__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

54

th

AUGUST 2020

1st in 2020 PP Corporate Aircraft Product Support Survey Jet Division Embraer Head Customer Relations & Aftermarket Sales Worldwide Marsha Woelber with (L–R) Customer Relations Directors for: APAC—Marcio Moreira, South America—Maury Yamazaki, EMEA—Ricardo Bechara, and Central & North America—Douglas Davidson.


PRAETOR 600: CERTIFIED OUTPERFORMANCE. Announcing the certified Praetor 600, the world’s most disruptive and technologically advanced super-midsize aircraft that leads the way in performance, comfort and technology. Unveiled at NBAA in October 2018 and now certified by ANAC, FAA and EASA, the Praetor 600 did not just meet initial expectations, it exceeded them. Named for the Latin root that means “lead the way,” the Praetor 600 is a jet of firsts. It is the first super-midsize jet certified since 2014. The first to fly beyond 3,700 nm at M0.80. The first with over 4,000 nm range at LRC. The first with full fly-by-wire. The first with turbulence reduction capability. The first with a cabin altitude as low as 5,800 feet. The first with high-capacity, ultra-high-speed connectivity from Viasat’s Ka-band. And all of this, backed by a top-ranked Customer Support network.

Learn more at executive.embraer.com/praetor600.

L E A D I NG T H E WAY


You’ve worked hard to earn these bars.

Now, reward yourself.

The next generation DC PRO-X2 The next generation DC PRO-X2 offers all the same  features that have made its predecessor, the   DC PRO-X, the most popular pro pilot headset in  aviation. Now with Automatic Gain Control (AGC) for  optimum ANR performance and Enhanced Auto Shutoff.  All in a durable, yet extremely comfortable, lightweight   rest-on-ear design. After all, you’re not just any pilot,   so why fly with just any headset?   Visit www.davidclark.com, or call  800-298-6235 for more information.  

© 2020 David Clark Company Incorporated  ® Green headset domes are a David Clark registered trademark.

W W W. D A V I D C L A R K . C O M

THE NEXT GEN

HYBRID

An Employee Owned American Company


2020 Corporate Aircraft Product Support Teams

Gulfstream (L–R) Dir Cust Support Technical Information Glen Howard, Chief Pilot Airborne Cust Support Tenille Cromwell, (center front) Pres Cust Support Derek Zimmerman, Dir Cust Support Planning & Inventory Rusty Bragg, Dir Part Sales & Pricing Jamie Linstroth, and Gen Mgr Gulfstream St Louis Murtaza Hassan.

Dassault (L–R) SVP Worldwide Cust Svc & Svc Center Network Jean Kayanakis, VP Worldwide Cust Svc Pierre Thielin, SVP Worldwide Svc Network Geoff Chick, VP Cust Svc (Americas/Asia) John Loh, Dir Operational Support (Americas) Arnaud Paulmier, and VP Operational Support Frederic Leboeuf.

Textron (L–R) Sr VP Cust Support Brian Rohloff, VP North American Cust Svc Centers Lannie O’Bannion, Sr VP Parts & Programs Kriya Shortt, Dir Distribution Ops Steve Hanson, Dir Cust Support Marisa Pollock, Mgr 1CALL Support Team Anthony Tagtow, VP Product Support Robert Khoury, and A&P Mechanic Michelle Stratman.

Bombardier (Top to bottom) Bombardier Aviation VP Cust Support & Cust Experience Andy Nureddin, VP/GM Cust Experience Jean-Christophe Gallagher, Sr Dir Aftermarket Products and Svcs & Cust Experience Elza Brunelle-Yeung, (front, L–R) Dir Technical Support & Cust Experience Ray Godon, CRC Technical Representatives: Marc Reynolds, and Jean-Francois Ethier.

Daher (L–R) Mgr Svc Engineering Marcel Kim, Mgr Training & Knowledge Alejandro Prem, NTSB & BEA Liaison-Mgr AOG & Special Projects Phil Santoro, VP Cust & Network Care Charles Holomek, Mgr Cust & Network Care Paulo Castro, Field Svc Reps Ruben Castellanos, Ron Guynn and CEO of Daher Aircraft Nicolas Chabbert.

Piper (L–R) Dir Cust Svc Vincent Zarrella, Sr Mgr Parts & Sales James Slaton, Sr Mgr Cust Support Frank Sosta, and VP Marketing & Sales Ron Gunnarson.


Turboprop Product Support Award

2020

Pilatus (L–R) Mgr Warehouse Ops Don Sherwood, Maintenance Training Instructor Mark Loos, VP Logistics John Patton, VP Customer Svc Piotr “Pete” Wolak, Mgr Service Center / Customer Relations Aaron DeBuhr and Pres and CEO Thomas Bosshard.

Pilatus 1 st in 2020 PP Corporate Aircraft Product Support Survey, TP Div, constant winner past 19 years


August 2020

Advertisers Index Page

Company/Creative Agency

Page

21 Avfuel | Potcake Aviation MMV Direct

Maria

Marian

Tony

Company/Creative Agency

11 FlightSafety Intl GretemanGroup

Murray

Eleni

Rafael

Masthead In memory of Founder Murray Smith Management MARCIA ELENI SMITH, President (eleni@propilotmag.com) ANTHONY HERRERA, General Manager (aherrera@propilotmag.com)

Editorial RAFAEL HENRIQUEZ, Managing Editor (rafael@propilotmag.com)

Graphics

12 Banyan Air Service FXE Direct

C4 Gulfstream Aerospace Direct

5 Bombardier Aircraft | Support Direct

JOSE VASQUEZ, Art Director (jvasquez@propilotmag.com)

Research MARCIA ELENI SMITH, Research Manager (esmith@propilotmag.com) MARIAN CORONADO, Research Assistant (marian@propilotmag.com)

13 Pilatus Business Aircraft | PC-24 Direct

Circulation ANTHONY HERRERA, Circulation Manager (subscription@propilotmag.com)

Advertising

9 Cirrus Aircraft Direct

37 Piper | M600/SLS Direct

17 Clay Lacy VNY Direct

8 Pro Pilot Surveys Direct

33 Concorde Battery Direct

35 Raisbeck Engineering Direct

C3 Daher | TBM Care Direct

8 Social Media | Pro Pilot 7 Dassault | Falcon Customer Service Direct Direct 1

José

Vol 54 No 8

25 West Star Aviation MAI

David Clark | DC PRO-X2 RDW Group

MARCIA ELENI SMITH, Marketing Manager (eleni@propilotmag.com) MARIA JACKSON, Marketing Assistant (mariabjackson@propilotmag.com)

Grant

Don

Brent

Karsten

Shannon

Phil

Glenn

Regular contributors BRENT BUNDY, Phoenix PD Officer/Pilot. AS350, Cessna 210/182/172. GLENN CONNOR, ATP. Cessna 425. SHANNON FORREST, ATP/CFII. Challenger 604/605. GRANT McLAREN, Editor-at-Large. PHIL ROSE, Contributing Writer. KARSTEN SHEIN, Comm-Inst. Climatologist, Natl Climatic Data Center. DON VAN DYKE, ATP/Helo/CFII. Canadian Technical Editor. Professional Pilot ISSN 0191-6238 5290 Shawnee Rd, Suite 201, Alexandria VA 22312 Fax: 703-370-7082 Tel: 703-370-0606 E-MAIL: editor@propilotmag.com

WEBSITE: www.propilotmag.com

Publication mail agreement #40030961 E-mail: subscription@propilotmag.com

Member NBAA. Aircraft: Beech Baron N241MS Piper Saratoga N4301M and Beech Sundowner N67135

C2 Embraer | Praetor 600 Direct

29 Western Aircraft Direct

27 Embraer | Services & Support Direct

18 X Vector Direct

We are here for you!

PRO PILOT Still working hard with passion.

Upcoming monthly editorial topics September - Where do you go for MRO?

Let us promulgate your products and services. Contact Eleni Smith - eleni@propilotmag.com or Maria Jackson - mariabjackson@propilotmag.com

4  PROFESSIONAL PILOT  /  August 2020

Qualified subscriptions‚ Those pilots and aviation dept mgrs operating business/ executive aircraft for a living under FAR Part 91 and 135 may qualify for a limited number of free subscriptions. For a complete description of who qualifies and instructions on receiving a qualification form go to our website at propilotmag.com PAID SUBSCRIPTIONS‚ Rates for 12 issues are set out below: US $50 Canada/Mexico $60 Other countries $80 Back issues $10 per issue Salary Study $20 per issue Only checks in US dollars are accepted. Virginia residents add 5.0% sales tax. Credit cards are not accepted. Make checks payable to Queensmith Communica­ tions Corp. Mail payment to 5290 Shawnee Rd, Suite 201, Alexandria VA 22312. Allow 4 to 6 weeks for processing. ADDRESS CHANGES‚ Please mail or fax the white carrier sheet containing your current address label along with any corrections to Professional Pilotmagazine, 5290 Shawnee Rd, Suite 201, Alexandria VA 22312. Fax to 703-370-7082. Allow 6 to 8 weeks for processing. POSTMASTER‚ Send address changes to Professional Pilot, 5290 Shawnee Rd, Suite 201, Alexandria VA 22312. Professional Pilot is published by Queensmith Communications Corp, 5290 Shawnee Rd, Suite 201, Alexandria VA 22312. TITLE AND TRADEMARKS‚ The title Professional Pilot has been trademarked as a magazine title by Queensmith Communications Corp and is duly registered at the US Patent Office. PERMISSIONS‚ Nothing may be reprinted in whole or part without a written permission from Queensmith Communications Corp. All rights in letters sent to Professional Pilot will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication and copyright purposes and as subject to unrestricted right to edit and to comment editorially. Published monthly. All rights reserved. MAILING AND POSTAGE‚ Periodical postage paid at Alexandria VA and addi­ tional mailing offices.

© Queensmith Communications Corp August 2020 • Vol 54 No 8


Bombardier and Exceptional by Design are trademarks of Bombardier Inc. or its subsidiaries. Š 2019 Bombardier Inc. All rights reserved.

Bring your jet

Home For all your support needs, bring your jet home to Bombardier and trust it to the experts who know it best. businessaircraft.bombardier.com

Exceptional by design Exceptional by design


August 2020

14

Vol 54 No 8

Features 14 AIRCRAFT INTERIOR REFURBISHMENT Aft Cabin design by Shannon Forrest Aircraft spaces personalized with flightcrew input benefit owners with comfortable traveling and higher resale value.

18

22 CORPORATE AIRCRAFT PRODUCT SUPPORT SURVEY Operator evaluations Staff compilation Pro Pilot subscribers evaluate business aircraft manufacturers based on aftersale service experienced during the past year. 38 WEATHER BRIEF How weather works by Karsten Shein Understanding the basics of the atmosphere helps anticipate flying conditions.

22

38

Voice your opinion Fill out our 2020 Turbine Powerplant Manufacturers Product Support Survey

6  PROFESSIONAL PILOT  /  August 2020


Follow us

on social media

August 2020

Vol 54 No 8

Departments Professional Pilot magazine

10 TERMINAL CHECKLIST Quiz on procedures when flying into BOI

@propilot_mag

(Boise ID). Answers on page 12.

18 SQUAWK IDENT Pro Pilot readers share how their responsibilities as aviation professionals have changed due to the coronavirus epidemic, and how their flight activity managing the situation.

@Pro.Pilot.Magazine

@pro_pilot_magazine

20 SID & STAR A non-flying day in Star’s life.

Cover 1st in 2020 PP Corporate Aircraft Product Support Survey Jet Division Embraer Head Customer Relations & Aftermarket Sales Worldwide Marsha Woelber with (L–R) Customer Relations Directors for: APAC—Marcio Moreira, South America— Maury Yamazaki, EMEA—Ricardo Bechara, and Central & North America—Douglas Davidson. Photo by Embraer.

8  PROFESSIONAL PILOT  /  August 2020


A SMART VISION TO ENABLE YOUR OPERATIONS

SmartLift™ offers the perfect supplement to your existing fleet with a world-class experience for your crew and passengers with best in class single engine economy. The Vision Jet™ features flexible cabin configurations, an intelligent flight deck and industry leading safety with CAPS® - Cirrus Airframe Parachute System® and Safe Return™ emergency autoland system. To learn more about SmartLift and the Vision Jet, call 844-788-3700 or visit CIRRUS.LINK/PROPILOT.

©2020, CIRRUS DESIGN CORPORATION D/B/A CIRRUS AIRCRAFT






















 

   







 



 

  

 

 





4.

The AGL and MSL height of obstacles within 1 nm of the departure end of a runway that penetrate the 40:1 obstacle clearance surface are listed on the chart under Takeoff Obstacles Notes. a True b False

5. The procedure is charted to scale. a True b False 6. Select the true statement(s) regarding obstacle and terrain clearance for this SID. a The highest charted terrain is 7000 ft MSL. b The Grid MORAs provide obstacle/terrain clearance of 1000 ft. c The Grid MORA of 8500 ft MSL applies to aircraft over BOISE VORTAC. d The MSA of 9500 ft MSL provides obstacle/terrain clearance of 1000 ft within 25 nm of BOI VOR.



 





 

 

   

 





3. Select all that apply. Which are obstacles that apply to takeoff? a A navaid facility is located 415 ft from the departure end of Rwy 10L. b A tree with a height of 100 ft AGL is located 2048 ft from the departure end of Rwy 28L. c A navaid facility that extends to 2880 ft MSL is located 5 ft from the departure end of Rwy 10L, 415 ft right of the centerline. d A building with a height of 15 ft AGL is located along the extended runway centerline 270 ft from the departure end of Rwy 10L.

 

 

           

























 











 

  



         

  

 

2. Select all that apply. Required obstacle clearance for an ODP is based on ______ a an obstacle assessment area that is limited to 25 nm from airport in mountainous areas. b the aircraft maintaining a climb gradient of at least 200 ft/ nm (or greater if indicated on the chart). c the aircraft climbing to 500 ft above the departure end of the runway elevation before making an initial turn. d the aircraft crossing the departure end of the runway at least 35 ft above the departure end elevation. e a 40:1 obstacle identification surface (OIS) that begins at the departure end of the runway and slopes upward at 152 ft/nm.

 

  

    



b maintain a climb gradient of at least 205 ft/nm to 4300 ft MSL. c climb in visual conditions on the assigned route of flight to the applicable MEA. d climb in visual conditions to cross the airport at or above the MEA or MCA applicable to BOI VOR. 9. Select all that apply. When flying the ODP, taking off from Rwy 10R with a ground speed of 150 kts, standard takeoff minimums apply with a minimum __________ to 4300 ft MSL. a climb rate of 205 ft/min. d climb gradient of 205 ft/nm. b climb rate of 513 ft/min. e climb gradient of 205 ft/min. c climb rate of 520 ft/min.

7. Select the requirement(s) for performing the visual climb over Select all that apply. Which is a correct procedure when flying 10. airport procedure. the ODP after taking off from Rwy 10L? a ATC approval. a Cross FIMGU at or above 5300 ft MSL. b A climb gradient over 200 ft/nm. c A minimum ceiling of 1000 ft AGL and minimum visibility b Cross BOI VOR at or above 3600 ft MSL. c Climb on a heading of 102° to 3600 ft MSL. of 1 sm. Climb gradient of 205 ft/min. At FIMGU, fly inbound on a d A minimum ceiling of 5500 ft AGL and minimum visibility d course of 036° to BOI VOR. of 3 sm. e Climb gradient of 205 ft/min. After flying a heading of 262°, 8. Select all that apply. To perform the visual climb over airport intercept the 216° radial inbound to BOI VOR. f Climb gradient of 205 ft/min. After flying a heading of 262°, procedure, the aircraft must _____ intercept the 216° radial outbound to FIMGU. a take off from Rwys 10L/R. 10  PROFESSIONAL PILOT  /  August 2020

Not to be used for navigational purposes



 

Reproduced with permission of Jeppesen Sanderson. Reduced for illustrative purposes.





Refer to the 10-3A GOWEN 4 DEPARTURE for KBOI/BOI (Boise ID) when necessary to answer the following questions: 1. An ATC clearance is required to fly this departure procedure. a True b False







Terminal Checklist Answers on page 12 8/20










TRAIN SAFELY, FLY SAFELY

FLIGHTSAFETY

IS HERE FOR

YOU

Unmatched Resources

Safety Protocols

Online Training

Leverage the unequaled experience

Our highest priority is keeping you

Pilot recurrent and maintenance

of our master instructors. Train on

safe. Enhanced safety protocols

training available through

advanced-technology simulators

include cleaning and disinfecting all

instructor-led LiveLearning or

and precision training devices.

facilities and training equipment.

self-paced Online Ground School.

FlightSafety.com • 201.528.0170 • A Berkshire Hathaway company


Answers to TC 8/20 questions 1.b

The GOWEN 4 Departure is an obstacle departure procedure (ODP), which is indicated by the word OBSTACLE in the procedure title. According to AIM 5-2-9, ODPs are recommended for obstruction clearance and may be flown without an ATC clearance, unless an alternate departure procedure (SID or radar vectors) has been specifically assigned by ATC.

2.

b, d, e According to the AIM 5-2-9, required obstacle clearance is based on the aircraft crossing the departure end of the runway (DER) at least 35 ft above the DER elevation, climbing to 400 ft above the DER elevation before making an initial turn, and maintaining a minimum climb gradient of 200 ft/nm, unless required to level off by a crossing restriction, until the minimum IFR altitude. The 40:1 obstacle identification surface (OIS) begins at the DER and slopes upward at 152 ft/nm until reaching the minimum IFR altitude, or entering the enroute structure. This assessment area is limited to 25 nm from the airport in non-mountainous areas, and 46 nm in designated mountainous areas.

3.

b, c According to the Takeoff Obstacle Notes for Rwy 10L, a navaid with a height of 16 ft AGL and 2880 ft MSL is located at 5 ft from the DER and a building and general utility, which is 15 ft AGL/2888 ft MSL begins at 270 ft from the DER. The navaid is 415 ft to the right of the centerline and the building is 444 ft to the left. The only obstacle listed for Runway 28L is a tree 2048 ft from the DER, 508 ft left of the runway centerline, at a height of 100 ft AGL/2909 ft MSL.

4.

a According the AIM 5-2-9, obstacles that are located within 1 nm of the DER and penetrate the 40:1 OCS are referred to as “low, close-in obstacles.” The standard required obstacle clearance (ROC) of 48 ft/nm to clear these obstacles would require a climb gradient greater than 200 ft/nm for a very short distance. To eliminate publishing an excessive climb gradient, the obstacle AGL/MSL height and location relative to the DER are noted so obstacles can be avoided.

5.

a Charting scales allow a to-scale depiction of the immediate area around the departure airport. The charting scale is indicated along the lower left side of the chart. Normally, all departure/arrival tracks will be shown within the to-scale portion of the procedure graphic. At times, transitions to and from the enroute structure will be shown within not-to-scale areas, which are indicated by a dashed line and clearly marked.

6. a, d The Highest Arrow indicates the highest charted terrain point/obstacle, which is the terrain northeast of the airport. The Contour Intervals key in the lower left of the plan view shows that the depicted terrain is 7000 ft MSL. Grid MORAs (based on grids formed by 30 minutes or 1 degree of latitude/longitude) are shown as thousands figures plus the first hundred figure in a smaller character, and are only charted for the to-scale portion of the chart. All MORA altitudes that are 5000 ft or lower have an obstacle clearance of 1000 ft. MORA altitudes that are 5001 ft or greater have an obstacle clearance of 2000 ft. Minimum safe/sector altitudes (MSAs) are depicted in brown (9500) with the MSA center identified (BOI VOR). The MSA diameter is depicted if it differs from 25 nm. 7.

a, d A visual climb over airport (VCOA) procedure is a departure option for an IFR aircraft operating in visual meteorological conditions (VMC) equal to or greater than the specified ceiling and visibility – in this case, 5500 ft AGL and 3 sm, as indicated in the takeoff minimums section. The VCOA procedure allows the pilot to visually conduct climbing turns over the airport to the published “climb-to” altitude from which to proceed with the instrument portion of the departure. VCOA procedures are developed to avoid obstacles greater than 3 sm from the DER as an alternative to complying with climb gradients greater than 200 ft/nm. The VCOA instructions indicate that ATC approval must be obtained when requesting an IFR clearance.

8. a, d VCOA instructions are only listed for takeoff from Rwys 10L/R. These instructions and notes on the plan view indicate that a climb in visual conditions to cross Boise Air Terminal/Gowen Airport at or above the BOI VOR MEA/MCA is required before proceeding on the assigned route of flight. 9.

b, d The takeoff minimums section of the chart indicates that, for Rwy 10R, standard minimums (or lower than standard, if authorized) apply with a minimum climb gradient of 205 ft/nm. The table indicates that a climb gradient of 205 ft/nm requires a climb rate of 513 ft per minute (ft/min) at a ground speed of 150 kts.

10.

a, c, d, f According to the Initial Climb instructions and the plan view, after taking off from Rwy 10L, climb on a heading of 102° to 3600 ft MSL before turning right to a heading of 262°. The line below 3600 on the plan view indicates a minimum altitude. The routing instructions state to intercept the 216° radial outbound to FIMGU, which is 11.0 nm from BOI VOR. A minimum altitude of 5300 is required when crossing FIMGU. At FIMGU, the aircraft must turn and intercept the 216° radial (036° course) inbound to the BOI VOR and continue to climb to cross BOI at or above the MEA or MCA for the assigned route of flight.


BIZJET INTERIOR REFURBISHMENT

Aft cabin design

Photos courtesy Western Aircraft

Aircraft spaces personalized with crew input benefit owners with comfy traveling and higher resale value.

Designers and techs at Western Aircraft work closely together to deliver a new interior for customers. The company serves Citation, Dassault, Embraer, Gulfstream, Hawker, Kodiak, Pilatus, Piper, and King Air series aircraft.

By Shannon Forrest

President, Turbine Mentor ATP/CFII. Challenger 604/605, Gulfstream IV, MU2B

P

rivate aviation is attractive because of its “newness factor.” At least, that’s what the psychologists tell us. Something new triggers strong emotions. Newness is associated with comfort, and that sense of comfort is one reason private air travel is preferable to the airline experience. Corporate aircraft always seem to look new, or at least newer than their airline counterparts, and that should be the intent if the goal is passenger comfort. An impeccable maintenance record is meaningless if a passenger can’t get past the psychological effects of a worn out, unkempt, or disheveled-looking interior. How an aircraft looks inside can affect a passenger’s attitude toward the flight. There’s a whole segment of the population that speciously believes any plane smaller than the Hindenburg is inherently unsafe. Pilots have heard it all before, for example: “Wow, this airplane is small.” Or, in the case of a turboprop, “I didn’t know I’d be flying on a propeller plane.” The executive-level interior of a brand-new King Air 350ER from Beechcraft (Textron) is visually indistinguishable from that of a jet of similar size. It not only looks great, but it’s also one of the most easily reconfigurable interiors on the market. The “antiprop” or “little plane” 14  PROFESSIONAL PILOT  /  August 2020

mentality starts to fade when one is ensconced in a comfortable leather seat and connected to the Wi-Fi. New things just make people feel better.

Newness factor One way of maintaining the newness factor is to buy aircraft right off the assembly line. Those who do – whether a private individual or corporation – tend to be of the “budget is not a factor” mindset. Much like building a brand-new house, there’s a sense of control and personal touch when selecting a paint scheme and interior from scratch. Original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) devote entire departments to cabin design, and, if it’s technically feasible, anything goes. Flight departments or private individuals with a budget that precludes the purchase of a new aircraft every couple of years can achieve a sense of newness by retrofitting or updating the interior of a pre-owned. Choosing where to have aftermarket work completed is an important decision. Facilities tend to fall into 2 categories – dedicated maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) service providers, and businesses that offer other aviation services, including interior design.

Maintenance, repair, and overhaul Stevens Aerospace and West Star Aviation are representative of the MRO segment, and both are Piaggio

authorized service centers. Retrofitting an interior simultaneously with heavy maintenance or avionics upgrades can minimize downtime and save money in the long run, particularly with a specialized aircraft like the Piaggio P180. The other segment includes companies like Clay Lacy Aviation, which touts itself as a provider of overall business aviation services, including management, charter, and FBO. Owners under management often have provisions to utilize other managed aircraft, or at least the ability to charter a similar platform while their aircraft is down for improvements. Often, well-established relationships or brand loyalties help an owner finalize where to have interior work done.

The design department Once an owner decides where to have interior work performed, the next step is to determine the scope and nature of the project. This is where having a design team is invaluable, as the process itself can be overwhelming. To say that the job of a designer is to turn a mental concept into reality is a disservice – there’s more to it than that. Personalities found among aircraft owners run the gamut from celebrities to high-net-worth individuals and corporations. Designers are part psychologists and part realists. They must deliver a product that makes the client happy,


Flightcrew input

Clay Lacy can provide charter service while a client’s bizjet is in the shop for a new interior. Pictured is a Dassault Falcon 900C interior done at Clay Lacy Aviation.

his golf clubs won’t fit because his new cabin renovation dramatically altered the layout probably won’t go over well, so it’s worth getting pilot input for significant changes.

Budget and design priorities: seats, carpets, and cabinetry To get a sense of what an interior designer could do, Professional Pilot gave Tonya Wood a challenge: to come up with a plan to update the interior of a hypothetical aircraft. Rather than completely fabricating the scenario, the editorial staff looked for a jet aircraft currently on the market, with an interior that could best be described as dated and unappealing. The result was a 1982 Dassault Falcon 50, most of the interior of which was 17 years old. The 9-passenger executive interior consist-

Photo courtesy Elliott Aviation

Owners might not consider the importance of flightcrews in interior design decisions, but that could be a mistake. Wood points out that pilots and flight attendants can be a valuable source of information regarding ergonomics and efficiency. For example, a client considering a redesign of the galley might only be interested in aesthetics. But the proposed retrofit could impede the flight attendant’s progress and make it difficult to prepare meals and give a high level of service. The only way to know is to ask. Will the design be elegant as well as functional? Pilots with significant time in type know how difficult (or easy) it is to get baggage loaded aboard their aircraft. Having to tell an owner that

Image courtesy Clay Lacy Aviation and Thomas James Photography

and do so within an established budget and timeframe. Despite a sense of control, owners often miss little details that could be important when it comes to “wear and tear” and resale value. Identifying what clients don’t want is as important as knowing what they do want. Tonya Wood, Interiors Manager at Western Aircraft in Boise ID, says that how an aircraft is used is an important consideration when selecting materials and configurations for an interior. An aircraft used for charter generally will see more traffic, consequently wearing out faster than those aircraft used strictly for Part 91 operations. Given a choice between opulent and durable, the more resilient furnishing (carpet, for instance) might be a better choice if the aircraft sees a rapid turnover of passengers.

A Challenger 300 interior completed by Elliott Aviation shows the clean and modern design look being requested by owners.

ed of chairs upholstered in light brown stressed buckskin leather, maple highgloss woodwork, and gold hardware. It looked as bad as it sounds. To get the most “bang for the buck,” Wood went right for the chairs, joking that the Archie Bunker look had to go. Second on her list was the carpet. It turns out that seats and carpet are the 2 most important interior features when it comes to resale. There’s no rule of thumb correlating renovation budget to purchase price. However, given the 1982 Falcon was selling at around $1M, 10% of that ($100K) would buy a lot of newness factor and change the look dramatically. As the budget gets smaller, a designer must get more and more creative to give the owner a new look. Changing the stitching, or modifying the tailoring, is one way to change the look of a seat without replacing it entirely. Sometimes, however, a engineering issues get in the way. For example, an aircraft owner might want to retrofit his jet with a seat he saw on a different model aircraft. Because of engineering limitations and regulations, a designer can’t pull a seat out of one type of aircraft and drop it into another, but there’s a workaround. What the designer can do is modify the foam and fabric of the existing seat to alter the appearance. According to Wood, personal touches like pillows, blankets, headrest covers, crystal, china, and flatware are all things an owner can change to add a personal touch without breaking the bank. Veneers are another way to change the look of a cabin dramatically. In terms of trends, owners are current-

PROFESSIONAL PILOT  /  August 2020  15


ly seeking veneers with fun finishes. These are colors and patterns that add a “wow” factor or make the look “pop” when used strategically or sparingly. The overall theme that’s in vogue these days is “clean,” which is defined as a crisp, anti-cluttered feel. The most popular color scheme is topes and grays. Keeping a color palette mostly neutral while accessorizing with bolder colors and patterns also improves resale value. It’s akin to the technique real estate agents use when telling home sellers that the best color for a quick sale is “realtor beige.” Even with Covid-19, Western Aircraft – which employs just over 200 people – is seeing consistent demand for interior work. Perhaps owners are currently flying less and taking advantage of the downtime to retrofit their aircraft in anticipation of business travel improving next year. If one had to define cabin items as “need to have” versus “nice to have” based on budget, efficacy, and resale value, cabinetry would be the next item after seats and carpet. A well-known name in custom cabinetry work is Duncan Aviation, the largest privately-owned business in the world devoted to business jet support. The company is a Bombardier authorized service center (along with line authorization on Global bizjets), and offers a wide range of interior services. Technicians and master craftsmen can reveneer existing cabinetry or fabricate new ones from scratch.

Power solutions In accordance with the clean, crisp philosophy, clients expect hardwired controls and equipment to be neatly tucked away or hidden. Every cabin management system on the market allows entertainment and environ16  PROFESSIONAL PILOT  /  August 2020

mental systems to be controlled from a personal device, but the challenge has always been powering said devices. Low-voltage USB ports are the modern-day equivalent of the power outlet and adapter. For ease of access, USBs can be embedded within the seat or adjacent to it.

Full vs partial renovations Meghan Welch, director of paint and interior sales for Elliott Aviation in Moline IL, has written a guide entitled “Questions for Planning Your Interior Refurbishment” to help those considering remodeling the cabin. The resource is available online at elliotta­ viation.com. The document addresses durability issues, and also raises an interesting point about inconsistent aging associated with partial renovations. If an owner opts to forgo a complete renovation, items in the cabin will age at a different rate. The outcome depends on the philosophy of ownership. If the plan is to keep the aircraft for a long period of time while changing components slowly as budget allows, a partial renovation strategy might make financial sense. On the other hand, if the plan is to put the plane on the market in a few years, potential buyers may be turned off by the fact that some things in the cabin look older than others.

Flightdeck upgrades This theory applies to the cockpit as well, although that may not be obvious to the owner. The flightcrew and passengers spend time in their own distinct bubble during the course of a flight, and neither has much interest in what the other is doing – except in the case of a flight attendant, whose job it is to attend to needs in the cab-

in. Unless money is of no concern, or something is mandated by regulation, owners prefer to spend money in the cabin rather than the cockpit. Older avionics – or not having the latest technology – can increase workload and decrease situational awareness. While the aircraft is grounded for interior work is a good time for a pilot to advocate for fixing squawk items up front or adding flightdeck features that can make operating the aircraft more efficient (eg, CPDLC) and increase its value.

Conclusion When it comes to retrofitting an aircraft, the most important variable to consider is the relationship between the 2 parties. Some owners like to be involved down to the smallest detail, while others only make the big decisions and appoint a representative (perhaps even the pilot) to deal with the day-to-day interactions. For a successful outcome, the owner or his/her designated representative must be able to work closely with the vendor’s designer or design manager, and believe in their vision. Money might not be able to buy happiness, but it can buy newness, and a brand-new aircraft interior can generate happiness during use, and even more happiness in the form of a big return on investment when it’s time to sell the aircraft.

Shannon Forrest is a current line pilot, CRM facilitator and aviation safety con­ sultant. He has over 10,000 hours and holds a degree in be­ havioral psychology.

Photos courtesy West Star Aviation

Falcon 900 interior by West Star Aviation. Remodeling included modifying seat configuration to meet mission-specific requirements.


Locations / Mobile Teams Los Angeles KVNY San Diego KCRQ Oxford KOXC Seattle KBFI Santa Ana KSNA

One-stop maintenance. Gulfstream, Falcon, Embraer, Learjet and Hawker. • • • • •

Light and heavy maintenance, engine and APU Avionics, Wi-Fi, cabin entertainment, interiors Over $3.4 million parts inventory Aircraft cleaning and disinfecting 24/7 mobile AOG support

800.423.2904 | claylacy.com/maintenance

W O R L D ’ S M O S T E X P E R I E N C E D O P E R AT O R O F P R I VAT E J E T S © 2020 Clay Lacy Aviation All rights reserved.

Our response to COVID-19. claylacy.com/cleancheck


M

W

A

U

R

T

y activity has come to a complete stop. Only those requirements related to keeping proficiency and currency are fulfilled. I try to offset the lack of flying with more hours of theoretical edification. My company is doing a good job keeping abreast of the myriad regulations and restrictions that are published almost daily. Jorge Barroso ATP. Gulfstream G650 Captain & Flight Safety Supervisor SEAF Alcobendas, Madrid, Spain

How have your responsibilities and schedules as a professional pilot changed due to the coronavirus epidemic? Also, how is the company you fly for managing the situation?

E

ach airplane is cleaned thoroughly by a professional cleaning crew. Masks, gloves, and antiseptic wipes are made available for each passenger and crew member. Before dispatch, each crew member has to file an electronic health assessment, similar to the FRAT. Passenger temperatures are taken when identification documents are verified. One can find the medical policies and procedures published on the company website for review by passengers and brokers. James Smet ATP/CFI. Challenger 300 Captain Silver Air Long Beach CA

ircraft was on a scheduled maintenance inspection in Europe, and should have been picked up mid-March. However, all airspace crossings closed. The aircraft is still there, and I haven’t flown for the past 4 months. Carlo Cesa ATP. King Air 350 Captain SPECAV Nyon, Switzerland esponsibilities have remained the same, but my work schedule has decreased. Throughout the company, employee activity has been reduced, including administrative work. Our FBO also has training and charter operations whose flying activities have diminished as well. FAA isn’t carrying out any base inspections. Instead, it’s all conducted via Facetime. Edison Pazmino ATP/CFI. Piper Cheyenne/Navajo Asst Chief Flight Instructor Paris Air Vero Beach FL

“Independent, but not on your own!” For a free consultation, please visit: www.xvector.ltd Financial Planning for Contract Pilots in Generation X

If you’ve recently been furloughed because of the COVID-19 pandemic, we may be able to assist: https://xvector.ltd/furloughed-pilot-help

X Vector, Ltd. is a Registered Investment Advisor doing business in the State of Nevada and other jurisdictions where exempt.

18  PROFESSIONAL PILOT  /  August 2020

e dropped off our aircraft on March 14 for a C check, and it wasn’t due to be ready until late July. Moving forward, we will be providing masks and sanitizers. We will also be implementing passenger screening by monitoring body temperatures. Darrell Roper ATP. Citation CE560+ & Falcon 2000LX President & Director Sovereign Aviation Services Kelowna BC, Canada nfortunately, schedules have decreased drastically. My responsibility is and will always be to look after the safety of my crew and passengers. Also, the company has implemented a higher standard of cleaning procedures. After each flight, the airplane is thoroughly cleaned and sanitized. Arnoldo Rojas ATP. Legacy 500/Phenom 300 Pilot Elite Jets Naples FL here are zero flights on our schedule at the moment. That’s always scary. The flight department is still getting paid, but we’re all helping with the boss’s other companies. I just started driving a delivery truck for the food company my boss owns. I’ll be doing whatever I can until things pick up with flying to maintain my pay and benefits. I’m incredibly grateful my boss is flexible. Otherwise, I would be furloughed until further notice. Ryan Johnson ATP. Challenger 601 & King Air 350 Captain DC Air Denair CA

S

ubstantially reduced schedule. We’re now redirecting our focus and time to thoroughly cleaning and sanitizing our facility and aircraft. Terry Alberta ATP. Citation Excel/Citation II Owner Alberta Aviation Wyoming MI


Squawk Ident

I

Hormel Foods Captain Greg Vortherms wearing a face mask at all times in his workplace.

R

esponsibilities are the same, yet the schedule has been reduced significantly. I don’t foresee the timetable changing until there is a noticeable improvement in testing for the flying public. The company has expanded its cleaning procedures and policies to include cockpit fogging. L Young ATP/CFI. Airbus A320 Captain American Airlines Torrance CA

N

ot flying unless deemed necessary. Thankfully, the company has kept the pilots on salary and full benefits, although we took a pay cut. Upper management has also taken a 50% pay cut. Operating in the hospitality industry, I’ve seen there have been hundreds of layoffs. I hope restrictions are lifted soon. Lloyd Sparrow ATP. Challenger 350 Chief Pilot Valley Jet II Winnetka CA

P

rocedures that we’ve implemented include asking the relevant Covid-19 questions and taking the passengers’ temperatures. We also provide passengers with a mask because they’re required to wear it for the duration of the flight. Before and after a flight, the interior of the aircraft is disinfected using RMR-141 spray. Larry D’Oench ATP. Cessna 414 Dir of Operations USAC Montville NJ

Y

es, schedules include cancelations and numerous reroutes. Our company has issued PPE to all crew members. Emergency time off is available voluntarily. Risk and resource management are highly emphasized and emphatically encouraged for flight ops. As employees, we appreciate the tremendous support of the company. Gregory Ramallo ATP/CFII. Boeing 737 Captain/Check Airman Southwest Airlines Phoenix AZ

M

y legacy airline has been affected immensely. Currently flying only 20% of a regular schedule, I’ve been given a 6-month leave of absence. No official word on furloughs, but I expect them late this year or early next year. The company is trying to conserve cash and survive. Robert Winkelman ATP/CFII. Boeing 737 & Citation Excel First Officer American Airlines Tebbetts MO

A

s a regional airline pilot based in New York City, the schedules for April, May, and June have had zero flight lines. Also, they’ve released pilots from reserve responsibilities. Joseph DeLuca ATP. Embraer 145/140 First Officer Envoy Air Springfield NJ

’m now a Part 91 pilot for 2 private Phenom 100 owners. One is a doctor, and the other runs a company that manages tours for shows and artists. Neither one has been flying at all since early March. Since the doctor runs his own back/pain clinics, he’s been forced to close his northern California locations until elective medicine is allowed. He is hoping to re-open them soon. It is more uncertain for the other owner, given that he is in the entertainment business. I pray the country lifts restrictions soon before my 2 employers lose their businesses entirely. Jennifer Leland ATP. Phenom 100 Corporate/Contract Pilot GTC/CA Back & Pain Specialists Corona CA

W

ith Covid-19, responsibilities have changed at our company just as they have worldwide. As the virus continues its spread throughout the continental US, inflicting a negative effect on our industry, the business continues to see an impact through slowed sales, flight cancellations, and restrictions imposed by many states. Due to the financial burden triggered by the pandemic, the company considered many options in order not to close. Alternatives ranged from paycuts and unpaid leaves to the perhaps inevitable furloughs. Out of 34 aircraft, only 2 remain flying. Flight crews of 4 per airplane are now down to only 2 crew members per aircraft. The company is making every effort to recall the furloughed pilots and keep everyone on payroll with the aid of government economic assistance plans. During these times of hardship, the company has been doing its best to maintain the safety of passengers, crew, and everyone else involved. Javier Lopez ATP. Citation III, Falcon 200, Gulfstream IV/G200 & King Air 300 Captain Jet Access Aviation Wake Forest NC

PROFESSIONAL PILOT  /  August 2020  19


Cartoon art by

We invite readers to submit story lines that would work for a 6-panel Sid and Star cartoon. Send your thoughts by e-mail to editor@propilotmag.com. If we use your idea we’ll credit you by name and pay you $100.

20  PROFESSIONAL PILOT  /  August 2020


Nestled within Willamette Valley, Potcake Aviation is surrounded by Oregon’s stunning wine country—a luxury destination that’s home to nearly 600 wineries, including sister-company, Potcake Cellars. A reservation at this fullservice FBO provides the perfect prelude for your socially-distanced vacation. Learn more at PotcakeAviation.com.

▪ 5,420-Foot Runway ▪ Lavatory & Oxygen Services ▪ GPU/Power Cart

▪ Hangar Space for Mid-Size Jets ▪ After-Hours Service Available ▪ Home to the 2021 Oregon Int’l Airshow

Avfuel Contract Fuel and AVTRIP Available | Avfuel Training System (ATS) Certified Powering your flight with more than just fuel. Learn more at avfuel.com

▪ Pet-Friendly Facility ▪ Rental & Crew Cars ▪ Catering & Concierge


2020 CORPORATE AIRCRAFT PRODUCT SUPPORT SURVEY

Jets: 1 Embraer, 2 Gulfstream, 3 Dassault, 4 Textron, 5 Bombardier. Turboprops: 1 Pilatus, 2 Daher TBM, 3 Textron, 4 Piper.

Embraer wins back 1st place in the jet division. Pilatus retains 1st place in TP support for 19 consecutive years. Results are based on 1041 line evaluations and 1175 survey forms received. Pro Pilot staff report

Data compiled by Conklin & de Decker

P

roduct support at the highest levels of quality is the key for OEMs to succeed with aircraft operators. Their continued support allows operators to plan and achieve all missions, from the simple ones to the most demanding ones. Operators can conduct their business with confidence knowing that they can rely on adequate OEM support at all times. Aircraft manufacturers understand the need to assist users of their products and solve problems with minimal or no interruption in their activities. Aftersale product support is a decisive factor for operators and influences their next aircraft purchase. Since aircraft are important tools for companies to accomplish their missions, OEMs continue to develop and employ advanced technologies in creating new aircraft models that meet or exceed operator requirements. Providing exceptional OEM product support is an essential part of this philosophy.

increase in cost of parts with 7.92 this year – up from 7.03 in 2019. This 0.89 increase is the largest in the entire survey. Embraer’s Contact Center is ready to give operators superior personalized support 24/7.

centers, and FAST (Field and Airborne Support Teams), Gulfstream is ready to ensure a flawless flying experience. Dassault ranks 3rd this year after being 1st in 2019. Its overall score is 8.22 this year compared to 8.26 in 2019. It takes 2nd place in cost of parts, and 3rd in all other categories. Best improvement is seen in cost of parts, with a score of 6.61 this year – up from 6.53 in 2019. Dassault’s FalconResponse program of AOG support services provides the parts, tools, and engineering resources to enable AOG situations to be resolved quickly.

Gulfstream moves up to take the 2nd place – the same as in 2018. The company’s overall score is 8.25 this year – up 0.11 from 8.14 in 2019. Gulfstream is 2nd in all categories except cost of parts. Biggest improvements are in tech manuals and tech reps, with a score increase of 0.23 in both categories. Together with its technicians, service

2020/2019 OEM comparison Manufacturers

Responses Company response time

Cost of parts

Spares availability

2020

2019

Dif

2020

2019

Dif

2020

2019

Dif

Embraer

116

8.96

8.48

0.48

8.26

7.64

0.62

7.92

7.03

0.89

Gulfstream

157

8.80

8.69

0.11

8.25

8.22

0.03

6.06

6.08

-0.02

Dassault

112

8.48

8.66

-0.18

8.16

8.30

-0.14

6.61

6.53

0.08

Textron

255

7.96

8.18

-0.22

7.65

7.76

-0.11

6.24

6.14

0.10

Bombardier

173

7.74

7.89

-0.15

7.00

7.17

-0.17

6.07

6.06

0.01

Jets

Jets

Turboprops

Embraer regains the crown it earned in 2018 and 2016. Its overall score this year is 8.76 – up from 8.16 last year. Embraer places first in all categories of the survey, earning the biggest category

Pilatus

46

9.02

8.73

0.29

8.91

8.50

0.41

7.17

7.15

0.02

Daher

60

9.33

8.86

0.47

8.63

8.31

0.32

6.26

6.20

0.06

Textron

59

8.07

7.99

0.08

8.07

7.63

0.44

6.24

5.84

0.40

Piper

17

7.88

--

--

7.53

--

--

6.94

--

--

2020 Pro Pilot Corporate Aircraft Product Support Survey

1 2 2

8.26

8.22

8.14

8.13

8.12

7.90

7.68

7.62

7.52

7.77

7.54

7.76

7.56

8.25

8.14

8.44

8.36

8.37

8.30

8.38

8.33

8.38

1 1 1 1 2

1 2

2

2 2

2

3

3 4 4 4 4

3

3

4

Embraer 22  PROFESSIONAL PILOT  /  August 2020

Gulfstream

Dassault

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2020

2019

2018

2017*

5

1 2 3 4 5 6

Pro Pilot Survey Rankings

1 1

8.31

8.37

8.23

8.14

8.76

8.55

8.16

8.51

8.06

8.58

1

3

2016

0

1

2015

2

3

2014

4

1 1

13 years of surveys for turbine

2

2013*

6

2012

8

8.11

10 2008 through 2011, 2013 & 2017 received insufficient returns for rating

Comparison of overall average scores

Jets


2020 Pro Pilot Corporate Aircraft Product Support Survey

Overall ranking Jets Embraer

Turboprops

116

8.76

157

Gulfstream

8.25

112

Dassault

8.22

Pilatus

46

Daher

60

Textron

59

255

Textron

Piper

7.67

0

173

Bombardier 0

2

6

8

8.73 7.87 17 7.68

00 0 2 2

7.51 4

8.74

2 44

46 6

Overall ranking

10

8 6 8 10

8 10

10

Responses

Jet mfrs rated by 100 responses or more. Turboprop mfrs rated by 17 responses or more.

support scores for corporate jets and turboprops Manufacturers

Speed in AOG service

Tech manuals

Tech reps

Service satisfaction

Overall scores

Jets

2020

2019

Dif

2020

2019

Dif

2020

2019

Dif

2020

2019

Dif

2020

2019

Dif

Embraer

8.90

8.24

0.66

9.07

8.57

0.50

9.22

8.92

0.30

9.00

8.23

0.77

8.76

8.16

0.60

Gulfstream

8.51

8.52

-0.01

8.59

8.36

0.23

8.91

8.68

0.23

8.63

8.47

0.16

8.25

8.14

0.11

Dassault

8.48

8.48

0.00

8.46

8.42

0.04

8.86

8.89

-0.03

8.46

8.58

-0.12

8.22

8.26

-0.04

Textron

07.87

2 7.93

4 -0.06

8.066

8.26 8

-0.20 10 8.13

8.33

-0.20

7.78

8.01

-0.23

7.67

7.80

-0.13

Bombardier

7.54

7.44

0.10

7.93

7.98

-0.05

8.56

8.45

0.11

7.73

7.68

0.05

7.51

7.52

-0.01

Pilatus

8.80

8.10

0.70

9.05

8.86

0.19

9.07

9.00

0.07

9.18

8.78

0.40

8.74

8.45

0.29

Daher

8.86

8.26

0.60

9.42

8.94

0.48

9.50

8.91

0.59

9.13

8.65

0.48

8.73

8.30

0.43

Textron

8.19

7.44

0.75

8.24

8.15

0.09

8.37

8.41

-0.04

7.93

7.93

0.00

7.87

7.63

0.24

Piper

7.33

--

--

8.00

--

--

7.93

--

--

8.13

--

--

7.68

--

--

Turboprops

Hawker Beechcraft

7.51

7.52

7.87

7.74

7.69

7.77

7.71

2020

5 5 5 2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

4 5 5

2019

4 5 5 5

2009

2008

2016

2015

2014

6 6 6 2013

2012

2011

2010

6

5 2017*

5

2018

4 5

Textron

7.72

7.51

7.49

7.61

7.58

7.14

7.04

6.96

6.88

7.22

7.81

7.56

7.51

7.53

7.80

7.67

7.76

6.90

3

4

2009

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2009

2008

2010

Cessna Citation

* No rating for years indicated

3 3 4 4 4

2008

3 4

2020

3

2018

2 2 2 2

Textron now includes Citation and Hawker Beechcraft

1 2 2

2019

7.99

7.97

8.07

7.98

8.14

8.10

8.14

8.14

8.24

8.02

corporate aircraft manufacturers rated 2008-2020

Bombardier PROFESSIONAL PILOT  /  August 2020  23


Textron (including Citation and Hawker Beechcraft) remains 4th this year, with an overall score of 7.67 – down from 7.80 in 2019. Textron is 3rd in cost of parts, with a score of 6.24 – up from 6.14 in 2019. Textron 1CALL provides immediate AOG support when an unscheduled maintenance event occurs and, together with its MSU (Mobile Service Units), coordinates with the service network to get operators back in the air promptly. Bombardier places 5th this year, with an overall score of 7.51 – slightly down from 7.52 in 2019. It takes the 4th spot in cost of parts and tech reps. Best category increase is in tech reps, with an 8.56 score – up 0.11 from 8.45 in 2019. Bombardier CRC (Customer Response Centre) can be reached 24/7 worldwide and provides immediate support for Learjets, Challengers, and Global aircraft.

offers its TBM Total Care Program (TCP) for every new TBM 940/910 as part of the purchase package, giving the initial retail owner of a TBM complimentary scheduled maintenance for the first 5 years or 1000 hrs of operation with the aircraft.

Turboprops Pilatus keeps the crown in the TP division for the 19th consecutive year since TPs were split out from jets in 2002. Overall score is 8.74 this year – up from 8.45 in 2019. Pilatus places 1st in spares availability, cost of parts, and service satisfaction, and 2nd in company response time, speed in AOG service, tech manuals, and tech reps. Best category increase is in speed in AOG service, with an 8.80 score this year compared to 8.10 in 2019 – up 0.70. Operators can contact Pilatus Customer Support & Enquiries 24/7.

Textron (King Air, Caravan, Conquest) ranks 3rd this year, with overall score 7.87 – up 0.24 from 7.63 in 2019. Textron is 3rd in all categories except cost of parts and service satisfaction. Biggest advance for Textron TP was in the speed in AOG category, where it earned an 8.19 score, increasing 0.75 from last year’s 7.44. Textron’s 1CALL program, together with its MSUs and service network, are ready to service turboprops wherever they’re located.

Daher TBM ranks 2nd for 12th year, with an overall score of 8.73 in 2020 – up from 8.30. They take 1st place in response time, speed in AOG service, tech manuals, and tech reps, and 2nd in spares availability and service satisfaction. Greatest category improvement is in speed in AOG service, with 8.86 this year – up 0.60 from 8.26 in 2019. TBM Care provides 24/7 hot lines for AOG and customer care worldwide. Daher

Piper has come back strongly, rounding out the survey by placing 4th with an overall score of 7.68. Piper is 2nd in cost of parts and 3rd in service satisfaction. The company is committed to providing operators with the necessary service and support to enable safe and successful operations.

Methodology

F

or the past 30 years Pro Pilot has used a paper questionnaire to ask corporate turbine aircraft operators to rate the quality of aftersale service provided by aircraft manufacturers. The use of electronic forms has been emphasized this year. For 19 years jet and turboprop aircraft support have been rated in different divisions. There are 7 categories listed on the survey form—company response time, spares availability, cost of parts, speed in AOG service, tech manuals, tech reps, and service satisfaction. During Apr 2020 a target mailing of 8116 survey forms was sent out to a random selection of corporate operators from the Pro Pilot subscription list. A total of 1175 survey forms, representing a 14.5% return, came back to the Pro Pilot office by the July 27 cutoff date. A total of 890 were properly filled out, providing 1041 line evaluations with 845 for the jet division and 196 for the turboprop division. A total of 285 forms were disqualified due to inconsistencies, errors, duplications, or lateness. On March 14th 2014, Textron acquired Beech Holdings LLC, the parent company of Beechcraft Corp, and it brought together Cessna and Hawker Beechcraft under 1 entity, Textron Aviation. Pro Pilot’s policy is to continue to rate newly-acquired product lines separately

for 3 years. Therefore, Cessna and Hawker Beechcraft are rated together under Textron for the 3rd year. Pro Pilot rules for the 2020 survey required a minimum of 100 evaluations to rank in the jet division. There were 5 manufacturers that met the criteria—Bombardier, Dassault, Embraer, Gulfstream and Textron (Citation, Beechjet and Hawker). There were other manufacturers that received responses but not enough to rank in the division: Airbus (1), Boeing (7), British Aerospace (1), Cirrus (3), Eclipse (2), HondaJet (8), Pilatus (4), Sabreliner (4), and Worthington Aviation/Westwind (2). For the turboprop division, manufacturers needed 17 responses for inclusion. Only 4 TP aircraft manufacturers met the criteria – Daher, Pilatus, Piper, and Textron (Caravan, Conquest, and King Air). Other TP manufacturers that didn’t receive enough responses to rank in the survey were Aero Commander (4), Bombardier (1), Fairchild/ Swearingen (1), Mitsubishi (6), and Piaggio (2). Survey respondents were asked to rate corporate aircraft OEMs on a scale of 1 (poor) to 10 (excellent) within each of the 7 categories. Conklin & de Decker, a JSSI company, acted as research agent and performed independent data analysis.

2020 Pro Pilot Corporate Aircraft Product Support Survey

Pilatus

Daher

24  PROFESSIONAL PILOT  /  August 2020

Beechcraft

3

Textron

Cessna

4 4

4

4

Piper

4 5

2020

5 2018 2019*

5 5 5 5 5 2013

5

4

2014 2015 2016 2017*

4

2009 2010 2011 2012

4

2008

4 4 4 4 4

Pro Pilot Survey Rankings

7.68

7.35

5.77 6.30 6.17 6.21 6.31 6.57 6.73 7.06 7.51

6.81

7.22 6.93

7.23 7.18 7.13 7.19 6.85

7.54 7.63 7.87

2

2017

2017

2013 2014 2015 2016

2009 2010 2011 2012

2008

2018 2019 2020

2016 2017

2013 2014 2015

2009 2010 2011 2012

2008

2018 2019 2020

2016 2017

2013 2014 2015

2009 2010 2011 2012

2008

2

1

3 3 3

2013* 2014 2015 2016*

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

2010 2011 2012

3

2008 2009

2

2018 2019 2020

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

4

0

*no rating for years indicated

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Textron now includes TP Beechcraft and Cessna

6

7.55 7.54 7.47 7.44 7.32 7.38 7.61 7.61 7.61 7.77

8

Comparison of overall average scores

7.49 7.68 7.60 7.65 7.59 7.91 8.01 7.96 8.28 8.15 8.30 8.30 8.73

10

8.37 8.16 7.74 8.02 7.71 8.20 8.07 8.32 8.42 8.32 8.38 8.45 8.74

Turboprops


Expertise

On What You Fly. TM

FA L C O N C I TAT I O N GULFSTREAM LEARJET HAWKER CHALLENGER GLOBAL EMBRAER KING AIR CONQUEST PIAGGIO WESTSTARAVIATION.COM


JETS Embraer Johann Bordais is president & CEO of Embraer Services & Support—the business unit that integrates the capabilities of Commercial Aviation, Executive, Defense divisions and OGMA to provide customers with the best solutions. Bordais can be reached at +55 12 3927 3518 or by e-mail at jbordais@embraer.com.br.

V

ery pleased with Tom Richardson at Embraer. He is the finest customer service representative I’ve ever dealt with. This guy gets it. He knows our airplane from radar to tail cones, and we can speak pilot or maintenance tech. One in a million! Mike Beaver ATP. Legacy 600 Chief Pilot Big South Fork Aero Huntsville TN

I

’ve been operating the Embraer 170 and Lineage 1000 for the past 11 years. They’re the most reliable and pleasant-to-fly aircraft I’ve ever flown.

They always get the job done, and product support received from the company is top-notch! Bernard Schvartz ATP. Embraer Lineage 1000 Captain ExecuJet Middle East Dubai, United Arab Emirates

E

mbraer’s responsiveness has been outstanding. We’ve had our Legacy 450 for 3 ½ years now, and have also operated a Phenom 300 for the same time frame. Previously, we had another Phenom 300 for 5 years, and the company’s response was similar. Hands down, Embraer tops the chart! David O’Maley ATP/A&P. Legacy 450/ Phenom 300 Member N583KD LLC Cincinnati OH

I

n my opinion Embraer is going through a tough year, carving out Executive Jets while the deal with Boeing fell through. And it shows. Hopefully they will recover from Covid-19 and return to their previous impressive support. Phenom 300 is still the perfect jet in its category. Jim McIrvin ATP/CFII. Phenom 300 & Boeing 737 Owner & Chief Pilot McIrvin Aviation Washingtonville NY

2020 scores by product division for jets and turboprops Manufacturer Responses Company Spares Cost Speed in Tech Tech Service Overall response availability of AOG manuals reps satisfaction average time parts service

Jets Bombardier

Challenger/Global Express 125 7.85 55

7.29 6.35 7.74 7.96 8.70 7.98 7.70 7.49 6.41 5.43 7.15 7.86 8.24 7.17 7.11

GII–V, G300–G700 121 IAI-1125/G100–G280 45

8.87 8.50 6.05 8.70 8.69 8.93 8.71 8.35 8.60 7.64 6.05 8.05 8.25 8.80 8.40 7.97

Learjet

Gulfstream Textron

Cessna Citation Jet Hawker Beechcraft*

204 51

8.13 7.26

7.99 6.29

6.61 4.73

8.20 6.54

8.17 7.63

8.41 7.06

8.05 6.72

7.94 6.60

* Includes Beechjet 400, Hawker 400, Hawker 125 series, Hawker 4000, Premier

Turboprops Textron

Beechcraft King Air 53 Cessna–Caravan, Conquest 6

8.18 8.23 6.29 8.31 8.39 8.48 8.02 7.99 7.17 6.67 5.83 7.00 7.00 7.00 7.17 6.83

Some respondents rated a single manufacturer on 2 or more different models they operate (eg, Bombardier for a Challenger 604 and Learjet 45). Because of this, there is a small difference between total responses for the overall rankings by type of aircraft rated within the divisions.

26  PROFESSIONAL PILOT  /  August 2020

E

mbraer delivers outstanding product support. We are very pleased with Alessandro Rossi, our FSR. He’s professional, very useful, and always willing to help, no matter what it takes. Giuliano Mota ATP. Phenom 100 Captain Horii Comércio e Empreendimentos Mogi das Cruzes SP, Brazil

P

raetor 600 is the aircraft we operate in our flight department. It’s a great machine to fly and highly economical when it comes to fuel burn and operating costs. With the very advanced systems in the cockpit, nav and approach capabilities of the Praetor, reaching more destinations and challenging airports has never been easier, and all at very reasonable cost. Every feature has been very well thought out and designed. Cabin environment is extremely comfortable and quiet. And with the entertainment and connectivity options available, it’s really hard not to enjoy every mission we do – short or long. Anas Jankhout ATP. Praetor 600 Aviation Mgr Radic Holding Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

O

verall, Embraer has a great support team. Sorocaba has the most valuable aircraft executive team in Brazil. AOG is AOG even during the holidays, nights, or weekends. They are the best team in the entire continent of South America. Thiago Magliano A&P. Legacy 650 Maintenance Mgr Onixtec Sorocaba SP, Brazil

C

ouldn’t be happier with FSR Alessandro Rossi. He’s the most efficient and helpful professional. He’s always ready to support and attend your needs and questions with expertise. Kleber de Miranda ATP. Phenom 300/100 Pilot Construtora DADO São José dos Campos SP, Brazil

A

ftersale product support received from Embraer has been outstanding. AOG support is excellent and we’ve never been told there are no spare parts available. T Mahendran Comm-Multi-Inst. Phenom 300 Executive Pilot Madurai Trans Carrier Mylapore, Chennai, Tamilnadu, India


A

Gulfstream President Customer Support Derek Zimmerman can be reached at 912-395-0856, or via e-mail at derek.zimmerman@ gulfstream.com.

G

ulfstream responded to our AOG support instantly and sent technicians the next day. Our aircraft was completely recovered the following day and flew its next mission without any restrictions. The product support team fixed everything within 36 hours. Christian Waldmeier ATP. Gulfstream G650 Dir of Technical Services/CAM Kai Aviation Basel, Switzerland

verall we’ve had exceptional support from Gulfstream on both types as we transitioned from the GIV to the G550. Entry into service was exceptional. David Bjellos ATP. Gulfstream G550 Aviation Mgr Agro Industrial Management West Palm Beach FL

8.96

Gulfstream

8.80

Dassault

8.48

Textron

7.96

Bombardier

7.74

Turboprops

Daher

9.33

Pilatus

9.02

Textron

8.07

Piper

7.88 6

8

10

F

ortunately, due to Gulfstream’s high reliability and dispatch rate, AOG’s are all but non-existent. They produce great aircraft backed up by exceptional support. Richard Goodhart ATP/Helo. Gulfstream G550/G450 Captain & Training Coordinator Ameriprise Financial New Fairfield CT

2020 Pro Pilot Corporate Aircraft Product Support Survey Jet mfrs rated by 100 or more. Turboprop mfrs rated by 17 or more.

Jet mfrs rated by 100 or more. Turboprop mfrs rated by 17 or more.

Embraer

28  PROFESSIONAL PILOT  /  August 2020

O

’m new to the Gulfstream G550, but I’ve been operating a G450 for the past 13 years. It’s been an amazing experience working with a support team that always tries to make good things happen. I’m very satisfied with Gulfstream’s products and the support behind them. Rod Alston ATP. Gulfstream G550 Chief Pilot Alsco Orem UT

Company response time

4

ery pleased with Gulfstream’s product support. They’ve always been responsive to our Gulfstream V, G550, and G450 needs. Patrick Dunn ATP. Gulfstream V/G550/G450 Contract Pilot One North Aircraft Support Mt Prospect IL

I

2020 Pro Pilot Corporate Aircraft Product Support Survey

2

V

e’re satisfied with all aspects of the product support received from Gulfstream. It’s always been great! James Booth ATP/CFI. Gulfstream G650 Captain Empire Aviation Honolulu HI

aving flown Gulfstream aircraft during the past 35 years, I can state how impressive they are – not only in terms of the product but also the OEM’s levels of aftersale product support. Not as cheap as going through a broker, but AOG items are dispatched within 24 hours. The service and knowledge of the technical support team is unquestionable. With Gulfstream you get what you pay for – excellence. Laurence Printie ATP. Gulfstream G550 Director Flying Chauffeur Hertford, United Kingdom

0

n my opinion, Gulfstream continues to earn its widely regarded reputation as the industry leader for all sectors of business aviation. They hold the top rank for production, innovation, performance, and customer support. Brett Beasley ATP. Gulfstream G550/G450 Dir of Aviation Alsco Salt Lake City UT

W

H

Jets

I

fter taking delivery of 3 new Gulfstream G650s, with our first one being the 6th aircraft delivered to a customer, we’ve seen a marked improvement in product service entry and reliability. The G650 continues to meet or exceed GAC’s specifications and performance. We use these aircraft to their full performance parameters in both speed and range, and they have unmatched reliability in class. Besides, the G650 is a very easy plane to fly, and the faster you go, the better it flies. Michael Meloche ATP/Helo/CFII/A&P. Gulfstream G650 Dir of Flight Ops Air Lease Alpine CA

Gulfstream

Spares availability Jets

Embraer

8.26

Gulfstream

8.25

Dassault

8.16

Textron

7.65

Bombardier

7.00

Turboprops

Pilatus Daher

8.91 8.63

Textron

8.07

Piper

7.53 0

2

4

6

8

10


WHAT’S NEW IN GULFSTREAM MRO?

A BETTER CHOICE.

Western Aircraft located in scenic Boise, Idaho is your industry-leading alternative for cost-effective, timely and personalized Gulfstream IV, 450, V and 550 service and support in the Western United States and Canada. We are a large boutique MRO with customized programs and the kind of friendly, personalized service that puts customers first. Our focus on quality, cost-effectiveness and a customer-centric approach - offer you a better choice. Learn more at westair.com/BetterChoice


D

Dassault Aviation Senior VP, Worldwide Falcon Customer Service & Service Center Network Jean Kayanakis. He can be contacted at +33 67 506 1747 or at jean. kayanakis@dassault-aviation.com.

his is the first year we’ve had our current Falcon 900C. Previously we flew a Falcon 50 and a 900B, so this is our 3rd Falcon jet. Dassault has always provided us with excellent product support. Paul Ahern ATP/CFII. Falcon 900C Chief Pilot John Fabick Tractor Eureka MO

V

Cost of parts Embraer

7.92

Dassault

6.61

Textron

6.24

Bombardier

6.07

Gulfstream

6.06

Turboprops

Pilatus

7.17

Piper

6.94

Daher

6.26

Textron

6.24

30  PROFESSIONAL PILOT  /  August 2020

6

8

10

H

ad a fantastic experience with Dassault ILG (Wilmington DE). Crew chiefs kept everyone up to date during the entire process – simply the best! And Customer Project Mgr Jason Doerflein deserves all the credit for such a great experience. Gary Render ATP. Falcon 7X Dir Flight Ops RTL Carriers Ocala FL

2020 Pro Pilot Corporate Aircraft Product Support Survey Jet mfrs rated by 100 or more. Turboprop mfrs rated by 17 or more.

Jet mfrs rated by 100 or more. Turboprop mfrs rated by 17 or more.

2020 Pro Pilot Corporate Aircraft Product Support Survey

4

assault has the best customer service of all manufacturers I’ve worked with during my career. The experience makes operating Falcon aircraft a real pleasure. David Nelson ATP/CFII. Falcon 900EX EASy/2000 Chief Pilot Gama Aviation Kent WA

’ve seen great improvement in DFJ product support. Service for our Falcon 7X/8X is far better than when we operated the legacy Falcon 900Bs. Covid-19 issues and protocols may have affected some service-related problems we’ve had recently, but, overall, Dassault has done a good job supporting our aircraft. Stuart Swanson ATP. Falcon 7X/8X Chief Pilot SC Johnson & Son Racine WI

ur flight department has been able to operate our Falcon 2000LXS/2000S with 100% dispatch reliability for over 2 years. This accomplishment has only been possible because of Dassault’s excellent customer service, along with a great aircraft. Drew Oetjen A&P. Falcon 2000LXS/2000S Mgr of Aircraft Maintenance Union Pacific Railroad Omaha NE

2

D

I

O

0

FJ continues to meet and exceed our needs and expectations. Company response has been excellent. Our FSR David Bollow is on spot whenever he is needed, and he assists at any time with professionalism. We’re fortunate that he lives within an hour because he drops what he is doing to come to our facility. Yes, there have been several issues with our aircraft, but we have not missed a trip. We’re so glad to be a member of the Falcon family. Mark Jones ATP/A&P. Falcon 2000EX EASy Dir of Aviation Neurosurgery and Endovascular Assoc Milwaukee WI

T

ery pleased with the product support received for our Falcon 900LX. Dassault continues to accelerate its already stellar strides in improving on its top-notch customer service and support. John Alexander A&P. Falcon 900LX & Citation Sovereign Senior Aircraft Technician Cintas Cincinnati OH

Jets

D

assault maintenance and spares support have reached new heights. Operational support also continues to be exceptional. Even during the Covid-19 pandemic we’ve been impressed with the level of care demonstrated by field service and spares teams, as well as DAS service centers and a host of other departments. George Afordakos A&P. Falcon 2000EX Dir of Aircraft Maintenance Comcast Philadelphia PA

Dassault

Speed in AOG service Jets

Embraer

8.90

Gulfstream

8.51

Dassault

8.48

Textron

7.87

Bombardier

7.54

Turboprops

Daher

8.86

Pilatus

8.80

Textron

8.19

Piper

7.33 0

2

4

6

8

10


T

Textron Aviation

(including Citation & Hawker Beechcraft) Textron Aviation Senior VP of Global Customer Support Brian Rohloff is responsible for all aftermarket service and support for Beechcraft, Cessna, and Hawker brands. He can be reached at brohloff@txtav.com or 316-517-7995.

e operate a Citation CJ4 in Asia. The highlight is that Textron Aviation Singapore Service Center at XSP (Seletar, Singapore) is doing an excellent job at supporting the region. They’ve made great progress from 4 to 5 years ago. However, worldwide support and spares availability is not yet satisfactory in general. Most AOG parts are still only available in Wichita. Even if they’re not actually available in Asia, we wish that more parts would be held at least in Europe or US West Coast for faster shipping. Many times we’ve been told that parts are not available anywhere – even common parts like an alternator. And then, a part gets shipped without anyone telling us for a couple of days. We find out only when the part arrives. Christian Von Strombeck ATP. Citation CJ4 Lead Pilot Springfield Air Singapore, Singapore

urrently we use Textron Service Center TPA (Tampa FL) for all scheduled maintenance. We always get the same team of mechanics and customer service assigned to our aircraft, so they’re familiar with it. I have a good working relationship with them. Communication is very good, and they always understand our concerns. Overall, I’m very satisfied with the service provided by Textron. Robert Rogers ATP. Citation CJ2 Aviation Mgr & Chief Pilot BCL Aviation Plant City FL

T

extron Aviation has worked continuously to improve its customer service and parts availability. We operate a Citation CJ3, and our experience with them has been outstanding. Michael Herman Comm-Multi-Inst. Citation CJ3 Owner & Pilot Bear Air Lansdale PA

A

lthough our Citation V is out of production, product support provided by Textron continues to be good. Harvey Martin ATP. Citation V Av Dept Mgr Martin Landscape Leeds AL

I

think Citations are easy to come by. And that’s why I always wonder about the cost of parts. Kris Kolba ATP/CFII. Citation V/II/ISP Chief Pilot & Aircraft Mgr 2141 Corporation Decatur GA

9.07

Gulfstream

8.59

Dassault

8.46

Textron

8.06

Bombardier

7.93

Turboprops

Daher

9.42

Pilatus

9.05

Textron

8.24

Piper

8.00 6

8

10

2020 Pro Pilot Corporate Aircraft Product Support Survey Jet mfrs rated by 100 or more. Turboprop mfrs rated by 17 or more.

Jet mfrs rated by 100 or more. Turboprop mfrs rated by 17 or more.

Embraer

4

ur Citation CJ4 is such a great aircraft. And it’s backed up by an outstanding company and aftersale product support team. Mauricio Rodriguez Barquet ATP. Citation CJ4 Corporate Pilot Westpoint Air León, Mexico

E

Tech manuals

2

O

ven though our Citation Encore is a legacy aircraft, Textron aftersale product support continues to be excellent. Michael Lobstein ATP/A&P. Citation Encore Reserve Captain Luhr Bros Columbia IL

2020 Pro Pilot Corporate Aircraft Product Support Survey

0

he Textron MSU at our home base of APA (Centennial, Denver CO) deserves much kudos! We’ve experienced excellent response to service requests and questions. And the techs are great – extremely knowledgeable, professional, and friendly. Overall I give them 10+. Jan Cooper ATP. Citation XLS+ Chief Pilot Lario Oil & Gas Greenwood Village CO

W

C

Jets

T

extron’s Mobile Service Unit (MSU) team at Lubbock TX is outstanding. We are very pleased with its services and product support. Dana Longino ATP. Citation Sovereign Chief Pilot Lee Lewis Construction Lubbock TX

Tech reps Jets

Embraer

9.22

Gulfstream

8.91

Dassault

8.86

Bombardier

8.56

Textron

8.13

Turboprops

Daher

9.50

Pilatus

9.07

Textron

8.37

Piper

7.93 0

2

4

6

8

10

PROFESSIONAL PILOT  /  August 2020  31


B

V

ery satisfied with our reliable Citation II. Both Textron and Pratt & Whitney have always given us excellent service. They consistently provide exceptional technical support, and parts are always available. Douglas Olson ATP/CFI. Citation II Captain Tri-State Drilling Buffalo MN

2020 Pro Pilot Corporate Aircraft Product Support Survey

Job titles of survey respondents

45 169 369

307

Aviation Dept Mgr, Chief Pilot, Dir of Aviation, Flight Ops Mgr or VP Operations Captain, Line Captain, First Officer or other pilot Owner, Chief Executive, President, VP, General Mgr or other corporate officer Maintenance Chief, Maintenance Mgr or Mechanic

32  PROFESSIONAL PILOT  /  August 2020

W

Bombardier Bombardier Aviation VP Customer Support Andy Nureddin can be reached by phone at 514-855-8307, or by e-mail at andy.nureddin@aero. bombardier.com.

V

ery pleased with our Bombardier Tech Rep Greg Sealey. He’s only a phone call away, and if he doesn’t have an immediate answer for us, he gets the required information in a timely manner. We’ve been serviced by Bombardier BDL (Windsor Locks CT) for the past 5 years, and it’s been a good experience. Unfortunately, we had a couple of hangar rash incidents on our most recent visit for a 5-year inspection and Ka-band Internet. Other than that, it’s been very good. Earl Larson ATP. Global 5000 Lead Pilot Delta Jet Coventry CT

O

ur Challenger 350 is a very reliable aircraft. It’s equipped with a nice and capable avionics system. I find it a real pleasure to fly, plus it’s backed by an excellent product support network. Wayne Sauls ATP/CFI. Challenger 350 Pilot NetJets Eau Claire WI

e’ve flown our Global 6000 for a year now, and have logged about 425 hours. Everything is still under warranty, and all aspects of service have been AAA/star/gold medal! Kevin Van Splunder ATP. Global 6000 Captain Solairus Aviation Puyallup WA

O

perating Bombardier Challenger 604/605/650s for more than 20 years has been an amazing experience. In my opinion, it’s the best bang for the buck with a 99.95% dispatch reliability. They’re amazing aircraft! Daniel Wolfe ATP/CFII/A&P. Challenger 605/650 VP & Gen Mgr Nationwide Columbus OH

G

lobal 5000 is a fantastic platform, very capable with a great dispatch reliability. However, obtaining spares can sometimes become an issue. Also, 3rd-party vendor items such as avionics can be problematic when you require replacement components. It’s not uncommon for only available units to be refurbished or NFF items that have been sent back into service. Warranty items can at times lead to a protracted process. Nonetheless, Bombardier aftersale service, overall, is superior. Joe Davitt ATP. Global 5000 Captain HBK Holding Doha, Qatar

2020 Pro Pilot Corporate Aircraft Product Support Survey Jet mfrs rated by 100 or more. Turboprop mfrs rated by 17 or more.

ased on my experience operating Citation CJs for 15 years, I can state that they’re dependable when maintained well. Textron Service Center GSO (Greensboro NC) does all maintenance support for our CJ4, and they’ve always been quick and efficient. Very pleased with their support. Asa Russ ATP/A&P. Citation CJ4 Chief Pilot Eagle Transport Battleboro NC

Service satisfaction Jets

Embraer

9.00

Gulfstream

8.63

Dassault

8.46

Textron

7.78

Bombardier

7.73

Turboprops

Pilatus

9.18

Daher

9.13

Piper

8.13

Textron

7.93 0

2

4

6

8

10


UPGRADE TO

TURBINE ENGINE RG-380E/K Series

RG-380E/KSH Series

PISTON ENGINE

ROTORCRAFT

EMERGENCY

RG-350

RG-150

RG-35AXC

RG24-15M

RG24-16

Start strong with a reliable battery. Concorde’s superior sealed lead acid RG® batteries have been selected by over 30 airframe manufacturers as original equipment based on their proven record of durability and safety for more than 40 years in the industry.

RG-407

RG-125

Start saving by converting to Concorde’s Platinum Series® sealed lead acid batteries. • Reduced cost of ownership • Lower acquisition costs • Fewer maintenance requirements • Drop in replacements • Hazmat exempt • Backed by the industry’s best customer support • Available through a professional network of global distributors Contact us to find the Concorde battery specific to your aircraft.

CONCORDE BATTERY CORPORATION Crafted for Quality in the U.S.A.

+1.626.813.1234 | ISO 9001 + AS9100 | CONCORDEBATTERY.COM


TURBOPROPS Pilatus Piotr “Pete” Wolak is Pilatus VP for customer service. Wolak welcomes calls from Pilatus customers. Operators can reach him at his office by calling 303-410-2720. Wolak’s cell phone is 720-201-3765 and his e-mail is piotr.wolak@pilatus-aircraft.com.

I

’ve always had very quick resolutions to any issues with our PC-12. Our local service center has been outstanding and keeps our aircraft ready to go at a moment’s notice. I’m really happy with the new extended 300-hr service intervals. It saves a fortune. Kirk Grimes Pvt-Inst. Pilatus PC-12NG President Grimes Well Servicing Edmonton AB, Canada

P

ilatus continues to exhibit superb customer service and it also shows throughout its authorized service centers. Epps Aviation PDK (DeKalb– Peachtree, Atlanta GA) runs great airframe and avionics departments. Bob Wilson Comm-Multi-Inst. Pilatus PC-12 Owner RAW Inc Memphis TN

O

ur PC-12 has been very reliable. Although it has had a few issues over the years, we are satisfied with the product support provided by Pilatus. Chris Wegener ATP/CFII. Pilatus PC-12 Flight Ops Mgr MRV Services Hiawatha KS

P

ilatus has some very good authorized service centers across the US. Epps Aviation PDK (Atlanta GA) is one of the best. It has a great relationship with Pilatus in Switzerland. We’re very pleased with their mx support. Bert Zeller ATP. Pilatus PC-12NG Chief Pilot McElroy Truck Lines Meridian MS

34  PROFESSIONAL PILOT  /  August 2020

Daher Daher VP Customer & Network Care Charles Holomek is located in Pompano Beach FL. His email is c.holomek@ daher.com. The TBM Care team can be reached at 1-833-TBM CARE during office hours. For after-hours AOG support, the 24-hr Global AOG Hot Line is 1-844-4 TBM AOG.

F

lying a TBM 940 has been fantastic. Daher‘s customer service is the best we’ve ever experienced. Lee Pillsbury Comm-Multi-Inst. TBM 940 & Premier I Managing Director Business Management Services Fort Lauderdale FL

M

y TBM 900 is in its 5th year of warranty. Fortunately, it’s been a very reliable aircraft. Whenever I’ve needed service for our aircraft, Daher and my local service center, Columbia Air, have both been outstanding. No effort has been spared to keep my aircraft in perfect condition. I highly recommend it! Bruce Feldstein Pvt-Inst. TBM 900 Owner & Operator Bruce M Feldstein DDS, PC West Lebanon NH

O

ur TBM 850 is a well-built aircraft. It’s both fast and strong. Other than inspections, tires, and brakes, there are no surprises. It always impresses me when I bring it in for its annual inspection and I have only 1 or 2 write-ups. It’s an amazingly efficient aircraft backed up by great product support from the manufacturer and its affiliates. Bob Bordes ATP. TBM 850 President Corporate Aircraft Association New Orleans LA

V

ery satisfied with Daher’s product support. It’s such a great company. Our TBM 940 is our 4th TBM, and it’s been awesome. Jim Thorpe Pvt-Inst. TBM 940 President & Chief Pilot JTS Consultants Naperville IL

W

e’re currently under the manufacturer’s warranty with extended services offered by AVEX at CMA (Camarillo CA). They’ve provided an amazing service and have resolved problems quickly, especially those that have been pilot-induced. Our TBM 930, with its excess power, speed, safety, and comfort, has been an amazing aircraft, but the deciding factor that keeps us in a TBM over a King Air, Pilatus, or very light jet, is the community of service providers, owners, and manufacturer. TBMOPA is not just a chat room for owners, but a strong collaboration with the manufacturer, training organizations, and service centers. They’re all working with one another to keep everyone flying, from the oldest TBM 700A model to the newest 940 aircraft. I feel safe, comfortable, and happy in the French bird. Jon Anderson Comm-Multi-Inst. TBM 930 Av Mgr & Chief Pilot MACA Transportation Orem UT

I

think the Daher service center at PMP (Pompano Beach FL) is excellent. The Canadian TBM facility has been outstanding, although it’s remotely located. This situation has created the need to coordinate carefully with both the Canadian and US service providers for effective service. David Metcalfe ATP. TBM 930 Corporate Pilot SWT Group Windsor ON, Canada

D

aher is very responsive to owner suggestions and concerns, and it strongly supports TBMOPA—the TBM owners association. Support is available promptly by phone. A good selection of factory-designed retrofits is available. And the 5-year broad warranty on new aircraft makes purchase attractive. I feel that these are good reasons to now own my 4th TBM. Ian Fries ATP/CFII. TBM 940 President Airborne Wilmington DE


FOR IMPROVED PERFORMANCE & OPERATIONAL FLEXIBILITY UPGRADE WITH EPIC

When you need improved performance and better handling characteristics – upgrade with EPIC. Raisbeck’s EPIC Performance Package for the King Air 90 series will transform your aircraft’s takeoff and landing distances, payload and range capabilities. Now you can climb faster and higher while reducing drag in all phases of flight. Take advantage of the improvement benefits that our Swept Blade Propellers, Dual Aft Body Strakes and Gross Weight Increase* provide in a money-saving package while giving your passengers a quieter, smoother ride. A superb investment that makes a great aircraft even better!

(800) 537-7277 | sales@raisbeck.com | www.raisbeck.com * Gross Weight Increase applicable to LJ-527 and subsequent


TEXTRON AVIATION (including King Air, Caravan & Conquest)

L

ove Beechcraft aircraft! We fly a King Air 200 and couldn’t be happier with the levels of product support we receive. David Strahle Comm-Multi-Inst. King Air 200 President MIUS RMI Fenton MI

H

ave been flying King Airs and other products for over 18 years, and I believe Textron’s policy of hiring tech reps and CSRs with little or no experience is affecting product and service support satisfaction. Adrians Santos ATP. King Air 350/200/90GTx, Beechjet 400 & Citation CJ1 President & Chief Pilot Global Flight Support Tampa FL

I

operate King Air 200 & 350 turboprops. My experience has been excellent both with the aircraft and service received from the support team. Can’t beat a King Air! Bradford Peterson ATP. King Air 200/350 Chief Pilot BPF Co Plymouth MN

Piper Piper Aircraft VP of Sales, Marketing & Customer Support Ron Gunnarson can be reached at 772-299-­2000. Additional contact information is available online at www.piper.com. Contact your nearest Piper dealer for product support and service questions.

E

xcellent support across the board is what I always receive from Piper. Particularly outstanding is the support provided by Skytech at DMW (Westminster MD), a Piper authorized service center. Philip Soucy Comm-Multi-Inst. Piper M600 Owner & CEO P and P Services Springfield VA

I

’ve been operating our Piper Meridian for the past 12 years with no major issues. Ronald Ziller ATP. Piper Meridian President Airworthy Services Pompano Beach FL

M

y experience with the Piper factory has been very satisfactory, just as with my Swiss Piper maintenance provider, MécanAir. I prefer to work with them rather than use the European Piper service agent in Germany. André Mueller Comm-Multi-Inst. Piper Meridian Owner & Pilot Mullair Weggis, Switzerland

P Abbott Laboratories Senior Maintenance Tech Engineer Anson Mount holds A&P and Comm-MultiInst licenses, and has 1250 hrs logged and 40 yrs of maintenance experience. He rates and comments on his favorite aircraft – G550/G450 and King Air 350 – for product support provided by Gulfstream and Textron. Mount is pleased with the service received from both OEMs. His survey form is 1 of 1175 received in the Pro Pilot 2020 Corporate Aircraft Mfrs Product Support Survey.

36  PROFESSIONAL PILOT  /  August 2020

iper M600 is a great airplane. And we’ve received superb product support from the manufacturer. Kirby Chambliss ATP. Piper M600 Owner Chambliss Aerobatics Eloy AZ


HOW DID WE MAKE THE NEW M600/SLS THE NEW STANDARD IN SAFETY? We taught it everything you know.

The HALO Safety System with Garmin® Autoland—the most groundbreaking advancement in recent general aviation history—does everything you would do when you can’t. After alerting ATC, checking fuel levels and weather, it safely lands the aircraft. In short, it’s as if the controls were still in your hands. See how your highest standards come standard at piper.com/HALO. TM

Download the Piper App to experience

Download the Piper our M600/SLS in flight App to experience our M600/SLS in flight.


WEATHER BRIEF

How weather works Understanding the basics of the atmosphere helps anticipate conditions. Earth’s energy budget Reflected by atmosphere 6%

Reflected by clouds 20%

Reflected from Earth’s surface 4%

64%

6%

Radiated to space from clouds and atmosphere

Incoming solar energy 100%

Absorbed by atmosphere 16%

Radiated directly to space from Earth

Absorbed by atmosphere 3%

Radiation reabsorbed by atmosphere 15%

Conduction and rising air 7%

Absorbed by land and oceans 51%

Carried to clouds and atmosphere by latent heat in water vapor 23%

About 55% of solar energy reaching Earth makes it to the surface, where it is either absorbed or reflected. Energy absorbed by the surface heats the overlying air and drives the troposphere.

By Karsten Shein Comm-Inst Climate Scientist

A

lthough most pilots fly uneventful flights, while some encounter white-knuckle conditions, every aviator must contend with the weather, as it affects just about every aspect of every flight. However, every year, pilots neglect to obtain weather briefings, and encounter adverse weather conditions beyond their own and/or their aircraft’s capabilities. While weather is a substantial part of flight training, and many instructors try to instill in their students a healthy respect for thunderstorms, turbulence, or icing, we tend to rely on forecasts and weather briefings to help us avoid the worst conditions. But simply taking a forecast as gospel without understanding the way the atmosphere functions is often why pilots find themselves in weather trouble. Basic meteorological knowledge can go a long way toward receiving more informative briefings and staying a step ahead of the weather. 38  PROFESSIONAL PILOT  /  August 2020

Molecular density Weather is mostly about 2 things – energy and water. However, to truly understand the atmosphere, one must see the atmosphere not as a layer of “air,” but rather as a layer of molecules which are held in place by gravity but are always trying to escape it. The force applied by these molecules is what gives us lift and thrust, but it’s also what produces drag. Weather happens because the molecules that make up the atmosphere are energized, de-energized, and displaced. The atmosphere is always trying to maintain a balance, and it does so by moving these molecules around. The molecular atmosphere is mostly (78%) nitrogen and 21% oxygen. Carbon dioxide, ozone, argon, and a few other gases, including water vapor, make up the last 1% or so, although, in some cases, their properties give them an outsized influence on the overall atmosphere. Each of these molecules has a tiny bit of mass. Mass is critical to all this, since it is a primary variable in the equation of force (Force equals

mass times acceleration.) With their tiny mass, each air molecule is influenced by the gravity of Earth keeping it from dissipating into space. Mass also means that each molecule itself exerts its own gravitational force. Earth’s gravity is the reason why these gas molecules are most concentrated near the surface, and decrease exponentially in quantity with increasing altitude. But the reason why gravity doesn’t compact all of the molecules into a super-dense atmosphere a few meters thick is something called hydrostatic equilibrium, which is related to the density of molecules present in the atmosphere at any given altitude. In fact, just about every motion in the atmosphere is related to air density. Hydrostatic equilibrium means the forces acting on a molecule are in balance. Vertically, those 2 primary forces are gravity, which acts downward, and a pressure gradient force acting upward. The pressure gradient force (PGF) is the force exerted by the molecules themselves at a given density. Fewer molecules in a volume of air (density) means lower mass and thus a lower force (barometric pressure). So, although density difference drives the dynamics of the atmosphere, it is easier to measure and think of those differences in terms of pressure. The concept of a PGF is not new to most pilots. It is why the wind blows from high pressures to low on the weather map. More molecules in a place will always want to push outward to places where there are fewer. The same is true vertically, and, of course, the ultimate lack of air density acting on our atmospheric system is outer space. The vertical PGF acting to draw molecules upward, and the force of gravity drawing them downward, support a fixed density of molecules at any given distance from the Earth’s surface. At that altitude, barring any outside influences, the density of the air allows a balance of the 2 forces. Both forces decrease exponentially with increasing altitude until density can no longer support flight. This happens at the Kármán line, around 62 miles (100 km). Without any external inputs, the ideal atmosphere would always be abso-


Clouds and water vapor

Transport

Clouds and water vapor Snow, glaciers and icesheets

Precipitation Precipitation

Permafrost

Evapotranspiration

Evaporation

Infiltration Ocean

Surface runoff

Water is critical to generating weather. Condensation of evaporated water provides heat energy needed to strengthen storms and produce precipitation.

Rivers and lakes

Soil moisture

Percolation

River discharge Groundwater flow

Groundwater

Sea ice

lutely stable, lacking any horizontal or vertical motion, and no weather. But this is not the case, due to solar radiation. As with most gases, the atmosphere is controlled by the ideal gas law that relates temperature, pressure, and volume. If volume is kept constant and temperature is increased, pressure increases. If pressure is kept constant and temperature increases, volume must increase. This is because temperature is a measure of sensible energy that, when absorbed by the air molecules, causes them to accelerate, exerting greater force. Either the volume in which they are acting must increase to maintain a constant pressure, or the pressure in the volume will increase. This give and take is essential to creating weather, because the input of more solar energy in one place than another creates a pressure imbalance that establishes a PGF, which allows the air to flow as wind.

The troposphere Most flight and most of what we consider weather occurs in the lowest layer of the atmosphere – the troposphere, which extends to around 66,000 ft (20,000 m) over the tropics and 23,000 ft (7000 m) over the poles, and contains around 75% of the atmosphere’s molecules. Some aircraft flying at higher latitudes may also cruise in the stratosphere, which extends up from the top of the troposphere to ~180,000 ft (55,000 m). These layers are defined by environmental temperature. The troposphere is heated from the Earth’s surface, and so temperature tends to decrease with height. The stratosphere is heated by the interception of solar radiation by

the ozone layer in its upper reaches, meaning it is heated from above, and temperature normally increases with increasing altitude. The temperature inversion at the boundary between the 2 layers ensures that most of what we consider weather is limited to the troposphere. Globally, around 55% of the solar radiation that reaches the Earth makes it to the surface, being either absorbed or reflected by the land and water. Earth’s rotation around the sun, the spin on its axis, and even variations in the type of soil or distribution of water at scales from a few square meters to an entire hemisphere will affect the distribution and handling of the incoming energy. For example, due to its low capacity to absorb energy before it increases in temperature, dry land will quickly reradiate absorbed solar energy as sensible heat (measured by increased temperature) that heats the overlying air through conduction. Similarly, at night, without solar input, dry land will not retain its energy, so it absorbs it from the overlying air, cooling the air. Water, on the other hand, can absorb more energy before increasing its temperature. Water is also an element that, at normally-occurring air temperatures, can use the absorbed energy to change state, melting or evaporating instead of heating. When the air over a location is heated by a warm surface, its molecules increase movement, pushing apart. Fewer molecules over the heated surface mean that the air is less dense. This does 2 things. First, it decreases the downward gravitational force relative to the upward PGF, making the air buoyant. Second, it creates an inward pressure gradient, and air flows toward

this less dense area. As it converges it must go somewhere, and the only place available to it is up. As the heated air rises through its denser (colder) surroundings, it travels further from its heat source and rapidly loses heat to its surroundings, gradually becoming denser until it eventually balances with the density of the air around it.

Water Water is the other key factor in the weather equation. Without water, our ‘weather’ would consist solely of wind and occasional turbulence in clear skies. Water vapor contributes to the density effect because it is lighter than atmospheric nitrogen or oxygen, meaning that, as more water is added to the air, air density decreases. Water plays much more important roles in creating weather, as it is capable of using absorbed energy to evaporate (or melt if it was ice). When it becomes a gas, water can be entrained by the atmosphere, along with the energy it has stored, and carried with the air flow to new places or heights. But water can’t hold on to that energy forever. In fact, most water molecules only hold on to their gaseous energy for a few milliseconds before releasing it and condensing back to a liquid state, but in sufficiently warm and unsaturated air, there is a surplus of heat energy that gives those molecules a new infusion of energy to reevaporate. Several things can happen when there is ample water vapor in the air. First, at any density, the air has a finite amount of energy to impart to keeping entrained water vapor in its gaseous state. When the rates of evaporation PROFESSIONAL PILOT  /  August 2020  39


Cyclonic flow

Anticyclonic flow Airflow (Counterclockwise)

Pressure gradient force

1004 mb

1024 mb

1008 mb

1020 mb

1012 mb

1016 mb Wind

Coriolis force Wind

Pressure gradient force

Coriolis force

(a) Cyclonic flow (Northern hemisphere)

and condensation balance each other, the air is said to be saturated. If saturated air becomes denser, usually via cooling, the air molecules will draw energy from the condensing water vapor and not return it. Instead, that heat slows the cooling of the air. This is important in 2 ways. As the surface air cools overnight, it may saturate, producing fog and and moderating nighttime temperatures. This is why night-time temperatures tend to grow so much colder in arid regions than humid places. In air rising convectively, saturation slows the cooling rate by the air drawing from the energy stored in the water vapor, which in turn allows the rising air to remain warmer than its environment for a bit longer, rising even further. Critically, if there are abundant aerosols in the air, they may be of a type that attract and scavenge condensed water into cloud droplets. Without aerosols, such as sea salt, dust, and even some pollutants, clouds and fog would have a very difficult time forming. With those aerosols, the liquid water molecules attach themselves, and when enough have done so, they create cloud droplets. Caught in updrafts, some of those cloud droplets collide and merge with other droplets. Most frequently, they do so well above the freezing level of the atmosphere, and grow as ice crystals that are able to preferentially attract and absorb nearby water molecules, either in the form of liquid droplets or directly from water vapor. Eventually, these crystals gain enough mass to overcome the updraft and fall 40  PROFESSIONAL PILOT  /  August 2020

Airflow (Clockwise)

back toward the Earth as precipitation. Importantly, above the freezing level, to temperatures of around -40° C (-40° F), but primarily in temperatures of 0° C to -15° C (32° F to 5° F), most cloud and precipitation droplets will remain liquid. These supercooled liquid droplets will freeze spontaneously to any subfreezing surface they strike. Fortunately, while water may remain liquid at temperatures well below freezing, ice will melt quickly as soon as temperatures rise above 0° C. Pilots should expect the possibility of airframe icing any time they operate in subfreezing air where visible moisture (clouds or precipitation) is present.

Coriolis effect A final primary concept we should address is the spin of the Earth and how it affects the weather. At any place on the planet, the speed and direction of the wind at the surface or aloft is a direct function of the pressure (density) change over the area. However, a look at any surface or upper air weather map will show that wind never blows directly from high pressure to low. The reason for this is that there is another, apparent, force acting on the moving air. That force is due to the spin of the Earth, and is known as the Coriolis effect. The strength of the Coriolis effect is determined by the latitude, and is relative to the rotation of the Earth. The effect is zero at the equator and becomes more pronounced at higher latitudes, and always acts 90 degrees to the right to the wind direction in the northern hemisphere (to the left in the southern). This effect causes the wind to appear (relative to the rotation of Earth) to veer to the right in the north-

Wind will flow perpendicular to the pressure gradient aloft (parallel to the isobars on the map) because the Coriolis effect of the spinning Earth acts perpendicular to the wind flow, balancing out the pressure gradient force.

(b) Anticyclonic flow (Northern hemisphere)

ern hemisphere and to the left in the southern. Aloft, the wind veers until the PGF and Coriolis forces are in direct opposition. When this happens, the wind is moving perpendicular to the PGF around the highs and lows, and is known as the geostrophic wind. At the surface, however, friction acts to slow the wind, reducing the Coriolis effect relative to the PGF, which is dependent only on the pressure difference. The result is that the wind turns back toward the low pressure. This is why flow at the surface appears to spiral cyclonically into low pressure centers. The angle of that deflection is dependent on the magnitude of the friction, which in turn is affected by the roughness of the surface. Understandably, the dynamics of the atmosphere are far more complex than described here, and the various weather phenomena that occur within its fold are affected by many things beyond preferential heating, water availability, and a rotating planet. But these are the core fundamentals that explain weather on scales large and small, and understanding them provides a greater ability to read important information into standard weather forecasts. As always, if you experience weather conditions that other pilots should know about, be sure to send a Pirep. Karsten Shein is co­ founder and science director at ExplorEiS. He was formerly an assistant professor at Shippensburg Univer­sity and a climatolo­gist with NOAA. Shein holds a commercial license with instrument rating.


A t D ah e r, s a f e t y an d c u s t o m e r s a t is f a c t io n ar e o ur t o p p r io r i t ie s , a s d e m o ns t r a t e d b y t h e T B M ’s b e s t- in - c l a s s w a r r a n t y p r o t e c t i o n a n d o ur a ll - in c lu s i v e m a in t e n a n c e p a c k a g e , c o v e r in g 5 y e a r s o r 1, 0 0 0 h o ur s . A n d n o w, w e ’ v e r e in f o r c e d o ur c o m m i t m e n t b y b r in gin g t o g e t h e r all s up p o r t s e r v i c e s a n d t e a m s un d e r a s in gl e b r a n d : T B M C a r e . T hi s i s w h y o ur v e r y f a s t t ur b o p r o p a ir c r a f t f a m il y r e m a in s t h e c h o i c e o f a v i a t o r s w o r l d w i d e .

Ask a TBM Care Expert +1 (833) TBM CARE www.tbm.aero

- Photo Maxime Fourcade photography

WITH DAHER, YOU’LL NEVER FLY ALONE!


INNOVATING FOR SuSTAINAbIlITy While innovating to deliver peak efficiency and performance today, we never lose sight of tomorrow. In the air, our new, clean-sheet aircraft achieve industry-leading fuel economy and reduced emissions. On the ground, green facilities, sustainable manufacturing processes and a carbon offset program help guide the way to a better shared future.

Profile for Professional Pilot

Professional Pilot Magazine August 2020  

Professional Pilot Magazine August 2020

Professional Pilot Magazine August 2020  

Professional Pilot Magazine August 2020

Profile for propilot