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Wellness

a family affair at United Natural

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Amica’s

investments produce dividends

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Social

approach yields results at Carousel

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Staff care helps Fellowship serve clients

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Competition spurs Visiting Nurse health

Presented by

sPonsors

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CVS Caremark CongratuLatES aLL oF tHE rHODe ISLaND COmPaNIeS tHat HaVE BEEn naMED rHODe ISLaND’S HeaLTHIeST emPLOYerS. WE arE ProuD to BE aMong tHIS PrEStIgIouS grouP. CVS Caremark is a pharmacy innovation company helping people on their path to better health. We are continuously developing new ways to improve health and lower costs, including for our own employees. We are 7,500 retail stores staffed by highly trained pharmacists who improve coordination of care to ensure that patients stay on their prescribed medications. We are one of the largest pharmacy benefit managers in the country, finding new ways to make prescription medications more affordable. We are a retail medical clinic with over 650 locations, providing convenient access to care. Every day, we’re working to make health care better. Learn more at CVSCaremark.com/BetterHealth


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R.I.’s Healthiest Employers 2013 Wellness plans improve 5,000-Plus Employees (Alphabetical order) CVS Caremark............................... 2 GTECH Corp................................... 9 Hasbro............................................ 8

Toray Plastics................................ 9 UnitedHealthcare........................... 8 United Natural Foods.................... 6

1,500-4,999 Employees (Alphabetical order) AAA Southern New England........ 11 Amica Mutual Insurance Co........10 Amtrol............................................12 Brown University..........................12 Care New England........................ 11

CharterCare Health Partners...... 11 FM Global...................................... 11 Gilbane Inc....................................12 Ryan, LLC......................................12

500-1,499 Employees (Alphabetical order) Carousel Industries..................... 13

South County Hospital................ 14

150-499 Employees (Alphabetical order) BankNewport............................... 16 Beacon Mutual Insurance Co..... 16 Dave’s Marketplace..................... 16

Fellowship Health Resources..... 15 Navigant Credit Union..................17 University Medicine..................... 16

5-149 Employees (Alphabetical order) Moran Shipping Agencies Inc..... 19 Partridge, Snow & Hahn LLP...... 19

Visiting Nurse Home Care.......... 18

about the cover ALL TOGETHER NOW: Amica employee Gail Coulter leads a yoga class at the insurer’s headquarters fitness facilities, part of the active lifestyle the company encourages.

PBN PHOTO/STEPHANIE ALVAREZ EWENS

your goals. your pace. your health.

momentum

culture, create savings Year two of Providence Business News’ Healthiest Employers program is in the books, and there are a few things that are clear. First, wellness programs work, from any number of perspectives. Employees are healthier (and happier) thanks to their participation. Companies see health care expenses decline, especially if they are self-insured. Programs that emphasize team approaches create a more tight-knit, collegial work atmosphere. At the same time, the data that the programs collect do not expose individuals to violations of their privacy. They truly are supportive of each person’s needs within the context of their health. And lastly, companies that do not have wellness programs already need to add one. Going forward, they will be a key component to creating a sustainable business culture, no matter how small the enterprise, delivering improved productivity and better

execution on company goals. As we did last year with the inaugural program, PBN used an outside group, Healthiest Employers, a privately held technologyand-data-research company with a focus on wellness, to judge this year’s entries. All companies that entered the 2013 edition of the program completed extensive surveys, which were then benchmarked against similar programs across the country, and finally, graded and ranked. The top 26 companies across the five company size categories are featured in this special section. Supporting PBN in its efforts through the Healthiest Employers program to improve the wellness of the Ocean State’s workforce is presenting sponsor Tufts Health Plan, as well as partner sponsors CVS Caremark Corp., Preventure and USI Insurance Services. Media sponsor is AM790.

Mark S. Murphy Editor

We are pleased to honor our fellow companies who share those same ideals.


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CVS Caremark would like to congratulate all of the Rhode Island businesses being recognized as the state’s Healthiest Employers by the Providence Business News. The honorees have been chosen for the work they are doing to promote and inspire health and wellness among their own colleagues and CVS Caremark is proud to be included in this prestigious group. As a pharmacy innovation company helping people on their path to better health, CVS Caremark understands that a healthy company needs healthy employees. We are continuously developing new ways to improve health and lower costs, not only for our customers and clients but also for our colleagues. We are 7,500 retail stores staffed by highly trained pharmacists who improve coordination of care to ensure that patients stay on their prescribed medications. We are one of the largest pharmacy benefit managers in the country, finding new ways to make prescription medications more affordable. We are a retail medical clinic with over 650 locations, providing convenient access to care. Every day, we’re working to make health care better. We congratulate all of the companies being recognized today, who are helping their employees live healthier lives.

Preventure’s mission is ‘To impact our clients’ success and the quality of life of each individual we touch.’ We feel a connection with each of the organizations recognized today as you strive to positively impact your company and employees with proactive health and wellness programs. Thank you for investing in your people and our community by supporting all of the great benefits of a healthier lifestyle. We all benefit when people feel better, increase their energy and spend more time doing what they enjoy. Keep up the good work!

We would like to congratulate all the winners of this year’s PBN Healthiest Employers of RI!  We recognize the challenges with executing and supporting these plans…trying to bridge the gap between employee engagement and corporate culture.  The reality is that effective wellness plans come in a variety of sizes and methodologies.  We see this everyday with our customers who currently employ many different wellness programs that we help support.  Keeping the programs relevant, timely and evolutionary are pivotal to their success and sustainability.  We commend and loudly applaud those companies who are working tirelessly to provide these types of plans to their employees and who actively promote a healthy work environment!  


Time to Celebrate! Healthy employers have so much to celebrate— higher productivity, more loyal employees, and often lower costs on health care and related expenses. Today we celebrate YOU and your work to improve the lives of your people.

From our people to yours, Thank you!

www.preventure.com


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Wellness program brings families onboard Number of Employees: 7,000 CEO (or equivalent): Steven Spinner, president & CEO

A Healthy Thought:

“The wellness program saved my life.”

Anne Mosher manager

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By Richard Asinof Contributing Writer

Anne Mosher, a manager at the national headquarters of United Natural Foods Inc. in Providence, was skeptical when the company, a food-distribution firm, announced its wellness program three years ago. The program was dubbed “Body and Mind.” “When it was first launched, I was like a lot of employees,” Mosher explained. “There was some suspicion that it was a big-brother kind of thing, that the company was going to be involved in our overall health, almost like a penalty system for our health-insurance selections.” Mosher’s attitude quickly changed. “It was different,” she said. “It was about me, and not so much about reducing health care costs. It made you aware of your own health and long-term goals.” As part of the wellness program, run by the consulting firm Provant, based in East Greenwich, Mosher had a physical, and as part of that physical, a routine mammogram screening. “They were able to identify a suspicious area, with the best prognosis, stage zero. Because of that early detection, there was no radiation, no chemotherapy,” she said. Without a doubt in her mind, Mosher said, “the wellness program saved my life. I wouldn’t have gone for a routine mammogram for a couple of more years.” Mosher said that the wellness program has created a sense of community at the workplace, where about 400 of the company’s 7,000 employees work. “The smoking-cessation program, the attention to diet, free organic fruit in the break rooms,” she said. “Everyone around me is participating. There is a Weight Watchers program at lunch hour, once a week. All these people have gotten pretty skinny.” The wellness program, she said with conviction, feels like an extension of the company’s core values. “It’s a great place to work. Your work life really reflects the company’s values, and the company’s values are not just words.” Every year, the wellness program at United Natural Foods has become a little more involved with the lives of employees, according to Deirdre Mendenhall, the director of benefits and wellness at the company. In 2013, it took a major step forward by welcoming into the program the spouses and domestic partners of employees. “We found, for someone to quit smoking without a support network at home was very difficult,” Mendenhall said. “So we decided to take the spouses down the same path in the wellness

PBN PHOTO/NATALJA KENT

EATING THE TALK: United Natural Foods provides free organic fruit in its break rooms as part of its commitment to employees. Above, Joni Weglein, left, and Karen O’Brien take advantage of the offering.

tainability officer at United Natural Foods, said program.” The participation rate has been very good one of the most important steps the company so far – with about 85 percent of employees and took was the move to shift the wellness program about 50 percent of spouses participating, acfrom voluntary to mandatory. “It’s the commitcording Mendenhall. About 7,000 United Foods ment,” he said. “We have the follow-through and workers and spouses have completed a healththe commitment. We started to hold people acrisk assessment. countable, and to make it mandatory.” The results of the wellness program have proThe need for the wellness program was driven duced “exceptionally positive” numbers in the reduction of health risks: a 9 percent decrease home when, during some initial health screenin those at risk for waist circumference, from 46 ings, several workers went directly from the percent to 37 percent; impressive improvements screening to local hospitals because in lowering blood pressure; and a of dangerously high blood pressure, reduction in cardiac risk, accordaccording to Dziki. ing to Mendenhall. And, Dziki’s spouse is particiThe Body and Mind programs is pating in the wellness program. not resting on its laurels, Mendenhall continued, but looking to the “I think, at first, she had trepidafuture. “The biggest piece for us tions,” Dziki said. “She had some this year was engaging with spousconcern that her information was es,” she said. “The next step is to somehow going to be shared. Evengage with folks not just to know their numbers (from biomedical Diedre MendenHALLL eryone takes their own health very personally.” screening and health-risk assessUnited wellness and Dziki said he reassured his ments). The next step is to move benefits director your numbers.” spouse, telling her: “No, honey, One of the most important facyou’re the only one who gets the tors in changing behaviors in the numbers. No one else has access.” wellness arena is the readiness for She went to the screenings, he addchange, Mendenhall said. “You ed. “There was no pain involved.” have to be ready to change your behaviors,” she Dziki said he was surprised to learn the large said. “We look at the readiness for change metpercentage of the population that doesn’t go to rics as part of our wellness program.” As part of the company’s smoking-cessation annual physicals or see a primary-care doctor. efforts, Mendenhall said that the wellness pro- These are people who are insured but not activegram has created tools so that employees can be ly engaged in the health system. successful when they are ready to change – in“At the end of the day,” he said, “we’re all trycluding an online and telephone-coaching program and a medical plan that covers smoking- ing to look at the rising costs of medical expenses, and to help our associates take control and cessation drugs. responsibility of their own health care – to do it “We try and remove the hurdles,” she said. Thomas Dziki, chief human resource and sus- for themselves and their family.” n

‘You have to be ready to change your behaviors.’


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AUGUST 2013

Mitigating Risks

Reducing Healthcare Costs

Self-Funded Programs

Coordinated Wellness Strategies

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For more than a decade, health care costs have posed a major challenge for employers. Now with Health Care Reform, it is more important than ever to motivate your employees to modify the behaviors that will lower their health risks. USI’s dedicated team of wellness experts offers a new approach to workplace strategies. This unique model of coordinating behavioral changes with workplace wellness has had significant results. Contact USI today to learn more about helping your company create a healthy, productive workforce.

USI Insurance Services LLC • 5700 Post Road, P.O. Box 1158 • East Greenwich, RI 02818 401.885.5700 • 800.335.5701 • www.usi.biz Copyright ©2013 USI Insurance Services. All Rights Reserved.


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Health-insurance savings help motivate employees Number of Employees: 70,000 CEO (or equivalent): Stephen Farrell

A Healthy Thought:

“We have a healthy eating policy for internal meetings.”

BEN GOLDSTEIN director of public relations

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By John Larrabee Contributing Writer

Good health is a reward in itself, but UnitedHealthcare of New England also provides employees with a financial incentive for keeping fit. People who get an annual physical and complete a health-risk assessment pay less for their health insurance. An individual can save $600 a year, while those with a family can save $1,200. The company has also taken steps to ensure its 550 Rhode Island employees are active by es-

tablishing a walking path outside its Warwick headquarters. The staff – including workers in Providence and Lincoln – has formed teams and held contests with prizes for people who log the most minutes walking. The exercise push doesn’t end there. The office conference room is sometimes used for yoga classes or group Zumba workouts. The company’s local wellness program puts an emphasis on eating smart, too. “We established fresh-fruit Mondays, where we have free fruit for our employees,” said Ben Goldstein, director of public relations for the health insurer. “We started this in January and it has been very well received.” There has been an effort to keep junk food out of the office. “We have vending machines that have healthy choices,” Goldstein said. “We have a healthy-eating policy for internal meetings. And we also no longer provide sweets for dessert. Instead, we have fresh fruit or a healthy alternative.” What’s more, the corporate campus has become smoke-free, and the company offers a smoking-cessation program to employees and their spouses. n

AUGUST 2013

Employees can walk, stretch, eat well all day Number of Employees: 6,000 CEO (or equivalent): Brian Goldner

A Healthy Thought:

“We continuously strive for unique ways to bring awareness of healthy lifestyles.”

Karen ROWLAND assistant manager of employer engagement

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By John Larrabee Contributing Writer

At Hasbro Inc., the Rhode Island-based toy, game and entertainment company, no one has an excuse for spending too much time sitting down. The company’s wellness program provides plenty of fun ways to be active. Hasbro’s 1,600 Ocean State employees enjoy workplace fitness centers at the Pawtucket headquar-

ters and at offices in East Providence and Providence. Trainers are sometimes on hand to run afterwork programs. A yoga instructor teaches exercises that can be done at one’s desk. There’s also an evening class for mind-body-barre – a stretching and relaxation technique – in the cafeteria. And a massage therapist visits the office to give chair massages. “As a branded play company and taking advantage of our fun culture, we continuously strive for unique ways to bring awareness of healthy lifestyles to our employees,” said Karen Rowland, assistant manager of employer engagement. The company has mapped and marked walking trails inside and outside its buildings. Employees nationwide are encouraged to join walking teams. For people who want a more difficult challenge, the company holds an annual 5K walking and running race. Last year more than 200 employees took part. Encouraging good nutrition is part of Hasbro’s wellness plan, too. Sodexo, the company that runs the office cafeterias, now offers healthy choices during lunch, and a chef sometimes comes in to provide healthy cooking demonstrations. n

Health efforts spread from HQ across the United States Number of Employees: 120,000 CEO (or equivalent): Larry Merlo, president & CEO

A Healthy Thought: Employees take advantage of their lunch break to head to the company gym where Edge Athletics’ owner Stephen Rodrigues prepares a workout routine.

We know work is important. So is our health. Thats why we are proud to be named one of 2013’s healthiest employers.

“The more healthy food you eat, the more free food you get through the program.”

JEFFREY VENTURA director of corporate communications

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By Jennifer Salcido Contributing Writer

After CVS/Caremark Corp. began its employee wellness initiatives in 2005 at its Woonsocket headquarters – offering fitness classes, weight management, and more – it soon decided to expand the effort across the country. CVS/Caremark has 120,000 employees in 44 states, and it quickly determined that making wellness a nationwide priority would benefit

the company as well as its workforce. The company installed a full-time employee “dedicated to expanding these initiatives to encompass a national footprint,” said Jeffrey Ventura, director of corporate communications. Early wellness projects in Rhode Island taught valuable lessons about which techniques worked, which didn’t, and which needed adjustments. Early incentives included savings of about $180 a year on employee out-of-pocket health care contributions. As that monetary benefit increased, so did participation. Ventura said popular changes were initiated in the on-campus dining facilities. “We worked with our food vendors to make healthy and affordable lunches available to our employees. A rewards program was established, so the more healthy food you eat, the more free food you get through the program.” Ventura credits the executivelevel support and the involvement of tens of thousands of employees with the success of the programs. “What might have started as an HR initiative has now become a program that is completely aligned with our company’s purpose. n


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Wellness efforts reach Company drives sugar into the neighborhood habit out of the office Number of Employees: 32,000 CEO (or equivalent): Rick Schloesser, president & CEO

A Healthy Thought:

“We are … promoting wellness beyond our employee and family population.”

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BetH eustis human resource manager

By Victor Paul Alvarez Contributing Writer

Toray Plastics (America) Inc. has made a commitment to health that extends beyond the company walls, beyond the families of employees, and right out into the general community. In its efforts to be a good corporate citizen, Toray, located in North Kingstown in the Quonset Business Park, has opened its on-site employee fitness center and gym to nonprofit community groups such as the local police and

fire departments, schools and recreation leagues. “We recognize that there is a need in our community for recreational space,” said Human Resource Manager Beth Eustis. The on-site fitness center is staffed by Prohealth, a corporate fitness-management service that administers health and fitness assessments, and provides personal training and exercise classes. Toray also offers programs for stress reduction and weight loss, chair massages, and measurements of blood pressure, cholesterol and body fat. Toray supports public fundraisers by community groups and individual employees to improve wellness. The company holds blood drives regularly and sponsors 5K races such as the Kent Hospital NK5K road race. It sponsors employees individually for many races that support charities that they are involved with. “We believe that our comprehensive approach to wellness and efforts to engage our employees, their families and the community at large makes us an employer of choice and a leader in wellness,” Toray said. n

Number of Employees: 6,945 CEO (or equivalent): Jaymin B. Patel, president & CEO

A Healthy Thought:

“Employees can expect to find … resources that encourage healthy living.”

susan eikinas senior benefits manager

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By Victor Paul Alvarez Contributing Writer

GTECH Corp. Americas, a worldwide operator and provider of technology for gaming, says its best investment is in the people who work for the company. GTECH offers a fitness center equipped with elliptical machines, treadmills, free weights, and exercise classes. The staff provides personal fitness evaluations: em-

ployees are encouraged to join programs such as ShapeUp. “We also offer zero-calorie, vitamin-enhanced water as one of our free beverages for employees. We provide coaches for weight loss, diabetes and heart health,” said Susan Eikinas, senior benefits manager at the Providence-based headquarters for the Americas division of Romebased GTECH S.p.A. The introduction of th water decreased soda consumption by 8,832 gallons, dropping sugar intake by more than 2 tons. GTECH manages its own inhouse food service department, providing healthy foods at a low cost. Nutritional information posted in the cafe defines meals that are unhealthy and suggests nutritious alternatives. GTECH uses health plan performance review data to measure employee results and improvements. Its eight-week ShapeUp summer program totaled a loss of 406 pounds, and the exercise program inspired 653,450 minutes of exercise. “Employees at GTECH can expect to find programs and resources that encourage healthy living, preventative care and shared responsibility,” said Eikinas. n

Going Beyond the Call … Since 1937 www.moranshipping.com

Moran Shipping Agencies, Inc. is honored to be recognized as one of the Healthiest Employers in Rhode Island. Now in its 76th year, Moran Shipping is the largest independent steamship agency in North America. This success and growth would not be possible without the great work of superb employees who give their personal health a high priority. Our strength is our people ... Moran Shipping boasts extremely low employee turnover as our managers average more than 20 years experience with the company. This dedicated team represents a diverse and committed skill base which includes captains, mariners, former and active Coast Guard personnel, ship operators, charterers, brokers, inspectors, vetting and maritime security experts as well as office personnel. Moran Shipping congratulates all the companies being honored as Healthiest Employers. Together, we are making Rhode Island a healthier place to live and work.


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Big investment in fitness yields big returns Number of Employees: 3,158 CEO (or equivalent): Robert A. DiMuccio, chairman, president & CEO

A Healthy Thought:

“There’s a significant return on investment with a healthy work-force.”

shameem awan assistant vice president

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By Jennifer Salcido Contributing Writer

Amica Mutual Insurance Co. in Lincoln has been pushing programs to improve its employees’ health since the 1990s. And in the last decade it has been measuring health outcomes and devising smarter techniques. Human Resource Officer Dina Pescione said Amica always has had a robust history of health initiatives, starting with the hiring of an occupational health nurse in the 1990s. Having an on-staff nurse helped keep the company’s absenteeism rates down, for three reasons. Employees had easy access to preventative care like immunizations, they had convenient help to understand their treatment options and they could avoid missing work to see a doctor for simple treatments. In addition to her presence on campus, the nurse began many of Amica’s longstanding wellness initiatives, such as smoking cessation, and lunch-and-learn sessions. Employees can walk and run on trails on the company’s sprawling property during lunch hour; gather in the fitness center for a quick workout after-hours; or play a pickup game of basketball together. “We’ve always had wellness incorporated into our culture,” said Pescione, noting that Amica’s on-site fitness center and health-friendly cafeteria have been staples since the company opened its doors. Shameem Awan, assistant vice president and claims executive, said, “As an executive, I absolutely set an example for my team. We have ongoing discussions about health, wellness and safety. There’s a significant return on investment with a healthy workforce.” Pescione said the effectiveness of the company’s wellness initiatives could be examined through data stretching back to 2004. Using a third-party data warehouse in cooperation with Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Rhode Island, which administers the company’s health plan, Amica has tracked the progress of those who use its wellness programs. “We also don’t have a lot of turnover, which is important in measuring outcomes,” she said. Starting in 2004, the company began to track risk factors for its employees based on analysis of claims submitted to Blue Cross. On-site biometric and personal health assessments were implemented, and Amica was able to measure risk based on body-mass index, cholesterol, blood pressure and tobacco use. After noting that the risk factors increased over time, Amica began to improve its tracking methods. In 2010, the company began to roll out

PBN PHOTO/STEPHANIE ALVAREZ EWENS

HEALTHY FOOD, HEALTHY OUTCOMES: Amica subsidizes healthy offerings at its campus cafeteria, one of the many initiatives the insurer has undertaken to improve the wellness of its employees.

its wellness programs as they stand now, to nearBeginning this spring, Amica is offering a pily the universal benefit – and delight – of employ- lot project for using standing desks, responding ees from the top down. to employee concerns about sedentary lifestyles. Pescione said Amica saw that early incentive The company brings in nutritionists in for demprograms like spot bonuses and cash awards re- onstrations over lunch, and offers personal sulted in little follow-through; some tweaking training. was in order. “We began to tie incentives to prePescione said that in 2012, Amica invested mium reduction. We feel the key to keeping an $300,000 in its reimbursement programs, $40,000 employee healthy is having a direct relationship on its awareness programs, and $1.2 million in with their physician, so we started driving them premium reductions. She emphasized that Amithere.” ca considers employee health an investment, not Instead of participating in on-site screening a cost. And the return has been measurable. and biometrics, employees were given a form In 2013, the company expects to see a less than to take to their physician to fill out 3 percent increase in its medical and deliver to the third-party data costs – less than half of the national collectors. That would get employaverage. Its diabetes-related costs ees in the system, said Pescione, and prevalence rates are down sigand get them invested in their own nificantly, a 3-to-1 ratio between health. This also allows employees those who participate in the proto benefit from preventative rather gram and those who do not. than acute care. Of Amica’s 3,000 employees naTotal cholesterol, blood prestionwide, Pescione said that 55 persure, glucose, body-mass index cent participate in the premium and blood pressure are all trending dina pescione reduction and screening programs. downward according to data from Amica human resource Amica has extended its premium 2011 to 2012. And from 2006 to 2012, officer reduction programs to the spouses disease prevalence rates all have of employees as well, offering disdecreased: asthma, cancer, corocounts of $1,000 annually on preminary heart disease and stroke are ums for a family plan. “A lot of employees have inching in the right direction. said that their spouses would never have seen a “The Amica brand stands for not only a high doctor for some of these issues,” said Pescione, level of customer service, but we have a high noting the high number of employees who have level of integrity internally, as well. It helps us been able to get fit as a family thanks to Amica. Premium reduction isn’t the only subsidy provide better service to our customers. There’s taken on by Amica in the name of health. The absolutely no downside to doing this,” said fitness-center membership is only $5 every two Pescione. Samuel C. Palmisano, senior assistant vice weeks; at-work Weight Watchers programs are president, concurred, citing the value of exerreimbursed at 75 percent; reimbursement is available for smoking cessation and diabetes cise for team building as well as for focus. “It’s management programs; and the company subsi- healthy to take a mental break from work with dizes healthier options in its cafeteria and vend- exercise. People return to their desks refreshed ing machines. and energized.” n

‘We began to tie incentives to premium reduction.’


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Company tailors program to the needs of employees

Living healthy is a team event for travel group

ment of family members as well,” said Domenic Delmonico, Care New England’s vice president of managed care. “That’s not so easy to do, because they’re not here onsite.” Care New England engages in a self-funded health care arrangement. Rather than purchasing health insurance, the hospital network pays for employees’ claims directly. So, healthier employees mean lower costs for Care New England. Flex for Life’s programs are also designed to respond directly to employees’ needs. Every year, employees and their families can take a health-risk appraisal, which assesses a person’s health conditions. The surveys provide a tailored list of strategies to help each respondent, and the overall results help Care New England identify priority areas for Flex for Life. “We find out areas where our employees need the most help, as well as their readiness to do something about it,” said Delmonico. “Whether people are prepared is key to how we design our programs.” n

ployees took an imaginary walk the length of the 4,200-mile mountain range. “More than 600 people participated in teams of up to 10 people,” explained Karen Diehl, AAA human resources activity and communications specialist. “Team members exercised about 30 minutes a day and … had fun with it,” she said, with the winning team “traveling” a little less than three times the length of the South American mountain chain. The company’s health initiative provides support for employees in the form of personal health assessments, on-site cooking demonstrations and a wellness team that acts as an “ambassador for health promotion,” according to Diehl. Employees are encouraged to be role models and resources. The President’s Health Award is presented to an individual who has shown significant improvement or success in maintaining a healthy lifestyle, but nominees are also evaluated based on their ability to support co-workers. Between 40 and 50 individuals were nominated for the President’s Health Award this year, double the number from last year. n

Number of Employees: 3,031 CEO (or equivalent): Dennis D. Keefe, president & CEO

A Healthy Thought:

“We find out areas where our employees need the most help.”

domenic delmonico vice president of managed care

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By Sarah Parsons Contributing Writer

Wellness is a family matter at Care New England Health System in Warwick. The network of hospitals and wellness centers opens its Flex for Life health program to its employees and their dependents, offering 12 to 15 free wellness programs every year – from nutrition classes to health screening to farmers markets. “A key element of our plan is that we try and get the involve-

Number of Employees: 1,800 CEO (or equivalent): Mark Shaw, president & CEO

A Healthy Thought:

“Team members exercised about 30 minutes a day and … had fun with it.”

karen diehl human resources activity and communications specialist

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By Meg Sullivan Contributing Writer

Hiking across the Andes Mountains is not an easy task, one made even more difficult when you are based in New England. That reality did not stop employees of AAA Southern New England from taking part in a Trek Down the Andes challenge, a six-week contest during which em-

Health providers merge Global firm’s workers forces to boost wellness walk around the world Number of Employees: 2,200 CEO (or equivalent): Ken Belcher

A Healthy Thought:

“We have been able to market and promote worksite wellness.”

r. otis brown vice president of development and external affairs

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By Sarah Parsons Contributing Writer

Roger Williams Medical Center and St. Joseph Health Services each used to offer their own employee-wellness programs. But when the two medical providers became affiliated under CharterCare Health Partners in 2010, it brought the best of both worlds into one wellness plan. “By combining the best of both programs, we have been able to market and promote worksite wellness as a key tenet in our

philosophy,” said R. Otis Brown, CharterCare’s vice president of development and external affairs. Under the direction of a Worksite Wellness Committee, the CharterCare Wellness Program offers its employees a mix of opportunities to improve their minds, bodies and spirits. CharterCare provides classes, financial planning sessions, weight loss and exercise programs, healthy cafeteria meal options, and even a weekly on-site farmers market. Brown said about 40 percent of CharterCare’s staff currently takes advantage of the wellness program, and it continues to grow in popularity year over year. Tracking progress is another critical element of the wellness plan. Employees are encouraged to log all of their activities into an online wellness portal. CharterCare even provides incentives to boost staff participation in all of the programs that the health system offers. “Offering a variety of programs and educational tools is very important, but only if it is considered of value to our workforce,” said Brown. n

Number of Employees: 4,990 CEO (or equivalent): Shivan Subramaniam, chairman & CEO

A Healthy Thought:

“Our … fitness challenge has more employees walking than ever before.”

Carole williamson manager of health and welfare plans

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By Richard Asinof Contributing Writer

FM Global, one of the world’s largest business-property insurers, takes a wide-angle view of managing risk – an approach that is mirrored in the company’s commitment to employee health and wellness. “Our new global corporate fitness challenge has more employees walking than ever before,”

said Carole Williamson, manager of health and welfare plans at FM Global, which has corporate offices in Johnston. During the 16-week challenge, which began in May, FM Global employees around the world walked 674 million steps – equivalent to 11 times around the globe. During the past year, new fitness facilities were installed at the company’s research campus in West Glocester and at its offices in Norwood, Mass. Williamson said the collective level of participation in fitness classes is higher than industry norms. FM Global supports a culture of wellness – even its corporate office building is environmentally healthy, receiving a LEED Gold standard rating in 2009 by the U.S. Green Building Council. At the corporate offices, brightly lit stairwells encourage employees to use the stairs. The on-site fitness center offers 22 group exercises a week – including Zumba, yoga and boot camp. A walking trail is located around the company’s 93-acre campus. The company offers a freshproduce stand on-site weekly. n


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Competitive firm hosts Building ways to measure aggressive health drive employee health on the job Number of Employees: 1,521 CEO (or equivalent): G. Brint Ryan, CEO

A Healthy Thought:

“Employees who are less stressed are more successful.’”

Robert A. Sheehan principal

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By Jennifer Salcido Contributing Writer

Ryan LLC in Providence is a leading tax-services firm, so the top brass there know a little something about the toll that stress can take on people. “We are in a competitive service industry driven by client and tax deadlines,” said Robert A. Sheehan, a principal in the company. “Unparalleled client service is expected, institutionalized and a hallmark of the company.” Managing the built-in stress

of a hard-charging business is one of the reasons that Sheehan himself participates in the health and wellness initiatives that Ryan makes available to its employees. Sheehan said Ryan was in its third year of an “aggressive” health program. Branded as myHealth, the program offers educational materials, team and individual challenges, online tools, and company-sponsored activities. Also, there are educational sessions about breast cancer awareness and children’s health. Ryan invests in the health of its employees through free on-site annual biometrics screenings, which help employees get a handle on their own risk factors; reimbursement of gym membership costs; and premium-reduction incentives, which were applied to more than 60 percent of Ryan’s employees in the United States in 2011. “This is driven from the top down,” said Sheehan, noting that company CEO G. Brint Ryan has lost 25 pounds and commits to continued physical activity. “I think employees who are less stressed are more successful, happier and certainly more effective. " n

Number of Employees: 1,998 CEO (or equivalent): Thomas Gilbane Jr., CEO

A Healthy Thought:

“The strategic plan helped us see … where we need to go.”

Lisa holland

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wellness consultant

By Richard Asinof Contributing Writer

Employees of Gilbane Inc., the national construction and real estate development company based in Rhode Island, have learned to judge their health and health needs by the numbers. Know Your Numbers, one part of the company’s multifaceted myHealth wellness program, emphasizes the use of biometric screen-

ing to select appropriate ways to change lifestyle and behavior patterns to achieve better health. The company uses a combination of resources to promote wellness, including people on its own human resources staff, “wellness champions” on the staff, and an external wellness vendor. “A strategic plan helped us see where we’ve been, how we improved, and where we need to go to achieve optimal wellness for Gilbane employees and health care affordability for all stakeholders,” said Lisa Holland, Gilbane’s wellness consultant. The program focuses on four critical factors that drive 75 percent of today’s chronic illnesses and provides interventions into employees’ health risks, focused on behavior change. Not surprisingly, the company can graph its own equation of wellness, with its medical spending having achieved a savings of $27 per member, per month. Overall, the return on investment for the Know Your Numbers campaign was calculated as better than 2-to-1, achieving total savings of $168,504 on a cost of $70,236. n

In-house experts help Programs suited to needs workers improve health show fitness success Number of Employees: 3,855 CEO (or equivalent): Christina H. Paxson, president

A Healthy Thought:

“We can tap into the resource we have, which is faculty.”

michele wise senior benefits coordinator

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By Sarah Parsons Contributing Writer

The concept behind Brown University’s wellness program is summed up in two words: think local. Faculty members and staff play a role in carrying out Wellness at Brown!, a lifestyle-management and physical-activity program open to Brown University employees. The program offers more than 30 classes, workshops, activities and events every year, working

with on-site experts and vendors like Preventure and Wellness Workdays. For example, Dr. Mary Flynn, an assistant professor of medicine and author of “The Mediterranean Diet” and “Pink Ribbon Diet,” presented a lecture on how diet can affect risks for breast cancer. Fred Jackson, director of the university’s greenhouse, offered a workshop on growing culinary herbs. The Dining Center and Faculty Club sponsor cooking demonstrations of healthy foods. “One unique aspect of Wellness at Brown! is that we can tap into the local resource we have, which is faculty,” said Michele Wise, Brown’s senior benefits and special-programs coordinator. Wellness at Brown! has grown in prominence over its 10 years of existence, said Wise. Hundreds of employees attend the university’s free yoga and Zumba classes, cooking demonstrations, lectures and flu clinics. Wise hopes to boost the program’s Internet presence and begin offering incentives to employees. “We start out with small steps,” said Wise. “But those small steps lead to big results.” n

Number of Employees: 1,700 CEO (or equivalent): Larry T. Guillemette, chairman, president & CEO

A Healthy Thought:

“We are always looking for new ways to encourage participation.”

andrea tirelli director of human resources

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By Paul E. Kandarian Contributing Writer

Amtrol Inc., a world leader in the design and operation of mechanical systems used to control hydronic heating and store potable water, employs 1,500 people in the United States and Portugal – and aims to keep them healthy. It does this by offering a variety of workshops, programs and seminars catering to employee health

needs, said Andrea Terilli, director of human resources. One popular program at the West Warwick location of the company is a weight-loss plan dubbed Ounces Count. “Some employees who have participated in it each time have lost totals of 40-plus pounds,” Tirelli said. And for most, losing weight isn’t a one-and-done deal, she said. Eighty percent of returning participants have not gained back the weight they lost the previous year. The company also offers healthy food options at its cafeteria and in vending machines, a smoking-cessation program, health-risk assessments, on-site doctor visits and a health services department staffed by a registered nurse. Amtrol reaches workers with various types of messaging, including announcements of wellness events via bulletin boards, emails, posters and meetings. When choosing health options, a wellness committee looks at employee healthrisk assessments and medication usage. “We are always looking for new ways to encourage participation,” Tirelli said. n


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Self-insurance boosts firm’s wellness efforts Number of Employees: 1,029 CEO (or equivalent): Jeff Gardner, CEO

A Healthy Thought:

“[The wellness program] has energized people into doing things they’ve been putting off.”

gail hynes

1

vice president for human resources

By John Larrabee Contributing Writer

Brenda Lopardo, a billing specialist at Carousel Industries of North America Inc. in Exeter, has noticed changes among her co-workers since the company launched a workplace wellness program last year. “People are walking during their breaks,” she said. “They’ve measured the building – it’s a quarter-mile around – so they’ll know how far they go. People tell me they’re trying to quit smoking, and everyone seems more diet conscious.” She is quick to add that the program has made a difference for her, too. “Last January, we had a biggest-loser contest, and I lost 22 pounds,” she says. “I’ve been able to keep it off by changing my eating habits. We have a gym here, and I work out four days a week on my lunch hour. I feel better, so I would say it’s worked for me.” At Carousel Industries, an IT and communications consulting company with offices across the country, the workplace-wellness program works three ways: employees are encouraged to see their doctor for annual checkups; they’re given information about healthy eating and good health habits; and group programs push people to be more active or drop a few pounds. The company launched its first formal wellness program in 2012, but it revised the program and added to it this year. “The employees think it’s awesome,” said Gail Hynes, vice president for human resources. “They’re really engaged. They like the incentives, of course, but also the camaraderie. They’re discovering the value of team support in achieving goals. And it has energized people into doing things they’ve been putting off.” The program includes some financial incentives. Employees can get an extra $300 in their paycheck or a day off if they obtain an annual physical, complete a health-risk assessment, and log into a company website with healthy recipes and articles on healthy living. There are cash prizes for walking and weight-loss contests. While Carousel has always promoted wellness, the issue took on more importance when the company became self-insured earlier this year. “We wanted to ensure that plan participants were fully engaged as their own health advocates and understood the value of the education and tools available and provided to them,” Hynes said. “It helps with the bottom line as it relates to

PBN PHOTO/BRIAN MCDONALD

AS PROGRAM GROWS, HEALTH IMPROVES: Carousel Industries’ retooled wellness program has had an effect on its employees, more of whom take part in physical activities, including using the on-site fitness center. Working out are Diane Stanley, left, and Anita Anderson.

insurance premiums, and there’s a positive re- support needed to keep moving every day. “It turn on the investment in terms of employees’ keeps you focused,” said Fuller. “We have a lot health and welfare. And the annual physicals of people here working desk jobs, and that can be and the health-risk assessments help us identify sedentary, so it’s good to have that reminder that behaviors so that we can provide programs that address those issues. If you have a lot if smokers, you should get out and walk.” The Carousel program doesn’t end there. The for example, you set up a cessation program.” Some companies penalize employees who do main office has a fitness center with treadmills, not take the health-risk assessment and annual elliptical machines, stationary bicycles, free physicals by making them pay a higher share of weights, and a Wii with active games. The fitness their health care costs, but that’s not part of the center also includes locker rooms with showers. wellness plan at Carousel, at least not yet. A yoga instructor visits the building Managers insist the program is twice a week to lead an after-work not coercive or intrusive. “We don’t say you can’t smoke,” said Kim yoga class in the company function Fuller, vice president for service room. Fresh fruit is available in the resource management. “We have break room, and vending machines designated smoking areas.” now include healthy snacks. Team challenge activities are a The company also sponsors a big part of the Carousel program. An eight-week walking program softball team, and at least 45 em– called Healthy Steps – took off in Brenda lopardo ployees belong to a company bowlMay. The company’s 1,029 employCarousel Industries ing league that uses office email to ees formed 38 teams, with each parbilling specialist keep people informed about scores ticipant equipped with a pedometer and statistics. and a tracking log. Cash prizes were Another weight-loss challenge involving awarded to those who logged the most steps – $100, $75, and $50 for first, second and third place. teams is planned for later this year. “It will be in There was also a drawing for all participants. the third quarter,” said Hynes, “when there are The prizes: five Nike Fitbits, which are wearable so many holidays that revolve around food. We high-tech devices that track a person’s activity haven’t worked out the details yet, but it will be levels, sleep hours and blood pressure. Only 268 Carousel employees work in the Ex- eight to 10 weeks, and we’ll be calling it Lose to eter office, but staff in all locations were encour- Win.” aged to join the daily walkathon. “We have a lot “The challenges make you think about your of remote employees, but we try to engage every- choices,” said Lopardo. “Last year we did a one,” Hynes said. “During our step challenge, healthy-eating challenge. You kept a record of someone in Washington state could be on a team with people in Florida, and they’d exchange mes- what you actually ate. It gave everyone some real insights into whether they were really eatsages by email.” Employees say the team system provides the ing healthy.” n

‘The challenges make you think about your choices.’


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Good Things Happen When We Practice What We Preach.

Hospital nudges staff off elevators, into the gym

Proud to be one of the winners of Number of Employees: 1,200 CEO (or equivalent): Lou Giancola, president & CEO

Awarded by Providence Business News

A Healthy Thought:

“Our case-management service offers direct coaching.” A health system is very good at telling its patients how to get better and stay healthy. But at CharterCARE Health Partners we ask, “Why stop with our patients?” That’s why we’ve worked hard to promote health, safety and wellness among our employees at each of our affiliate organizations: Roger Williams Medical Center, St. Joseph Health Services and Elmhurst Extended Care. And it’s why we are honored and humbled to be named one of Providence Business News’ Healthiest Employers. If you’re a health professional who values a healthy workplace, we’d love to hear from you. Contact Human Resources at 401-456-3200 or visit Chartercare.org

ROGER WILLIAMS MEDICAL CENTER | ST. JOSEPH HEALTH SERVICES OF RHODE ISLAND

AUGUST 2013

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joanne socciO senior benefits manager

By Paul E. Kandarian Contributing Writer

A hospital strives to restore patients to sound health. South County Hospital Healthcare System also strives to help its 1,200 employees get and stay that way. The Well Beyond Program operating at South County Hospital over the past three years melds existing and new initiatives, said Joanne Soccio, senior benefits and compensation manager. This package rewards participation with enticements that include cash incentives

that employees can use for medical expenses. Other programs include a 24/7 hospital fitness center, a system of flyers and bulletins informing people about health programs, nutritional cooking classes, yoga fitness sessions and disease management courses. One piece even leans a bit on the guilt button: A Take the Stairs campaign has signs near elevators suggesting employees get a workout by climbing up to their floor. A newer component is the financial wellness program, Soccio said. “We introduced education sessions on banking, savings strategies, planning for higher education for themselves or their children or grandchildren, and information on short- and long-term savings for retirement. Financial wellness needs to be part of the overall package.” And even if a component of wellness is not specifically delineated in programming, it is not neglected. “There are other services that are best geared to alleviate the gray areas of the staff needs,” Soccio said. “Our case-management service offers direct coaching on any topics that our group programs cannot or do not touch upon.” n

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Health care group takes care of the caretakers Number of Employees: 460 CEO (or equivalent): Debra M. Paul, president & CEO

A Healthy Thought:

“Healthy employees make for productive employees.”

jennifer mckenna benefits and wellness adviser

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By Michael Persson Contributing Writer

Practicing what it preaches is perhaps one of the most valuable tools in the employee-wellness campaign of Lincoln-based Fellowship Health Resources Inc. A nonprofit agency providing clinical and support services to people with mental illness and other life challenges, Fellowship declares that its health programs are as important for its employees as they are for its clients. The company states, “Our leadership team makes it a priority to ensure that these caretakers do not lose sight of taking care of themselves.” It is well documented that people with persistent mental-health problems die earlier than people without these problems. This fact inspired Fellowship to initiate its comprehensive health program and make it part of its company culture. In 2009, former President and CEO Joseph Dziobek hitched the company’s employee physical health component to its primary mental-health services. He was inspired in this integration by his wife’s battle with cancer, and he put his full support behind exercise and wellness education for his employees. Benefits and Wellness Adviser Jennifer McKenna said that Dziobek “understood that healthy employees make for productive employees.” In the past year, Fellowship has furthered its programs and monitoring of its staff by committing more resources to raise the ante in its culture of healthy living. Incoming CEO and President Debra M. Paul noted that artist “Henry Moore said, ‘What’s important is finding out what works for you.’ ” As a result, she added, “We offer our employees various programs to live a healthy lifestyle.” The offerings are extensive, including continuous updates through monthly email bulletins called BeneBuzz, along with the company’s Intranet and the various social media channels, enabling Fellowship to distribute information about a variety of wellness programs to employees and their families. Since July 1, employees have had access to a new Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Rhode Island portal that they can use to monitor weight and stress levels, and to get customized information on medical concerns. Fellowship is planning to introduce new requirements for a premium discount for the upcoming year on this portal as well. Currently, nonsmoking families receive a wellness discount. This is the fourth consecutive year Fellow-

PBN PHOTO/FRANK MULLIN

WHEN CONTAGIOUS IS GOOD: The seamless implementation and significant participation of a comprehensive health program has made a major impact at Fellowship Health Resources. Demonstrating one aspect of the communication tools in the program are, from left, Jennifer McKenna, benefits and wellness adviser, President and CEO Debra M. Paul, and Director of Finance Stephen Duggan.

ship has been actively involved in ShapeUp this type of culture can have on health. That Rhode Island and that program’s multitude of kind of communication and extending of oneself fitness practices. These directives and their posi- would have never happened if they were sitting tive value for the general well-being of staff mem- in front of each other across a desk.” bers have drawn further recognition. Fellowship The creative implementation of some group recently received the Blue Cross Blue Shield activities also has brought people into the fold. Healthy Worksite Award. It’s more than a good “We organize group Wii-fitness tournaments start, but it certainly is just the beginning. and have charity events that involve all kinds According to Director of Corporate Media of sports,” added Daisey. “By adding another Mike Ratté, the success of this cultural shift and component to the act of exercising, it becomes more about having fun; that’s what mindset can be credited to leaderdraws people in.” ship commitment. “None of this The costs of being healthy have would have been as effective if it been absorbed by the company, weren’t for Joe Dziobek, followed which believes that dividends from by a seamless transition to Debra the effort are entirely tangible. DiPaul. They have provided a tremenrector of Peer Recovery Services dous support system,” he said. Bob Rousseau said, “The savings to The executive team also has the state whenever a person doesn’t gotten on board. Chief Operating use the emergency-room services Officer Pamela Daisey achieved a or crisis centers is huge. Multiply major personal success by using that by our staff and you’ve got ShapeUp RI’s diet and fitness regisome serious savings.” mens. “I lost 90 pounds and feel so “We allow employees to attend much better. I have more energy, Jennifer mckenna to their health during work hours,” mental and physical. I believe that benefits and wellness adviser said McKenna. “It’s all there in if I’m going to preach it, I must pracfront of them. We’ve made it easy, tice it as well.” and perhaps when you have to go For a company that is decentraloutside your normal routine things ized the way Fellowship happens to be, with 450 like health are harder to consider.” employees scattered throughout seven states, But something as far reaching and extensive the onus placed on teamwork and helping one as a company-wide culture shift doesn’t happen another attain healthier goals is vital. By form- overnight. To succeed, a culture shift must be ing teams like Pound Busters and Mission Slim authentically embraced by the people involved. Possible, employees get into friendly competi- And health is something that must be practiced tions that can help push the agenda. The team routinely, not in a stop-and-start fashion. “Right aspect also adds to office camaraderie. now, Joe [Dziobek] is riding across Iowa in some “Several months ago, our regional director in 500-mile bike race,” said Ratté. “He’s a huge Maine, who’s a runner, caught wind of an em- outdoors guy, and he does it because it’s contaployee who also liked to run,” Ratté said. “Before gious.” you knew it the two of them had started running In this new culture that’s been the motto: contogether. That’s support. That’s the power that tagious is good. n

‘We allow employees to attend to their health during work hours.’


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AUGUST 2013

Despite temptations, Experts come onboard Dave’s embraces health to help workers be well Number of Employees: 485 CEO (or equivalent): David Cesario, owner

A Healthy Thought:

A wellness program has been “unbelievably well-received.”

kevin lovett Gencorp Insurance Group senior vice president of employee benefits

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By Eli Okun Contributing Writer

At Dave’s Marketplace, employees face some unique hurdles to staying healthy and fit – namely, the products that surround them at work. “At any given time, you can smell baked goods or pizzas being made,” said Kevin Lovett, senior vice president of employee benefits for Gencorp Insurance Group,

of which Dave’s is a customer. The independent grocer has several initiatives to keep its workers healthy. Chief among them is a “Biggest Loser” weightloss competition: The eight to 12week program, now in its fourth year, weighs employees weekly and ultimately hands out top prizes to the winning store and individual worker. This year, the grocer is rolling out a complementary multimedia program to promote diabetes awareness and preventative care. Lovett called the competition “enormously successful” and “excellent for morale,” citing the 1,000 pounds employees collectively lost in its first year. Enrolled employees must complete biometric screenings, a physical examination and a personal-health-assessment survey, with the reward that their deductible will be offset the following year. An upcoming smoking-cessation program will use several pathways. The various measures have been “unbelievably well-received,” Lovett said, with 70 percent of employees participating. n

Number of Employees: 290 CEO (or equivalent): Dr. Louis Rice, president

A Healthy Thought:

“Our employees receive a weekly abundance of fresh, locally grown vegetables.”

tammy lederer chief human resources officer

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By Victor Paul Alvarez Contributing Writer

To help its employees achieve good health and fitness, University Medicine Foundation Inc. puts money behind its convictions. The company contracts with several vendors to ensure that employees have the tools to maintain a healthy lifestyle. “Being a health care company in words and not deeds would be

inconsistent with our mission to provide compassionate, accessible, state-of-the art care to our patients,” said Dr. Angela Caliendo, vice-president. UM provides many traditional wellness resources through its contract with Health Advocate, a health care assistance and advocacy program, which helps with chronic disease management, weight loss and nutrition programs, biometric screening, and wellness coaching. The major goals of UM’s health care programs for employees are smoking cessation, connecting each employee with a primary care doctor, and promoting more-active lifestyles. But the company also thinks inside the box, if you will, by offering Farm Fresh Rhode Island Veggie Boxes. “Our employees who participate receive a weekly abundance of fresh, locally grown vegetables and support our local farmers, too,” said Tammy Lederer, UM’s chief human resources officer. UM also reimburses employees a portion of the cost for attending Weight Watchers. n

Staff works to lose Wellness program hundreds of pounds banks on convenience Number of Employees: 178 CEO (or equivalent): James Rosati, president & CEO

A Healthy Thought:

“Ensuring a successful wellness program begins … at the top.”

pamela L. Alarie

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vice president of human

By Victor Paul Alvarez Contributing Writer

Beacon Mutual Insurance Co. in Warwick is the state’s largest writer of workers’ compensation and property casualty insurance. By definition, the company is serious about safety, and it is equally serious about the health of its employees. “Wellness is a part of our everyday life at Beacon. Ensuring a successful wellness program begins with a positive and energetic tone set at the top,” said Pamela L.

Alarie, vice president of human resources. This year, Beacon launched a 12-week Healthy Weight Challenge. Nearly 60 employees committed themselves to the program, which will conclude this month. “Over the course of the program, participants receive motivation through weekly emails with healthy-weight tips and recipes. … To date, participants have lost a combined 250 pounds,” Alarie said. The health and wellness opportunities at Beacon also include community 5K walks, the Beacon walking program during the work day, and the use of ergonomically sound work stations. Beacon is especially proud of one of its employees, Trish Johnson, a 2013 recipient of the American Heart Association Lifestyle Change Award. “Trish was motivated by the tragic loss of her father to a heart attack, followed shortly by her own heart attack,” Alarie said. Johnson turned to Beacon’s wellness programs to find the support she needed to lose weight, increase her physical activity, and completely revamp her diet toward heart-healthy nutrition. n

Number of Employees: 275 CEO (or equivalent): Sandra J. Pattie, president & CEO

A Healthy Thought:

“People … not joining the gym are attending … events and workshops.”

Carolyn Odell human resources generalist/ officer

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By Carol Kim Contributing Writer

For the busy employee, BankNewport’s wellness initiatives emphasize empowering people to take their health into their own hands. Employees at the Rhode Island community bank can look forward to a new wellness center – equipped with two elliptical trainers, two bicycles, two treadmills, free weights

and a locker room with shower, said Carolyn Odell, human resources generalist/officer at BankNewport – when the bank opens its new Middletown headquarters. The company also has expanded the range of activities offered by its wellness program, Vitality, to include Zumba, a sleep seminar, and workshops in weight management and family nutrition. By providing numerous opportunities to practice fitness and health awareness, BankNewport makes healthy living a convenient choice. “People who are not joining the gym are attending these events and workshops,” said Odell. She also noted that BankNewport stocks its vending machines with healthy options. In addition to supplying resources that make a healthy lifestyle easier for employees, BankNewport will continue its annual Walk for Fitness this fall. The program challenges employees to see who can walk the most steps over a period of six weeks, measured by personal pedometers. Walk for Fitness usually has a participation rate of more than 100 of BankNewport’s 270 employees, according to Odell. n


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Co-workers compete and cooperate to get fit Number of Employees: 253 CEO (or equivalent): Gary E. Furtado, president & CEO

A Healthy Thought:

“Encouragement from fellow employees is always a positive.”

terri brophy

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assistant vice president

By Victor Paul Alvarez Contributing Writer

It was a sunny day, so Marguerte Vadenais and some of her Navigant Credit Union co-workers ditched the gym and went for a walk outside. That day, their path to wellness led to the top of a daunting hill. Time passed with chatter and encouragement, so Vadenais didn’t realize she had climbed higher than ever­­– with no trouble from her asthma. “That was a great thing for me,” she said. As part of Navigant’s Biggest

Loser weight-reduction contest, Vadenais lost 31.6 pounds and 13.98 percent of her body fat. She took home the $300 prize. Navigant offers many wellness resources: a worksite gym with a personal trainer; an annual Wellness Clinic for blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose screening; support to quit smoking; a healthcoaching program through Blue Cross; and information on sun safety, nutrition, stress and weight. Navigant even has a healthy cookbook by employees. “The word health relates to so many aspects of one’s life – physical, emotional, spiritual and even financial,” said Terri Brophy, human resources assistant vice president. Navigant offers people in the company’s 13 branches a wellness portal on the company Intranet and email access to the Wellness Committee. But more is on the way. “We are recruiting for wellness champions to be stationed throughout the credit union,” Brophy said. “Their job will be to get the word out to their area employees. Encouragement from fellow employees is always a positive.” n

WHAT’S YOUR TROPHY MOMENT? Over the years I have had the privilege to participate in the sport of gymnastics as a gymnast, coach, and aunt of a gymnast. During this time I have experienced many trophy moments that I am so honored and proud of, however the BEST moment is when my mentors awarded me with a success trophy. In June of 1992, after graduating from East Greenwich High School and competing in the National Gymnastics Championships, my parents celebrated my achievements by presenting a trophy with this caption on the plate, “Becoming a National Gymnastics Champion, You are one of the few who has learned that without risks, you will suffer no defeats: and, likewise, you will also win no victories. Let this victory give you the guidance to fulfill your future dreams. Love, Mom and Dad” I place this trophy in my office to remind myself each day to deliver the same message to all our future athletes and hopefully I can aspire to be their BEST mentor as my parents have been to me!

Amy Nelson-Bryant President, Aim High Academy, Inc.

GTECH – Committed to wellness and proud to be one of Rhode Island’s Healthiest Employers

THE WPRO MORNING NEWS WITH

GENE VALICENTI


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AUGUST 2013

Wellness benefit for company as well as clients Number of Employees: 120 CEO (or equivalent): Donna M. Gouveia, president & CEO

A Healthy Thought:

“The Wellness Clinic made our employees … think about ways they can improve their health.”

rebecca neveux marketing specialist

1

By Alli-Michelle Conti Contributing Writer

Visiting Nurse Home Care sees a healthy workforce as a two-way street: Helping its employees stay healthy and fit leads to benefits for the organization itself. Managers say that when the company promotes healthy habits and choices by employees, it sees a reduction in absenteeism and health care costs, along with an improvement in the well-being of the employees. Also, Visiting Nurse Home Care believes that promoting wellness at the workplace allows the company to show caring for the employees not only through a work perspective but also a personal perspective. Formerly known as Visiting Nurse Service of Greater Rhode Island, VNHC is a nonprofit, home health care service provider for people in Rhode Island and southern Massachusetts. Last year, its employees made more than 80,000 home visits, relying partly on computer-based technology to monitor and assist with medical needs. “From the healthy snack choices in our vending machines to the Walk for Wellness program and Wellness Clinic, our employees are provided with the opportunity to choose a healthier lifestyle for themselves,” said Rebecca Neveux, public relations and marketing specialist. During the month of May, which is national Employee Health and Fitness Month, VNHC hosts wellness clinics with biometric, blood pressure, glucose and cholesterol screenings. These are conducted by licensed laboratory technicians. Participants receive their results through a confidential consultation by a certified health educator. Neveux said the screenings showed some of the employees that their blood pressure and cholesterol were dangerously high. “The Wellness Clinic made our employees aware that they were at health risk and got them to think about ways they can improve their health,” said Neveux. Together employees made a plan for better food choices to improve their overall health. Part of the overall wellness effort is to determine the health problems and needs perceived by the employees themselves. “In July of this year, our employees took a health-interest survey to determine [their] primary health and wellness interests, needs and expectations,” Neveux said. Also in response to workers’ perceived needs, leaders of the company chose to focus on relaxation as a theme for this year’s Benefits Fair, a yearly wellness event. VNHC also will host a stress-management seminar in September. Dur-

PBN PHOTO/RUPERT WHITELEY

TAKING ADVANTAGE: The multi-faceted wellness program at Visiting Nurse Home Care brings the staff health benefits as well as a more connected workplace. Showing off different aspects of the fitness options are, from left, Chelsea Vincente, Maureen Flanagan, Phil Laboeuf, Matt Coupe and Susan Bleuel.

ing the benefits fairs, employees enjoy perquisites that include a free, healthy lunch on the go. Susan Bleuel, a registered nurse and care transition coordinator, said attending a previous fair brought direct benefits for her health. “I have high cholesterol,” Bleuel said. “I have visited my cardiologist and changed my diet. So when we had the Benefits Fair and I was told my cholesterol dropped dramatically, it made my day.” Individual results have spurred on competition among co-workers. Bleuel said, “We are all competitive; we compared each other’s good cholesterol, the HDL, to see whose was the highest. You share results and it is motivating for everyone.” The Benefits Fair is held at the company’s headquarters in Lincoln. This year’s fair highlights will include a yoga and reflexology demonstration. The reflexology demo includes zero-gravity chairs. Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Rhode Island will host an information booth for relaxation techniques. Employees can learn which relaxation techniques work for them and which may be used to cope with everyday problems, such as stressrelated pain and illness. The fair also include information on several relaxation techniques such as visualization, deep breathing and muscle relaxation. Coastline EAP also will be attending the Benefits Fair to describe stress-management tips. There will be several raffles for massage gift certificates at the Benefits Fair, as well as a lunch on the go provided by Atria Lincoln Place. Benefits fairs of the past, like the one with the theme of sun damage, were an “eye opener” to Bleuel and others. The fairs and Walk for Wellness activities are “also a break in the day – a

stress reliever,” said Bleuel. Participants in the Walk for Wellness program receive pedometers. The employees report on their own progress during for the program’s 10-week duration. The top two runners from the Field Staff Team and the Office Staff Team will receive gift certificates to Dick’s Sporting Goods. VNHC has found its most effective promotion tool to be raffles and competition. “The Walk for Wellness gets you motivated to get more steps in. It serves as a huge motivator and connects us all. It enhances work life and gives us a sense of camaraderie,” said Bleuel. The wellness corner in the company’s newsletter also has been a great success in promoting better choices for healthy living, as well as creating buzz for upcoming wellness events. This section of the newsletter provides healthy tips for daily living. VNHC also offers on-site Weight Watchers, smoking-cessation programs and personal-health assessments. In addition, it provides Coastline EAP’s confidential consultation with support offered around the clock to employees and their family members. “[The wellness programs] positively affect your job performance because it gives you something in common with your colleagues,” said Bleuel. Maybe more than many other workers, visiting nurses need to stay fit and healthy because ill and injured people at home depend upon them. Since the early 1920s, VNHC has been providing home care 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Last year, VNHC performed the first in-home platelet and blood transfusion in Rhode Island. n

Individual results have spurred on competition among co-workers.


5 - 149 EMPLOYEES

AUGUST 2013 www.pbn.com n 19

Employee support A family feeling helps begins road to change build a well workplace Number of Employees: 116 CEO (or equivalent): David M. Gilden, managing partner

A Healthy Thought:

“[Employees] are impressed that the firm cares so much.”

robin kuznitz health and wellness coordinator

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By Eli Okun Contributing Writer

Introducing more wholesome lunch options and taking junk food out of vending machines might seem like a sure bet to induce groans and resistance among employees. But at Partridge Snow & Hahn LLC, the meals that accompany on-site monthly wellness programs are a major draw. “People are excited – they want to know what healthy lunch we’ve selected this month,” said Robin Kuznitz, the firm’s office manager

and wellness coordinator. “They’re impressed that the firm cares so much,” she added about the wellness programs, which generally attract a few dozen people and have ranged from a lecture about sleep to a popular installation of massage chairs each winter. The law firm’s guiding wellness principle is that by taking care of its workers, “it will help them become more productive and happier, healthier employees,” Kuznitz said. Among its other offerings are a Weight Watchers program, in partnership with the Office of the Attorney General next door, and a website Kuznitz designed that provides various resources to promote healthful living. She curates its selection of links and information, whether listings of nearby farmers markets or articles about smoking and disease. And one of the offerings of which Kuznitz is most proud is a free, confidential employee assistance program that offers counseling services for those struggling emotionally. Run through Coastline, the program has counselors available by phone 24/7, and they often meet with employees in person. “It’s not a stigma here anymore,” Kuznitz said. n

Number of Employees: 131 CEO (or equivalent): James A. Black, president & CEO

A Healthy Thought:

“We tried to go green and be as healthy as [we] could.”

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michael sullivan wellness coordinator

By Meg Sullivan Contributing Writer

At Moran Shipping Agencies, it’s all about family. “Everyone here is like family. Everyone’s been here for five or six years at least and some have been here 40,” said Michael Sullivan, Moran wellness coordinator. That’s why when the familyowned national shipping company relocated its Providence headquarters, it took the opportunity to develop a wellness program that keeps its employees happy and

healthy. The initiative is now four years old, and includes an array of programs on lifestyle and physical wellness, offering its 31 Providence office employees classes on healthy cooking and stress management, an annual walking competition, a flu clinic and weekly deliveries of Farm Fresh Rhode Island vegetables. And though the campaign for healthy living began with the company administration, employees and their feedback have been the key to making the program work. “[Employees] play the biggest role. When I’m planning programs I go to employees and ask if there is anything in particular [they] want,” Sullivan said. “Without them we can’t have a program.” Moran also embraces community health. The company held seven blood drives in its office in the past year and a half and, following its relocation, transformed its headquarters into a “green” building. “Run-off on the building, rain water, is filtered back into the ground. We also have a geo thermal well,” Sullivan elaborated. “We tried to go green and be healthy as [we] could for the employees.” n

BUY FRESH • BUY LOCAL Locally Owned And Operated Since 1969

At Dave’s, Our Health Conscious Employees   Strive To Offer Our Valued Customers the   Greatest Variety of Healthy Food Choices:

Fresh Produce Freshly Prepared Foods Organic Foods Natural Foods Specialty Foods Fresh Seafood


Are you serious About heAlth And Wellness?

so are we. First in the Northeast to be NCQA accredited in Wellness and Health Promotion

We commend you for making wellness as high of a priority as we do.


2013 HEALTHIEST EMPLOYERS