Issuu on Google+

Prospectus News

Wednesday

February 19, 2014 Volume 6, Number 5 Your source for Parkland College news, sports, features and opinions.

www.prospectusnews.com

News

Top Stories

Free

Christie Clinic Illinois Marathon fast approaching in Champaign

Allerton Spring Break Program needs more volunteers for 2014

Lifestyle

News - Page 2

Effective listening a good tool for students

Lifestyle - Page 3

Illustration by Nicole Dudka/The Chicago Tribune

Opinions

Mackenzie Eisenmann Staff Writer

Coca-Cola Super Bowl commercial receives mixed reactions

Sports

Opinions - Page 4

Cobra’s Softball enters 2014 season

FOLIO LINE

FOLIO LINE

M c C l a t c h y - Tr i b u n e ANSWERS

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Entertainment

ost of us know prominent black women in Hollywood — from Cicely Tyson to Halle Berry to Kerry Washington. We know superstar black female athletes, such as the tennis-playing Williams sisters, and we remember bronze medal-winning figure skater Debi Thomas from the momentous Calgary Winter Olympics of 1988. But sports and entertainment aren’t the only arenas in which black women have achieved. Here, we examine a historical roll call of black women firsts and their legacies as we celebrate Black History Month and Women’s History Month with an eclectic and challenging trivia quiz.

1.

Who was the first black woman named to a U.S. Cabinet position? A. Condoleezza Rice B. Alexis Herman C. Patricia Roberts Harris D. Hazel R. O’Leary

2. Michelle Obama became the first black first lady when Barack Obama won the presidential election in 2008. At what college did she complete her Michelle undergraduate Obama studies? A. Yale B. Princeton C. Illinois D. North Carolina

3. Debi Thomas became the

first black woman to win a medal in a Winter Games when she captured the bronze in figure skating in 1988. What professional discipline did she enter after her skating career? A. Chiropractor B. Accountant C. Attorney D. Physician

4.

RICHARD HODGES/COLUMBUS LEDGER-ENQUIRER/MCT

Who was the first black woman to win a Nobel Prize in literature? A. Lorraine Hansberry B. Toni Morrison C. Alice Walker D. Maya Angelou

5.

Exploring the historical and cultural contributions of black women

Who was the first black woman to moderate a U.S. presidential debate? A. Gwen Ifill B. Suzanne Malveaux C. Fredricka Whitfield D. Carole Simpson

6. Halle Berry, in 2002,

became the first black woman to receive an Academy Award in the Best Actress category. Name the movie in which she appeared for said award. A. “Losing Isaiah” B. “Monster’s Ball” C. “Solomon & Sheba” D. “Gothika” Halle Berry

7. Name the first black woman to play for a Negro League baseball team. A. Althea Gibson B. Wilma Rudolph C. Toni Stone D. Wyomia Tyus

8.

11.

Who was the first black woman named Playboy Magazine’s Playmate of the Month? A. Halle Berry B. Vanessa Williams C. Jennifer Jackson D. Dorothy Dandridge

12. Vanessa James and

Yannick Bonheur became the first black couple to compete in Winter Olympic pairs skating when they participated in the Vancouver

Games in 2010. Which country did they represent in that Olympics? A. United States B. England C. Canada D. France

13.

Name the first black woman who was a nonsupermodel or a nonathlete to appear on the cover of Sports Illustrated’s swimsuit edition. A. Beyonce B. Rihanna C. Aaliyah D. Iman

17.

Who is the first black woman named to the NCAA’s College Football Playoff Selection Committee? A. Pam Oliver B. Jemele Hill C. Condoleezza Rice D. Lisa Salters

18.

Who was the first black female millionaire in the United States? A. Nichelle Nichols B. Madam C. J. Walker C. Oprah Winfrey D. Judy Smith

Full Story - Page 8

Who was the first black female flight attendant? A. Ruth Carol Taylor B. Bessie Coleman C. Shirley Chisholm D. Aretha Franklin

9.

1. C. Patricia Roberts Harris was named secretary of housing and urban development in 1977 during the administration of President Jimmy Carter. 2. B. At Princeton, Michelle Obama majored in sociology with a minor in African-American studies, earning a B.A. in 1985. She received her law degree from Harvard in 1988. 3. D. Physician. Debi Thomas graduated from Stanford University in 1991 with a degree in engineering, then graduated from the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in 1997. She performed her surgical residency at the University of Arkansas Medical Sciences Hospital and an orthopedic surgery residency at the Martin Luther King Jr./Charles Drew University Medical Center in South Central Los Angeles. 4. B. Toni Morrison won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1993 for the body of her work “characterized by visionary force and poetic import.” 5. D. Carole Simpson moderated a debate in 1992 between U.S. presidential candidates George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton and Ross Perot. 6. B. Halle Berry played the role of Leticia Musgrove, the troubled wife of an executed murderer in “Monster’s Ball.” Her performance was awarded the National Board of Review and the Screen Actors Guild best-actress awards. In a most interesting coincidence, she became the first black woman to win the Academy Award for Best Actress when earlier in her career, she portrayed Dorothy Dandridge, the first black woman nominated for Best Actress. 7. C. Toni “Tomboy” Stone played second base for the Indianapolis Clowns in 1953. She even got a hit off legendary pitcher Satchel Paige. 8. A. Ruth Carol Taylor became the first black flight attendant in 1958, working for Mohawk Airlines. 9. A. Vonetta Flowers initially participated in track and field as a sprinter and long jumper. Flowers originally aimed to compete in the Summer Games, but, after several failed attempts at the trials, she switched to bobsledding, teaming with Jill Bakken to take the gold in the 2002 Salt Lake City Games. 10. A. Ursula Burns, who grew up in a housing project in New York City, replaced Anne Mulcahy in 2009 as CEO of Xerox, the world’s largest maker of highspeed color printers. A math whiz, Burns earned a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from Columbia University in 1981. 11. C. Jennifer Jackson became the first black woman to appear as Playmate of the Month for the March 1965 issue. She later became a social worker; her twin sister, Janice, also worked as a Playboy Bunny. 12. D. Vanessa James and Yannick Bonheur represented France. They placed 14th in the competition. 13. A. Singer Beyonce created a major buzz in 2007 when she appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated’s Swimsuit Edition. 14. A. Bessie Coleman received an international pilot’s license in 1921 in France instead of the United States because of segregationist laws in America. 15. C. Alice Coachman won the high jump in the 1948 London Games with a height of 5 feet, 6 1/8 inches. In fact, she was the only U.S. woman to win a track and field gold medal in that games; Coachman’s dominance was so pronounced that she won the AAU outdoor high jump championships from 1939 to 1948. She was only 25 in 1948, so imagine how many medals she would have won had the 1940 and 1944 Summer Olympics not been canceled because of World War II. 16. D. Ida Stephens Owens received a Ph.D. in physiology in 1967 from the Duke Graduate School. 17. C. Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, also an accomplished figure skater and classical pianist, was named to the 13-person panel that determines the four teams that will play in major college football’s playoff system. 18. B. Sarah Breedlove, also known as Madam C. J. Walker, was a U.S. entrepreneur and philanthropist who earned her milliondollar fortune by developing and marketing beauty and hair-care products for black women. She died in 1919 at age 52, amassing her wealth several decades before Oprah. 19. D. Gabrielle Douglas was nicknamed the “Flying Squirrel” because of her acrobatic performances on the uneven bars. 20. A. Gwendolyn Brooks, in 1950, won a Pulitzer Prize for poetry with her book, “Annie Allen.”

14.

Who was the first black woman to earn her pilot’s license? A. Bessie Coleman B. Mae Jemison C. Shirley Ann Jackson D. Ella Fitzgerald

Vonetta Flowers became the first black woman to win a gold medal in a Winter Olympics in the 2002 Games in Salt Lake City. In which sport did she participate in before bobsledding? A. Track and field B. Basketball C. Softball D. Soccer

15.

Alice Coachman became the first black woman to win a gold medal in an Olympics. In what year did she win the gold? A. 1960 Rome B. 1936 Berlin C. 1948 London D. 1956 Melbourne

10.

Ursula Burns is the first black female CEO of a Fortune 500 company. Name the company. A. Xerox B. Archer Daniels Midland C. Hewlett-Packard D. Avon

GEORGE BRIDGES/MCT

Vanessa James and Yannick Bonheur compete in the ice skating pairs event at the 2010 Winter Games in Vancouver, British Columbia.

16. Name the first black

woman to receive a Ph.D. from Duke University. A. Susan Rice B. Melissa Harris-Perry C. Michelle Bernard D. Ida Stephens Owens

19. Gabrielle Douglas

became the first black woman to win a gold medal in the individual all-around gymnastics competition, during the 2012 London Olympic Games. What is her nickname? A. “Supergirl” B. “Ace” C. “Queen of the Mat” D. “Flying Squirrel”

20. Who was the first black female author to win a Pulitzer Prize? A. Gwendolyn Brooks B. Zora Neale Hurston C. Nikki Giovanni D. Terry McMillan

S O U R C E S : B I O G R A P H Y. C O M , I M D B . C O M , P L AY B OY E N T E R P R I S E S , E S P N , H I S TO RY CHANNEL, PBS

PIONEERING BLACK WOMEN MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

- Newsroom (217) 351-2216 prospectus@parkland.edu

Contact

- Publications Mgr. Sean Hermann (217) 351-2216

prospectus.editor@gmail.com

- Advisor John Eby (217) 353-2627

jeby@parkland.edu

where runners can get water as well as encouragement from enthusiastic volunteers. Parking lots at the State Farm Center will be open for runners and spectators on Thursday–Saturday in April. A Health and Fitness Expo will take place at the Activities and Registration Center of the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana on Thursday, April 24, 4-9 p.m. and Friday, April 25, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. The Health and Fitness Expo consists of booths set up by different vendors. Christie Clinic 2014 Marathon merchandise can be purchased at the expo as well as other fitness related products. Registered runners must stop by the expo to pick up their registration packets, consisting of their race number and a Christie Clinic Marathon shirt. The Christie Clinic Illinois Marathon offers many opportunities to volunteer. According to Christie Clinic Illinois

Construction for the Parkland Student Services Center is nearing completion, and is expected to be fully functional by Fall 2014. This center will bring many improvements to Parkland College, and will be a one stop shop for students. The Parkland College Bookstore will be one building’s new occupants. Since 1966 the bookstore has been in its current location, but on Monday, March 24, 2014 it will be the first to enter the new wing of Parkland College. Julie Thomas of Physical Plant explained that other departments moving into the space will include Admissions, Financial Aid, the Career Center, Counseling and Advising, Food Services, Parkland College Bookstore and Student Life. This will eliminate the cross campus trek that past students have taken to complete all the logistical requirements to ready students for enrollment. Parkland College Bookstore will only have a week to make the move to their new location, and is undoubtedly one of the largest new occupants of the U Wing. The original location had about 4,600 square feet, but will grow to about

5,750 square feet, about a 25 percent increase. The layout will change from an “L” shape to a nearly square floor plan. This new area will allow for registers along the front of the store with lines extending back through the center towards the textbook area. The staff will benefit from the larger space as the store will include a stock room for shipping and receiving. This will be a change from crowding the storeroom floors with boxes of new items as students have seen in the past. The larger space will also afford greater wheelchair access with wider aisles and ramps where needed, and will have more windows and lights, brighter colors, and a much livelier atmosphere than their old location. Jennifer Eisenhauer, Assistant Manager of the Parkland College Bookstore, said additional changes include a walk-up window outside the store to sell back used textbooks. Designed to streamline the process, students will be able to simply scan their textbooks and get cash on the spot without ever having to enter the store. Also, book bag check-in will no longer create hallway lines as a room inside the store was specifically designed for book bag storage. The general breakdown of the merchandise content

Photo by Ted Setterlund/Prospectus News

A view of the new Parkland College Bookstore at its current stage of construction inside the new Student Services Center, which is due to open in late spring 2014. will remain about the same, but some of the products will be enhanced with nicer versions of those in years past. Eisenhauer also mentioned that a new Point of Sale system will be installed, and this could reduce the time of waiting in line at the checkout.

- Advertising Linda Tichenor (217) 351-2206

Index

prospectusads@parkland.edu

News - 2 Lifestyle - 3 Opinions - 4 Puzzles/Comics - 6 Sports - 7 Entertainment - 8

Marathon’s website, volunteers may sign up beginning in mid-February. Volunteers for the race will receive an “Illinois Marathon 2014 team” drawstring backpack. Around 50 different jobs are available to volunteers, from working at hydration stations along the race courses to awarding medals to racers. “I hate running, but my boyfriend was in the race so I volunteered last year. It was actually a lot of fun working,” general education student Emily Smith remarked. Biaggi’s restaurant is hosting a prerace pasta feed in Gym six at the ARC on campus on Friday, April 25 at 5 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $15 for adults and $7 for children and can be purchased in the lobby of the ARC. Registration for all races closes on Tuesday, April 15. Formoreinformationonvolunteering, race courses and times, go online to http://www.illinoismarithon.com.

Construction to bring many improvements for Parkland Ken Smith Staff Writer

Sports - Page 8 BY GREGORY CLAY

Each spring, thousands of people gather in the City of Champaign to participate in the Christie Clinic Illinois Marathon, which takes place on April 25 and 26. Runners can participate in a 5-kilometer, 10-kilometer, half marathon or full marathon. There is also the opportunity for children to participate in the 1K youth run. The 5K takes place on  Friday, April 25. The 10K, half marathon and full marathon begin on the morning of Saturday, April 26. Co director Jan Seeley described the marathon as Champaign’s biggest local event. “There never is a bigger gathering and celebration in Champaign-Urbana all year. It’s all about Fitness, Fun, and Fellowship,” Seeley said. Last year 20,735 people participated

in the races. About 25 percent of the runners fell in the 18-24 year age group. Registration costs $40 for the 5K, $50 for the 10K, $75 for the half marathon, and $100 for the full marathon.  Students may be reluctant to participate in a race, thinking they are out of shape, but a 5K is actually a very manageable distance. A 5K is the equivalent of 3.1 miles. A 10k is equal to 6.2 miles, and a half marathon is 13.1 miles. The popular “Couch-to-5K” running plan recommends two months of light training for a 5K race. The “C25K” mobile app can be downloaded for $1.99 on ITunes.  All race courses start near the State Farm Center on First Street, run through urban neighborhoods and downtown streets through crowds of cheering spectators and finish on the 50-yard line of Memorial Stadium. Hydration stations are situated at intervals along all race courses,

Eating cheese late at night will give you nightmares. (Find the answer on page 4)

Besides the storefront changes the online bookstore will remain active, and she noted that many textbook titles have gone towards using online access codes instead of physical copies. See BOOKSTORE on P. 5


News

Wednesday, February 19, 2014 Page 2

Prospectus News www.prospectusnews.com

Allerton Spring Break Program needs more volunteers for 2014

Illustration by Chris Ware/Lexington Herald-Leader Mindy Brand Program & Volunteer Coordinator Allerton Park & Retreat Center will be hosting ten local students for a week of volunteer projects during spring break, March 23-28. This program is open to University of Illinois and Parkland students. During this week, participants will work together to improve the grounds, gardens, and facilities of Allerton Park. Participants are invited to stay at Allerton in the beautiful and historic House in the Woods. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner will be provided daily.

Allerton Spring Break began over ten years ago, but lapsed for several years due to lack of funding; this is the 2nd Allerton Spring Break in recent years. Spring 2013 saw the renewal of ASB, but the park did not yet have the resources to house the participants. Fortunately, last year went so well that we have been able to expand it to accommodate participants for the entire week. It will be an experience like no other. Volunteers will commit to participating in a week-long endeavor to preserve and improve the park. Allerton is comprised of 1,000 acres of natural areas and 500 acres of formal gardens that includes over 100 pieces of sculpture.

Last year, students put their efforts toward improving both of these areas through projects such as cleaning up flower beds, painting structures, and planting trees. Jay Mulakala, an Aerospace Engineering major at the University of Illinois, had this to say about his experience in Allerton Spring Break 2013, “I knew I wanted to make my spring break worthwhile instead of sitting at home doing nothing, and the week easily surpassed my expectations. Thank you for the awesome program!� The goals of this program are twofold. The

short-term goal is to use the hard work and spirit of volunteerism of our local students to physically improve Allerton Park for use by the entire community. The long-term and most important goal is to increase awareness of this natural, horticultural, and architectural resource to students of the C-U area that are often disconnected because of the distance between them and the park. We hope that this program will help to reignite that connection between local students and this unparalleled community resource. Registration forms can be found on our website: allerton@illinois.edu.

Have an opinion?

Speak up, be heard, make a difference. www.prospectusnews.com - prospectus.editor@gmail.com - (217) 351-2216


Lifestyle

Prospectus News www.prospectusnews.com

Wednesday, February 19, 2014 Page 3

Do smartphone traffic apps really work? Katie Humphrey Star Tribune Mobile apps promise real-time traffic info, but — honk! honk! — picking the best route is still a gamble. It’s the commuter’s constant question: Stay the course despite the traffic jam or stray in search of a faster route? Winter weather only ups the ante. Routine and gut instinct, plus a well-timed radio traffic report, used to be our guides. Then the smartphone-turnednavigator came along, giving us real-time traffic updates with the tap of a touch screen. Apps like Waze and Google Maps highlight the fastest routes based on traffic data, while staterun tools post traffic and road conditions. But computers aren’t always the best co-pilots, especially in a snowstorm. The technology can provide a nifty snapshot of the present, but can’t say with absolute certainty what will come next. Elisa Poquette found that out on a recent snowy morning. According to Google Maps, her trip from south Minneapolis to her Wayzata, Minn., office should have taken 45 minutes. “It took me over an hour just to get to the basilica,” she said. “It was just absurd how wrong it was.” So is our faith in such apps misplaced? Our hope for technology too high? Will we be stuck in traffic forever? “(Apps) can tell you what may happen in the near future, assuming that nothing out of the ordinary takes place,” said John Hourdos, director of the Minnesota Traffic Observatory. “During your trip, a billion unexpected things can happen that are going to push your experience out of the ordinary. It’s quite unpredictable, bottom line.” The Minnesota Department of Transportation has been tracking traffic in real time for decades. The department uses sensors on freeways and many state highways in the metro area to figure out where traffic’s moving and where it’s jammed. Construction updates, road conditions (reported by snowplow drivers), plus hazards or crashes reported by the State Patrol have long been available to traffic reporters and the general public by calling 511 or checking www.511mn.org. That wealth of public data is often the basis for other navigation apps. Google Maps, which displays real-time traffic flow with red, yellow and green lines, also draws data from the GPS coordinates of Android phone users who have opted to anonymously share their locations. Waze, purchased by Google last year for a reported $1 billion, is even more fervent about crowdsourcing. Its millions of users worldwide, all tracked by their phones’ GPS, update the

Waze map in real time just by driving. They can also report specific incidents, from slow traffic to police car sightings, with voice commands. Waze added the hands-free controls so people wouldn’t be tapping while driving. Some apps ask users to agree not to use them while driving. Before setting out on snowy mornings, Diane Kulseth checks three different apps.

Yet even without a 100 percent success rate, Kulseth recommends Waze to friends. “The more people use it, the better it will get,” she said. Waze had nearly 50 million users when Google bought the Israel-based app in July. Julie Mossler of Waze said there are about 200,000 registered users in the Twin Cities. That doesn’t mean they’re all active, but she said the area is relatively well-populated, and therefore keeps maps up-todate. But sometimes people would just rather get their traffic updates from a real human. Ken Olson, who does on-the-air radio traffic reports for 1500 ESPN My Talk 107.1, boasts nearly 8,000 Twitter followers who pepper his @MSP—Traffic account with inquiries. “I receive tweets from people in bed. I receive tweets from people just leaving, especially in the afternoon,” he said. “?’How’s the drive in St. Paul look? How’s the drive in Bloomington look?’?” He bases most of his tweets on the information provided by MnDOT, with occasional updates from people who report from the road. While tech-fueled traffic updates aren’t always accurate, they can help people adjust their expectations, said David Levinson, a civil engineer at the University of Minnesota who specializes in transportation. “If it’s going to be 15 or 30 minutes because of some incident and you can’t change it, then you can notify people or feel much more comfortable about accepting it,” Levinson said. “You feel better about the situation when you have more information about it.” But sometimes more information about one traffic jam can lead to another elsewhere. If a lot of drivers opt for the same alternate route — suggested by Google, Waze or some other app — it may get clogged, too. The apps that update in real time will pick up on that secondary congestion, but not until it happens. “The more people that you have listening to this information, the higher probability that they’re all going to follow the suggestion of the computer and they’re going to end up in the same place as everybody else and therefore creating (a new) problem,” said Hourdos. It’s a Catch-22. Still, he said, it’s an improvement. Hourdos uses Waze when driving Illustration by Eddie Thomas/Minneapolis Star Tribune/MCT unfamiliar routes at rush hour. “Before, we were totally blind,” She uses MnDOT for winter road conditions, he added. Google for a quick overview of traffic flow But when the snow flies, Hourdos said, and Waze to pick a route from her home in it’s tough for an app to keep up: “Anything, Maplewood to work in Eagan, Minn., based on especially anything with traffic lights, is not travel time. going to be a good choice — no matter what “It’s been a little bit of a tossup. There have Waze says.” been a couple times where it’s been great and I’ve ended up cutting off a good chunk of time,” -she said. ©2014 Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

Effective listening a good tool for students Heidi Priebe Student Health 101 When it comes to getting the most out of lectures, effective listening is a crucial skill to have. But when else do you need to be opening your ears? A recent Student Health 101 survey indicates that 50 percent of students just want to be listened to during times of distress. Sometimes what people need most is the opportunity to talk. So how can you demonstrate that you’re really hearing what other people say? Listen Carefully Active listening refers to the goal of truly understanding what someone says. Facilitating a conversation where the speaker feels heard is a crucial part of good communication. “Sometimes people are just waiting for their turns to speak,” says James D., a junior at Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. “It feels like what you’re saying is just going in one ear and out the other.” Here are some basic techniques: • Allow silence in conversation so the speaker has time to reflect. • Ask open-ended questions. These lead to more descriptive answers, rather than just a “yes” or “no.” • Paraphrase the speaker’s words to show that you’re listening and to confirm that you understand what he or she is saying. • Summarize the conversation. This again

serves as validation for the speaker and an opportunity to clarify anything you’ve misunderstood. What Your Body Says In the recent Student Health 101 survey, 22 percent of respondents ranked eye contact as the most important part of a conversation. Professor Rex Campbell’s Leadership: Getting It Done, a manual for the University of Missouri in Columbia, suggests using the following body language: • Keep your posture open by uncrossing legs and arms. • Remove physical barriers between you and the speaker. • Lean toward the speaker (slightly) to display interest in what he or she is saying. • Maintain eye contact. • Nod silently to show agreement or encouragement. Increase Understanding You can practice this skill and achieve academic results at the same time. Effective communication combines welcoming body language with active listening skills. Practicing these helps ensure that not only do the people you speak with feel heard, but also that you get the most from conversations. Heidi is a senior studying psychology at the University of Guelph. -Copyright 2014 Student Health 101

Illustration by Rick Nease/Detroit Free Press


Opinions

Page 4 - Wednesday, February19, 2014

Prospectus Prospectus News News Rm. X-155 2400 W. Bradley Ave. Champaign, Il 61821 217-351-2216

Find us online: www.prospectusnews.com facebook.com/prospectusnews twitter.com/the_prospectus

Originally created as the Parkland College Prospectus in 1969 in Champaign, IL, Prospectus News is a student produced news source in print, Web, and design media formats. Prospectus News is published weekly during the semester and monthly during the summer.

Editorial Policy and Letter to the Editor - All content is subject to review by the editorial staff. - All submissions must follow the Parkland College code of conduct. All violations of said code will be turned over to Parkland College Administration and Public Safety. - All content, once published, becomes property of Prospectus News. - All submitted content must be original work. - All submissions must also include up to date contact information. - View expressed are not necessarily that of Prospectus News or Parkland College. - E-mail prospectus@parkland.edu, subject “Letter to the Editor.”

Advertising Interested in placing an ad? Contact us: 217-351-2206 prospectusads@parkland.edu

- Advertising is accepted which is non-discriminatory and not in violation of any laws. Prospectus News reserves the right to refuse any advertising. Publication of advertising constitutes final acceptance. - Advertisers must verify ads for accuracy. - Prospectus News deadline for all advertising is 5 p.m. of the Friday immediately before the upcoming edition. - The advertiser pays for all advertising and views expressed in ads are not necessarily that of Prospectus News or Parkland College.

Prospectus News staff: Advisor: John Eby Publications Manager: Sean Hermann Production Supervisor: JoJo Rhinehart Staff Writers: Mackenzie Eisenmann Mace Mackiewicz Ken Smith Alex Wallner Photographers: Ted Setterlund Graphic Designers: Amber Walters Web Editor: Burke Stanion Ad Manager: Linda Tichenor

Did you know? All unused issues of Prospectus News are donated to the Parkland College Veterinary Technology program or the Champaign County Humane Society.

Prospectus News www.prospectusnews.com

Coca-Cola commercial receives mixed reactions Mace Mackiewicz Staff Writer During NFL Super Bowl XLVIII a multitude of commercials play that are tailor-made just for the event. Everything from movies, TV Shows, snack, soda and alcohol are advertised during the Super Bowl and a large amount of money is spent on advertising each year. This year’s Super Bowl featured a controversial commercial from CocaCola entitled “America is Beautiful,” which can be viewed on YouTube. The response to the commercial was mixed with some people absolutely loving it to other people viewing it as non-American. The commercial features the song “America the beautiful” being sung by many American families of different cultural backgrounds. The song is performed in several different languages while showing the families enjoying life, Coca-Cola and living in America. While it’s almost impossible to run an ad or speak an opinion in the public forum without getting some sort of mixed reaction, this particular commercial seemed to have gained notoriety faster than most. Communications professor Holly Melby voiced her opinion on the commercial. “Personally, I found the Coca-Cola ad to be a beautiful spot. It was compelling to watch. As was the case in the group I was with, it commanded attention and caused a lull in the room. Something that doesn’t always happen during commercials,” Melby said. “Given that personal experience as well as the stir the ad created, I’d say

it was rather effective for the brand. Unlike several other spots where people couldn’t tell you who created the ad, it seems likely that most people can both recognize the spot as well as recall that it was a Coke ad,” Melby continued. After the commercial initially aired the response was almost immediate on Twitter with people voicing their distaste or support of the commercial’s message. “@CocaCola has America the Beautiful being sung in different languages in a #SuperBowl commercial? We speak ENGLISH here, IDIOTS,” read a tweet authored by a Twitter user voicing their distaste for the commercial. Some students weren’t the biggest fans of the commercial, either. “I wasn’t really offended by the commercial or its message per se. But it kind of felt like Coca Cola did this on purpose to stir the pot. They probably knew airing the commercial in front of such a large audience would garner publicity and I am not really a fan of using controversy to gain attention.” Radiologist major Zack Thompson said. Melby reacted to the backlash the commercial got, explaining that she was surprised so many Americans were still unaware of the diversity the land represents. “As a consumer, I find the backlash to be rather shocking. I’d like to believe that we’ve come farther as a nation. The fact that there are many nationalities and languages represented by our country shouldn’t be surprising. Yet the reaction to the ad represents otherwise,” Melby said. “However, I do not believe that CocaCola was shocked by the response. The fact is that they run their ads through thorough testing and focus groups prior

to releasing them would indicate to me that they were well informed of the impending backlash.” Melby continued. But there were positive reactions to the commercial as well, and Twitter users took to their accounts to share these opinions as well. “For the record, I thought the @ CocaCola superbowl commercial was beautiful. On that note, I’m picking up some caffeine free Coca Cola now ;),” read a more positive tweet from a Twitter user. Some students also had positive reactions to the commercial. “I really didn’t see where the controversy was coming from. America is a melting pot of different cultures, races, languages and traditions. I really enjoyed the commercial as I wasn’t expecting anything that sentimental running during the ads,” Communications major Ashley Hall said. Melby explained that she believes advertisers should follow CocaCola’s example, and represent the diverse nation and honor the differences each American has. With social media being so popular, allowing anyone to voice their opinion for everyone else to see, it will be interesting to find out how the reaction to this commercial possibly affects future commercials. Some advertisers might take the opposite route of the Coca-Cola commercials while others might continue the inclusiveness of it. To view Coca-Cola’s “America is Beautiful” commercial that aired during the Super Bowl this year, visit http://goo.gl/Cpta2W.

Illustration by Molly Quinn/The Spokesman-Review/MCT

Comcast/Time Warner merger isn’t that bad Los Angeles Times The proposed merger between Comcast and Time Warner Cable, the country’s two largest cable TV operators, generated a predictable wave of outrage from opponents of corporate consolidation. With about 30 percent of all pay-TV customers served by its wires, the combined company would have extraordinary leverage when negotiating with television networks over the fees for their programming. It also would be the gatekeeper to a third of all U.S. homes with broadband. Those are scary scenarios for consumers and content companies. The underlying problem for them, particularly in broadband, is that today’s markets have too few competitors to protect against service providers that put their thumbs on the competitive scales. But while Comcast’s takeover of Time Warner Cable wouldn’t improve that situation, it wouldn’t necessarily make it worse either. Unlike AT&T and T-Mobile, whose proposed merger was blocked by the Justice Department, Comcast and Time Warner Cable don’t go head-tohead in any markets. Their lines run in different cities, or in the case of New York and a few other towns, in different neighborhoods. So the concerns raised by the deal stem mainly from the extra weight Comcast will be able to throw around when negotiating for content, equipment and bandwidth. Some supporters of the deal say that a larger Comcast-TWC entity would be able to pay TV networks less for their programs, holding down the fees that have driven up consumers’ monthly cable bills. That may be true, but there’s also the risk that Comcast would use its leverage over TV programmers to gain an unfair advantage over other pay-TV providers, such as DirecTV and Verizon’s FiOS. Or that it would

charge them excessive fees for the programming networks it owns, including NBC and regional sports channels. In broadband, the merger could accelerate Comcast’s efforts to create a nationwide Wi-Fi-based data network to compete with the mobile phone companies’ offerings. But it also would let Comcast impose data caps and other market-distorting restrictions on millions of additional customers. Not coincidentally, such restrictions could make life more difficult for Netflix and other online services that are growing in

popularity at cable operators’ expense. The merger would give Comcast more incentive and opportunity to engage in such mischief. The shortage of broadband service providers - most homes have no more than two to choose from - leaves consumers with little ability to dump an Internet service provider whose terms they don’t like. Regulators have a head start, however, in stopping Comcast from abusing the market power it would gain by acquiring Time Warner Cable. The Federal Communications Commission imposed a number of

Fact or Fiction? FICTION: A study of 200 people by the British Cheese Board disproved this myth, finding no connection between late-night cheese consumption and nightmares in their subjects.

restrictions on Comcast in 2011 when it bought NBC Universal, aiming to protect against self-dealing and other forms of anti-competitive behavior online and on its cable system. Among other things, Comcast is compelled to live by the FCC’s “net neutrality” rules, even the ones a federal appeals court has thrown out. Those protections would go a long way toward mitigating the risks posed by the expanding bulk of Comcast, while still allowing two noncompetitors to join forces. --(c)2014 Los Angeles Times

Show current ID and receive $10 off application fee at Westgate Apartments

1600 W. Bradley Ave. Champaign, IL Open M-F 9am - 5:30pm, Sat. 10am - 4pm


Prospectus News www.prospectusnews.com

BOOKSTORE continued from page 1

Overall this will be a big change for the bookstore, but it comes with many improvements that students will directly benefit from. The main reason for the quick turnaround of only one week to vacate their old space is that construction will begin for the location’s new occupant on Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Just down the hall from the bookstore’s current location is the Department of Natural Sciences. After years of planning, the Natural Sciences department will get the much desired additional space. Kathy Bruce, Department Chair of Natural Sciences, said the new space will be converted into four separate classrooms. Two of the rooms will be considered “flex-labs” and will have lecture-discussion format with basic Wet lab activities and models for the Anatomy and Physiology general education classes. These will provide a dynamic teaching environment since many of the tables and utilities are “flex”-ible and can be relocated around the classroom to accommodate various lecture formats. The third classroom will be a Kinesiology and Exercise

Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - Page 5

Physiology lab for biological stats testing. Students in these courses will also spend time in the new exercise and physical fitness center just recently completed here at Parkland. The fourth lab will be for the class SCI 208, Forensic Science II: Death Analysis. Commonly called the “CSI lab” after the TV series, this lab will explore many of the topics that are alluded to on the hit television show. Each of these classrooms will be structured to accommodate 24 students, have plenty of storage, and have an all new design layout with projection lecture screens frequently seen in today’s top educational institutions. These four new labs are part of a department-wide remodeling project. Updates in the five existing labs added with the four new ones will provide the much needed facelift the department has wanted. While new facilities have obvious practical benefits, Bruce said she strongly believes this could be an excellent recruiting tool for future students as most classes transfer to four-year institutions. Existing students will move to a more structured approach to learning but with the added flexibility of integrating lecture and lab formats. Overall, Bruce remarked, this has been a long time coming, and the entire department is very excited. To find out more about the new Student Services Center at Parkland College, please visit http://goo.gl/CbcG7g.

Notice to Students and Faculty Regarding FINAL EXAMINATIONS

A final exam is expected in each credit course at Parkland College. Final exams for all full-semester and second-half-semester courses will be given during final exam week (May 12 – 16.) according to the official published schedule. The schedule can be found on the last part of the printed semester class schedule. These final exams are not to be given early (during regular class periods). Final exams for all other courses (those ending earlier) will be given at the last regularly scheduled class meeting. All requests from faculty to alter scheduled final exam times or dates must be reviewed and approved by the Department Chair and the Vice President for Academic Services. In courses where a final exam is not appropriate, as determined by the Department Chair, an educational alternative scheduled during the week of final exams is expected. Students: These official College guidelines were established to more fully ensure that you receive the full set of instructional class periods for which you paid and to which you are entitled; and that you have the appropriate amount of time to prepare adequately for your final exams. If your final exam is given earlier than scheduled, or at a date and time that is not consistent with the college’s final exam schedule, please contact the Department Chair or the Vice President for Academic Services (3512542, Room A117). Three final exams scheduled on the same day may be considered a conflict. Conflicts may be resolved by arrangement with the faculty of these courses. Questions or concerns about these guidelines should be directed to the Vice President for Academic Services.

Prospectus News

serving nearly 1,000 readers weekly


Puzzles & Comics

Page 6 - Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Bliss

Classifieds

Prospectus News www.prospectusnews.com

Intermediate Sudoku by KrazyDad, Volume 1, Book 6

Sudoku Sudoku #3 (intermediate)

Place your classified here for only $5 per week. Ads must be less than three lines or 30 words. Contact our ad department today! 217-351-2206 or prospectusads@parkland.edu

LOST: Gold and diamond bracelet

This was a Christmas present and it means a lot to me. If you have it or have any information on it please call 317-987-2950.

$250 reward

Let us step into the night and pursue that flighty temptress, adventure. - J.K. Rowling

4 9 8 1

4

6 5 3 2

8

6 3 1 8

1 9 2

© 2013 KrazyDad.com

FOR RELEASE OCTOBER 20, 2013 Fill in the blank squares so that each row, each column and each 3-by-3 block contain all of the digits 1 thru 9.

THE TV CROSSWORD If you use logic you can solve the puzzle without guesswork.

Need a little help? The hints page shows a logical order to solve the puzzle. Use it to identify the next square you should solve. Or use the answers page if you really get stuck.

by Jacqueline E. Mathews

FRESH.

FAST. TASTY.

1 4 9 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 20 22 26 27 28 29 32 35 39 40 42

ACROSS “Good Morning America” network Garbo or Van Susteren Actress Dawber “What’d you say?” Place of refuge “__ You There, Chelsea?” Mr. Onassis, to friends Insurance representative Paul’s cousin on “Mad About You” Sportscaster Musburger __ Hotchner; “Criminal Minds” role “The Real Housewives __” “...__ it all, just like Bogie and Bacall...” (“Key Largo” lyrics) “Much __ About Nothing” “__ Life to Live” Sullivan and Asner Liz __; role on “30 Rock” “ABC World News” anchor “A Bell for __”; movie for Gene Tierney Burton of “Roots” “The Adventures of __ Tin Tin” Solution to Last Week’s Puzzle

FREAKY FAST

DELIVERY! ©2011 JIMMY JOHN’S FRANCHISE, LLC ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

(c) 2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

43 Robert of “Baretta” 47 “__ Ventura: Pet Detective”; movie for Jim Carrey 48 Actress Leoni 49 Allowed by law, for short 50 “__ and Stacey” 51 Suffix for host or count 52 Anthony and Barbara 53 Yrbk. section DOWN 1 Gregory Peck’s “Moby Dick” role 2 Donkey 3 “Sorry about that, __”; Maxwell Smart’s line on “Get Smart” 4 Small pointed beard 5 “__ Doll”; Four Seasons hit song 6 Suffix for Japan or Nepal 7 “Cat on a Hot __ Roof” 8 “__ Is Born”; film for Streisand 9 __ off; joined in teams of two 10 Intermittently dry creek 11 “__ Girls”; Lindsay Lohan movie 19 180˚ from SSE 21 “Not __ Stranger”; Frank Sinatra film 23 “The __ Nine Yards”; movie for Bruce Willis 24 Fonda and Seymour 25 Water retention problem 29 Cibrian and Van Halen 30 Ross and Rigg 31 “The Streets of __ Francisco” 33 Baby hooters 34 “Bill __, the Science Guy” 36 James __ of “Benson” 37 Roy Rogers and Dale __ 38 Jeff Gordon or Richard Petty 39 Johnson of “Laugh-In” 41 Skelton and Buttons 44 __ the way; pioneered 45 “Men of a Certain __”; Scott Bakula/Ray Romano series 46 Relatives

When asked by an anthropologist what the Indians called America before the white men came, an Indian said simply "Ours." -- Vine Deloria, Jr.

1 7 2 9 3 8 7

YOUR AD HERE


Sports

Prospectus News www.prospectusnews.com

Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - Page 7

Cobra’s Softball enters 2014 season

Photo courtesy of Rod Shilts/Parkland College Alex Wallner Sports Writer Parkland Women’s Softball is entering the 2014 season with their first game on Tuesday, March 4, 2014 against Rend Lake in Ina, Illinois. Last season proved to be a great one for Parkland softball as the Lady Cobras finished with a record of 38 and 11 before losing in the regional semifinals to Lincoln Land Community College. For Head Coach Chuck Clutts, who is entering his fourteenth season at Parkland, this year is one that he is looking forward to the most. Clutts said that last year was rough because they had high expectations due to their third place finish at Nationals the year before, which did not translate during the spring season. Clutts is confident that this year will be better. “This team has no last year expectations except they have a few grudges on their plate for the other teams in our conference. I think this team is going to do real well,” Clutts explained. For the newcomers on the team, nerves are bound to hit and not only will they be anxious to play, but they may also be nervous that they’ll

make mistakes on the field.“Yes, I am a little nervous but it’s more like an excited nervous because I can’t wait to see what our team does and how our hard work in the off season has paid off,” Occupational Therapy major Taylor Spivey said. Clutts referred to this year’s sophomore class as tremendous leaders and is happy that everything they are doing now will really help the freshmen succeed this season. “They took these freshmen under their wings and they showed them how it’s played here at Parkland College; how to take care of the class room, how to take care of softball, how to be a great person and the sophomores have just done a great job with everything they have done,” Clutts explained. This team is eager to play and the hard work that they have shown through the fall season and now into winter proves their dedication to succeed in the spring season. Clutts remarked that he is proud to see his team becoming closer and closer together each and every day, creating a strong bond that will translate well during games. “We had a great group last year; this group

right now seems a little closer together and they are willing to work very, very hard this year,” Clutts said. This team has been working hard to prepare for the season, because, it is important to the athletes that they leave their mark on this softball program for the future women that come into it. “We are scrimmaging twice a week and we are really working on our hitting in the gym and pitchers are throwing every day and working on their weaknesses and we’re trying to put it all together in scrimmages,” Accounting major Jordan Wheeler said. As the saying goes, “Practice makes perfect,” and for Wheeler it couldn’t be more than the truth, as they are not only helping her, but they are getting her and the team eager for the upcoming season. For the freshmen on the team, the college game is much different than the high school game by many aspects. It is all about adjusting to the game and trying to get better every day. “The college game differs a lot from high school,” Spivey explained, “You actually have girls who have the same ability as you or even

Cobra Men’s Basketball lose at Wood

PC Women’s Basketball start fast, finish strong

Rod M. Lovett Parkland College Following a recent trend of slow starts in the first half, the Parkland Men fell behind early and lost to #17 John Wood 77-65 in Quincy. The Blazers came out hot, shooting a sizzling 60% in the opening 20 minutes, while the Cobras shot just 35%. The hot shooting resulted in a 42-25 halftime lead for JWCC. The Blazers cooled off in the second half and PC climbed back into the contest but the deficit was too much to overcome.   JW shot 50% for the game, including 45% from behind the arc. PC shot just 38% from the field and a dismal 2-11 from three. A bright side for the Cobras was the play of Kevin Phillips who came off the bench to lead the Cobras with 15 points and 8 rebounds. Nate Tidwell added 12 points for PC, which drops to (15-10 3-4) with four games remaining.  John Wood (18-8 7-0) clinched at least a tie for the M-WAC title and needs just one victory in their final three games to wrap up the title. They were led by a balanced attack with Jordan Johnson’s 19 points leading the way. Brody Gronewold added 17, TJ Tisdell added 14 points and 10 rebounds, and Josh Baldridge scored 11. Parkland will try to get back on track when they host the Illinois Wesleyan JV starting at 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014 at the Dodds Athletic Center. 

better playing, which challenges you even more. Also you have girls that love the sport playing so it’s a lot more competitive.”As Clutts said, this team has grudges on teams in the conference, and these rivalries are bound to intensify as the season progresses. “I’m really focused on Heartland, Lincoln Land and ICC; they’re all really big competition. I think that if we can beat them, then we probably can do really well this season, we just have to really focus on jumping ahead early on them and beating them,” Wheeler said. Those three teams are the ones that Cobra’s Softball team is most anxious to play because last year they proved to be very tough for the Cobras to handle. Those are also the teams at the top of the conference that the Cobras are looking forward to playing. Overall, the season looks very bright for Cobra softball. Not only are they preparing well, but they are ready to be on the field and play and hopefully compete for their first goal; a conference championship. For more information on the Women’s Softball program at Parkland College, please visit http:// www.parkland.edu/athletics/softball.

Rod M. Lovett Parkland College

Photo courtesy of Rod Shilts/Parkland College

Date

Time

VS.

Location

 Mar. 4     

 2 p.m.

 Rend Lake

 Ina, Ill.

 Mar. 9

 11 a.m.

 Blackhawk

 Pensacola, Fla.

 Mar. 9

 1 p.m.

 Blackhawk

 Pensacola, Fla.

 Mar. 10  

 1 p.m.

 Pensacola State College

 Pensacola, Fla.

 Mar. 13

 3 p.m.

 Jefferson Davis CC

 Brewton, Ala.

 Mar. 14

 TBA

 University of West Florida

 Pensacola, Fla.

 Mar. 20

 2 p.m.

 Danville Area

 HOME

 Mar. 21

 3 p.m.

 Kankakee

 Kankakee, Ill.

 Mar. 22

 1 p.m.

 Lewis & Clark

 HOME

 Mar. 23

 Noon

 John Wood

 HOME

 Mar. 27

  2 p.m.

 Heartland

 Normal, Ill.

For full schedule, go to www.parkland.edu/softball

The #24 Parkland Women’s Basketball team defeated John Wood 82-71 to keep pace in the M-WAC race. The victory keeps the Cobras tied at 6-1 in the conference with Danville, which knocked off Lewis and Clark on Saturday.  Parkland raced out to an early 8-0 lead as freshman Hannah Wascher scored the first eight points of the contest. PC would maintain the lead for the remainder of the half and increased the margin to 42-29 at the break behind Wascher’s 12 points.  The second half started much differently as the Cobras came out cold and the Blazers would use a 10-0 run to grab their first lead of the game at 54-53 with 9:03 left. John Wood’s lead would grow to as many as four before PC regained the lead at 71-70. The Blazers answered back with a lay-up with 2:22 to go to regain the lead, but that would be their final score, as PC would end the game on a 12-0 run. A strong effort on the defensive end and excellent free throw shooting helped the Cobras earn the win. PC made 13 of 14 free throws down the stretch to seal the win. Wascher led PC with 17 points and 8 rebounds while Erin Kelley also had 17 points including 8-8 from the line.   Jocie Klocke continued her solid play off the bench as she scored 18 points and chased down 11 rebounds. Jerica Hawkins scored 10 points while Aimee Iverson handed out six assists.  The win moves Parkland to (18-9 6-1) while John Wood falls to (11-14 3-3).


Page 8 - Wednesday, February 19, 2013 Prospectus News www.prospectusnews.com

FOLIO LINE

FOLIO LINE

M c C l a t c h y - Tr i b u n e

BY GREGORY CLAY

ANSWERS

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

ost of us know prominent black women in Hollywood — from Cicely Tyson to Halle Berry to Kerry Washington. We know superstar black female athletes, such as the tennis-playing Williams sisters, and we remember bronze medal-winning figure skater Debi Thomas from the momentous Calgary Winter Olympics of 1988. But sports and entertainment aren’t the only arenas in which black women have achieved. Here, we examine a historical roll call of black women firsts and their legacies as we celebrate Black History Month and Women’s History Month with an eclectic and challenging trivia quiz.

1.

Who was the first black woman named to a U.S. Cabinet position? A. Condoleezza Rice B. Alexis Herman C. Patricia Roberts Harris D. Hazel R. O’Leary

2. Michelle Obama became the first black first lady when Barack Obama won the presidential election in 2008. At what college did she complete her undergraduate studies?

Michelle Obama A. Yale B. Princeton C. Illinois D. North Carolina

3. Debi Thomas became the

first black woman to win a medal in a Winter Games when she captured the bronze in figure skating in 1988. What professional discipline did she enter after her skating career? A. Chiropractor B. Accountant C. Attorney D. Physician

RICHARD HODGES/COLUMBUS LEDGER-ENQUIRER/MCT

4.

Who was the first black woman to win a Nobel Prize in literature? A. Lorraine Hansberry B. Toni Morrison C. Alice Walker D. Maya Angelou

5.

Who was the first black woman to moderate a U.S. presidential debate? A. Gwen Ifill B. Suzanne Malveaux C. Fredricka Whitfield D. Carole Simpson

6. Halle Berry, in 2002,

became the first black woman to receive an Academy Award in the Best Actress category. Name the movie in which Halle she appeared for Berry said award. A. “Losing Isaiah” B. “Monster’s Ball” C. “Solomon & Sheba” D. “Gothika”

7. Name the first black woman to play for a Negro League baseball team. A. Althea Gibson B. Wilma Rudolph C. Toni Stone D. Wyomia Tyus

8.

11. Who was the first black

woman named Playboy Magazine’s Playmate of the Month? A. Halle Berry B. Vanessa Williams C. Jennifer Jackson D. Dorothy Dandridge

13.

12. Vanessa James and

Yannick Bonheur became the first black couple to compete in Winter Olympic pairs skating when they participated in the Vancouver

Who was the first black female flight attendant? A. Ruth Carol Taylor B. Bessie Coleman C. Shirley Chisholm D. Aretha Franklin

Name the first black woman who was a nonsupermodel or a nonathlete to appear on the cover of Sports Illustrated’s swimsuit edition. A. Beyonce B. Rihanna C. Aaliyah D. Iman

14.

Who was the first black woman to earn her pilot’s license? A. Bessie Coleman B. Mae Jemison C. Shirley Ann Jackson D. Ella Fitzgerald

9.

Vonetta Flowers became the first black woman to win a gold medal in a Winter Olympics in the 2002 Games in Salt Lake City. In which sport did she participate in before bobsledding? A. Track and field B. Basketball C. Softball D. Soccer

15.

Alice Coachman became the first black woman to win a gold medal in an Olympics. In what year did she win the gold? A. 1960 Rome B. 1936 Berlin C. 1948 London D. 1956 Melbourne

10. Ursula Burns is the first

black female CEO of a Fortune 500 company. Name the company. A. Xerox B. Archer Daniels Midland C. Hewlett-Packard D. Avon

Games in 2010. Which country did they represent in that Olympics? A. United States B. England C. Canada D. France

GEORGE BRIDGES/MCT

Vanessa James and Yannick Bonheur compete in the ice skating pairs event at the 2010 Winter Games in Vancouver, British Columbia.

16. Name the first black

woman to receive a Ph.D. from Duke University. A. Susan Rice B. Melissa Harris-Perry C. Michelle Bernard D. Ida Stephens Owens

17.

Who is the first black woman named to the NCAA’s College Football Playoff Selection Committee? A. Pam Oliver B. Jemele Hill C. Condoleezza Rice D. Lisa Salters

18.

Who was the first black female millionaire in the United States? A. Nichelle Nichols B. Madam C. J. Walker C. Oprah Winfrey D. Judy Smith

19. Gabrielle Douglas

became the first black woman to win a gold medal in the individual all-around gymnastics competition, during the 2012 London Olympic Games. What is her nickname? A. “Supergirl” B. “Ace” C. “Queen of the Mat” D. “Flying Squirrel”

20. Who was the first black female author to win a Pulitzer Prize? A. Gwendolyn Brooks B. Zora Neale Hurston C. Nikki Giovanni D. Terry McMillan

S O U R C E S : B I O G R A P H Y. C O M , I M D B . C O M , P L AY B OY E N T E R P R I S E S , E S P N , H I S TO RY CHANNEL, PBS

PIONEERING BLACK WOMEN MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE

1. C. Patricia Roberts Harris was named secretary of housing and urban development in 1977 during the administration of President Jimmy Carter. 2. B. At Princeton, Michelle Obama majored in sociology with a minor in African-American studies, earning a B.A. in 1985. She received her law degree from Harvard in 1988. 3. D. Physician. Debi Thomas graduated from Stanford University in 1991 with a degree in engineering, then graduated from the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in 1997. She performed her surgical residency at the University of Arkansas Medical Sciences Hospital and an orthopedic surgery residency at the Martin Luther King Jr./Charles Drew University Medical Center in South Central Los Angeles. 4. B. Toni Morrison won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1993 for the body of her work “characterized by visionary force and poetic import.” 5. D. Carole Simpson moderated a debate in 1992 between U.S. presidential candidates George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton and Ross Perot. 6. B. Halle Berry played the role of Leticia Musgrove, the troubled wife of an executed murderer in “Monster’s Ball.” Her performance was awarded the National Board of Review and the Screen Actors Guild best-actress awards. In a most interesting coincidence, she became the first black woman to win the Academy Award for Best Actress when earlier in her career, she portrayed Dorothy Dandridge, the first black woman nominated for Best Actress. 7. C. Toni “Tomboy” Stone played second base for the Indianapolis Clowns in 1953. She even got a hit off legendary pitcher Satchel Paige. 8. A. Ruth Carol Taylor became the first black flight attendant in 1958, working for Mohawk Airlines. 9. A. Vonetta Flowers initially participated in track and field as a sprinter and long jumper. Flowers originally aimed to compete in the Summer Games, but, after several failed attempts at the trials, she switched to bobsledding, teaming with Jill Bakken to take the gold in the 2002 Salt Lake City Games. 10. A. Ursula Burns, who grew up in a housing project in New York City, replaced Anne Mulcahy in 2009 as CEO of Xerox, the world’s largest maker of highspeed color printers. A math whiz, Burns earned a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from Columbia University in 1981. 11. C. Jennifer Jackson became the first black woman to appear as Playmate of the Month for the March 1965 issue. She later became a social worker; her twin sister, Janice, also worked as a Playboy Bunny. 12. D. Vanessa James and Yannick Bonheur represented France. They placed 14th in the competition. 13. A. Singer Beyonce created a major buzz in 2007 when she appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated’s Swimsuit Edition. 14. A. Bessie Coleman received an international pilot’s license in 1921 in France instead of the United States because of segregationist laws in America. 15. C. Alice Coachman won the high jump in the 1948 London Games with a height of 5 feet, 6 1/8 inches. In fact, she was the only U.S. woman to win a track and field gold medal in that games; Coachman’s dominance was so pronounced that she won the AAU outdoor high jump championships from 1939 to 1948. She was only 25 in 1948, so imagine how many medals she would have won had the 1940 and 1944 Summer Olympics not been canceled because of World War II. 16. D. Ida Stephens Owens received a Ph.D. in physiology in 1967 from the Duke Graduate School. 17. C. Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, also an accomplished figure skater and classical pianist, was named to the 13-person panel that determines the four teams that will play in major college football’s playoff system. 18. B. Sarah Breedlove, also known as Madam C. J. Walker, was a U.S. entrepreneur and philanthropist who earned her milliondollar fortune by developing and marketing beauty and hair-care products for black women. She died in 1919 at age 52, amassing her wealth several decades before Oprah. 19. D. Gabrielle Douglas was nicknamed the “Flying Squirrel” because of her acrobatic performances on the uneven bars. 20. A. Gwendolyn Brooks, in 1950, won a Pulitzer Prize for poetry with her book, “Annie Allen.”


Prospectus News 19 FEB 2014