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50 _ ANOTHER LOOK

The self-driving A

s a grandfather, I have the privilege of being able to go for walks with our oneyear-old granddaughter. First it was in the pram, now we can take the buggy. We got the buggy about 25 years ago, from my wife’s sister. And she in turn had been given it by her sister-in-law. A buggy that’s already carrying its fourth generation of children. It's a MacLaren but it's not as fast as that might suggest. It only shares the same name as the one of the world of F1. The wheels are so worn that they are crooked. It is so old that the wheels are no longer on the hinges. If you want to turn, you have hold the buggy at an angle so that it is only resting on the front or rear frame. Our daughter – and the mother of our granddaughter – takes umbrage at the fact that we carry her Alix around in such a rickety, old-fashioned, faded pushchair. She has a new one that’s bigger and better. And yes, one that is easier to use. And if anyone ever comes up with a self-driving buggy, it will be better still. So what? At the end of the day, none of that is important. People are emotional human beings. That is what makes us different from things and computers. What matters is the relationship you have with one another. Contact counts. A smile. A hand. A friendly word. And technology doesn’t change any of that. A self-driving buggy for my granddaughter? No thanks, I’d rather push her myself. JEAN-MARIE,

Marketing Expert at Proximus and grandfather of Alix

Profile for Proximus

Proximus one q3 2017 en  

Businessmagazine for IT professionals

Proximus one q3 2017 en  

Businessmagazine for IT professionals