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Many hands, one Mission

Providence Health & Services California Region 2009 Community Benefit Report www.providence.org


Volunteer Work for Valley Seniors

5

Creating Opportunity for Physical Activity

10

Faith Community Nurses

6

Patient Navigators Helping Those in Need

14

Embracing America, Learning Her Language

7

Mobile Clinic Serves Children in Need

15

The Children’s Health Insurance Program

8

2009 Community Investment

16

Greetings

Our Mission As people of Providence,

One of the most trying years in our nation’s recent history is behind us, one that truly underscored the importance of outreach efforts of Providence Health & Services,

we reveal God’s love for all,

California, to bring health care services to the most vulnerable - the sick, the poor,

especially the poor and vulnerable,

the elderly and the families struggling with job losses.

through our compassionate service.

The global recession also highlighted the importance of partnering with our government leaders, industry, nonprofit agencies, our own Providence family of physicians, nurses and volunteers, and the communities we serve to ensure help for those most in need. It is especially important during challenging times to adhere to our core values: Excellence, Compassion, Justice, Respect and Stewardship. Our numerous community benefit programs, inspired by our founding Sisters, are built on those ideals as we provide the best for our less fortunate neighbors, utilizing a variety of resources. In 2009, we saw tremendous progress in our efforts to expand access to uninsured adults through the Vasek Polak Health Clinic, which had a 60 percent increase in patient visits. Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Center Torrance was one of just two California nonprofits chosen by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to receive funding to assist parents in enrolling their children in subsidized health insurance.

Our Core Values

In our Valley Service Area, we were proud to partner with Dr. Glenn Lopez whose mobile van provides preventative health care, screenings and follow-up to low-income areas of the eastern San Fernando Valley. We worked with our local congressman to

Respect

Compassion

Justice

Excellence

Stewardship

All people have been created in the image of God. – Genesis 1:27

Jesus taught and healed with compassion for all. – Matthew 4:24

This is what the Lord requires of you: act with justice, love with kindness and walk humbly with your God. – Micah 6:8

Much will be expected of those who are entrusted with much. – Luke 12:48

The earth is the Lord’s and all that is in it. – Psalm 24:1

We welcome the uniqueness and honor the dignity of every person. We communicate openly and we act with integrity. We develop the talents and abilities of one another.

We reach out to people in need and give comfort as Jesus did. We nurture the spiritual, physical and emotional well-being of one another and those we serve. We embrace those who are suffering.

We set the highest standards for ourselves and for our ministry.

We believe that everything entrusted to us is for the common good.

We strive to remove the causes of oppression.

We strive to transform conditions for a better tomorrow while serving the needs of today.

We strive to care wisely for our people, our resources and our earth.

We join with others to work for the common good and to advocate for social justice.

We celebrate and encourage the contributions of one another.

We seek simplicity in our lives and in our work.

We believe everyone has a right to the basic goods of the earth.

upgrade our tattoo removal program, gaining federal funding to help young men and women shed anti-social tattoos through a program with proven social benefits. By engaging stakeholders – our local churches, schools, physician groups and others – these programs will be sustained. At the same time, we pledge to monitor the pulse of the community to see what new programs might be necessary. Thanks to our Providence family and to our supporters, Providence Health & Services flourishes, never wavering in our tradition of quality and compassionate care.

Arnold R. Schaffer Chief Executive

Colleen Settles, OP, D. Min Chief Mission Integration Officer

Providence Health & Services 2009 Community Benefit Report [ page 3 ]


Many hands, one Mission

Driven to Help their Peers

Reaching Out to the Community

Minnette Wilson was the first volunteer to sign up 12 years ago

Miriam Hernandez of the Latino Health Promoter Program

when the Senior Outreach Program was established, and today,

found relief for Sandra Sanchez, in pain and in need. Sandra

at 95, she is the oldest of 30 Senior Peer Counselors. Minnette

had a terrible toothache, but no dental insurance. Miriam was

doesn’t get out of her Sherman Oaks home too often and her

able to link her to MEND – Meeting Each Need with Dignity – a

eyesight isn’t what it used to be, but she remains determined

charity that saw its client list multiply as Los Angeles County’s

to help seniors – some young enough to be her own children –

unemployment rate surpassed 10 percent. Along with a busy

who rely on Senior Outreach services provided by the Providence

food bank and clothing program, MEND has a dental program

Center for Community Health Improvement in North Hollywood.

that gave Sandra the help she needed.

Volunteer Work for Valley Seniors

Sharing Resources to Benefit those in Need

Providence outreach programs, Latino Health Promoters in

The specially-trained peer counselors are part of a larger group of 150 kind-hearted, Mission-driven men and women of all ages who reach out to the elderly, helping them manage their simple needs.

particular, refer clients to MEND and People of Providence have opened their hearts to the organization by providing food for its pantry shelves and school supplies for the youngsters it helps. Volunteer Peer Counselors from Providence provide counseling to MEND clients and the two organizations work together to address any problems that surface. The partnership works because the volunteers often are from the communities where they are providing services. They help

Minnette is part of a strong volunteer team that help San Fernando Valley seniors in need, coordinating efforts to check on them regularly, providing peer counseling and arranging transportation to doctors appointments and other errands. “A lot of my counselors are in their 80s, and they’ve been with us for years,” said Carolyn Young, Supervisor of Senior Services. “They understand the challenges many face, especially right now with the rising costs of housing, medicine and food. The volunteers are trained to offer supportive counseling and help refer them to services where they can get the help they need.

In the spirit of true teamwork, the People of Providence reached out in 2009, extending their many hands in living one Mission. Their targets were the poor and the vulnerable –elderly men and women, children living in poverty, troubled young people trying to turn their lives around and a surge in the number of families with no health care, struggling to survive a brutal economy. In many cases, Providence Health & Services community benefit programs teamed with one another or with partners in the community to help those in need. In all cases, People of Providence shared their time, talents and humanity, revealing God’s love for all.

those in need open up and seek the help they need to deal with traumatic problems including immigration issues, domestic violence, legal cases and discipline problems with their children. Latino Health Promoters serve immigrants in the Valley Service Area, providing a range of health care services and referrals. One outreach campaign truly saves lives. The very grateful mother of a 9-year-old girl told Jenny Rosales, a Providence Faith Community Nurse, that the Chagas disease screening program saved her daughter from the potentially fatal parasitic infection. The disease is common in Central America and parts of Mexico and caused by a bug bite. The effects can lie dormant

The specially-trained peer counselors are part of a larger group

for decades, but left untreated Chagas can lead to heart and

of 150 men and women of all ages who reach out to the

gastrointestinal problems and even death. Early detection allows

elderly, helping them manage their simple needs. B.J. Valencia,

for treatment.

who coordinates the Valley Service Area’s volunteer program for seniors, said these volunteers drive seniors to doctor

To learn more, call (818) 847-3983.

appointments, do their grocery shopping, do tasks around their homes, help with their mail and, most importantly, spend time with them. This crew provides a lifeline for so many seniors who see their independence dwindling because they no longer drive or, perhaps, their eyesight or other faculties are diminishing. To learn more, call (818) 847-3845.

Providence Health & Services 2009 Community Benefit Report [ page 4 ]

Providence Health & Services 2009 Community Benefit Report [ page 5 ]


Meeting Health Care Needs in their Neighborhoods

Embracing America, Learning Her Language

Five Emergency Department nurses at Providence Holy Cross

have a variety of needs. Cruz said the program is aimed at

Every morning at 8 a.m., 30 adults arrive at Barton Hill

with others. But Lucila was determined to provide a good start

trained as Faith Community Nurses, eager to reach out in

serving all denominations and that she is particularly interested

Elementary, children racing ahead. It’s another day at Even

for her youngest child. He needed to develop social skills that

their communities to bring their special talents to the less

in connecting nurses with synagogues, especially in the

Start, a program designed to improve literacy and early

would prepare him for Kindergarten. And he needed to learn

fortunate. Each was driven by different life experiences – from

predominantly Jewish neighborhoods served by the newest

childhood education. Everyone seems happy. It’s educational,

English. When Lucila learned of the Even Start program, she

Susan Ortiz, a former missionary who aspires to be a chaplain,

Providence ministry, Providence Tarzana Medical Center.

yes, but fun too.

enrolled both him and herself.

Some Faith Community Nurses provide preventative health

The kids are pre-Kindergarten age, from 0 to 5. They enjoy

Lucila loved it. As she learned English and new parenting

screening at local churches, others work with seniors.

an early education program next door to their parents,

techniques, she encouraged Christopher to enjoy his own

Jennifer Dodson wants to help grieving parents like her deal

learning age-appropriate skills and playing with their peers.

classes. Gradually, he began to trust the staff and other children,

The five were linked by their work together at Providence

with the loss of a child. A nurse educator in the Emergency

Their parents sit down in their own classroom for a morning

relaxing enough to enjoy the art projects, games and books they

Holy Cross, but share a bigger bond because they are among

Department, Dodson lost her toddler daughter in a home

the few who step forward to help those in need in their own

accident and wants to honor her child by serving other

neighborhoods. For Karen Muff, serving others fills her own

grieving parents.

Lessons are lively. As they work to memorize

Suenette Watnik said her strong faith was formed from a

words, tenses and spellings, the students help

Faith Community Nurses

to Jennifer Dodson and Karen Muff, whose own personal tragedies drove them to help others. Also joining the training were Sue Baunsgard, and Suenett Watnick.

need. She lost her 22-year-old son in a motorcycle accident and that, coupled with the passing of her mother, made her realize she wanted to help with outreach in her parish in Sylmar. One of her passions is increasing organ donorship, an issue that comes up frequently in the Emergency Department and an effort she hopes to see expand. Providence Health & Services’ Faith Community Nurse Partnership, formerly the Parish Nurse Program, encourages nurses seeking to satisfy their own spiritual needs to enroll in a certificate program to join the partnership, said Connie Cruz, the R.N. who coordinates the program from her office at the Providence Center for Community Health Improvement in North Hollywood. Optional training provides nurses with the tools to go into the community and connect with those who

tough childhood and from loving foster parents who made

Even Start Program

read together.

their home hers. She sees her own faith as a beacon that can

one another, building networks of support.

help those suffering – whether they’re patients, their families,

Laughter punctuates every class!

her co-workers or fellow church members – look to God for

Lessons are lively. As they work to memorize words, tenses and spellings, the students help one another, building networks of support. Laughter punctuates every class! And at the end of the morning, little voices join the adult ones as parents and children come together for an hour of family literacy activities. They take their lessons home with them, too. Our lending

help, support and guidance.

library includes books the children choose again and again for bedtime stories. What a wonderful way for their parents to

Helping people ensure their wishes are carried out when they’re incapacitated is Sue Baunsgard’s personal mission. As a faith

of English as a Second Language. It is here that they learn

community nurse, she wants to educate people about advance

skills to help them succeed in employment, in relationships

directives to ensure their wishes are met when circumstances

with their children’s teachers, in helping build and

are dire. That doesn’t mean not providing the best possible

strengthen the community in their new American home.

her his newest craft. He pulls her toward the playground for

treatment, it means knowing when it’s time, she said.

Just like the European immigrants of previous centuries, the

looks forward to a wonderful future for both him and her

To learn more, call (818) 847-3890.

Soto family came to these shores looking for a better life.

entire family. With her own improved English-speaking and

Originally from Mexico, the Sotos faced challenges similar to

writing skills, she hopes to find a good job. Her ultimate goal?

early European immigrants, including language and culture.

To send her children to college, where they will continue to

Fortunately, Providence Little Company of Mary Medical

learn to become responsible, caring citizens of the world.

Centers provided support through the Even Start program.

practice their new skills! Now, he races toward her at the end of each day to show shared activities. Lucila is proud of her youngest child, and

To learn more, call (310) 257-3586.

Little Christopher pulls his mom toward his school door every Faith Community Nurses are eager to reach out in their communities to bring their special talents to the less fortunate.

morning. He can’t wait to see his friends, play games and learn new things. He loves coming! But it wasn’t always that way. In the beginning, he was withdrawn and isolated. At 3 years old, Christopher had never been away from his mother. He clung to her wherever they went, refusing to interact

Providence Health & Services 2009 Community Benefit Report [ page 6 ]

Providence Health & Services 2009 Community Benefit Report [ page 7 ]


Drawing on Life’s Lessons to Promote Children’s Health Care The Children’s Health Insurance Program

Remote Area Medical

Providence Helps Serve Thousands

It was the Summer of 1972 and the sun had not yet risen over

confide in Maria that they fear their child’s enrollment in health

As Congress debated health care reform in August 2009,

“We were honored to provide extensive diagnostic care

the Sacramento Valley, but Maria Garibay, her parents, and 5

insurance will affect their pending citizenship application or they

tens of thousands of uninsured Los Angeles area residents

for women and immunizations for children and adults,”

younger siblings were already up and getting dressed. They had

will eventually have fees withdrawn from their social security.

crowded The Forum in Inglewood for a week-long health

said Arnold Schaffer, Vice President and Chief Executive of

a long day ahead of themselves picking melons in the fields. As

These myths are why Health Promoters like Maria are essential

clinic that illustrated the nation’s critical need for medical and

Providence California. Our volunteer caregivers were deeply

the seasons changed, her parents moved the family between

to successfully enrolling children in health insurance programs.

dental services for the under-served.

moved by this opportunity to briefly touch the lives of so

the fields in Sacramento and the canneries in Wilmington,

She has been in their position, she has heard the myths, and

picking up whatever jobs they could to make ends meet. Maria

understands their fears. The difference now is that she is

knew the vagabond life was not for her; by the time she

educated and trained in the facts and can use her credibility

married, she and her husband decided to make Wilmington

with families to make sure they take advantage of the programs

their home. Although a familiar environment, she was often

and services to improve their children’s health.

separated from her family and left alone with little support to navigate the challenges of raising their children and struggling financially. More often than not they had no health insurance, so when someone in the family got sick they went to the nearest free clinic and waited for care.

Providence Little Company of Mary’s CHIP program works with trusted local organizations like schools, churches, clinics and businesses to enroll children in subsidized health insurance. Children are enrolled in comprehensive medical, dental and vision insurance for a monthly premium of $4-$24 depending

In the crowds were the faces of the newly uninsured, those

many people in such desperate need.”

who had lost their jobs and their family health insurance in

Philip R. Schwarzman, M.D., an Emergency Department

the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression.

physician at Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center, spent

And the People of Providence stepped up to help. About a

an afternoon at RAM. Patients, he said, waited hours to

dozen physicians and nurses volunteered to provide check-

see doctors.

ups, screenings and vaccines.

“They came in with a variety of complaints, some acute,

The project was the Remote Area Medical (RAM), a

most of them chronic,” said Dr. Schwarzman. “They were

Tennessee-based nonprofit medical charity that expanded

people who had no access to medical care. They came from

its program of free health care to serve those in need in Los

all over L.A. These are people who are just getting by and

Angeles. Service was provided at no cost to the patient, the

they had an opportunity to get medical care. They camped

taxpayer or the government.

overnight. It was amazing to see the number of people just

It has been over twenty years since Maria began her own family

on the family’s income level and what plan they choose. A

in Wilmington and her children are grown. Now her challenge

family of four with annual income up to $55,000 is eligible to

is to help people in her own community. Last year, she was

enroll their children up to age 18. Children must be California

“They never asked for our help, but when we learned about

hired as a Providence Little Company of Mary Health Promoter

residents and either a US citizen or US national. The parents’

it, several physicians and nurses volunteered to help,” said

“There are so many people out there who don’t have access

as part of a new federal grant, the Children’s Health Insurance

immigration status does not matter. Providence Little Company

Sister Colleen Settles, OP, Chief Mission Integration Officer

to medical care,” he said. “Helping where you can, it’s the

Program (CHIP). She helps parents in her community enroll their

of Mary’s goal is to enroll 1,600 children by the end of 2011.

for Providence Health & Services, California. Providence

right thing to do.”

children in health insurance programs. She helps parents like Wilmington resident Isabel, whom Maria sees daily bringing her son to school. Each time, Maria told her about the CHIPRA program and invited her to meet, but Isabel always turned

For more information on the program or to schedule a presentation by our staff please call us at (877) 567-7463.

waiting to get care.”

also sent its Partners for Healthy Kids Mobile Clinic from the South Bay Service Area to provide check-ups and immunizations. In all, 3,827 RAM volunteers provided 14,561 patient services to 6,344 patients.

her down. After 3 months, Isabel finally agreed to meet and now her two children are enrolled in Healthy Families. Parents

Providence Little Company of Mary’s

Providence sent its Partners for Healthy

CHIP program works with trusted local

Kids Mobile Clinic from the South Bay

organizations like schools, churches,

Service Area to provide check-ups

clinics and businesses to enroll children in

and immunizations. In all, 3,827 RAM

subsidized health insurance.

volunteers provided 14,561 patient services to 6,344 patients.

Providence Health & Services 2009 Community Benefit Report [ page 8 ]

Providence Health & Services 2009 Community Benefit Report [ page 9 ]


Drawing on Lifes’ Lessons to Promote Children’s Health Creating Opportunity for Physical Activity (COPA) Fourth grade teacher John Scognamillo hated Physical

John now loves to play and interact with his kids outside

Education class. Growing up he was often picked last for

during P.E. “I am very proud to be part of COPA; proud

games and as the most overweight kid in class, he dreaded

of myself and thankful for the lessons I have learned. It

wearing his school’s mandated P.E. shorts. “I was the first

has been well worth the effort.” Barton Hill Elementary

grader who had to listen to the nurse shout out ‘110 pounds’

School Principal, Louie Mardesich is grateful for his school’s

while being weighed in front of my friends and I looked

partnership with Providence Little Company of Mary and

horrible as a heavy-set kid in our gym uniforms.”

the COPA program. He sees his school’s students excel in

But John loves to teach and thrives in the classroom as he interacts with his 9 and 10 year old students who eagerly listen to what he teaches them. His students are from Barton Hill Elementary School in San Pedro, an urban working class neighborhood. These kids live in neighborhoods that their parents don’t always think are the safest in which to play and so P.E. at school is often their only chance to be physically active. Even though John loves to teach, he doesn’t consider himself a “P.E.” teacher. John was paired with a Providence Little Company of Mary peer coach, Matthew Collette, a Physical Education Specialist who is a Providence Little Company of Mary employee. He met with Matt every other week for co-taught classes. He realized how

new activities outside of the classroom and sees the effects of their release of energy in the classroom where they are more focused. Mr. Mardesich comments, “The high level of engagement in COPA makes students forget they are even exercising. The instructors set the expectations from the beginning and implement exciting physical activities that all students enjoy. PE is no longer viewed as another kickball or sockball game.” Over 200 teachers, like John, in three public school districts have been trained in COPA. Kids are more active because COPA builds teachers’ skills, confidence, and support to get their children moving…and have fun while they are learning! To learn more, call (310) 257-3586.

much fun his students were having, and after two years John was taking his kids out on his own.

Providence Little Company of Mary also offers COPA: After School To reinforce the physical activity instruction that children

lifestyles in our community. Family Nights engage family

learn in COPA outside of the school environment, we

members in fun and educational activities that they can

developed COPA: After School. On the school grounds and

replicate at home. And Cardio Carnivals are fun for the

at home with family members the after school program

entire community. Parents say they see increases in physical

teaches and encourages physical activity to promote healthy

activity and confidence in their children as a result of COPA.

Providence Health & Services 2009 Community Benefit Report [ page 10 ]

Kids are more active because COPA builds teachers’ skills, confidence, and support to get their children moving… and have fun while they are learning!

Providence Health & Services 2009 Community Benefit Report [ page 11 ]


Leaving the Past Behind

Samuel Dixon Partnership

Building Abroad

Baby Moves

Things were OK for Alvaro Cortez when he wore long sleeves,

Behind-the-scenes of the ongoing battle over health care

Sixteen Providence leaders made the five-day trip, an annual

Providence Little Company of Mary’s Baby Moves program offers

but when it was time for T-shirts and tank tops, the collage

reform are the thousands of clients served by the Samuel Dixon

Ministry Leadership project to help the Esperanza Community

fun, and learning, for children from birth to age 4. It offers a safe

of tattoos on both his arms gave away the past he was trying

Family Health Centers in the Santa Clarita Valley where the

Development Fund that works with member families to build

and fun environment for parents to learn how to engage in age-

hard to overcome. In 2009, Cortez was in the midst of having

number of patients skyrocketed in 2009 as jobs were lost in the

homes. The backdrop is one of extreme poverty, but one

appropriate play with their children. While children play with their

the multi-colored links to gang and prison life erased through

worst recession in 80 years.

tempered by a strong sense of community and a shared drive

caregivers and peers, great things happen. They build cognitive,

to work together for a better future.

language and social skills, they develop fine and large motor skills,

Providence Tattoo Removal Program

the free Tattoo Removal Program offered by Providence Health & Services at the Providence Center for Community Health Improvement in North Hollywood. “People don’t see me the same if they see my tattoos,” said Alvaro, who had a 7-year-old daughter and a job in a body shop.

Providing Services to Neighborhood Clinics

And Providence Health & Services was there to lend a hand.

imaging for Dixon clinic patients, a contribution of more than $60,000 annually.

take a little step backward. If it’s a lady, she grabs her purse.”

“We, as people of Providence, came down to

“The Samuel Dixon Family Health

It took several sessions with the volunteer team of physicians using a high-tech laser device to erase the tattoos – a collection that includes cell blocks, gates and spider webs. And when it was over, Cortez would spend dozens of hours

The first thing that hit the group as they crossed the border

Santa Clarita Valley, particularly now

was the contrasts. From the lush hills of San Diego to the

and their health insurance.”

organizers ask of their clients. “I would go look for a job, the first thing they would ask me I was young, but I’m not like that any more. They would say they

The goal is outreach to those with no money for health care –

would call, and I waited and waited but they never did.

and to provide preventative medicine. “The Samuel Dixon Family Health Centers do such important work in the Santa Clarita Valley, particularly now when so many people are losing their jobs and their health insurance,” said Sister Colleen Settles, OP, Chief Mission Integration Officer for the California Region. “It’s a privilege for Providence Holy Cross to partner with such an important organization by providing lab work and diagnostics. It is our mission to provide care for the poor and vulnerable, and so our two organizations work well together, hand-in-hand. Established more than 20 years ago in the semi-rural community of Val Verde, the organization now operates three centers in the Santa Clarita Valley. Contributions from Providence have enabled the health centers to meet the needs of the growing population in need.

own community. Manuel’s story is a great example. Manuel clung to his grandma in bewilderment and fear. At 3 years old, he had seldom been around other children, and the As he held on, the Promotora asked his grandmother to sit down and tell her about their home together. Grandma confessed that, as Manuel’s primary care giver, she

the “haves” and the “have nots.” And once in Mexico, the

didn’t feel safe or comfortable taking him out to play, so he had

Providence crew saw further contrasts in the new sparkling

very little interaction with other children. Despite Manuel’s fear,

factories that were built among Tijuana’s shanties.

Grandma felt comfortable at the Center, and began to bring him

families share. “We realized after three days of work that we gained so much more from this experience than we could ever give these people,” said Ken Keller, Regional Director of Physician Business Services.

twice a week. After a short time, Manuel started playing with the other children, and has developed social skills appropriate for his age. Grandma says she encourages more play at home now, too. Playtime is learning time for everyone Baby Moves sessions begin with “circle time,” where the children

The Providence group was split to work on two different

and their parents sing and dance together, clap their hands and

homes. One group spent the day digging foundations

wave colorful flags. Playtime is next. As the kids explore the

and trenches in very compacted clay, grueling work under

games, blocks, balls and crafts available at various stations, their

the hot sun. The second group laid blocks with cement,

parents and staff members interact with them, as the parents learn

backbreaking yet very satisfying labor, the kind where the

techniques to use to promote their kids’ development at home.

sense of accomplishment is immediate. The lessons learned the first day centered on community and family.

Ultimately, the parents end up having as much fun as their

“The group formed into a family,” Ken said. “We, as people

chance to laugh, share and network with one another. As one

of Providence, came down to help as part of a larger group.

mom says, “This program has been so enjoyable. It has taught

Even though these families don’t have a lot, they are very

me things I can do at home with my son, and I see a difference

proud of what they do have and they are supportive of each

in him already. He loves coming, too. As soon as he sees the

other. They work harder than all of us out here. They’re

building he tries to climb out of his car seat, he’s so excited.”

open, willing to give, charitable – again we took away more than we gave.”

Providence Health & Services 2009 Community Benefit Report [ page 12 ]

encouraging families to trust and confide in members of their

barren ones of Tijuana, the scenery drew a line between

But it wasn’t long before this crew realized the riches these

about was my tattoos,” Cortez said. “I said I put them on when

Promotoras (Community Health Workers) staff the program,

Baby Moves Developmental Play Center was filled with them!

Centers do such important work in the when so many people are losing their jobs

performing community service, the only thing program

To learn more, call (818) 847-3860.

“The group formed into a family,” Ken said. help as part of a larger group.”

my tattoos, sometimes they don’t even want to talk to me. They

Building Blocks for the Future

and they become eager to take part in community activities.

For four years, Providence has provided lab services, X-rays and

“When they’re covered, it’s fine. But if they’re not and they see

“It’s so much better now.”

Group Finds Tremendous Rewards in Giving

children. Not only is the program educational, it offers them a

To learn more, call (310) 257-3586.

Providence Health & Services 2009 Community Benefit Report [ page 13 ]


Patient Navigator Program Helps Community Navigate the Healthcare System Uninsured patients rarely have access to regular medical care, meaning they tend to use the Emergency Room for all of their medical needs - even the non-urgent ones. While that strains an already over-burdened health care system, the consequences can be deadly for our patients. Without regular care, patients suffer, often become disabled and even die from such manageable diseases as diabetes and high blood pressure. A recent health status interview of residents in economically disadvantaged communities in the South Bay underscores the danger: Up to 25% of residents say they rarely or never receive health care when they need it; up to 68% say they do not have a regular doctor; up to 37% say their health is “only fair” or “poor.” By the time a symptom scares them enough to seek help, their health can have deteriorated terribly. Promotora Patient Navigator Program

Juan’s Story When Juan came to the Emergency Room looking for help, Promotora Maria sat down with him. He had been diagnosed with San Joaquin Valley fever, or coccidioidomycosis, a

Partners For Healthy Kids

Mobile Clinic Serves Children in Need Bay area. For one thing, their parents often don’t know that free clinics exist. And transportation issues often keep them at home.

disease that produces only mild symptoms in most people,

Many kids have to soldier through common, but painful,

but was killing Juan. Without regular medical care, he

illnesses such as ear infections and strep throat without

probably wouldn’t survive.

medical care. Many have never had a regular check up

Juan’s family needed him now more than ever. Although his wife had been working on her immigration papers, she had been deported to Mexico for 3 years. Their 5-year-old daughter had been left behind with Juan, who now had to be both mother and father to her. Cooking and cleaning were now taking up every minute of the time that Juan wasn’t working at the small business he owns with his brother.

The Program

language and special needs of our diverse population. It had

down a bit. My next was to get him enrolled in Medi-Cal.”

provides wellness education and referrals to dental and

laryngeal tumor that required surgery.

As in other areas of Providence, Promotoras helped to craft

thanks to Maria and the Promotora Patient Navigator Program.

themselves healthy and strong. Sometimes they experience

the solution. By pairing promotoras with uninsured patients,

His health has improved, and his little girl is getting ready to

life-saving care.

patients learn to navigate the complex and confusing

start school. With a little luck, his wife will be able to return

healthcare system. They learn about affordable healthcare

sooner than later. And Juan’s business will have a good year!

have found new medical homes!

Providence Health & Services 2009 Community Benefit Report [ page 14 ]

with specialists. She arranged transportation to and from the appointments. As it turned out, she was right. Samuel had a

specialty care when needed. The kids learn how to keep

affordable healthcare options. And they

The nurse practitioner got on the phone to make appointments

Run by a bilingual staff, Partners for Healthy Kids also

Today, Juan gets regular medical care in his community clinic,

healthcare system. They learn about

her little boy to a specialist. She spoke only Spanish and had

seen and treated immediately - it could spread. He could die.

afford the medications he needed. My first job was to calm him

navigate the complex and confusing

Samuel’s mom was frightened. She didn’t have a way to get

schools in Lawndale, Gardena, Wilmington and San Pedro

clinics was key. Any solution had to embrace the culture,

ER patients, patients learn how to

immediate attention.

practitioner knew that if Samuel had cancer - and wasn’t

where they are.

By pairing promotoras with uninsured

noticed a lump that wasn’t supposed to be there. It needed

Healthy Kids program, sending a mobile pediatric clinic to

take care of his little girl while being very sick himself. He couldn’t

To learn more, call (310) 257-3544.

and saw nothing unusual. But when she felt his neck, she

no understanding of the healthcare system. But the nurse

Helping connect uninsured patients with low-cost or free

themselves in low cost insurance programs.

Our nurse practitioner examined Samuel’s throat and ears

Providence Little Company of Mary created the Partners for

every week. The kids get the medical care they need right

options. They learn how to enroll their children and

Healthy Kids van at his school. He said his throat and ears had give him something to make him feel better?

whooping cough. And some children suffer with serious, lifethreatening conditions that could, if treated, be managed.

Samuel was 6 years old when he visited the Partners for been hurting a lot and that he probably had a cold. Could we

or been immunized against polio, mumps, tetanus or

“Juan was under a lot of stress,” Maria says. “He was trying to

to come from the community itself.

A Happy Ending

Caring for uninsured kids is a huge challenge in the South

Today, Samuel is a happy, healthy kid, back at school with his friends. His mom says she will be forever grateful that we cared enough to help him get the treatment he needed. We here at Providence Little Company of Mary are grateful too, that we had a program that allowed us to be part of Samuel’s successful care! To learn more, call (310) 514-5466.

Run by a bilingual staff, Partners for Healthy Kids also provides wellness education and referrals to dental and specialty care when needed. The kids learn how to keep themselves healthy and strong.

Providence Health & Services 2009 Community Benefit Report [ page 15 ]


Total Community Benefit

$124.2 Million

People Served

180,346

2009 Community Investment

About Us

Total Community Benefit – $124.2 Million

Providence Health & Services, California, is a not-for-profit Catholic health care ministry committed to providing

Unpaid Costs of Medi-Cal

Free Community Programs & Services

Subsidized Health Services

Charity Care

Total Cost of Care & Services Donated in 2009

South Bay Service Area

$24,042,717

$8,162,440

$3,712,447

$2,272,682

$38,190,286

Valley Service Area

$59,172,698

$9,423,545

$108,014

$17,335,619

$86,039,876

Total Providence Health & Services in California

$83,215,415

$17,585,985

$3,820,461

$19,608,301

$124,230,162

for the needs of the communities we serve — especially the poor and vulnerable. The region operates five, awardwinning Medical Centers in Southern California: Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center, Providence Holy Cross Medical Center, Providence Tarzana Medical Center, Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Center Torrance and Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Center San Pedro. In addition, Providence operates several non-acute facilities and physician clinics, as well as a high school. With more than 10,000 employees, physicians and volunteers, we remain committed to our core values of respect, compassion, justice, excellence and stewardship. These goals, defined by our founding sisters more than 150 years

Charity Care $19.6 Million

ago, feed philosophies that result in high-quality care for our patients, a broad spectrum of outreach programs for our community, and a focus on recruiting and retaining dedicated employees. Providence Health & Services is dedicated to quality, compassionate care for all. The Providence Medical Centers

Subsidized Health Services $3.8 Million

Unpaid Costs of Medi-Cal $83.2 Million

provide a full continuum of health care services.

How Do Our Communities Benefit?

Free Community Programs & Services $17.6 Million

Providence gives back to our communities by providing a variety of health care programs. We tailor our programs to respond to regional, area and neighborhood needs. Our contributions include: •

Financial assistance for the uninsured and others

who cannot pay for the cost of their care •

Subsidies to make up the difference between the

Subsidies for medical residency programs, nursing and other education, and medical research

Services to our communities such as wellness

cost of care and what is paid by state and federal

and prevention education, health screenings,

government

immunizations and support groups

Services are offered because of a need in the

Community-building grants, cash gifts, and in-kind

community including our primary care safety net

donations such as medical supplies, child safety

clinics and behavioral health programs

seats and food

Providence Health & Services 2009 Community Benefit Report [ page 16 ]

Tax Status Benefit As a not-for-profit service organization, Providence Health & Services in California received an estimated $35.8 million in federal, state and local tax exemptions in 2009. In comparison, we gave back more than $119.5 million to the communities we serve or more than $83.7 million in excess of our exemptions. In addition, there are taxes from which we are not exempt and which we must pay as part of our normal course of operations, just like any other organization. These taxes totaled more than $50.3 million in 2009 and include business and occupation taxes; taxes on non-exempt properties; and payroll and state taxes.

Providence Health & Services 2009 Community Benefit Report [ page 17 ]


Region Service Area Oakland

 Providence House

CALIFORNIA REGION

Santa Clarita

 Providence Holy Cross Health Center

Porter Ranch

 Providence Holy Cross Health Center

Mission Hills

 Providence Holy Cross Medical Center  Providence TrinityCare Hospice  Providence Holy Cross Surgery Center  Providence Holy Cross Diagnostic Center

North Hollywood

 Providence St. Elizabeth Care Center  Providence Center for Community Health Improvement

Tarzana

 Providence Tarzana Medical Center  Providence Tarzana Diabetes Care Center  Providence Tarzana Women’s Center  Providence Tarzana Imaging Center  Providence Tarzana OutpatientTherapy Center  Valley Radiation Oncology Center

Burbank

 Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center  Providence TrinityCare Hospice  Providence High School  Providence Saint Joseph Health Center  Providence Saint Joseph Diagnostic Center  Roy and Patricia Disney Family Cancer Center  Providence Home Care

Health Care Campus Freestanding Long Term Care Facility Housing and Assisted Living Owned Primary Care Network Educational Facility Behavioral Health Services Adult and Child Day Care Centers Home Health and Hospice Services Medical Laboratory Services Providence Health Plan Providence Infusion and Pharmacy Services Freestanding Outpatient Services Food Bank Community Outreach Center

Providence Health & Services 2009 Community Benefit Report [ page 18 ]

Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Center San Pedro Nancy Carlson, Chief Executive

501 South Buena Vista Street Burbank, CA 91505 (818) 847-3334

Kerry Carmody, Chief Operating Officer

Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Center Torrance Michael Hunn, Chief Executive

Jeffrey Winter, Chief Administrative Officer

4101 Torrance Boulevard Torrance, CA 90503 (310) 540-7676

501 South Buena Vista Street Burbank, CA 91505 (818) 847-3375 VALLEY SERVICE AREA

Providence Holy Cross Medical Center Larry Bowe, Chief Executive

Redondo Beach

Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center Barry Wolfman, Chief Executive

Hawthorne

501 South Buena Vista Street Burbank, CA 91505 (818) 847-3380

 Providence Little Company of MaryMedical Institute  Vasek Polak Community Health Clinic

Torrance

 Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Center Torrance  Providence Little Company of Mary Transitional Care Center/Unit  Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Institute  Providence Little Company of Mary Home Health  Providence TrinityCare Hospice  Outpatient Care Center

Carson

 Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Institute

San Pedro

 Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Center San Pedro  Sub Acute Care Center  Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Institute  Providence TrinityCare Hospice  Providence Diagnostic Center  Providence Little Company of MaryPeninsula Recovery Center

1300 West Seventh Street San Pedro, CA 90732 (310) 832-3311

501 South Buena Vista Street Burbank, CA 91505 (818) 847-4561

Manhattan Beach

 Providence Little Company of MaryMedical Institute  Outpatient Care Center

             

SOUTH BAY SERVICE AREA

Arnold Schaffer, Senior Vice President, Regional Operations

15031 Rinaldi Street Mission Hills, CA 91346 (818) 365-8051

 Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Institute

Key

ADMINISTRATION

Providence Tarzana Medical Center Dale Surowitz, Chief Executive 18321 Clark St. Tarzana, CA 91356 (818) 708-5140

Providence St. Elizabeth Care Center Neil Silverstein, Administrator 10425 Magnolia Boulevard North Hollywood, CA 91601 (818) 980-3872

Providence Health & Services Foundation Valley Service Area Patricia E. Modrzejewski, President 501 S. Buena Vista Street Burbank, CA 91505 818.847.4673

TrinityCare Hospice Terri Warren, Executive Director 2601 Airport Drive, Suite 230 Torrance, CA 90505 (310) 530-3800

Providence Little Company of Mary Foundation Joseph M. Zanetta, JD, President 4101 Torrance Blvd. Torrance, CA 90503 (310) 303-5340 MISSION LEADERSHIP

Sister Colleen Settles, OP, D. Min, Chief Mission Integration Officer 501 South Buena Vista Street Burbank, CA 91505 (818) 847-3350

Jim Tehan, Director, Community Health Providence Little Company of Mary 2601 Airport Drive, Suite 220 Torrance, CA 90505 (310) 257-3586

Ron Sorensen, Director, Community Outreach Valley Service Area 6801 Coldwater Canyon, Suite 1A North Hollywood, CA 91605 (818) 847-3862

Providence Health & Services 2009 Community Benefit Report [ page 19 ]


501 S. Buena Vista Street Burbank, CA 91505 T: (888) 432-5464 www.providence.org/california Š 2010 Providence Health & Services


Community Benefit Report