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FORUM A look into national initiatives for PRSSA

By Lauren Gray National President PRSSA is only as strong as its members. As such, this year for PRSSA, our focus will be on our members: improving membership benefits and working toward our national initiatives. The first step is making sure our members are familiar with and understand all of our PRSSA member benefits. These benefits are showcased online (http://www.prssa.org/about/ Join/Benefits/index.html). By knowing these benefits, you are on the way to getting the most out of your membership. Key benefits include:

What To Expect This Year AT The prssa 2012 National Conference in san francisco BY Maikalina Madali Communications Director If there are three consistent factors expected of every year’s PRSSA National Conference, it would be: to gain applicable knowledge, a choice location and the ability to create cherished memories. The PRSSA

Featuring

Timothy Jordan

2012 National Conference, to be held from October 1216, will promptly deliver all of the above without skipping a beat. The program, the renowned city of San Francisco, Calif. and the company of more than 1,000 PRSSA members will make this Conference one to never forget. The program sessions are filled with professionals that are well-versed in the public relations field and have graciously taken time away from

sports FASHION

Applying for scholarships and awards, to help fund your education

T R A V E L

Access to social media channels, to discuss industry news and trends with members around the country and abroad

The Publication of the Public Relations Student Society of America

“Bridge the Gap”

Attending events, such as National Conference and National Assembly

Interacting with the Internship Center to secure job and internship opportunities

FALL 2012 | VOLUME 45, ISSUE 1 | www.prssa.org/FORUM

HEALTH CARE

demanding careers to impart their knowledge. Speakers were chosen to cover many different aspects of public relations such as fashion, sports, social media, travel, international relations and much more. For example, Saturday keynote speaker Timothy Jordan is a senior developer advocate for Google and has taught on multiple platforms of media. The general manager of global and marketing communications for San

Francisco-based Zynga, Dani Dudeck, will offer strategic advice on moving a company forward and other insight on the technology sector. Matt Prince, the 20-something senior manager of executive communications for the Walt Disney Company, plans to speak on branding yourself as a professional. These presenters, along with many others, will provide information that every aspiring public relations student can build a solid foundation on. The Conference will also host a Career Development Exhibition where attendees will be able to mix and mingle with professionals that will open doors for countless opportunities. All these experiences presented will help pave the path to a successful career. Beyond the program, the location of San Francisco is perfect for convenience, leisure and adventure. Conference will be held at the Westin San Francisco Market Street, which is in walking distance to anything that you could ask for during a visit. Restaurants, shopping venues and entertainment are guaranteed to be within a 10-minute stroll. Although all the essentials you would need are central, why not explore everything that makes San Francisco worldknown? During their free time, attendees will be able to venture out and taste the mouth-watering seafood at Fisherman’s Wharf, listen to the calm waves at Ocean Beach, take in the breathtaking scenery at Golden Gate Bridge,

illustration by Kaitlin Bondra

Our national initiatives help our Society follow along our national tagline:

Advancing the profession and the future professional.

SEE NATIONAL, PAGE 2

OPEN FORUM

3

Create and maintain your PRSA/PRSSA Relationship

4

Learn what happened at this year’s :LeadershipRally.

learn about events that changed history and experience the cultures of Chinatown, Little Italy and San Francisco itself. Granted, all that San Francisco has to offer is impossible to cover within five days, but it’ll be worthwhile to take full advantage of a city that marches to its own beat. By the time attendees leave, they will understand the meaning of the statement, “I left my heart in San Francisco.” The combination of an eventfilled Conference and a city with a life of its own sets the stage for an unforgettable trip. Conference not only gives attendees the opportunity to meet professionals but it also makes way for peers from across the nation create relationships. It will allow for different perspectives to be presented and open up the floor to new concepts. The “Day in the Bay” opening night social will be a great way to kick-off the weekend and make new acquaintances. As the Conference program for each day ends, it is encouraged to make plans with members of other PRSSA Chapters to explore the city together. Those who have attended a PRSSA National Conference in the past can attest to the frequency of new acquaintances becoming lifelong friends. Conference will also give attendees the chance to construct team bonding that will advance the Chapter as a whole. This long weekend will provide the opportunity to strengthen existing bonds as new ones are established. The tools that each attendee will bring back to their respective Chapters will set a new pace for future members. From what attendees will learn at Conference to the adventures that await them in San Francisco, this will be an invaluable experience that will further growth for individuals on a professional and personal level. The PRSSA 2012 National Conference will not only “Bridge the Gap” between the present and a bright future, but also what is currently known and what is yet to be discovered.

7

Discover your PRSSA Member Benefits.


FORUM

Fall 2012 | Volume 45, Issue 1 | www.prssa.org/FORUM

NATIONAL

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

These initiatives include: Community Service

Staying Active After Summer Internships

High School Outreach Mini-Competitions PRSA/PRSSA Relationship Month PRSA Ethics Month

k n a th

! u o y

&

The Diversity Initiative The FUNdraising Bowl The Bateman Case Study Competition Attending National Conference, National Assembly and Leadership Rally Applying for scholarships and awards Developing a Chapter Development Session for National Conference

By Samantha Scribner Waynesburg University

Hosting a Regional Conference

You spent months researching internships, applying and interviewing for positions and waiting for the call to say you got the job. As any talented PRSSA member would, you worked diligently to excel at every task assigned to you by your internship supervisor. The internship affirmed your love of public relations, honed a few of your skills and created new passions and projects.

Starting a student-run firm or applying for National Affiliation Submitting Chapter News Participating in these initiatives will improve your Chapter and get your Chapter involved on a national level. Chapter participation in the initiatives will also help you become eligible for PRSSA’s Star Chapter Award. As a Society, we will continue working toward advancing our students, improving ethical standards, accepting all aspects of

FORUM® STAFF 2012-2013

Editor in Chief Ashley Mauder Design Editor Kaitlin Bondra Copy Editor Jeni Kmic Managing Editor Lauren Stahl Advertising Manager Lauren Tennet Blog/ Staff Assistant Kelsi Rupersburg FORUM® is published three times a year for PRSSA members. The opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the Society or staff. The Editor in Chief reserves the right to refuse all copy. Article submissions, comments and suggestions may be made via email to the FORUM® Editor in Chief at a-mauder@onu.edu. FORUM® is produced by students at Ohio Northern University in Ada, Ohio.

diversity, including all students and coming together as a membership. I encourage all of our Chapters and members to get involved in these national initiatives and take advantage of these benefits this year. Strive to advance your Chapter to excellence and leave a legacy for future leaders of your Chapter and our Society.

&

weeks reminiscing on an excellent summer internship, you might find yourself wondering how to stay engaged with the connections you made during your summer. As someone who finds herself in the same situation, I have gathered a few tips for ways to extend the glow of a great learning experience.

The Day-of Competition at National Assembly

Now what? If you’ve spent the past few

2

Send a note Nothing beats the old-fashioned, formal sentiment of a mailed (that’s right – snailmailed) thank you note. Sending a sincere and well-written note that details your appreciation for the opportunity and at least one specific thing you learned during the summer will leave a lasting impression on your supervisor and open paths for continued communication. Connect through social media Make the effort to connect through LinkedIn if you

haven’t already – but be sure to reach out with a personalized message. Instead of sending the customary memo, communicate your desire to remain connected throughout the school year and into your professional future. Don’t limit yourself to just your supervisor, but also consider contractors, clients and coworkers you met along the way. Ask for a recommendation from your supervisor. This action can spur your employer to remember the projects you completed and the special skills you brought to the position. Just don’t forget to remember to thank your internship supervisor for the accolade. Don’t discount Twitter as a means to stay involved after your internship ends. If you follow your supervisor and the company you interned for, consider retweeting interesting articles or thoughts from SEE INTERNSHIPS, PAGE 4

Marketplace Advocacy

A Powerful Public Relations Tactic BY Kristi Jacobsen Elon University Alum The field of public relations continually evolves to include profoundly influential campaigns. Marketplace advocacy, a new term to academia, is one specific tool being used by corporations worldwide. When I was working on a research project, my professor, Barbara Miller, had written a book on her research in marketplace advocay called,“Generating Public Support for Business and Industry: Marketplace Advocacy Cam-

paigns”, it explained that marketplace advocacy is a powerful strategic communications tool that is used by corporations to promote a product, service or industry function while influencing policy and public opinion. According to Miller, this method of communications is often used by organizations promoting risk-related products such as tobacco, gas, oil, coal and pharmaceuticals. The campaign appeals to common values and beliefs and can be used to distract attention from concerns about possible issues,

while gaining public support for an organization. Ideally, students should keep in Environmentally based campaigns serve as one example of marketplace advocacy campaigns. For example, General Electric’s (GE) Ecomagination campaign works to influence a broad range of stakeholders to support its efforts in creating clean technology to solve environmental problems. Over the past seven years, GE has utilized various communications tactics as part of its Ecomagination campaign.

These tactics include television commercials, a high-tech website, social media, news coverage, internal communication initiatives and a print advertisement campaign. According to the GE website, the campaign strives to increase public awareness of the commitment GE has made to develop clean technology and sustainable infrastructure to solve environmental challenges while increasing financial gains. With its global reach and integrated components, EcoSEE ADVOCACY, PAGE 3

SOCIAL MEDIA CONNECTION FOLLOWERS, FRIENDS & MORE Next Twitter Chat

Sept. 17

Follow the Twitter chats using #PRSSA.

PRSA Webinar

Blog

CONNECT MORE

Available Until Dec. 31

PRSSA Progressions

Knowing Your Business is Good PR

Look for new posts each week! A great way to enhance your portfolio and gain experience. http://progressions.prssa.org/

PRSSA National Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/#!/ prssanational

Find webinars and more at http://www.prsa.org/Learning/Calendar/list/all

FORUM ADVOCACY

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2 magination fully meets the criteria to be considered marketplace advocacy. It fits the mold not because of the large amount of planning and money spent on audience engagement, but because of the message and the integration of the campaign into the core business model. In the “Ecomagination 2010 Annual Report,” GE specifically states that the campaign is a business strategy. A careful look at the advertisements and communication efforts reveal that GE is not attempting to sell a specific product, but instead is promoting a general idea. The idea is centered on environmental responsibility and the opportunity for growth in the clean technology sector. Ecomagination as a whole has made great strides toward innovative technologies that help increase environmental responsibility. The corporation has seen much success surrounding the campaign. According to the “Ecomagination: 2010 Annual Report,” GE generated more than $85 billion in revenue from Ecomagination services since the launch of the campaign. Ecomagination serves its marketplace advocacy purpose of showcasing the opportunities GE has to offer to this innovative field while impacting the public’s opinions and the political environment surrounding GE’s industry developments and financial goals. Marketplace advocacy can be an effective public relations strategy. It penetrates deeply into a corporation’s core so that all involved understand the importance of the campaign and can speak on its behalf. As an outcome, marketplace advocacy can allow corporations to change their business strategies in order to turn the political environment in their favor, increase revenue, protect their market and form a positive brand image. This powerful tactic adds even more depth to the public relations field and provides a way to make an impactful and positive change for our client’s business and the world.

Fall 2012 | Volume 45, Issue 1 | www.prssa.org/FORUM

How to Create and Maintain your PRSA/PRSSA Relationship By Melinda Biegen Fashion Institute of Technology Building and maintaining relationships with public relations professionals is an important step to furthering our career aspirations in the public relations industry. As PRSSA members, we have the opportunity to connect with members of our local PRSA Sponsor Chapters to form meaningful networks, enhance our industry knowledge and receive valuable advice for a professional future. But is your PRSSA Chapter taking the initiative to create and maintain a relationship with your PRSA sponsor Chapter? October is PRSA/PRSSA Relationship Month, and it’s right around the corner! These four tips will help your PRSSA Chapter build and maintain a stronger relationship with your PRSA Sponsor Chapter that will benefit members with industry knowledge and guidance. A good relationship with your PRSA sponsor Chapter will lead to successful Chapter programming and initiatives. Your Chapter could even be eligible for the PRSA/PRSSA Relationship Teahan Award. However, don’t just limit the relationship to October. Take advantage of everything PRSA has to offer and create your own professional development opportunities involving PRSA members throughout the year. This will establish a strong, mutually beneficial relationship for years to come.

Chapter meetings. This is a great way to educate members about the various sectors of public relations, agency versus corporate, the transition from student to professional and more. Plus, it makes meetings educational and interactive! Ask members which areas of public relations they’re interested in learning more about, so the meeting is beneficial. If you need help finding professionals or alumni, contact your Chapter’s Professional Adviseor and Faculty Adviseor for assistance. If distance is an issue, try Skyping or engaging in Twitter chats.

A simple way to meet and connect with local PRSA members is to reach out and invite them to your PRSSA

Attending your PRSA Sponsor Chapter’s events and workshops serve as great opportunities to strengthen a relationship, but it’s even better to host your own! Not only will members gain event planning experience, but also an increased knowledge and network. By inviting PRSA members to professional development events, your Chapter’s members will be able to seek guidance and form connections on a more personal level. For example, the FIT PRSSA Chapter hosts an annual “Connections Dinner” to network with public relations professionals in an intimate setting. This event gives FIT PRSSA members the advantage to gain a mentor and learn about internship opportunities. Consider inviting your Chapter’s alumni, experienced public relations professionals and your PRSA Sponsor Chapter’s New Professionals members.

24 Volunteer at PRSA events and workshops

Reach out to your PRSA sponsor Chapter’s Volunteer Chairperson to learn how your PRSSA Chapter members can volunteer at award ceremonies, socials and workshops. Volunteering is a great opportunity to build relationships with local PRSA professionals and support their Chapter initiatives. Everything from event set-up to guest check-in allows your Chapter to gain networking opportunities with public relations professionals and allows the professionals to meet the next generation of public relations practitioners. PRSSA Chapter members will also see firsthand how these functions are just one of the many benefits of being a PRSA member.

1 3 Invite PRSA members to Chapter meetings

3

Host a professional development event

Mentor PRSA Professionals

All relationships should be mutually beneficial. In order to create and maintain a strong relationship, your Chapter should strive to provide assistance and guidance to your PRSA Sponsor Chapter. Volunteering is always a great way to offer services, however, many experienced professionals lack the knowledge that public relations students hold. For example, when the FIT PRSSA Chapter invited Bari Rafferty, Director of Ketchum’s New York office, she encouraged members to share their knowledge of social media and Internet marketing trends. Host various workshops with your Chapter’s members and your PRSA Sponsor Chapter’s members that allow everyone to learn how to utilize the latest public relations and digital trends and their benefits for business.

WANT MORE NEWS? VISIT US ONLINE AT http://progressions.prssa.org/ If you can’t wait until the next issue of FORUM for public relations tips and industry news, check out the Progressions. It is updated regularly with posts from professionals and other Chapter members. Some of the recent posts have been included: Gearing Up For A Google Keynote–National Conference

Developing Your Chapter Through Event Planning

PRSSA Through a Mentor’s Eyes

August Twitter Chat Highlights: “Setting Your Chapter Up For Success”

Take Your Opportunity to Network

Timothy Jordan’s presentation is just one part of the morning program on Saturday – after he speaks, several PRSSA award recipients will be celebrated and attendees will head into the Chapter Roll Call part of National Conference! This event starts on Saturday, Oct. 13 at 9 a.m.

As any member of an organization will say, development takes time and effort; not just from executive members, but from everyone involved. Development is an ever-changing process that never ceases. If an organization reaches its goals, new ones must be set or it risks becoming stagnant.

The post is a Q&A between FORUM Editor in Chief Ashley Mauder and Jennifer Braner, an account/media intern at marketing and brand communications agency Harris D. McKinney. Braner graduated from DePaul University in 2012, where she served as the vice president of Chapter programming.

Students discussed their Chapters’ traditions and practices as well as what they are excited for in the upcoming year. This post reviews highlights of the chat. What did you learn from the August chat? What does your Chapter do to stay active and involved? What advice do you have for other Chapters?

Networking is a beneficial opportunity that PRSSA has to offer. Through Twitter chats, national events, PRSA/PRSSA events and other activities--PRSSA gives students a chance to increase their networking opportunities as well as relationship building.


FORUM

Fall 2012 | Volume 45, Issue 1 | www.prssa.org/FORUM

NATIONAL

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

These initiatives include: Community Service

Staying Active After Summer Internships

High School Outreach Mini-Competitions PRSA/PRSSA Relationship Month PRSA Ethics Month

k n a th

! u o y

&

The Diversity Initiative The FUNdraising Bowl The Bateman Case Study Competition Attending National Conference, National Assembly and Leadership Rally Applying for scholarships and awards Developing a Chapter Development Session for National Conference

By Samantha Scribner Waynesburg University

Hosting a Regional Conference

You spent months researching internships, applying and interviewing for positions and waiting for the call to say you got the job. As any talented PRSSA member would, you worked diligently to excel at every task assigned to you by your internship supervisor. The internship affirmed your love of public relations, honed a few of your skills and created new passions and projects.

Starting a student-run firm or applying for National Affiliation Submitting Chapter News Participating in these initiatives will improve your Chapter and get your Chapter involved on a national level. Chapter participation in the initiatives will also help you become eligible for PRSSA’s Star Chapter Award. As a Society, we will continue working toward advancing our students, improving ethical standards, accepting all aspects of

FORUM® STAFF 2012-2013

Editor in Chief Ashley Mauder Design Editor Kaitlin Bondra Copy Editor Jeni Kmic Managing Editor Lauren Stahl Advertising Manager Lauren Tennet Blog/ Staff Assistant Kelsi Rupersburg FORUM® is published three times a year for PRSSA members. The opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the Society or staff. The Editor in Chief reserves the right to refuse all copy. Article submissions, comments and suggestions may be made via email to the FORUM® Editor in Chief at a-mauder@onu.edu. FORUM® is produced by students at Ohio Northern University in Ada, Ohio.

diversity, including all students and coming together as a membership. I encourage all of our Chapters and members to get involved in these national initiatives and take advantage of these benefits this year. Strive to advance your Chapter to excellence and leave a legacy for future leaders of your Chapter and our Society.

&

weeks reminiscing on an excellent summer internship, you might find yourself wondering how to stay engaged with the connections you made during your summer. As someone who finds herself in the same situation, I have gathered a few tips for ways to extend the glow of a great learning experience.

The Day-of Competition at National Assembly

Now what? If you’ve spent the past few

2

Send a note Nothing beats the old-fashioned, formal sentiment of a mailed (that’s right – snailmailed) thank you note. Sending a sincere and well-written note that details your appreciation for the opportunity and at least one specific thing you learned during the summer will leave a lasting impression on your supervisor and open paths for continued communication. Connect through social media Make the effort to connect through LinkedIn if you

haven’t already – but be sure to reach out with a personalized message. Instead of sending the customary memo, communicate your desire to remain connected throughout the school year and into your professional future. Don’t limit yourself to just your supervisor, but also consider contractors, clients and coworkers you met along the way. Ask for a recommendation from your supervisor. This action can spur your employer to remember the projects you completed and the special skills you brought to the position. Just don’t forget to remember to thank your internship supervisor for the accolade. Don’t discount Twitter as a means to stay involved after your internship ends. If you follow your supervisor and the company you interned for, consider retweeting interesting articles or thoughts from SEE INTERNSHIPS, PAGE 4

Marketplace Advocacy

A Powerful Public Relations Tactic BY Kristi Jacobsen Elon University Alum The field of public relations continually evolves to include profoundly influential campaigns. Marketplace advocacy, a new term to academia, is one specific tool being used by corporations worldwide. When I was working on a research project, my professor, Barbara Miller, had written a book on her research in marketplace advocay called,“Generating Public Support for Business and Industry: Marketplace Advocacy Cam-

paigns”, it explained that marketplace advocacy is a powerful strategic communications tool that is used by corporations to promote a product, service or industry function while influencing policy and public opinion. According to Miller, this method of communications is often used by organizations promoting risk-related products such as tobacco, gas, oil, coal and pharmaceuticals. The campaign appeals to common values and beliefs and can be used to distract attention from concerns about possible issues,

while gaining public support for an organization. Ideally, students should keep in Environmentally based campaigns serve as one example of marketplace advocacy campaigns. For example, General Electric’s (GE) Ecomagination campaign works to influence a broad range of stakeholders to support its efforts in creating clean technology to solve environmental problems. Over the past seven years, GE has utilized various communications tactics as part of its Ecomagination campaign.

These tactics include television commercials, a high-tech website, social media, news coverage, internal communication initiatives and a print advertisement campaign. According to the GE website, the campaign strives to increase public awareness of the commitment GE has made to develop clean technology and sustainable infrastructure to solve environmental challenges while increasing financial gains. With its global reach and integrated components, EcoSEE ADVOCACY, PAGE 3

SOCIAL MEDIA CONNECTION FOLLOWERS, FRIENDS & MORE Next Twitter Chat

Sept. 17

Follow the Twitter chats using #PRSSA.

PRSA Webinar

Blog

CONNECT MORE

Available Until Dec. 31

PRSSA Progressions

Knowing Your Business is Good PR

Look for new posts each week! A great way to enhance your portfolio and gain experience. http://progressions.prssa.org/

PRSSA National Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/#!/ prssanational

Find webinars and more at http://www.prsa.org/Learning/Calendar/list/all

FORUM ADVOCACY

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2 magination fully meets the criteria to be considered marketplace advocacy. It fits the mold not because of the large amount of planning and money spent on audience engagement, but because of the message and the integration of the campaign into the core business model. In the “Ecomagination 2010 Annual Report,” GE specifically states that the campaign is a business strategy. A careful look at the advertisements and communication efforts reveal that GE is not attempting to sell a specific product, but instead is promoting a general idea. The idea is centered on environmental responsibility and the opportunity for growth in the clean technology sector. Ecomagination as a whole has made great strides toward innovative technologies that help increase environmental responsibility. The corporation has seen much success surrounding the campaign. According to the “Ecomagination: 2010 Annual Report,” GE generated more than $85 billion in revenue from Ecomagination services since the launch of the campaign. Ecomagination serves its marketplace advocacy purpose of showcasing the opportunities GE has to offer to this innovative field while impacting the public’s opinions and the political environment surrounding GE’s industry developments and financial goals. Marketplace advocacy can be an effective public relations strategy. It penetrates deeply into a corporation’s core so that all involved understand the importance of the campaign and can speak on its behalf. As an outcome, marketplace advocacy can allow corporations to change their business strategies in order to turn the political environment in their favor, increase revenue, protect their market and form a positive brand image. This powerful tactic adds even more depth to the public relations field and provides a way to make an impactful and positive change for our client’s business and the world.

Fall 2012 | Volume 45, Issue 1 | www.prssa.org/FORUM

How to Create and Maintain your PRSA/PRSSA Relationship By Melinda Biegen Fashion Institute of Technology Building and maintaining relationships with public relations professionals is an important step to furthering our career aspirations in the public relations industry. As PRSSA members, we have the opportunity to connect with members of our local PRSA Sponsor Chapters to form meaningful networks, enhance our industry knowledge and receive valuable advice for a professional future. But is your PRSSA Chapter taking the initiative to create and maintain a relationship with your PRSA sponsor Chapter? October is PRSA/PRSSA Relationship Month, and it’s right around the corner! These four tips will help your PRSSA Chapter build and maintain a stronger relationship with your PRSA Sponsor Chapter that will benefit members with industry knowledge and guidance. A good relationship with your PRSA sponsor Chapter will lead to successful Chapter programming and initiatives. Your Chapter could even be eligible for the PRSA/PRSSA Relationship Teahan Award. However, don’t just limit the relationship to October. Take advantage of everything PRSA has to offer and create your own professional development opportunities involving PRSA members throughout the year. This will establish a strong, mutually beneficial relationship for years to come.

Chapter meetings. This is a great way to educate members about the various sectors of public relations, agency versus corporate, the transition from student to professional and more. Plus, it makes meetings educational and interactive! Ask members which areas of public relations they’re interested in learning more about, so the meeting is beneficial. If you need help finding professionals or alumni, contact your Chapter’s Professional Adviseor and Faculty Adviseor for assistance. If distance is an issue, try Skyping or engaging in Twitter chats.

A simple way to meet and connect with local PRSA members is to reach out and invite them to your PRSSA

Attending your PRSA Sponsor Chapter’s events and workshops serve as great opportunities to strengthen a relationship, but it’s even better to host your own! Not only will members gain event planning experience, but also an increased knowledge and network. By inviting PRSA members to professional development events, your Chapter’s members will be able to seek guidance and form connections on a more personal level. For example, the FIT PRSSA Chapter hosts an annual “Connections Dinner” to network with public relations professionals in an intimate setting. This event gives FIT PRSSA members the advantage to gain a mentor and learn about internship opportunities. Consider inviting your Chapter’s alumni, experienced public relations professionals and your PRSA Sponsor Chapter’s New Professionals members.

24 Volunteer at PRSA events and workshops

Reach out to your PRSA sponsor Chapter’s Volunteer Chairperson to learn how your PRSSA Chapter members can volunteer at award ceremonies, socials and workshops. Volunteering is a great opportunity to build relationships with local PRSA professionals and support their Chapter initiatives. Everything from event set-up to guest check-in allows your Chapter to gain networking opportunities with public relations professionals and allows the professionals to meet the next generation of public relations practitioners. PRSSA Chapter members will also see firsthand how these functions are just one of the many benefits of being a PRSA member.

1 3 Invite PRSA members to Chapter meetings

3

Host a professional development event

Mentor PRSA Professionals

All relationships should be mutually beneficial. In order to create and maintain a strong relationship, your Chapter should strive to provide assistance and guidance to your PRSA Sponsor Chapter. Volunteering is always a great way to offer services, however, many experienced professionals lack the knowledge that public relations students hold. For example, when the FIT PRSSA Chapter invited Bari Rafferty, Director of Ketchum’s New York office, she encouraged members to share their knowledge of social media and Internet marketing trends. Host various workshops with your Chapter’s members and your PRSA Sponsor Chapter’s members that allow everyone to learn how to utilize the latest public relations and digital trends and their benefits for business.

WANT MORE NEWS? VISIT US ONLINE AT http://progressions.prssa.org/ If you can’t wait until the next issue of FORUM for public relations tips and industry news, check out the Progressions. It is updated regularly with posts from professionals and other Chapter members. Some of the recent posts have been included: Gearing Up For A Google Keynote–National Conference

Developing Your Chapter Through Event Planning

PRSSA Through a Mentor’s Eyes

August Twitter Chat Highlights: “Setting Your Chapter Up For Success”

Take Your Opportunity to Network

Timothy Jordan’s presentation is just one part of the morning program on Saturday – after he speaks, several PRSSA award recipients will be celebrated and attendees will head into the Chapter Roll Call part of National Conference! This event starts on Saturday, Oct. 13 at 9 a.m.

As any member of an organization will say, development takes time and effort; not just from executive members, but from everyone involved. Development is an ever-changing process that never ceases. If an organization reaches its goals, new ones must be set or it risks becoming stagnant.

The post is a Q&A between FORUM Editor in Chief Ashley Mauder and Jennifer Braner, an account/media intern at marketing and brand communications agency Harris D. McKinney. Braner graduated from DePaul University in 2012, where she served as the vice president of Chapter programming.

Students discussed their Chapters’ traditions and practices as well as what they are excited for in the upcoming year. This post reviews highlights of the chat. What did you learn from the August chat? What does your Chapter do to stay active and involved? What advice do you have for other Chapters?

Networking is a beneficial opportunity that PRSSA has to offer. Through Twitter chats, national events, PRSA/PRSSA events and other activities--PRSSA gives students a chance to increase their networking opportunities as well as relationship building.


FORUM INTERNSHIPS

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2 your supervisor or company. Go the extra step and occasionally tweet findings that pertain to your internship supervisor or company and include the appropriate Twitter handles – just make sure that your information is timely and relevant. Extend an olive branch If you believe that your PRSSA Chapter could benefit from some of the same lessons you learned under the direction of your internship supervisor, invite him or her to speak to your Chapter. Work with your Chapter Adviser or a professional development coordinator to develop a speaking topic that best suits the needs and interests of your Chapter, then coordinate the ideal speaking time and place with your internship supervisor. Inviting someone from your internship to visit your college will allow him or witness your planning skills and your involvement with the Chapter. You’ll also gain the experience to serve as a liaison between practicing public relations professionals and young college hopefuls. Volunteer to freelance or continue a project If you exceeded expectations at your summer internship, your supervisor may miss your work ethic and your talent. Volunteer to continue an ongoing project, such as clipping or blogging, until the company trains a fall intern. Bridging this gap for your supervisor will stand out as a willingness to continue learning and growing as a public relations practitioner. Volunteering to freelance can indicate to an employer that you’ve developed a true passion for the work. Recommend and recruit Ready to move on but resistant of breaking ties? Keep the connection alive by recommending some of your best Chapter members as possible interns for the future. If your past supervisor trusts your instincts, he or she will be grateful if you send top picks his or her way. Share internship postings from the company with your Chapter and consider hosting the company during a professional development event or job/ internship fair.

Fall 2012 | Volume 45, Issue 1 | www.prssa.org/FORUM

Leadership Rally — Beginning a New Year for PRSSA By Katie Hozan Ohio Northern University As a college student, when meeting new people, the question of what your major is usually comes up. For public relations majors, this may require an in-depth explanation as to what public relations really is. However, there are a few situations where this explanation is not necessary. The PRSSA Leadership Rally is one of them. On June 1-3, PRSSA Chapter leaders from all over the country flew to Scottsdale, Ariz. to attend the annual Leadership Rally. Serving as a great start Chapter leaders just beginning their terms, the weekend was comprised of speakers, workshops on leadership skills, group brainstorming and friendship. At the beginning of any leadership position, there is a combination of excitement and uncertainty for the upcoming year. Everyone is anxious, wanting to leave a mark, but sometimes, the how isn’t as clear. Leadership Rally provided a great opportunity for Chapter leaders to share and build upon one another’s ideas and create a plan of action. Throughout the weekend, the passion and commitment that each leader had for PHOTOgraphy by | erica brown

Students gathered at the Leadership Rally in Scottsdale, Ariz.

PRSSA was clear. Whether sharing secrets of success or shortcomings, the end goal was to foster stronger PRSSA Chapters. One of the many highlights of the weekend was the keynote presentation by Cathy Blanchard, APR, partner and general manager, Phoenix, Allison + Partners. Blanchard presented on the topic of “Follow the Leader” and spoke to the different styles of leadership. Not only did attendees learn their personal leadership style, but also how to identify and work with other styles effectively. The weekend retreat also included with rotating breakout sessions. Topics such as recruiting and maintaining a diverse membership, building strategic plans and defining leadership styles were discussed, as well as discussions between leaders from Chapters of a similar size. These sessions provided leaders with numerous ideas for the upcoming year. The 2012 Leadership Rally seemed to end almost too fast; however, the ideas and relationships formed will grow throughout the upcoming year.

4

FORUM

Fall 2012 | Volume 45, Issue 1 | www.prssa.org/FORUM

Showcase Your Best Work with socialmedia

BY Danielle Michels University of Florida Developing public relations professionals are well-versed in the importance of social media platforms in the areas of engagement and brand management.

However, more recent platforms such as Pinterest and Instagram, are taking image-sharing sites by storm and are becoming an integral part of the social media landscape in addition to personal branding. Using both established and

newfound platforms to your advantage allows you to visually display your knowledge during an interview and make a solid case that you are the best person to be the next team member of (insert dream job company name here).

The first step to making each social media site work for you is to find out what special skill you can sell to a potential employer. Is it your writing, photography or design skills? Maybe it’s all of your internship experience and your stellar portfolio.

5

The next step is to find the platform that allows for the best showcasing of your work. Finally, use links to create a web that allows access to your work through the powerhouse social media platforms.

Who you are

a strong writer

a photographer

a pop culture & news junkie

a media maven

What to use

A blog

Pinterest

tWITTER

facebook

Why it works

How to Connect

A blog gives you complete freedom to write on whatever topic you desire outside of the classroom. Using a blog that demonstrates your writing on a subject you’re passionate about will only help when explaining how you are a well-rounded communications professional who can take on new challenges including consistently improving your own writing.

Pinning and displaying your photographs through Pinterest can help generate traffic to your online portfolio and it can also help with organizing your photographs onto organized boards that a potential employer can easily view. (This also could apply to graphic design.)

Twitter is by far the best tool for immediate engagement with brands, top industry influencers and your peers. Build relationships on Twitter that enhance your personal brand’s reputation as well as your credibility as a communications profession.

Creating your own Facebook fan page is a great way to integrate every talent involved in social media. Twitter can be streamed along with Facebook status updates and photography albums are readily accessible for displaying creative work. There is also the feature of Facebook notes, which allows for longer writing pieces.

The key to a blog is keeping it simple. Let your writing take center stage and have social media buttons be available so people can explore other areas of your work or personality if they want. Don’t crowd your writing with icons and sidebars that detract.

Pinterest gives users the ability to connect their Facebook and Twitter to their home pin board as well as create a short bio that can give other Pinterest users an idea of what kind of content you pin. Use these tools to your advantage by adding a link to your portfolio site as well. Analytics, such as the number of likes and repins of your photographs, are things you can show as a rating of your work to a future employer.

Craft a Twitter bio that gives people a quick glimpse of who you are, what you do and what kind of tweets your followers could expect. Provide a link to your personal website or LinkedIn so your followers can explore more of your experience and work.

Use the connectivity of Facebook to link together your personal website, Pinterest, Twitter, etc. in addition to making a “Facebook resume” that lists all of the places you have interned and worked so future employers can see the culture of the other companies you’ve gained experience with.

INFOGRAPHIC by Kaitlin Bondra

ALUMNI EXPERIENCE

Four Years Later:

What My PRSSA Membership Meant to Me By Ryan McShane Taylor

As my PRSSA days have gone into the sunset, I can only reflect how my membership has impacted life as I know it. For those who haven’t heard my life story at a recent national event, I served as FORUM Editor in Chief in 2007-08 and was fortunate enough to meet my employer, Taylor, during my senior year at National Conference. Looking back, I can honestly say that no other decision shaped my future more than my PRSSA membership.

“ Looking back, I can honestly say that no other decision shaped my future more than my PRSSA membership. ” At the PRSSA 2012 Assembly in Charlotte, where I moderated a special session on finding your fit in the public relations industry, it finally hit me: I have been in the professional industry longer than I was a college student.

PRSSA instilled in me the importance of pre-graduation internships, professional networking and a wealth of best practices that I was able to apply across all stages of my early career. PRSSA instilled in me the

importance of pre-graduation internships, professional networking and a wealth of best practices that I was able to apply across all stages of my early career. One way or another, PRSSA has determined the city I live in, the job I go to every day, the friends I keep up with on Facebook and even the woman I’m going to marry. Needless to say, contacts I’ve made through PRSSA are on my Christmas card list. Enough about me, though – my time as a student is over. The advice I want current members to get out of this piece is to make the most of their membership. Go to meetings, run for office, attend national events (if possible), network with members from other Chapters, contribute to FORUM, follow @PRSSANational; this list could go on, but I have a word count to keep. The benefits of the student Society are plentiful, and you can personalize your experience any

way you feel will most effectively impact your future. One final action item for any PRSSA member is to utilize members of the National Committee who have special initiatives planned for the year that will provide incredible knowledge and experience opportunities. That’s my pep talk – now get involved. I never would have believed where PRSSA could take me, but the return on investment for my dues far surpasses any box of Ramen I bought as a student. Ryan McShane is a senior account executive at Taylor and works from the agency’s Charlotte office. He served on the PRSSA National Committee in 2007-08 and was a member of the Hanna E. Norton Chapter of PRSSA at Arkansas Tech University. His blog, ryanmcshane.com, is dedicated to advice for public relations students and young professionals.

ONLINE ONLY PRSSA INTERNSHIP CENTER Browse internship listings, post your resumé and find career resources at www.prssa.org/ internships.

DON’T FORGET OCT. 12-16 PRSSA 2012 National Conference Nov. 1 PRSSA National dues deadline Nov. 2 Bateman Case Study Competition intent-toenter forms deadline Share your own PRSSA news by using #PRSSA in your tweet. Tweet National Conference related content using #PRSSANC.


FORUM INTERNSHIPS

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2 your supervisor or company. Go the extra step and occasionally tweet findings that pertain to your internship supervisor or company and include the appropriate Twitter handles – just make sure that your information is timely and relevant. Extend an olive branch If you believe that your PRSSA Chapter could benefit from some of the same lessons you learned under the direction of your internship supervisor, invite him or her to speak to your Chapter. Work with your Chapter Adviser or a professional development coordinator to develop a speaking topic that best suits the needs and interests of your Chapter, then coordinate the ideal speaking time and place with your internship supervisor. Inviting someone from your internship to visit your college will allow him or witness your planning skills and your involvement with the Chapter. You’ll also gain the experience to serve as a liaison between practicing public relations professionals and young college hopefuls. Volunteer to freelance or continue a project If you exceeded expectations at your summer internship, your supervisor may miss your work ethic and your talent. Volunteer to continue an ongoing project, such as clipping or blogging, until the company trains a fall intern. Bridging this gap for your supervisor will stand out as a willingness to continue learning and growing as a public relations practitioner. Volunteering to freelance can indicate to an employer that you’ve developed a true passion for the work. Recommend and recruit Ready to move on but resistant of breaking ties? Keep the connection alive by recommending some of your best Chapter members as possible interns for the future. If your past supervisor trusts your instincts, he or she will be grateful if you send top picks his or her way. Share internship postings from the company with your Chapter and consider hosting the company during a professional development event or job/ internship fair.

Fall 2012 | Volume 45, Issue 1 | www.prssa.org/FORUM

Leadership Rally — Beginning a New Year for PRSSA By Katie Hozan Ohio Northern University As a college student, when meeting new people, the question of what your major is usually comes up. For public relations majors, this may require an in-depth explanation as to what public relations really is. However, there are a few situations where this explanation is not necessary. The PRSSA Leadership Rally is one of them. On June 1-3, PRSSA Chapter leaders from all over the country flew to Scottsdale, Ariz. to attend the annual Leadership Rally. Serving as a great start Chapter leaders just beginning their terms, the weekend was comprised of speakers, workshops on leadership skills, group brainstorming and friendship. At the beginning of any leadership position, there is a combination of excitement and uncertainty for the upcoming year. Everyone is anxious, wanting to leave a mark, but sometimes, the how isn’t as clear. Leadership Rally provided a great opportunity for Chapter leaders to share and build upon one another’s ideas and create a plan of action. Throughout the weekend, the passion and commitment that each leader had for PHOTOgraphy by | erica brown

Students gathered at the Leadership Rally in Scottsdale, Ariz.

PRSSA was clear. Whether sharing secrets of success or shortcomings, the end goal was to foster stronger PRSSA Chapters. One of the many highlights of the weekend was the keynote presentation by Cathy Blanchard, APR, partner and general manager, Phoenix, Allison + Partners. Blanchard presented on the topic of “Follow the Leader” and spoke to the different styles of leadership. Not only did attendees learn their personal leadership style, but also how to identify and work with other styles effectively. The weekend retreat also included with rotating breakout sessions. Topics such as recruiting and maintaining a diverse membership, building strategic plans and defining leadership styles were discussed, as well as discussions between leaders from Chapters of a similar size. These sessions provided leaders with numerous ideas for the upcoming year. The 2012 Leadership Rally seemed to end almost too fast; however, the ideas and relationships formed will grow throughout the upcoming year.

4

FORUM

Fall 2012 | Volume 45, Issue 1 | www.prssa.org/FORUM

Showcase Your Best Work with socialmedia

BY Danielle Michels University of Florida Developing public relations professionals are well-versed in the importance of social media platforms in the areas of engagement and brand management.

However, more recent platforms such as Pinterest and Instagram, are taking image-sharing sites by storm and are becoming an integral part of the social media landscape in addition to personal branding. Using both established and

newfound platforms to your advantage allows you to visually display your knowledge during an interview and make a solid case that you are the best person to be the next team member of (insert dream job company name here).

The first step to making each social media site work for you is to find out what special skill you can sell to a potential employer. Is it your writing, photography or design skills? Maybe it’s all of your internship experience and your stellar portfolio.

5

The next step is to find the platform that allows for the best showcasing of your work. Finally, use links to create a web that allows access to your work through the powerhouse social media platforms.

Who you are

a strong writer

a photographer

a pop culture & news junkie

a media maven

What to use

A blog

Pinterest

tWITTER

facebook

Why it works

How to Connect

A blog gives you complete freedom to write on whatever topic you desire outside of the classroom. Using a blog that demonstrates your writing on a subject you’re passionate about will only help when explaining how you are a well-rounded communications professional who can take on new challenges including consistently improving your own writing.

Pinning and displaying your photographs through Pinterest can help generate traffic to your online portfolio and it can also help with organizing your photographs onto organized boards that a potential employer can easily view. (This also could apply to graphic design.)

Twitter is by far the best tool for immediate engagement with brands, top industry influencers and your peers. Build relationships on Twitter that enhance your personal brand’s reputation as well as your credibility as a communications profession.

Creating your own Facebook fan page is a great way to integrate every talent involved in social media. Twitter can be streamed along with Facebook status updates and photography albums are readily accessible for displaying creative work. There is also the feature of Facebook notes, which allows for longer writing pieces.

The key to a blog is keeping it simple. Let your writing take center stage and have social media buttons be available so people can explore other areas of your work or personality if they want. Don’t crowd your writing with icons and sidebars that detract.

Pinterest gives users the ability to connect their Facebook and Twitter to their home pin board as well as create a short bio that can give other Pinterest users an idea of what kind of content you pin. Use these tools to your advantage by adding a link to your portfolio site as well. Analytics, such as the number of likes and repins of your photographs, are things you can show as a rating of your work to a future employer.

Craft a Twitter bio that gives people a quick glimpse of who you are, what you do and what kind of tweets your followers could expect. Provide a link to your personal website or LinkedIn so your followers can explore more of your experience and work.

Use the connectivity of Facebook to link together your personal website, Pinterest, Twitter, etc. in addition to making a “Facebook resume” that lists all of the places you have interned and worked so future employers can see the culture of the other companies you’ve gained experience with.

INFOGRAPHIC by Kaitlin Bondra

ALUMNI EXPERIENCE

Four Years Later:

What My PRSSA Membership Meant to Me By Ryan McShane Taylor

As my PRSSA days have gone into the sunset, I can only reflect how my membership has impacted life as I know it. For those who haven’t heard my life story at a recent national event, I served as FORUM Editor in Chief in 2007-08 and was fortunate enough to meet my employer, Taylor, during my senior year at National Conference. Looking back, I can honestly say that no other decision shaped my future more than my PRSSA membership.

“ Looking back, I can honestly say that no other decision shaped my future more than my PRSSA membership. ” At the PRSSA 2012 Assembly in Charlotte, where I moderated a special session on finding your fit in the public relations industry, it finally hit me: I have been in the professional industry longer than I was a college student.

PRSSA instilled in me the importance of pre-graduation internships, professional networking and a wealth of best practices that I was able to apply across all stages of my early career. PRSSA instilled in me the

importance of pre-graduation internships, professional networking and a wealth of best practices that I was able to apply across all stages of my early career. One way or another, PRSSA has determined the city I live in, the job I go to every day, the friends I keep up with on Facebook and even the woman I’m going to marry. Needless to say, contacts I’ve made through PRSSA are on my Christmas card list. Enough about me, though – my time as a student is over. The advice I want current members to get out of this piece is to make the most of their membership. Go to meetings, run for office, attend national events (if possible), network with members from other Chapters, contribute to FORUM, follow @PRSSANational; this list could go on, but I have a word count to keep. The benefits of the student Society are plentiful, and you can personalize your experience any

way you feel will most effectively impact your future. One final action item for any PRSSA member is to utilize members of the National Committee who have special initiatives planned for the year that will provide incredible knowledge and experience opportunities. That’s my pep talk – now get involved. I never would have believed where PRSSA could take me, but the return on investment for my dues far surpasses any box of Ramen I bought as a student. Ryan McShane is a senior account executive at Taylor and works from the agency’s Charlotte office. He served on the PRSSA National Committee in 2007-08 and was a member of the Hanna E. Norton Chapter of PRSSA at Arkansas Tech University. His blog, ryanmcshane.com, is dedicated to advice for public relations students and young professionals.

ONLINE ONLY PRSSA INTERNSHIP CENTER Browse internship listings, post your resumé and find career resources at www.prssa.org/ internships.

DON’T FORGET OCT. 12-16 PRSSA 2012 National Conference Nov. 1 PRSSA National dues deadline Nov. 2 Bateman Case Study Competition intent-toenter forms deadline Share your own PRSSA news by using #PRSSA in your tweet. Tweet National Conference related content using #PRSSANC.


FORUM OPINION ADVICE ON ADVISERS

Chapter Leadership Development By Bob “Pritch” Pritchard, APR, Fellow PRSA

6

Fall 2012 | Volume 45, Issue 1 | www.prssa.org/FORUM

A ‘Major’ Impact How your minor can carve out your niche in public relations

National Faculty Adviser Developing student leaders is a basic tenant upon which PRSSA was established. It is also an unwritten responsibility of the Chapter’s Faculty and Professional Adviser. (Side note: we recently revised PRSSA’s Chapter Handbook to fit the responsibility of both.) There are several ways you as members can take advantage of this responsibility. First and foremost, your Advisers should be modeling leadership and a “leader” mentality. Pay attention to the way in which they advise the Chapter. It may seem they are taking a “hands-off ” approach, when closer observation could reveal they are simply avoiding micro-managing the Chapter’s affairs. Observe how your Advisers “delegate” responsibility and authority. In my experience, the hardest thing to learn about leadership is delegating and the worst form of delegation, in my honest opinion, is delegating responsibility without authority. You need to be empowered with the means to meet your responsibilities if you ever hope to achieve complete success. Second, your Advisers should have access to all sorts of leadership development resources. Every university and college has some sort of student leadership development program. Likewise, your Professional Adviser often has professional contacts with leadership resources. Bringing both to

bear can be extremely fruitful in your members’ development as leaders. Finally, your Advisers can be helpful in counseling how best to structure your Chapter’s leadership. There are certain positions specified in the PRSSA National Bylaws, with several of those positions able to be held simultaneously. Your Adviser just might have some suggestions for additional committee chairs or executive board positions that can make your Chapter operate more efficiently while expanding leadership opportunities for your members. As the PRSSA National Faculty Adviser, I’ve taken a huge interest in this important responsibility and hope to provide more and better tools to aid Faculty Advisers in their role as champions of student leadership development. In addition, scholarly research in the area of PRSSA’s role in student leadership development is gaining momentum, which will result in additional advice and counsel to strengthen this area. Time will tell, but as Faculty Advisers we owe it to you, our young professionals, and our profession to take every opportunity to be a leadership resource.

where dgoo Iin want toareer? my c

nt?

Enhance Your Education

Social Media

Events

Plug in to PRSSA social media and connect with members from all over

National Conference National Assembly Regional Conferences

PRSA Sponsor Chapters Meet professionals, ask questions and get professional advice through your Chapter’s PRSA Sponsor Chapter

Competitions

Champions for PRSSA

Compete in one of our many case study competitions

what lls? are my ski

Browse through this network of professionals dedicated to PRSSA members and your education

Leadership Run for office in your Chapter, student-run firm or the PRSSA National Committee

Scholarships and Awards PRSSA offers many scholarships and awards throughout the year

News and Intelligence Stay current on industry news and the latest trends through PRSSA and PRSA resources

Writing

3

Launch Your Career PRSA Jobcenter Browse career resources and search for public relations employment opportunities all over the world

Internships Get job-hunting tips, upload your résumé and find the most recent internship opportunities

PRSA Associate Membership

Add to your portfolio and write for FORUM or Progressions, the PRSSA Blog Illustration by Kaitlin Bondra

By Brian Price Vice President of Chapter Development My recently-retired PRSSA Faculty Adviser used to always say that at least two-thirds of learning occurred outside of the classroom. What you do in PRSSA, internships, networking and everyday life makes up that 66 percent. But as we do get some of our knowledge and skills from lectures, assignments and exams; so we

cannot ignore the other one third.

minor while staying on track to graduate.

A frequent theme I hear from presenters about preparing for a public relations career is to create a niche, and that the best way to do so is through an internship. But another way to do it is through your academic minor.

You can use your minor to strengthen existing skills, get a taste for a new topic or even create a specialty in our field. Let me explain.

Minors are usually around 20 credits, so most students can change or pick up a second

Let’s say that you like sports and your dream job is to do public relations for the Green Bay Packers. A minor in sports

By Danielle Stewart Vice President of Professional Development

source for accurate, up-to-date crime information), The Library of Congress, and American Mothers, Inc. (a national organization for men and women who value the role of motherhood). Bradley Public Relations is a strong student-run firm with a tremendous presence in PRSSA. The firm incorporates a professional atmosphere in college life giving students that step ahead into the world of public relations.

2

Join PRSA as an Associate Member and connect with 20,000 public relations professionals for $60 up to five months before or two years after graduation

Broaden Your Network

PRSA Sections

Events

Check out PRSA’s New Professionals Section

Develop valuable relationships with future colleagues and current professionals through national and regional events

CHAPTER NEWS

Building a Network within PRSSA “I’ve experienced opportunities that I would not have had without PRSSA. Through the organization I have had real life experiences and have made contacts in the professional community,” said Schafer.

SEE MAJOR, PAGE 7

BRADLEYBrigham PUBLIC RELATIONS Young University

Bradley Public Relations, the student-run firm at Brigham Young University Chapter of PRSSA, was established in 1986 and has set a successful example of leadership. This student-run firm has maintained a steady clientele of over a dozen accounts and at least 80 students consistently throughout the years. Bradley Public Relations became

By Kate ryan Vice President of Member Services

am I differe

FIRM OF THE ISSUE

Nationally Affiliated in 2005. Over the past seven years, they have won some of PRSSA most prestigious awards, including the Dr. F.H. Teahan award for Outstanding PRSSA Chapter because of their Chapter involvement in the studentrun firm program. They were ranked in the “Top 5 PR Programs of the Year” in PR Week. Past and current clients include the school’s Department of Communications, Crime Reports (the largest online re-

Fall 2012 | Volume 45, Issue 1 | www.prssa.org/FORUM

Member Benefits What Can PRSSA Do For You? 1

what else amt?I good a minor?

FORUM OPINION

To learn more about Bradley Public Relations, visit their website at http://bradleypr.com FORUM would like to hear about your student-run firm’s accomplishments. Contact Vice President of Professional Development Danielle Stewart at ds.lynne@gmail.com to share your story.

By Cierra D. Wallace Central Michigan University Many PRSSA members would agree that joining an organization with thousands of students who share the same passion and similar interests is an amazing and life changing experience. Along with gaining a clear understanding of public relations, members are also able to create life-long friendships and a solid network of connections that will last a lifetime. PRSSA offers numerous ways nationally, regionally and locally for students to have opportunities to students and professionals from around the country. Conferences, rallies, workshops, agency tours and meetings students can easily begin to build a

strong support system. Morgan Schaefer, director of programming at the Dr. Diane S. Krider Chapter of PRSSA at Central Michigan University, said she joined PRSSA to get experience her classes couldn’t offer. “I’ve experienced opportunities that I would not have had without PRSSA. Through the organization I have had real life experiences and have made contacts in the professional community,” said Schafer. Being a member of PRSSA allows students the chances to go above and beyond their peers who are not active members. Members are often presented with unique opportunities and connections through networks they’ve built from PRSSA.

Central Michigan University PRSSA Chapter president Alexandria Converse said that the connections she’s made through PRSSA has helped in her educational efforts and career choices. “Through PRSSA, I have made connections with alumni that have helped me get interviews for internships and other job opportunities. It is important to try your best to get to know other members, the executive board and alumni,” said Converse. Many Chapters participate in agency and in-house public relations tours each semester. These tours provide a first-hand look into the day-to-day of a public relations practitioner as well as the opportunity to start making connections to professionals

outside of the schools campus. “PRSSA helps public relations students meet and network with professionals. Visiting their offices gives members the opportunity to learn more about the field and different types of public relations,” Schaefer said. “With PRSSA, you learn more insight that classes won’t give you .” Kelsi Rupersburg, vice president of the Ohio Northern University PRSSA Chapter, said she joined to also learn from other members in the organization. “This organization is great because not only can you work with professionals and alumni, you can work with fellow students. One day, we will all help each other in the professional world.”

MAJOR

7

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 management would be a great way to get an inside look at how a team’s front office operates. Or, if you wanted to be a campaign manager for a politician, a political science minor would be the perfect match to give you a qualified background. What if you know your writing needs improvement? Four or five journalism courses should cure that. And on top of honing your writing skills, now you are better prepared to work with the media during your public relations career. A reoccurring joke is that people in communications are bad at math. If you have the skills that buck common thinking, why not pick up a minor in statistics or mathematics and really show employers you are different? What if you are in your first year at an agency and the client wants to go green? If you minored in something like environmental conservation, this would be your opportunity to rise above where your title says you are and have the higher-ups looking at you for direction. There are minors in philosophy for critical thinking, hospitality management for the travel and tourism sector, economics for consumer insight, public administration for principles of government, human geography for people and cultures: the list goes on and on. Remember to use your unique way of thinking from public relations to take a new look at the subject in the classroom and always be thinking of how new knowledge affects your main practice. Think to yourself, what interests me? What else am I good at? Where do I want to go in my career? Your minor can help take you there. It is an edge that will help you break into your niche, providing that baseline understanding of a different discipline. Just don’t forget about the 66 percent from outside of the classroom.


FORUM OPINION ADVICE ON ADVISERS

Chapter Leadership Development By Bob “Pritch” Pritchard, APR, Fellow PRSA

6

Fall 2012 | Volume 45, Issue 1 | www.prssa.org/FORUM

A ‘Major’ Impact How your minor can carve out your niche in public relations

National Faculty Adviser Developing student leaders is a basic tenant upon which PRSSA was established. It is also an unwritten responsibility of the Chapter’s Faculty and Professional Adviser. (Side note: we recently revised PRSSA’s Chapter Handbook to fit the responsibility of both.) There are several ways you as members can take advantage of this responsibility. First and foremost, your Advisers should be modeling leadership and a “leader” mentality. Pay attention to the way in which they advise the Chapter. It may seem they are taking a “hands-off ” approach, when closer observation could reveal they are simply avoiding micro-managing the Chapter’s affairs. Observe how your Advisers “delegate” responsibility and authority. In my experience, the hardest thing to learn about leadership is delegating and the worst form of delegation, in my honest opinion, is delegating responsibility without authority. You need to be empowered with the means to meet your responsibilities if you ever hope to achieve complete success. Second, your Advisers should have access to all sorts of leadership development resources. Every university and college has some sort of student leadership development program. Likewise, your Professional Adviser often has professional contacts with leadership resources. Bringing both to

bear can be extremely fruitful in your members’ development as leaders. Finally, your Advisers can be helpful in counseling how best to structure your Chapter’s leadership. There are certain positions specified in the PRSSA National Bylaws, with several of those positions able to be held simultaneously. Your Adviser just might have some suggestions for additional committee chairs or executive board positions that can make your Chapter operate more efficiently while expanding leadership opportunities for your members. As the PRSSA National Faculty Adviser, I’ve taken a huge interest in this important responsibility and hope to provide more and better tools to aid Faculty Advisers in their role as champions of student leadership development. In addition, scholarly research in the area of PRSSA’s role in student leadership development is gaining momentum, which will result in additional advice and counsel to strengthen this area. Time will tell, but as Faculty Advisers we owe it to you, our young professionals, and our profession to take every opportunity to be a leadership resource.

where dgoo Iin want toareer? my c

nt?

Enhance Your Education

Social Media

Events

Plug in to PRSSA social media and connect with members from all over

National Conference National Assembly Regional Conferences

PRSA Sponsor Chapters Meet professionals, ask questions and get professional advice through your Chapter’s PRSA Sponsor Chapter

Competitions

Champions for PRSSA

Compete in one of our many case study competitions

what lls? are my ski

Browse through this network of professionals dedicated to PRSSA members and your education

Leadership Run for office in your Chapter, student-run firm or the PRSSA National Committee

Scholarships and Awards PRSSA offers many scholarships and awards throughout the year

News and Intelligence Stay current on industry news and the latest trends through PRSSA and PRSA resources

Writing

3

Launch Your Career PRSA Jobcenter Browse career resources and search for public relations employment opportunities all over the world

Internships Get job-hunting tips, upload your résumé and find the most recent internship opportunities

PRSA Associate Membership

Add to your portfolio and write for FORUM or Progressions, the PRSSA Blog Illustration by Kaitlin Bondra

By Brian Price Vice President of Chapter Development My recently-retired PRSSA Faculty Adviser used to always say that at least two-thirds of learning occurred outside of the classroom. What you do in PRSSA, internships, networking and everyday life makes up that 66 percent. But as we do get some of our knowledge and skills from lectures, assignments and exams; so we

cannot ignore the other one third.

minor while staying on track to graduate.

A frequent theme I hear from presenters about preparing for a public relations career is to create a niche, and that the best way to do so is through an internship. But another way to do it is through your academic minor.

You can use your minor to strengthen existing skills, get a taste for a new topic or even create a specialty in our field. Let me explain.

Minors are usually around 20 credits, so most students can change or pick up a second

Let’s say that you like sports and your dream job is to do public relations for the Green Bay Packers. A minor in sports

By Danielle Stewart Vice President of Professional Development

source for accurate, up-to-date crime information), The Library of Congress, and American Mothers, Inc. (a national organization for men and women who value the role of motherhood). Bradley Public Relations is a strong student-run firm with a tremendous presence in PRSSA. The firm incorporates a professional atmosphere in college life giving students that step ahead into the world of public relations.

2

Join PRSA as an Associate Member and connect with 20,000 public relations professionals for $60 up to five months before or two years after graduation

Broaden Your Network

PRSA Sections

Events

Check out PRSA’s New Professionals Section

Develop valuable relationships with future colleagues and current professionals through national and regional events

CHAPTER NEWS

Building a Network within PRSSA “I’ve experienced opportunities that I would not have had without PRSSA. Through the organization I have had real life experiences and have made contacts in the professional community,” said Schafer.

SEE MAJOR, PAGE 7

BRADLEYBrigham PUBLIC RELATIONS Young University

Bradley Public Relations, the student-run firm at Brigham Young University Chapter of PRSSA, was established in 1986 and has set a successful example of leadership. This student-run firm has maintained a steady clientele of over a dozen accounts and at least 80 students consistently throughout the years. Bradley Public Relations became

By Kate ryan Vice President of Member Services

am I differe

FIRM OF THE ISSUE

Nationally Affiliated in 2005. Over the past seven years, they have won some of PRSSA most prestigious awards, including the Dr. F.H. Teahan award for Outstanding PRSSA Chapter because of their Chapter involvement in the studentrun firm program. They were ranked in the “Top 5 PR Programs of the Year” in PR Week. Past and current clients include the school’s Department of Communications, Crime Reports (the largest online re-

Fall 2012 | Volume 45, Issue 1 | www.prssa.org/FORUM

Member Benefits What Can PRSSA Do For You? 1

what else amt?I good a minor?

FORUM OPINION

To learn more about Bradley Public Relations, visit their website at http://bradleypr.com FORUM would like to hear about your student-run firm’s accomplishments. Contact Vice President of Professional Development Danielle Stewart at ds.lynne@gmail.com to share your story.

By Cierra D. Wallace Central Michigan University Many PRSSA members would agree that joining an organization with thousands of students who share the same passion and similar interests is an amazing and life changing experience. Along with gaining a clear understanding of public relations, members are also able to create life-long friendships and a solid network of connections that will last a lifetime. PRSSA offers numerous ways nationally, regionally and locally for students to have opportunities to students and professionals from around the country. Conferences, rallies, workshops, agency tours and meetings students can easily begin to build a

strong support system. Morgan Schaefer, director of programming at the Dr. Diane S. Krider Chapter of PRSSA at Central Michigan University, said she joined PRSSA to get experience her classes couldn’t offer. “I’ve experienced opportunities that I would not have had without PRSSA. Through the organization I have had real life experiences and have made contacts in the professional community,” said Schafer. Being a member of PRSSA allows students the chances to go above and beyond their peers who are not active members. Members are often presented with unique opportunities and connections through networks they’ve built from PRSSA.

Central Michigan University PRSSA Chapter president Alexandria Converse said that the connections she’s made through PRSSA has helped in her educational efforts and career choices. “Through PRSSA, I have made connections with alumni that have helped me get interviews for internships and other job opportunities. It is important to try your best to get to know other members, the executive board and alumni,” said Converse. Many Chapters participate in agency and in-house public relations tours each semester. These tours provide a first-hand look into the day-to-day of a public relations practitioner as well as the opportunity to start making connections to professionals

outside of the schools campus. “PRSSA helps public relations students meet and network with professionals. Visiting their offices gives members the opportunity to learn more about the field and different types of public relations,” Schaefer said. “With PRSSA, you learn more insight that classes won’t give you .” Kelsi Rupersburg, vice president of the Ohio Northern University PRSSA Chapter, said she joined to also learn from other members in the organization. “This organization is great because not only can you work with professionals and alumni, you can work with fellow students. One day, we will all help each other in the professional world.”

MAJOR

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 management would be a great way to get an inside look at how a team’s front office operates. Or, if you wanted to be a campaign manager for a politician, a political science minor would be the perfect match to give you a qualified background. What if you know your writing needs improvement? Four or five journalism courses should cure that. And on top of honing your writing skills, now you are better prepared to work with the media during your public relations career. A reoccurring joke is that people in communications are bad at math. If you have the skills that buck common thinking, why not pick up a minor in statistics or mathematics and really show employers you are different? What if you are in your first year at an agency and the client wants to go green? If you minored in something like environmental conservation, this would be your opportunity to rise above where your title says you are and have the higher-ups looking at you for direction. There are minors in philosophy for critical thinking, hospitality management for the travel and tourism sector, economics for consumer insight, public administration for principles of government, human geography for people and cultures: the list goes on and on. Remember to use your unique way of thinking from public relations to take a new look at the subject in the classroom and always be thinking of how new knowledge affects your main practice. Think to yourself, what interests me? What else am I good at? Where do I want to go in my career? Your minor can help take you there. It is an edge that will help you break into your niche, providing that baseline understanding of a different discipline. Just don’t forget about the 66 percent from outside of the classroom.


Thinking about graduate school? Meet Claire. Claire Berlin 2011 WVU IMC graduate PR and Publications Coordinator Baltimore Symphony Orchestra

me to start my career while also getting my master’s degree. In my job, I do everything from producing press releases and interacting with media, to updating our website and producing content for print publications. I apply the skills that I learned in the IMC program to my job every single day.

The online WVU IMC program allowed

Watch Claire’s video story by scanning the QR code.

imc.wvu.edu Consider a Master of Science in Integrated Marketing Communications (IMC). West Virginia University’s online IMC program will give you the practical skills needed to build, implement and measure integrated communication programs in today’s dynamic digital environment – and it can be completed from anywhere in the world. Learn more about our dynamic curriculum and how it can enhance your career path at imc.wvu.edu.

FORUM Fall 2012  

The Public Relations Student Society of America's fall 2012 issue of FORUM.

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