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Bon Iver’s self-titled album that led me to listen to Lubomyr Melnyk’s album, Corollaries, whose art Euclide also created. This spring, I wrote to Euclide, eager to speak with the artist himself about his work. His responses were refined and thoughtful, and led me to even more queries about the relationship between art and music, as well as his own transition from the life of a musician to a successful career as a visual artist.

You have mentioned in other interviews that he listens to the music he is creating for while working on the album art. What does this mean? How does sound change the physical process of creating? After finishing cover art for two different artists, did you have similar experiences? Yes, when I do an album cover for a band I really try to get into what is being said through the music. Both of these experiences were highly rewarding. They are both really great pieces of work. Lubomyr’s album has very few words; there is only one song that contains lyrics. It is a very intense music, something that could lift you into another place – mentally. Lubomyr holds the world record for playing the most notes per second. He plays in waves and the album is mostly piano. There are a couple of other instruments, but what you really feel is the piano. There is kind of this intensity of sound that is coming from one instrument; creating these images and patterns. I wanted to reflect that in the design of the cover. I photographed a plastic bag and used its contour for the die-cut. Then, I

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Profile for PRØOF

PRØOF Magazine: For the Record  

PRØOF Magazine's third issue explores the relationships that exist between music, art, and literature.

PRØOF Magazine: For the Record  

PRØOF Magazine's third issue explores the relationships that exist between music, art, and literature.

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