__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  

MINE KASAPOGLU AMIR TIKRIT GIULIA BERTAGLIA MARIEKE ZAPASNIK DAMIAN BROWNE JUNE ROGRIGO SHIORI AKIBA LANCE LAWRENCE RAUL GUILLERMO WILLIAM WATERWORTH COVER: MINE KASAPOGLU


CONTENTS PAGE 4 TEAM PROPAAH PROPAAH is a quarterly published online magazine that aims to provide a platform to young photographers.

PAGE 5 PEAK /\ APEX An interview with 2003 alumni Mine Kasapoglu Puhrer about her journey in Sports Photography. 

PAGE 12 ROADHEADS Amir Tikriti

PAGE 19 OFELIA Giulia Bertaglia

PAGE 24 FEM Marieke Zapasnik

PAGE 32 THE IRON ORE TRAIN MAURITANIA Damian Browne

PHOTO CREDIT: MINE KASAPOGLU


CONTENTS PAGE 37 SEAMLESS Shiori Akiba

PAGE 45 THE END OF WINTER June Rodrigo

PAGE 54 THE ROLLING ENGLISH ROAD EXHIBIT William Waterwoth

PAGE 61 PLAGE ISOLÉE Raül Guillermo

PAGE 71 PARISIAN MULIEBRITY Lance Laurence

PHOTO CREDIT: RAUL GUILLERMO


TEAM

PROPAAH is a quarterly published online magazine that aims to provide a platform to young photographers to showcase their ongoing and completed photography projects. It will also serve as an inspiration resource for anyone seeking to further their visual education in photography genres like fashion, documentary and fine art and embark on their personal journey in the complex photography market.

Co-Editor in Chief/Artistic Director  - Taushik Mandal Co-Editor in Chief - Meritxell Cortes Assistant Editor - Raul Guillermo Social Media - Hortense Giraud Advisor - Claire Saint Jean E-mail : propaah.mag@gmail.com Submissions : submissions.propaah.mag@gmail.com  

PAGE 4 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1


PEAK

APEX

MINE KASAPOGLU INTERVIEWED BY TAUSHIK MANDAL

We met up with Mine Kasapoglu Puhrer, an alumni from 2003 batch of Speos International Photo School, on the day of her exhbition 'PEAK /\ APEX' at the Speos gallery. Mine is Turkish and is currently excelling in the field of Sports Photography. Here's an excerpt from the conversation that we had.

"You have to have the drive to get the best picture." PAGE 5 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1


Your strongest memory from your time at Speos?

So actually when I came to Speos, I was on a

I loved the international atmosphere

graduated, I went back to Istanbul and started

and there was one thing that was

training again and in 2017 I became the Turkish

common was the love for photography.

champion in snowboarding. My biggest dream

We are all so young All of us would go

was to compete at the Winter Olympics and I

out to the cafes and the bars with our

tried to qualify for the 2010 Vancouver games

cameras clicking photographs all the

but I failed as my preparation wasn’t enough

time, of the each other, of a candle

but I got an offer to go as a photographer to

light etc. we were all obsessed with

the same games that I wanted to qualify as an

being in Paris and obsessed with

athlete. I took it up and was the photographer

photography. I am very thankful to

at the snowboard event and I had my skis on,

have met all those friends, share

and once the race was over I skied down the

images and life, it was a great

same slope that the race had happened with all

experience.

my equipment and in a way I got my

How did you decide to become a photographer?

redemption. Nobody was filming me but it was

PAGE 6 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1

break from my sports career. Once I

very emotional.


Your favorite photographer and why?

then I get bored of it myself but I would say

It’s difficult to choose one favorite

that I love most of these photos that I am

because I have looked up to so many of

showing here and I would say that the girl on

them over the years.

the balance beam is my latest favorite one is

Your best picture and why? You know what the favorite photo always changes. Even in this show, I have a favorite for few months, then I get bored of it and move to another one. My own photos play tricks on me. When I see them shared too many times, too many times everywhere  

one of my favorite shots. I had skipped this one in the first selection and then I was looking at my photos again and I rediscovered it. I fell in love with it second time around and it looks like she is just placed and there is no gravity. Yesterday at the vernissage, I asked a lot of people what their favorite photo was from the series and most of them chose the girl on the beam. But yeah favorite picture changes, PAGE 7 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1


your relationship with your photos change as time goes and you look at them again and you remember something that happened

Qualities for a good sports photographer?

before or after and these little things are also detrimental for your

Patience, a real intense desire to get

favorite photos.

the picture, like real because you need to really work for it, you have to be in the cold, walk up and down, go hungry sometimes, push it push it, you really should have a strong want or drive to get the best picture. That’s the number one thing. If you also get an amazing pleasure when you get a good picture then that should keep one going too. But yeah, you have to have the drive to get the best picture.

How do you handle pressure? May be my athletics background is very helpful in this, because we learn how to prepare before an event. You have to really want the shot and yes there is a lot of pressure however you have to perform under all this pressure, just like the athletes that we are photographing. There is no repeat of anything, you have to capture everything as it is happening. What motivates me the most is the knowledge of how hard these athletes have trained to perform at these events and once I have established that in my head, I go for it and shoot more and more to do justice to the dedication that they have shown to their sport. They deserve the best and they indirectly push you to get better and better with your shots. PAGE 8 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1


Have you faced difficulties in your career and what advice will you give to new photographers who just finished school? Yes it is tough because everybody with a camera is a photographer. To me what’s important is to really go deep inside yourself and find out what motivates me. If I want to give advice to anyone it would be like really go for what you love, find something that’s special for you. My story cannot be perfect for everybody because everyone is out there creating their own stories. It is important to look at past experiences etc. to find what moves you and what pictures you want to show to the world and why. Think also about the philosophy, that’s actually one of the reasons I love the name Speos because it comes from Philosophy and I have also studied philosophy in college, and this is why I ended up doing Photography because I wanted to do what I love and wanted to do something that made sense to my existence and me. So I would suggest everybody should go inside and see what their story shows them. I think everybody’s answers lies within them.

"I think everybody’s answers lies within them." PAGE 9 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1


What is next for you? Ummm...I don’t know and even am really excited to find out as well. I feel am still just in the beginning of my journey. Photography is a career that allows you to get better and better every time and am happy to be a photographer. All photographer when they look back at their first photo and their current work, they always feel that they have got better with time. So am just excited about the future and hopefully it will reveal itself and we’ll all see (laughs)..

What would you ask the next photographer that PROPAAH magazine will interview?

That’s a really good question (laughs).. I think all the questions that you guys have asked have been very well thought out and are really deep. But if I was interviewing a photographer, I would may be interested in their journey, their inspirations etc. and also maybe ask what are you after, what and why are you sharing. Photography is kinda like ‘look at that’, so I guess that’s the question to be explored. If you would ask me that question then I would say  I want to transfer emotions. I am working in a super emotionally charged atmosphere for. example the olympics, the world  


championships or national championships where people are at the maximum level of their emotions and I am there and I see some very special moment, I capture that and share it to people. This whole process is so magical to me and it is so special to be part of. I am like the vessel during this whole transfer. The most special thing is to take something, process it with my emotions and share it with people and also get a feedback. So yeah finding out why the photographer is sharing could be a very interesting question.  

www.minekasapoglu.com

"The most special thing is to take something, process it with my emotions and share it with people and also get a feedback."

PAGE 11 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1


ROADHEADS BY AMIR TIKRITI

PAGE 12 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1


Amir Tikriti is a photographer from Los Angeles, California, and currently based in Paris, France. www.amirtikriti.com

The purpose of the series, “Roadheads”, is to document the illusion of private space on public roads. As population sizes increase and cities become more and more dense, people spend a greater portion of their days inside their vehicles. This is especially true of Los Angeles (where most of the images in this series were shot), which is a city whose obsession with all things related to the automobile is well-renowned. Angelinos spend more time in traffic than anywhere else in the world: on average of 104 hours per year, or roughly 12% of their drive time. Thus, as people are in their cars for greater lengths of time, it only makes sense to see what they are up to in there. Beginning in July of 2015, I began to do just that. When people are in their cars, they often act as if others cannot see them. This veil of privacy occasionally leads to outrageous behavior; people acting in a manner rather inconsistent with the way they would otherwise act in public settings. For example, anyone who has been in a car long enough has seen all sorts of activities typically reserved for the home: eating, shaving, applying makeup, even picking nose (“digging for gold”). And few people would ever dare to cut in front of another person while in line at, say, the grocery store or movie theater.

PAGE 13 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1


Angelinos spend more time in traffic than anywhere else in the world: on average of 104 hours per year, or roughly 12% of their drive time.

PAGE 14 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1


PAGE 15 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1


PAGE 16 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1


Yet, people in their cars frequently do this, driving dangerously close to a neighboring car, risking both bodily injury to themselves and others, as well as costly repair work on their expensive machinery, just to save a few minutes of time on the road. A more extreme example, of course, is road rage, which is expressed through shouting at, insulting, tailgating (when a driver follows the car immediately ahead of himself or herself too closely), and, even, hurting, fighting, or killing other drivers. Inside cars, people are surrounded by four or more panes of transparent glass, and are, for all intents and purposes, on display to the world. Yet, they behave as if they are in a private setting. I cannot explain why this occurs: has the increase in the amount of time spent inside cars caused comfort levels to also go up? Or do we feel emboldened behind the glass and metal that makes up our vehicles? I do not know. But I do know that we act more authentically in this space.

PAGE 17 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1


PAGE 18 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1


OFELIA BY GIULIA BERTAGLIA


PAGE 20 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1


Born in 1990 in Italy, Giulia Bertaglia is a young photographer specialized in portraiture and fashion photography, who has been working as a freelance since 2011. She attended amateur courses in Turin and then attended the Central Saint Martins (UAL) in London in 2014, where she specialized in fashion photography. In 2016, she moved to Paris to update her professional training and to specialize in studio photography, obtaining, in 2017, a diploma at Spéos Photographic Institute. www.giuliabertaglia.com

PAGE 21 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1


Ofelia is a personal project that Giulia did during a studio class in Spéos Photographic Institute in 2017. She really love the result and considers this to her best work while in Paris. She found the inspiration on the internet where she saw a girl with a piece of glass. So she found a beautiful girl and created Ofelia! 

The model lies on the floor, with a glass on her. On the glass she put flowers, paint and water. The light is from the side and she shot from the top. She considers this project to reflect her a lot. She really loves the atmosphere and the feeling. "It seems like a dream."

PAGE 22 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1


PAGE 23 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1


FEM BY MARIEKE ZAPAśNIK


Marieke Zapaśnik is a documentary photographer born in the Netherlands and who spent her early years all over Europe, but mainly in Switzerland and France. Zapaśnik‘s interest in photography began when she was eight years old after she put her eye in the view finder of an Agfamatic 4008 of her aunt's. At that moment, she realized that a whole other world existed inside the lens of a camera. She really began her journey of photography in 2007 with her first digital camera, by shooting mainly her family and cats. She is now working on photo documentary project in Paris, France; where she is, for now, based. www.mrkdz.ch

PAGE 25 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1


“Fem” is one of my on going projects about femininity. I began the series by shooting some of my friends where I worked on finding details that I found were related to femininity. This project is here to break clichés, because women are not always as how they are portrayed, all pink and glittery; women are raw and sweet. Chaotic and harmonious. Crude and rude. Soft and feathery. This project is also a message. A message to my younger self who had to suffer from an early age to show perfection because of her gender. I was scared to be what I was. I was scared that I was fat, or that I had too much body hair. I would feel ashamed about having my period and other parts of me that I deemed as a weakness.

PAGE 26 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1


A good woman was always to be seen but not heard. But women are, were, and always will be, amazing and imperfect human beings, and this is what I am trying to show with my work. As you can see, with my project I do not just stop at these unshown details, but try to show as well some parts of the “cliché”. That girls talk and they do their make up for a night out. They're all still true; it is a part of femininity, but not the whole part of it. If I choose to do closeups, no faces, no bodies, just details, it is so that girls and women can feel related as much as possible to the subject. I believe in this project. That these photos are a message of good vibes and beauty about the feminine gender. And hopefully, not only to girls and women, but also to boys and men.

PAGE 27 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1


I have to say, that when I showed my work to some professionals I was told not be too vindictive or act like an activist, even if I think this is not the main subject of my work. But I won’t restrain myself or say that this work is not an activist's work, because it would be going against myself and against the whole message I am trying to put out here.

PAGE 28 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1


PAGE 29 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO. 1


THE IRON ORE TRAIN MAURITANIA BY DAMIAN BROWNE


Damian is a former professional rugby player turned photographer, traveler and adventurer. He has travelled to over 50 countries, including Afghanistan, The Democratic Rep. of Congo and Lesotho. Damian's next adventure will prove to be his biggest challenge yet as he attempts to row solo and unsupported across the Atlantic ocean this December. www.damianbrowne.com

PAGE 33 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


Opened in 1963, the national railway of Mauritania is single, 704-kilometres railway line linking the iron mining centre of Zouerate with the port of Nouadhibou. The state agency Société Nationale Industrielle et Minière (SNIM) controls the railway line. Trains on the railway are up to 2.5 kilometres in length, with each car carrying up to 84 tonnes of iron ore,making them among the longest and heaviest in the world. Passenger cars are occasionally attached but due to the expense and over crowding, more often than not passengers simply ride atop the ore, often carrying with them their goods and livestock.

PAGE 36 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


SEAMLESS BY SHIORI AKIBA

Shiori Akiba is a Japanese photographer and fashion stylist based in Paris. She learned photography on her own during her studies. After her graduation, she stopped taking photographs for a while and went to Montreal to work with a fashion designer as a fashion stylist. Then, she moved to Tokyo and worked as an assistant of a fashion stylist. She started photography again with a deep interest in nudity and graduated in Speos in July 2017. www.shioriakiba.com

PAGE 37 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


I was born in Japan where nudity causes a strong negative impression till the point that most of the times a nude is considered as pornography. I think that growing up in this culture is the main reasons why I got interested in ”nudity”. Nudity has been considered as a business tool for men and nowadays this way of thinking still exists in Japan due to the male-dominated society.

PAGE 38 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


A nude body is supposed be a beautiful thing but in Japan it’s still a taboo.I have been interested in nudity since I was a child which made me feel very uncomfortable and doubtful about it. Therefore, I have always expressed myself through photography by focusing on nudity. In this work, I just wanted to focus on the “naked body” by getting rid of the “sexuality” and “sex”.

PAGE 39 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


PAGE 40 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


PAGE 41 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


PAGE 44 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


THE END OF WINTER BY JUNE RODRIGO


June Rodrigo is a social documentary photographer based in Paris. Her photos highlight the resilience of people responding to climate change and social crises. She travels to far reaches of the planet to carry out long term studies of communities that are not ordinarily in the public eye, to raise awareness of the global reaches of climate change and its impacts.

PAGE 46 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


She has developed a style of photography that lies at the boundary of documentary and artistic photography, finding images that both portray a story and have an impact and beauty in their own right. Hidden within the images is often a sense of quite loneliness as people face themselves and their lives. She has studied Creative Documentary and Photojournalism at the Magnum Photos Agency in Paris. www.junerodrigo.com

PAGE 47 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


The Sami indigenous people of northern Scandinavia are reindeer herders who have lived and thrived in the Arctic for thousands of years. Today, climate change and modern technology are having large impacts on their lives and traditions. Internet, cell phones and snowmobiles are now part of their daily lives. The younger generation tend to speak Norwegian and English instead of Sami. So there is the question whether their culture and language will survive.

PAGE 48 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


I went to the northernmost part of Norway to live with Sami families at the end of winter, just prior to the spring migration. The pictures focused around their daily lives, at home and with the reindeer that are central in their lives. The food they eat is largely reindeer based. Many of the clothes and shoes they wear are handmade from reindeer skin. Sami families are also very close. If there is a problem, there is a phone call to family members who usually live nearby and immediately come over to help.

PAGE 49 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


Almost everything in their homes is built by their own hands. So despite the influences of modern technology, their lives remain close to the Earth and nature, centered on family.

PAGE 50 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


In these photos I portray the Sami as they are today, impacted in many details by modern culture, and yet trying to preserve their language and traditions. I call it the End of Winter because on the one hand, that is the time of year these pictures were taken. And with climate change the end of winter may be coming, and their culture, so based on winter, may also be approaching its end.

PAGE 53 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


THE ROLLING ENGLISH ROAD EXHIBIT WILLIAM WATERWORTH


I was born in Macclesfield in 1996, but mother was a restless soul and thus the family moved 8 times before I was 13, finally settling in Shropshire. It was about 16 that I got first introduced to photography when I saw the pictures of Tim Walker. His fantastical world was fascinating thus encouraging me to take up the subject at school.

After school I left Shropshire and moved to London to intern in Interior Design but I fled the scene quite quickly, made some money and left to travel to India and sailed around the Caribbean where I begun to find the documentary side of photography quite stimulating.

PAGE 55 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


PAGE 56 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


It was only when I returned that I begun to photograph my friends in my Battersea sitting room vigorously. Working as an assistant to a good set designer and helping to style on some shoots. After all this I persuaded my parents to send me off to Paris to study in the Art of Photography. I had slim photographic knowledge and could barely turn on my camera and get an exposure. So Paris gave me the lonely apple seed and I planted it. www.williamwaterworth.com

PAGE 57 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


PAGE 58 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


Thus here I am, preparing after a year studying in Paris for my first exhibition “The Rolling English Road’ which is my most exciting series to date. The series is made up of an eclectic mix of characters, mostly friends. Helps with the intimacy and they tend to give me power power! The series I’ve submitted is shot in Dover and is one of my favorites to date. Alexandra Moncrieffe and Barnaby Chambers killing it.

PAGE 59 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


PAGE 60 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


PLAGE ISOLÉE BY RAUL GUILLERMO


Raul Guillermo was born in Lima, Peru 27 years ago. He started his career in Management. On 2016 he decided to follow his passion and start studying photography in Paris. Nowadays, he enjoys working on his long-term projects such as his ‘plage isolée’ series. He likes observing his surroundings while he’s living in Paris. Moreover, he tries to travel as much as possible to discover new worlds and find inspiration for new projects. www.raulguillermo.com

PAGE 62 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


During “‘Plage Isolée’ I was just traveling around France and by coincidence or something else (I don’t want to call it destiny), I felt the attraction by the ocean; contemplating my past, I find this desire to be around this vast body. In this series, the idea is to see what objects and traces people have left behind or are using in their daily life. The intention is to feel their presence even when they are not around. The question I ask myself is ‘Who’s around me or us?’. It’s like a hide and seek game where I’m just an observer of my surroundings.”

PAGE 63 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


PAGE 64 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


PAGE 65 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


PAGE 66 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


PAGE 66 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


PAGE 69 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


PAGE 70 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


PARISIAN MULIEBRITY BY LANCE LAURENCE


With influences ranging from social documentarist August Sander, the everyday banality of William Eggleston and the portraiture of Lise Sarfati, I documented a day in the lives of artistic women living in Paris. This body of work over the last year has focused on capturing the moments in the mundane and daily lives of young women in paris. In an era saturated with self-promotion and marketing of oneself’s most appealing moments through social media, my hope is to provide a more accurate reflection of the moments that comprise daily life.

PAGE 72 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


My work explores the relationship between authenticity and life as performance. We live in an era of globalization and excessive cultural movement and appropriation. Through the lens of photography and short videos, our lives have become products of existential contradiction; the superficial layer in which we selectively represent ourselves versus the mundane everyday reality. Through this, new insights arise from both constructed and discovered narratives. www.lancelaurence.com

PAGE 73 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


I chose subjects that reflected my own social-economic background, middle-class and from Global North, to explore the ways in which we currently choose to self-identify. As each of my subjects strive to carve themselves and create their lives, I attempt to highlight the connection between the young women emerging as adults whilst also capturing the uniqueness that is inherent to each person. Ultimately, the viewer is left with a monument to the individual and a tribute to the outposts of our culture.

PAGE 74 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


PAGE 75 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


PAGE 76 | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  


a big thank you to all our issue#1 featured artists


Issue #2 Submission Call For our next issue which is planned for release in January 2018, we invite submissions in the following genres: 1. Fashion 2. Documentary / Photojournalism 3. Fine Art 4. Travel 5. Interviews 6. Culture / Society 7. Architecture 8. Street Photography The submission guidelines are: 1. Upto 12 images per submission. 2. Images should be submitted in .jpeg format 3. Image dimension should be 1000 px max on the wider side. 4. Images should be profiled in sRGB or AdobeRGB1998 5. Images should be less than 250 KB in size and should be saved for web. 6. Image naming format should be 'firstname01.jpg' (ex. brooklynbeckham01.jpg) 7. Send in a text file with the following details:    > Photographer Name    > Photographer Bio    > Project Title    > Project Description (400-800 words in English)    > Photography Genre    > Image titles and Sequencing of series 8. Send in your files to submissions.propaah.mag@gmail.com as an attachment in .zip format or using wetransfer. 9. Last date to receive submission is December 15, 2017 Follow us on our Facebook, Instagram and Twitter channels (@propaahmagazine). To get featured on our Instagram profile, use #propaahmagazine in your posts.


PARIS | NOVEMBER 2017 | ISSUE NO.1  

PHOTO CREDIT: WILLIAM WATERWORTH

Profile for Propaah Magazine

Propaah  

PROPAAH is a quarterly published online magazine that aims to provide a platform to young photographers to showcase their ongoing and comple...

Propaah  

PROPAAH is a quarterly published online magazine that aims to provide a platform to young photographers to showcase their ongoing and comple...

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded