESENTLY HAVE A LEARNING PLAN?

5. IS ANY OTHER AGENCY OR PROFESSIONAL CURRENTLY INVOLVED? Signed: Date: Reviewed by Student Health and Well-being Committee on …… Recommendations

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Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

2. Individual Learning Plan Template

INDIVIDUAL LEARNING PLAN

NAME: PURPOSE OF MEETING: DATE: PRESENT: STRENGTHS, IMPROVEMENTS, ISSUES DISCUSSED AT THE INTERVIEW

LEARNING GOALS

HOME ACTIVITIES

SCHOOL/CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES

Review will be organised by parent or teacher as required. Parent Signature…………………Teacher Signature…………………………… 29


Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

3. Guidance Officer Referral Form 4. Speech Pathology Referral Form - teacher 5. Speech Pathology Referral Form – parent

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Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

6. Student Absence Learning Plan Template Appendix 6 - Student Absence Learning Plan template Students who are taking extended absences from school must have a Student Absence Learning Plan to support the education of students who are absent from school for an extended period. It may also be useful to develop a Return to School Plan for students who have been absent for an extended period. Student name Year level Reason for absence:

Date of last day of school:

Date

Date of return to school:

Description of the educational program: Teachers/year-level coordinators should include elements of the learning program the student will be missing while away. The learning program should enable the student to more easily re-engage in class activities when they return.

Activities for the student to undertake while away from school:

For example, if a student is travelling, what research can they undertake, or what presentations can be prepared?

Outcomes for the student to achieve:

Resources that the student may find useful:

Agreed role of parents/carers in supporting the absence learning program:

Contact details for the student to stay in touch:

School phone number:

School contact person: Signature of parent/carer:

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Signature of Principal:


Student Health and Well-Being Policy 2009

7

References

Effective Schools are Engaging Schools - Student Engagement Policy Guidelines School Accountability and Improvement Framework Effective Schools are Engaging Schools Disability Standards for Education Safe Schools Charter of Human Rights Equal Opportunity Act Education and Training Reform Act 2006

VIT Teacher Code of Conduct

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http://www.education.vic.gov.au/healthwellbeing/wellbeing/codeofconduct.htm http://www.education.vic.gov.au/management/schoolimprovement/accountability/default.htm http://www.eduweb.vic.gov.au/edulibrary/public/stuman/wellbeing/segpolicy.pdf http://www.education.vic.gov.au/healthwellbeing/wellbeing/disability/handbook/legislation.htm http://www.education.vic.gov.au/healthwellbeing/safety/bullying/default.htm http://www.education.vic.gov.au/healthwellbeing/safety/bullying/cyber/default.htm http://www.education.vic.gov.au/management/elearningsupportservices/www/default.htm http://www.education.vic.gov.au/studentlearning/programs/multicultural/tchhrcharter.htm http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/vic/consol_act/cohrara2006433/ http://www.det.vic.gov.au/hrweb/divequity/eeo/eeoact.htm http://www.education.vic.gov.au/about/directions/reviewleg.htm

http://www.vit.vic.edu.au/files/documents/1543_Code-of-Conduct-June-2008.pdf


SEWB Policy