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LESSONS FROM THE PROMISE NEIGHBORHOODS PROGRAM 2013 FUNDERS EVENT Agenda Friday, January 25, 2013 9:30am – 10:00am

Getting Acquainted: Images and Ice Breakers

10:00am – 10:25am

Welcome and Introductions Ford Foundation Director Jeannie Oakes PolicyLink CEO and Founder Angela Glover Blackwell

10:25am – 10:40am

Promise Neighborhoods as a U.S. Department of Education Priority Department of Education Assistant Deputy Secretary for Innovation and Improvement, Jim Shelton, discusses the department’s policy priorities and the need for philanthropic investment.

10:40am – 10:55am

Why Promise Neighborhoods are Important to the Nation Harlem Children's Zone President, Geoffrey Canada, talks national impact and change.

10:55am – 11:20am

Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink (PNI) Vision and 2013 Scope of Work PNI Director, Michael McAfee, describes the plan to get results for Promise Neighborhoods.

11:20am – 11:30am

Break

11:30am – 12:00pm

Promise Neighborhoods: What We’re Learning Center for the Study of Social Policy Director, Frank Farrow, shares learnings from the past few years.

12:00pm – 1:15pm

Working Lunch & Discussion Sessions PNI and Promise Neighborhood leaders from Berea, KY, Buffalo, NY, and Minneapolis, MN facilitate conversations on three issue areas important to Promise Neighborhoods: Expanded Learning // Black Male Achievement // Whole School Reform

Concurrent Sessions 1:15pm – 1:30pm

Report Out Angela Glover Blackwell and Promise Neighborhood Leaders

1:30pm – 2:00pm

Call to Action and Adjournment

2:00pm – 4:00pm

One-on-One Briefings for Interested Funders Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink leaders will be available to meet individually with funders interested in learning more about the work and investment opportunities.


Promise Neighborhoods: A Comprehensive Approach to Expanding Opportunity for All Children A strong and vibrant America requires children who are educated, healthy, and ready to enter the workforce. Yet, 16 million children live in poverty and less than a fifth of poor fourth graders are pro-ficient in reading and math. These children lack the opportunity and resources to achieve their full potential. Children facing educational, health, and safety challenges can be found in neighborhoods across the country, in cities, suburbs, rural, and tribal areas. The challenges facing these children are tough and no quick fix exists. Multi-faceted approaches are needed so that all children have access to resources that ensure they are healthy, their families are strong, and they live in safe homes and supportive neighborhoods. The Promise Neighborhoods program seeks to create a comprehensive pipeline of educational and community supports to make certain that children reach their full potential. Every child deserves a Promise Neighborhood.

1 in 5 $500 billion 17 & 22

12.8 million

children live in poverty in yearly costs to the U.S. associated with childhood poverty (nearly 4% of GDP) percent of poor children who score at or above proficient in reading and math (respectively) by the 4th grade school days missed due to asthma among the more than 4 million children with asthma

Key Components of the Promise Neighborhoods Program Inspired by the Harlem Children’s Zone, Promise Neighborhoods are place-based efforts to wrap children in integrated, coordinated, high-quality academic, social, and health programs and supports from the cradle to college to career. Strong schools are core to every Promise Neighborhood, as is family and community engagement. Administered by the U.S. Department of Education, some of the key features of the program include: •

The Importance of Planning and Implementation. The U.S. Department of Education has awarded three cycles of competitive Promise Neighborhoods grants since 2010. In the first year of funding (FY 2010), 21 diverse communities received planning grants between $400,000-$500,000 to develop a plan to create their Promise Neighborhood. In December 2011, five communities were awarded up to $5 million to implement their Promise Neighborhoods plan, and 15 additional communities were awarded up to $500,000 for planning. In December 2012, another seven communities were awarded up to $7 million for implementation and ten communities up to $500,000 for planning. Increased resources are needed in FY 2013 to meet the overwhelming interest from communities engaged in planning and implementation—an essential step in improving the educational outcomes for poor children in America.

Leveraging Local Resources for Maximum Impact. Promise Neighborhoods grantees have the support of the public and private sectors, which have committed matching funds for the federal grants received. Planning grant applicants are required to obtain matching funds equal to at least 50 percent of the award (unless they applied as a rural or tribal community, in which case the matching requirement is 25 percent of the grant award). Implementation grant applicants are required to obtain matching funds equal to at least 100 percent of the award (unless they applied as a rural or tribal community, in which case the matching requirement is 50 percent). Additionally, at least 10 percent of the matching funds must be cash or in-kind contributions from the private sector.


Some key results of the Harlem Children’s Zone include: ÚÚ

For the ninth year in a row, 100 percent of children who participated in HCZ’s original Harlem Gems® pre-K program were school ready. In FY 2011 across all four of the Gems programs, 100% of children attained a school readiness classification of average or above.

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Participants in the HCZ Asthma Initiative have missed fewer days of school (9.1% vs 29.7% percent) and have fewer emergency-room visits (16.1% vs. 47.2%) due to asthma. This is critically important in a neighborhood where 28.9% of children 12 and under have asthma, compared to national averages of 5-7%.

ÚÚ

A Harvard University evaluation of HCZ’s Promise Academy Charter Schools concluded HCZ “is enormously effective at increasing the achievement of the poorest minority children. Taken at face value, the effects in middle school are enough to reverse the black-white achievement gap in mathematics and reduce it in English Language Arts. The effects in elementary school close the racial achievement gap in both subjects.”

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An average of $5,000 per year per child is spent on HCZ programming to achieve these and other results, compared to over $200,000 per year per young person in the New York Juvenile Justice System.

Diverse Communities Targeted. The Department of Education carved out three separate priorities for applicants from distressed communities, including a unique priority for both rural and tribal communities.

Evidence-Based, Results-Focused. Promise Neighborhoods grantees must propose strategies based on the best available evidence of improving outcomes for children and the surrounding community.

School Partnerships. Lead agencies can be either nonprofit organizations, institutions of higher education or Indian tribes that must team up with one or more schools in their neighborhood. At least one school must be either a persistently lowest-achieving school or a low-performing school.

The Federal Landscape for 2013 •

Funding History. In 2010, Congress appropriated $10 million for planning grants. In 2011, Congress tripled this appropriation to $30 million for both planning and implementation. In 2012, Congress appropriated $60 million for one-year planning and five-year implementation grants.

FY 2013 Budget Request. President Obama requested $100 million for Promise Neighborhoods planning and implementation grants in the FY 2013 federal budget, signaling continued support for the program. The Senate Appropriations committee proposed $80 million and the House $60 million.

Promise Neighborhoods Legislation and ESEA. In 2011, Senator Tom Harkin of Iowa introduced legislation (S.1004) to incorporate Promise Neighborhoods in the Early and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), and allows for two five-year, renewable grants. The late Representative Donald Payne of New Jersey, Representatives Michael Honda of California, and Robert Scott of Virginia have introduced a companion bill on the House side (H.R.2098).

About the Promise Neighborhoods Grantees The Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink—a nonprofit institute that provides communities with a system of support to help them become Promise Neighborhoods—and its partners, the Harlem Children’s Zone and the Center for the Study of Social Policy— will provide technical assistance to a network of more than 60 sites (including implementation and planning grantees awarded between FY10-12). The plans developed and implemented will highlight how Promise Neighborhoods can successfully carry out their comprehensive approaches for children by leveraging public and private sector support, and coordinate the services and resources of local nonprofits, schools, health centers, universities, and foundations. Promise Neighborhoods funding totals nearly $100 million awarded to over 50 urban, rural, and tribal communities representing more than 700 schools across the country. They all have a commitment to focusing on great schools as center to their revitalization efforts and to creating strong systems of support for all children. Increased resources are needed now to help make Promise Neighborhoods a reality so that all children grow up healthy and well-educated. The children of today are the teachers, engineers, and community leaders of tomorrow. The Promise Neighborhoods program is one of the most important investments we can make as a nation.

For more information contact:

Michael McAfee, Director | PolicyLink | michael@policylink.org | 510 663-2333, ext 310


Vision  All children live in communities of opportunity that enable them to learn, grow, and succeed.    

Mission  Inspired by the successful model of the Harlem Children’s Zone, the Promise Neighborhoods Institute at  PolicyLink supports Promise Neighborhoods—communities of opportunity centered around strong  schools—to wrap children in education, health, and social supports from the cradle to college to career.  By effectively coordinating the efforts of schools, families, social services, health centers, and  community‐building programs, all children can fulfill their promise.   

What We Do  The Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink—a nonprofit, independent organization—helps build  and sustain Promise Neighborhoods to ensure children are healthy, succeed in school, reach their full  potential, and that families and neighborhoods support the healthy development, academic success,  and well‐being of their children.    The Institute works to strengthen and expand Promise Neighborhoods across the nation by managing a  hub of high‐quality technical assistance providers and consultants, including PolicyLink, the Harlem  Children’s Zone, and the Center for the Study of Social Policy. The Institute leverages these and other  supports to:     Mobilize neighborhood leaders to build communities of opportunity;   Build a national community of practice for local leaders to share tools, resources, and  successes;   Provide a suite of supports through trainings, webinars, strategic planning, and conferences;   Strategically engage urban, rural, and tribal neighborhoods in long‐term community building  work;    Systemically align public and private funding to ensure longevity and stability.   

Our Principles  The Institute supports Promise Neighborhoods to operate by the following principles used by the  Harlem Children’s Zone:      

Serve an entire neighborhood comprehensively and at scale;  Create a comprehensive pipeline of programs for children from birth through college  graduation, and wrap that pipeline in supports for families;  Build community among residents, institutions, and stakeholders who help to create the  environment necessary for a child’s healthy development;  Evaluate program outcomes and create a data feedback loop to help management improve and  refine program offerings;  Cultivate a culture of success rooted in passion, accountability, leadership, and teamwork. 

Every Child Deserves a Promise Neighborhood.  Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink  

 

PromiseNeighborhoodsInstitute.org  |   1 


Meet the Promise Neighborhood Community of Practice The Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink (the Institute) is a nonprofit institute that provides communities with the support they need to become Promise Neighborhoods. Inspired by the Harlem Children’s Zone’s place-based model, Promise Neighborhoods help break the cycle of generational poverty by wrapping children in health, social, and educational support from cradle to college to career. Promise Neighborhoods help children—and communities—learn, grow, and succeed. The Institute has formed a community of practice – currently including Promise Neighborhoods FY 2010-12 federal planning and implementation grantees and 17 high-scoring applicants from FY 2010 continuing to pursue the Promise Neighborhoods model. The Promise Neighborhood Community of Practice provides a platform in which burgeoning Promise Neighborhoods share tools and resources, attend trainings and webinars, and support each other’s work. Promise Neighborhood Community of Practice members represent urban, rural, and tribal areas across the country, and link nonprofits, schools, health clinics, foundations, institutions of higher learning, and other community-based organizations committed to developing a place-based, coordinated approach to ending poverty. 2012 Federal Implementation Grantees (7) *2010 or 2011 planning grantee Boston Promise Initiative* Chula Vista Promise Neighborhood* East Lubbock Promise Neighborhood Five Promises for Two Generations (DCPNI)* Los Angeles Promise Neighborhood* Mission Promise Neighborhood* Indianola Promise Community*

Boston and Roxbury, MA Chula Vista, CA Lubbock, TX Washington, DC Los Angeles, CA San Francisco, CA Indianola, MS

2012 Federal Planning Grantees (10) *2010 high-scoring applicant Adams County Promise Neighborhood Initiative Camden Cooper Lanning Promise Neighborhood Cypress Hills Promise Neighborhood The Everett Freeman Initiative Langley Park Promise Neighborhood Many Flags Promise Neighborhood Newark Fairmount Promise Neighborhood* Ogden United for Promise Neighborhoods Promise Heights, A Promise Neighborhood Rogers Promise Neighborhood Project

Meet the Promise Neighborhood Network

Adams County, WI Camden, NJ Brooklyn, NY Corning, CA Langley Park, MD Rockland, Cushing, Owls Head, St. George, Thomaston, and South Thomaston, ME Newark, NJ Ogden, UT Baltimore, MD Marshalltown, IA

Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink | 1


2011 Federal Implementation Grantees (5) *2010 planning grantee Berea College* California State University East Bay Foundation, Inc.* Northside Achievement Zone United Way of San Antonio & Bexar County, Inc.* Westminster Foundation*

Clay, Jackson, and Owsley Counties, KY Hayward, CA Minneapolis, MN San Antonio, TX Buffalo, NY

2011 Federal Planning Grantees (15) *2010 high-scoring applicant Black Family Development* CAMBA Campo Band of Mission Indians Catholic Charities of Albany Children Youth and Family Services Community Action Project of Tulsa* Elmezzi Foundation Martha O’Bryan Center Mercer University Meriden Children’s First Mission Economic Development Agency Ohio University Reading and Beyond SGA Youth and Family Services* South Bay Community Services

Detroit, MI New York, NY Campo, CA Hudson, NY Charlottesville, VA Tulsa, OK New York, NY Nashville, TN Macon, GA Meriden, CT San Francisco, CA Glouster, OH Fresno, CA Chicago, IL Chula Vista, CA

2010 Federal Planning Grantees (21) Abyssinian Development Corporation Amherst H. Wilder Foundation Athens-Clarke County Family Connection Berea College Boys and Girls Club of the Northern Cheyenne Nation California State University East Bay Cesar Chavez Public Policy Charter High School Community Day Care Center of Lawrence Delta Health Alliance, Inc. Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative Lutheran Family Health Centers/Lutheran Medical Center Morehouse School of Medicine, Inc. Neighborhood Centers, Inc. Proyecto Pastoral at Dolores Mission The Guidance Center United Way of Central Massachusetts United Way of San Antonio & Bexar County, Inc. Universal Community Homes University of Arkansas at Little Rock Westminster Foundation Youth Policy Institute Meet the Promise Neighborhood Network

New York, NY Saint Paul, MN Athens-Clarke County, GA Clay, Jackson, and Owsley Counties, KY Northern Cheyenne Reservation, MT Hayward, CA Washington, DC Lawrence, MA Indianola, MS Boston, MA Brooklyn, NY Atlanta, GA Houston, TX Los Angeles, CA River Rouge, MI Worcester, MA San Antonio, TX Philadelphia, PA Little Rock, AR Buffalo, NY Los Angeles, CA Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink | 2


2010 High-Scoring Applicants (17) Arizona Board of Regents Black Family Development Chatham-Savannah Youth Futures Authority Cherokee Nation Community Action Project of Tulsa County Grace Hill Settlement House Martin University Neighborhood House Newark Promise Neighborhood Partnership SGA Youth & Family Services Self Enhancement, Inc. Sisters of Charity Foundation of Cleveland Southern Bancorp Capital Partners Southwest Youth and Family Services/White Center Suitland Family and Life Development Corporation United Way of Salt Lake United Way of the Quad Cities Area

Meet the Promise Neighborhood Network

South Tucson, AZ Detroit, MI Savannah, GA Tahlequah, OK Tulsa, OK St. Louis, MO Indianapolis, IN Seattle, WA Newark, NJ Chicago, IL Portland, OR Cleveland, OH Phillips County, AR King County, WA Prince George, MD Salt Lake City, UT Davenport, IA

Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink | 3


NORTHSIDE ACHIEVEMENT ZONE MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA

2011 PROMISE NEIGHBORHOOD IMPLEMENTATION GRANTEE: CRADLE TO COLLEGE TO CAREER $28 MILLION OVER FIVE YEARS

A Focus on Results

Community Served

The Northside Achievement Zone works to ensure all youth graduate from high school college-ready. NAZ utilizes results-based, high-accountability strategies to: engage parents and strengthen their ability to support achievement; improve schools and the educational experience within a continuum of support services; and coordinate effective whole-family support programs.

The Northside Achievement Zone is a 13-by-18-block area in North Minneapolis. It is home to 14,798 people and approximately 5,615 children. Northside residents struggle with poverty, unemployment, failing schools, and high rates of violence, all of which impact children’s development and achievement. In tests of kindergarten readiness in 2010, only 29 percent of entering kindergartners living in and near the zone met literacy benchmarks. Only 28 percent of children were at or above grade level in reading. Neighborhood Composition

Early Accomplishments In the first year of its federal implementation grant, NAZ has expanded its evidence-based programs and implemented a rigorous quality-control process: • NAZ recruited 100 students in a single two-week period; among the students tested after completing the program, none had suffered summer learning loss. Sixty-one percent made at least a half a grade level improvement in reading; 42 percent increased their math proficiency by at least 5 percentage points.

18%

7% 20%

African American White Asian/South Asian Latino Other

8%

47% Source: US Census 2010.

Residents at or below the Federal Poverty Line

• To support healthy development before kindergarten and increase proficiency during the school years, NAZ developed and launched two distinct Family Academy trainings, which provide parents with clear action steps to improve learning according to their children’s age. Twenty-two families completed an eight-week parent empowerment training and 45 families completed a 12-week infant and toddler class. The Family Academy is now expanding to additional sites with a new cohort that exceeds initial enrollment targets.

36%

14% NAZ

Nationwide

Data Source: U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey 2006-2010 (5-year estimate), Table C17002. US Census Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) to the Current Population Survey (CPS). The Zone is the aggregation of 18 block groups, five of which are only partially within the zone.

Scaling Up serve 133 pilot families and 359 children.

2011

incorporate 24 partners and 300 families, and upgrade capabilities for complex data analysis.

2012

provide high-quality academic extended learning programming to 500 youth.

2014

support approximately 1,200 families with 3,000 children most in need of service.

2015

NAZ + PNI: Amplification of Results The Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink provides ongoing assistance to NAZ with peer learning opportunities and strategic technical assistance. PNI has connected NAZ with outside experts to help in the areas of Early Childhood Education and Out-of-School Time as part of NAZ’s “Seal of Effectiveness” process. promiseneighborhoodsinstitute.org


Partners Northside Achivement Zone Ascension Catholic School Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Greater Twin Cities Bolder Options Bright Water Montessori School Elizabeth Hall International Elementary School Emerge Community Development

Greater Minneapolis Crisis Nursery Juxtaposition Arts Kinship of Greater Minneapolis LaCreche Early Childhood Centers, Inc. Minneapolis Public Housing Authority Minneapolis Public Schools Early Childhood Education

Minnesota Visiting Nurse Agency Nellie Stone Johnson Elementary School North High School NorthPoint Health & Wellness Center Northside Child Development Center Patchwork Quilt Patrick Henry High School

Plymouth Christian Youth Center (PCYC) Project for Pride in Living (PPL) PYC Arts & Technology High School Seed Academy and Harvest Preparatory School Sojourner Truth Academy Elementary School The Family Partnership Think Small

Twin Cities RISE! Urban Homeworks Washburn Center for Children Way to Grow W.I.S.E. Charter School

Promise Neighborhoods are communities of opportunity that allow children to learn, grow, and succeed. Based on the successful model of the Harlem Children’s Zone, Promise Neighborhoods build partnerships between schools, community organizations, local businesses, and community members to wrap children in high-quality, coordinated health, social, community, and educational support from cradle to college to career. The U.S. Department of Education’s Promise Neighborhoods program insists on high-quality efforts that respond to 15 indicators to achieve 10 results for children and families. Successful Promise Neighborhoods with and without federal funding are using these indicators to improve educational and social outcomes in their communities. TABLE 1—EDUCATION INDICATORS AND RESULTS THEY ARE INTENDED TO MEASURE INDICATOR

RESULT

# and % of children birth to kindergarten entry who have a place where they usually go, other than an emergency room, when they are sick or in need of advice about their health.

ÚÚ

Children enter kindergarten ready to succeed in school.

# and % of three-year-olds and children in kindergarten who demonstrate at the beginning of the program or school year age-appropriate functioning across multiple domains of early learning (as defined in this notice) as determined using developmentally appropriate early learning measures (as defined in this notice).

# and % of children, from birth to kindergarten entry, participating in center-based or formal home-based early learning settings or programs, which may include Early Head Start, Head Start, child care, or preschool.

# and % of students at or above grade level according to State mathematics and reading or language arts assessments in at least the grades required by the ESEA (third through eighth and once in high school).

ÚÚ

Students are proficient in core academic subjects.

Attendance rate of students in sixth, seventh, eighth, and ninth grade .......................................................

ÚÚ

Graduation rate (as defined in this notice) ...................................................................................................

Students successfully transition from middle school grades to high school.

# and % of Promise Neighborhood students who graduate with a regular high school diploma, as defined in 34 CFR 200.19(b)(1)(iv), and obtain postsecondary degrees, vocational certificates, or other industry-recognized certifications or credentials without the need for remediation.

ÚÚ

Youth graduate from high school.

ÚÚ

High school graduates obtain a postsecondary degree, certification, or credential.

TABLE 2—FAMILY AND COMMUNITY SUPPORT INDICATORS AND RESULTS THEY ARE INTENDED TO MEASURE INDICATOR

RESULT

# and % of children who participate in at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity daily; and—# & % of children who consume five or more servings of fruits and vegetables daily; or possible third indicator, to be determined (TBD) by applicant.

ÚÚ

Students are healthy.

# and % of students who feel safe at school and traveling to and from school, as measured by a school climate needs assessment (as defined in this notice); or possible second indicator, TBD by applicant.

ÚÚ

Students feel safe at school and in their community.

ÚÚ

Students live in stable communities.

ÚÚ

Families and community members support learning in Promise Neighborhood schools.

ÚÚ

Students have access to 21st century learning tools.

Student mobility rate (as defined in this notice); or possible second indicator, TBD by applicant.

For children birth to kindergarten entry, the # and % of parents or family members who report that they read to their child three or more times a week;

For children in kindergarten through the eighth grade, the # and % of parents or family members who report encouraging their child to read books outside of school;

For children in the ninth through twelfth grades, the # and % of parents or family members who report talking with their child about the importance of college and career; or possible fourth indicator TBD by applicant; and

# and % of students who have school and home access (and % of the day they have access) to broadband Internet (as defined in this notice) and a connected computing device; or possible second indicator TBD by applicant.

The Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink provides support to Promise Neighborhoods to ensure that all children live in communities of opportunity that enable them to learn, grow, and succeed. promiseneighborhoodsinstitute.org


BUFFALO PROMISE NEIGHBORHOOD BUFFALO, NEW YORK

2011 PROMISE NEIGHBORHOOD IMPLEMENTATION GRANTEE: CRADLE TO COLLEGE TO CAREER $6 MILLION OVER FIVE YEARS

A Focus on Results

Community Served

The Buffalo Promise Neighborhood advances the healthy development of over 3,000 children and their families from birth through college to career. BPN uses a continuum of tested, evidence-based interventions, and builds upon the transformation of Buffalo’s lowest performing school into the Westminster Community Charter School. BPN’s partnership includes the involvement of a major commercial bank, which dedicates strategic managerial and financial resources to this community turnaround effort.

The Buffalo Promise Neighborhood is located in the northeast corner of the city. It is a predominantly African American community that is home to around 12,000 people, including 3,000 children. Neighborhood Composition 5%

23% African American White Other

Early Accomplishments • Took on shared management with the school district of a previously low-performing K-8 and high school in the neighborhood; implemented a rigorous, evidencebased curriculum; and instituted an early warning system to ensure struggling students are immediately provided extra attention and matched with the academic or community supports they need.

72%

Children Qualifying for Free or Reduced School Lunch

• Works with the school district to modify school feeder patterns so that more students from the neighborhood have the opportunity to attend the Promise Neighborhood’s strengthened schools. • Broke ground on a $2.5 million Early Childhood Education Center adjacent to Westminster Community Charter School. The Center will serve 150 children from infancy to age five every year, and ensure that students enter kindergarten ready to learn.

Source: American Community Survey 2005-2009.

88%

47.5% Buffalo PN

Nationwide

Hayward Source: Buffalo Public Schools 2011. National Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "Public Elementary/Secondary School Universe Survey," 2000-01, 2005-06, 2008-09, and 2009-10.

Scaling Up whole school reform and early childhood education center construction; focus on 6th and 9th graders.

2012

expand services to one additional grade every year in each of the three schools in the neighborhood, focusing on 6th and 9th graders.

2013-15

expand services to early grades, and serve all 3,000 K-12 students in the zone.

2016

expand geographically to contiguous zones for a total of 11 schools and approximately 10,000 students (25,000 residents).

2017

Buffalo + PNI: Amplification of Results The Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink has provided key support to the Buffalo PN on the theory and practice of Results-Based Accountability, and provides ongoing assistance with strategy, peer learning, and troubleshooting. promiseneighborhoodsinstitute.org


Partners Westminster Foundation AmeriCorps Bethel Head Start Buffalo Public School District Buffalo Urban League City of Buffalo Closing the Gap

Community Health Center of Buffalo Council for Unity County of Erie Every Person Influences Children (EPIC) Hillside Works Scholarship John R. Oishei Foundation Johns Hopkins University Talent Development

Read to Succeed Buffalo University at Buffalo Westminster Community Charter School

Promise Neighborhoods are communities of opportunity that allow children to learn, grow, and succeed. Based on the successful model of the Harlem Children’s Zone, Promise Neighborhoods build partnerships between schools, community organizations, local businesses, and community members to wrap children in high-quality, coordinated health, social, community, and educational support from cradle to college to career. The U.S. Department of Education’s Promise Neighborhoods program insists on high-quality efforts that respond to 15 indicators to achieve 10 results for children and families. Successful Promise Neighborhoods with and without federal funding are using these indicators to improve educational and social outcomes in their communities. TABLE 1—EDUCATION INDICATORS AND RESULTS THEY ARE INTENDED TO MEASURE INDICATOR

RESULT

# and % of children birth to kindergarten entry who have a place where they usually go, other than an emergency room, when they are sick or in need of advice about their health.

ÚÚ

Children enter kindergarten ready to succeed in school.

# and % of three-year-olds and children in kindergarten who demonstrate at the beginning of the program or school year age-appropriate functioning across multiple domains of early learning (as defined in this notice) as determined using developmentally appropriate early learning measures (as defined in this notice).

# and % of children, from birth to kindergarten entry, participating in center-based or formal home-based early learning settings or programs, which may include Early Head Start, Head Start, child care, or preschool.

# and % of students at or above grade level according to State mathematics and reading or language arts assessments in at least the grades required by the ESEA (third through eighth and once in high school).

ÚÚ

Students are proficient in core academic subjects.

Attendance rate of students in sixth, seventh, eighth, and ninth grade .......................................................

ÚÚ

Graduation rate (as defined in this notice) ...................................................................................................

Students successfully transition from middle school grades to high school.

# and % of Promise Neighborhood students who graduate with a regular high school diploma, as defined in 34 CFR 200.19(b)(1)(iv), and obtain postsecondary degrees, vocational certificates, or other industry-recognized certifications or credentials without the need for remediation.

ÚÚ

Youth graduate from high school.

ÚÚ

High school graduates obtain a postsecondary degree, certification, or credential.

TABLE 2—FAMILY AND COMMUNITY SUPPORT INDICATORS AND RESULTS THEY ARE INTENDED TO MEASURE INDICATOR

RESULT

# and % of children who participate in at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity daily; and—# & % of children who consume five or more servings of fruits and vegetables daily; or possible third indicator, to be determined (TBD) by applicant.

ÚÚ

Students are healthy.

# and % of students who feel safe at school and traveling to and from school, as measured by a school climate needs assessment (as defined in this notice); or possible second indicator, TBD by applicant.

ÚÚ

Students feel safe at school and in their community.

ÚÚ

Students live in stable communities.

ÚÚ

Families and community members support learning in Promise Neighborhood schools.

ÚÚ

Students have access to 21st century learning tools.

Student mobility rate (as defined in this notice); or possible second indicator, TBD by applicant.

For children birth to kindergarten entry, the # and % of parents or family members who report that they read to their child three or more times a week;

For children in kindergarten through the eighth grade, the # and % of parents or family members who report encouraging their child to read books outside of school;

For children in the ninth through twelfth grades, the # and % of parents or family members who report talking with their child about the importance of college and career; or possible fourth indicator TBD by applicant; and

# and % of students who have school and home access (and % of the day they have access) to broadband Internet (as defined in this notice) and a connected computing device; or possible second indicator TBD by applicant.

The Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink provides support to Promise Neighborhoods to ensure that all children live in communities of opportunity that enable them to learn, grow, and succeed. promiseneighborhoodsinstitute.org


BEREA PROMISE NEIGHBORHOOD

JACKSON, CLAY, AND OWSLEY COUNTIES, KENTUCKY 2011 PROMISE NEIGHBORHOOD IMPLEMENTATION GRANTEE: CRADLE TO COLLEGE TO CAREER $30 MILLION OVER FIVE YEARS

Community Served

A Focus on Results The Berea Promise Neighborhood (BPN) promotes academic achievement and fosters the physical, social, and emotional well-being of children and youth in three economically distressed counties in rural Kentucky. The effort is centered on creating excellent schools and building a culture of success, and includes expanding access to learning technology and Internet connectivity, and boosting family engagement in student learning.

Jackson, Clay, and Owsley Counties are three of the most economically distressed counties in Appalachia. Located in the mountains of eastern Kentucky, they are home to 39,533 people and 6,319 public school students. Every middle and high school in the area is classified as Persistently Lowest Achieving. Neighborhood Composition 3%

Early Accomplishments

White Other

• BPN expanded a highly successful early-learning program to serve 170 low-income rural children and teaches parents and expectant parents skills in promoting language development and pre-literacy through home visits and regular parent meeting.

97%

• BPN has increased access to Advanced Placement courses to support middle and high school students and teachers.

Source: US Census 2010.

• BPN has put in place an academic early warning and response system that is codified and consistent across all 11 schools in the region. Full-time academic specialists monitor individual student progress and mobilize appropriate support quickly to solve problems with attendance, behavior, or course work. • BPN launched a new after-school program in all three counties focused on math, reading, nutrition education, physical activity, the arts, and character development, and is aligned and supportive of the school curriculum. After-school programs currently serve approximately 900 students in the three counties.

Scaling Up key elements of the continuum of services serve all 6,319 children in the three counties.

2012

Students Qualifying for Free or Reduced School Lunch 81% 47.5%

Berea PN

Nationwide

Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "Public Elementary/Secondary School Universe Survey," 2000-01, 2005-06, 2008-09, and 2009-10.

implementation of additional elements of the continuum (mentoring, expanded learning opportunities, and more) to reach more residents, including low-income students, males, and elementary school students.

2013-15

Berea + PNI: Amplification of Results The Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink has provided key support to the Berea PN on the theory and practice of Results-Based Accountability, and provides ongoing assistance with planning, strategy, and peer learning.

promiseneighborhoodsinstitute.org


Partners Berea College Clay County School System Collaborative for Teaching & Learning

Cumberland Valley Regional Health Department Eastern Kentucky Child Care Coalition

Jackson County School System Owsley County School System Save the Children

Promise Neighborhoods are communities of opportunity that allow children to learn, grow, and succeed. Based on the successful model of the Harlem Children’s Zone, Promise Neighborhoods build partnerships between schools, community organizations, local businesses, and community members to wrap children in high-quality, coordinated health, social, community, and educational support from cradle to college to career. The U.S. Department of Education’s Promise Neighborhoods program insists on high-quality efforts that respond to 15 indicators to achieve 10 results for children and families. Successful Promise Neighborhoods with and without federal funding are using these indicators to improve educational and social outcomes in their communities. TABLE 1—EDUCATION INDICATORS AND RESULTS THEY ARE INTENDED TO MEASURE INDICATOR

RESULT

# and % of children birth to kindergarten entry who have a place where they usually go, other than an emergency room, when they are sick or in need of advice about their health.

ÚÚ

Children enter kindergarten ready to succeed in school.

# and % of three-year-olds and children in kindergarten who demonstrate at the beginning of the program or school year age-appropriate functioning across multiple domains of early learning (as defined in this notice) as determined using developmentally appropriate early learning measures (as defined in this notice).

# and % of children, from birth to kindergarten entry, participating in center-based or formal home-based early learning settings or programs, which may include Early Head Start, Head Start, child care, or preschool.

# and % of students at or above grade level according to State mathematics and reading or language arts assessments in at least the grades required by the ESEA (third through eighth and once in high school).

ÚÚ

Students are proficient in core academic subjects.

Attendance rate of students in sixth, seventh, eighth, and ninth grade .......................................................

ÚÚ

Graduation rate (as defined in this notice) ...................................................................................................

Students successfully transition from middle school grades to high school.

# and % of Promise Neighborhood students who graduate with a regular high school diploma, as defined in 34 CFR 200.19(b)(1)(iv), and obtain postsecondary degrees, vocational certificates, or other industry-recognized certifications or credentials without the need for remediation.

ÚÚ

Youth graduate from high school.

ÚÚ

High school graduates obtain a postsecondary degree, certification, or credential.

TABLE 2—FAMILY AND COMMUNITY SUPPORT INDICATORS AND RESULTS THEY ARE INTENDED TO MEASURE INDICATOR

RESULT

# and % of children who participate in at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity daily; and—# & % of children who consume five or more servings of fruits and vegetables daily; or possible third indicator, to be determined (TBD) by applicant.

ÚÚ

Students are healthy.

# and % of students who feel safe at school and traveling to and from school, as measured by a school climate needs assessment (as defined in this notice); or possible second indicator, TBD by applicant.

ÚÚ

Students feel safe at school and in their community.

ÚÚ

Students live in stable communities.

ÚÚ

Families and community members support learning in Promise Neighborhood schools.

ÚÚ

Students have access to 21st century learning tools.

Student mobility rate (as defined in this notice); or possible second indicator, TBD by applicant.

For children birth to kindergarten entry, the # and % of parents or family members who report that they read to their child three or more times a week;

For children in kindergarten through the eighth grade, the # and % of parents or family members who report encouraging their child to read books outside of school;

For children in the ninth through twelfth grades, the # and % of parents or family members who report talking with their child about the importance of college and career; or possible fourth indicator TBD by applicant; and

# and % of students who have school and home access (and % of the day they have access) to broadband Internet (as defined in this notice) and a connected computing device; or possible second indicator TBD by applicant.

The Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink provides support to Promise Neighborhoods to ensure that all children live in communities of opportunity that enable them to learn, grow, and succeed. promiseneighborhoodsinstitute.org


EASTSIDE PROMISE NEIGHBORHOOD SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS

2011 PROMISE NEIGHBORHOOD IMPLEMENTATION GRANTEE: CRADLE TO COLLEGE TO CAREER $24.6 MILLION OVER FIVE YEARS

Community Served

A Focus on Results

The Eastside Promise Neighborhood covers 3.5 square miles just east of downtown San Antonio, Texas, and is home to 17,955 people. The families in the target area are younger, poorer, and have less education than San Antonio as a whole. They face inadequate access to high-quality early-learning programs, struggling schools, and insufficient or ineffective support services.

The Eastside Promise Neighborhood (EPN) seeks to improve educational outcomes among children and youth in San Antonio’s historic Eastside. The effort brings together residents, nonprofit organizations, schools, and city government to ensure that: the community supports youth to succeed in school and beyond; youth move along a pathway from the cradle through college to a career and stay in the neighborhood; the community shares responsibility for results; everyone, including residents, organizations, and programs, works with each other so that services are effective and efficient; and lessons are shared so that other communities can build from what works.

Neighborhood Composition 7% 25%

Early Accomplishments

• EPN established SIX new pre-K classrooms at two community centers, serving 80 three- and four-year-olds who otherwise would not have had access to high-quality early learning. EPN also finalized an agreement with these providers to meet the vital need of parents for after-hours care.

68%

• EPN successfully piloted an evidence-based out-of-schooltime program serving 221 youth in the EPN footprint over the summer, including a popular Midnight Basketball program that achieved a 97 percent retention rate.

Latino African American White

Source: United States Census 2010.

Children Living in Poverty 60.1%

• EPN underwrote a summer robotics program for 35 students at Wheatley Middle School, responding to strong community demand for 21st century technology opportunities. • Working with the HUD-funded Choice Neighborhood Initiative, the San Antonio Housing Authority broke ground on a new, mixed-income, green housing development opposite the elementary school, and is incorporating jobtraining for at-risk youth.

21.9% Eastside PN

Nationwide

Eastside Source: American Community Survey 2005-2009. National Source: US Census Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) to the Current Population Survey (CPS).

Scaling Up

implement an intervention with a targeted cohort, assess results, and expand to additional cohorts

2012-14

provide all residents in the neighborhood access to the entire continuum of solution

2015

serve 5,925 children and youth

2016

EPN + PNI: Amplification of Results The Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink provides ongoing support to the Eastside PN with technical assistance, peer learning opportunities, and troubleshooting. promiseneighborhoodsinstitute.org


Partners United Way of San Antonio and Bexar County City of San Antonio City Year San Antonio

Community Information Now Family Service Association of San Antonio, Inc. P16Plus Council of San Antonio

San Antonio Housing Authority San Antonio Independent School District

Promise Neighborhoods are communities of opportunity that allow children to learn, grow, and succeed. Based on the successful model of the Harlem Children’s Zone, Promise Neighborhoods build partnerships between schools, community organizations, local businesses, and community members to wrap children in high-quality, coordinated health, social, community, and educational support from cradle to college to career. The U.S. Department of Education’s Promise Neighborhoods program insists on high-quality efforts that respond to 15 indicators to achieve 10 results for children and families. Successful Promise Neighborhoods with and without federal funding are using these indicators to improve educational and social outcomes in their communities. TABLE 1—EDUCATION INDICATORS AND RESULTS THEY ARE INTENDED TO MEASURE INDICATOR

RESULT

# and % of children birth to kindergarten entry who have a place where they usually go, other than an emergency room, when they are sick or in need of advice about their health.

ÚÚ

Children enter kindergarten ready to succeed in school.

# and % of three-year-olds and children in kindergarten who demonstrate at the beginning of the program or school year age-appropriate functioning across multiple domains of early learning (as defined in this notice) as determined using developmentally appropriate early learning measures (as defined in this notice).

# and % of children, from birth to kindergarten entry, participating in center-based or formal home-based early learning settings or programs, which may include Early Head Start, Head Start, child care, or preschool.

# and % of students at or above grade level according to State mathematics and reading or language arts assessments in at least the grades required by the ESEA (third through eighth and once in high school).

ÚÚ

Students are proficient in core academic subjects.

Attendance rate of students in sixth, seventh, eighth, and ninth grade .......................................................

ÚÚ

Graduation rate (as defined in this notice) ...................................................................................................

Students successfully transition from middle school grades to high school.

# and % of Promise Neighborhood students who graduate with a regular high school diploma, as defined in 34 CFR 200.19(b)(1)(iv), and obtain postsecondary degrees, vocational certificates, or other industry-recognized certifications or credentials without the need for remediation.

ÚÚ

Youth graduate from high school.

ÚÚ

High school graduates obtain a postsecondary degree, certification, or credential.

TABLE 2—FAMILY AND COMMUNITY SUPPORT INDICATORS AND RESULTS THEY ARE INTENDED TO MEASURE INDICATOR

RESULT

# and % of children who participate in at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity daily; and—# & % of children who consume five or more servings of fruits and vegetables daily; or possible third indicator, to be determined (TBD) by applicant.

ÚÚ

Students are healthy.

# and % of students who feel safe at school and traveling to and from school, as measured by a school climate needs assessment (as defined in this notice); or possible second indicator, TBD by applicant.

ÚÚ

Students feel safe at school and in their community.

Student mobility rate (as defined in this notice); or possible second indicator, TBD by applicant.

ÚÚ

Students live in stable communities.

For children birth to kindergarten entry, the # and % of parents or family members who report that they read to their child three or more times a week;

ÚÚ

Families and community members support learning in Promise Neighborhood schools.

For children in kindergarten through the eighth grade, the # and % of parents or family members who report encouraging their child to read books outside of school;

For children in the ninth through twelfth grades, the # and % of parents or family members who report talking with their child about the importance of college and career; or possible fourth indicator TBD by applicant; and

# and % of students who have school and home access (and % of the day they have access) to broadband Internet (as defined in this notice) and a connected computing device; or possible second indicator TBD by applicant.

ÚÚ

Students have access to 21st century learning tools.

The Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink provides support to Promise Neighborhoods to ensure that all children live in communities of opportunity that enable them to learn, grow, and succeed. promiseneighborhoodsinstitute.org


HAYWARD PROMISE NEIGHBORHOOD HAYWARD, CALIFORNIA

2011 PROMISE NEIGHBORHOOD IMPLEMENTATION GRANTEE: CRADLE TO COLLEGE TO CAREER $25 MILLION OVER FIVE YEARS

Community Served

A Focus on Results Hayward Promise Neighborhood (HPN) is a results-focused partnership working to guarantee that children in the neighborhood succeed academically; enroll in college or workforce training after high school; and enter a productive career. HPN’s comprehensive Cradle-to-College-to-Career approach emphasizes both academic rigor and a holistic support system consisting of evidence-based programs addressing student achievement, health, access to technology, safety, community stability, and family engagement.

The ethnically diverse Promise Neighborhood is in the Jackson Triangle section of South Hayward. The area includes two census tracts and is home to 10,662 residents and 3,123 children. Neighborhood Composition 9%

4% 4%

11% Latino African American Asian/South Asian White Other

Early Accomplishments

• HPN established TWO new pre-school classrooms, providing high-quality, evidence-based early education for three- and four-year-olds who otherwise would not be served. • Rolled out FIVE Kindergarten Readiness camps, serving children without prior pre-school experience and who face other barriers such as being English language learners or having disabilities.

72% Source: Hayward Unified School District (HUSD) Assessment Department, 2012.

Families at Low or Extremely Low Income Levels

• Initiated a six-month professional development opportunity for licensed family childcare providers and early childhood centers in the area, to be followed by 18 months of specialized coaching to improve results.

51%

• Developed a bilingual play and learn group training program for non-licensed informal childcare providers, which the providers attend with the children (ages 0-5) for which they are caring. • Kicked off a rigorous, bilingual parent education class utilizing a curriculum proven to increase academic achievement on the part of school-age children.

11.8% Hayward PN

Nationwide

Hayward Source: United States Census 2010. National Source: US Census Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) to the Current Population Survey (CPS).

Scaling Up early childhood and K-6 strategies

2012

middle school strategies

2013

high school and college and career readiness

2014

serve all 3,123 children in Jackson Triangle; expand to nearby areas

2015

Hayward + PNI: Amplification of Results The Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink has provided key support to the Hayward PN in the areas of resident engagement, governance, project management, and communications, and provides ongoing opportunities for peer learning. promiseneighborhoodsinstitute.org


Partners California State University, East Bay Alameda County Office of Education Alameda Healthcare Services Agency City of Hayward Chabot Community College

Community Child Care Council (4C’s) of Alameda County Eden Area Regional Occupation Program First 5 California Hayward Area Recreation and Parks Department

Hayward Unified School District Superstars Literacy Tiburcio Vasquez Health Center

Promise Neighborhoods are communities of opportunity that allow children to learn, grow, and succeed. Based on the successful model of the Harlem Children’s Zone, Promise Neighborhoods build partnerships between schools, community organizations, local businesses, and community members to wrap children in high-quality, coordinated health, social, community, and educational support from cradle to college to career. The U.S. Department of Education’s Promise Neighborhoods program insists on high-quality efforts that respond to 15 indicators to achieve 10 results for children and families. Successful Promise Neighborhoods with and without federal funding are using these indicators to improve educational and social outcomes in their communities. TABLE 1—EDUCATION INDICATORS AND RESULTS THEY ARE INTENDED TO MEASURE INDICATOR

RESULT

# and % of children birth to kindergarten entry who have a place where they usually go, other than an emergency room, when they are sick or in need of advice about their health.

ÚÚ

Children enter kindergarten ready to succeed in school.

# and % of three-year-olds and children in kindergarten who demonstrate at the beginning of the program or school year age-appropriate functioning across multiple domains of early learning (as defined in this notice) as determined using developmentally appropriate early learning measures (as defined in this notice).

# and % of children, from birth to kindergarten entry, participating in center-based or formal home-based early learning settings or programs, which may include Early Head Start, Head Start, child care, or preschool.

# and % of students at or above grade level according to State mathematics and reading or language arts assessments in at least the grades required by the ESEA (third through eighth and once in high school).

ÚÚ

Students are proficient in core academic subjects.

Attendance rate of students in sixth, seventh, eighth, and ninth grade .......................................................

ÚÚ

Graduation rate (as defined in this notice) ...................................................................................................

Students successfully transition from middle school grades to high school.

# and % of Promise Neighborhood students who graduate with a regular high school diploma, as defined in 34 CFR 200.19(b)(1)(iv), and obtain postsecondary degrees, vocational certificates, or other industry-recognized certifications or credentials without the need for remediation.

ÚÚ

Youth graduate from high school.

ÚÚ

High school graduates obtain a postsecondary degree, certification, or credential.

TABLE 2—FAMILY AND COMMUNITY SUPPORT INDICATORS AND RESULTS THEY ARE INTENDED TO MEASURE INDICATOR

RESULT

# and % of children who participate in at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity daily; and—# & % of children who consume five or more servings of fruits and vegetables daily; or possible third indicator, to be determined (TBD) by applicant.

ÚÚ

Students are healthy.

# and % of students who feel safe at school and traveling to and from school, as measured by a school climate needs assessment (as defined in this notice); or possible second indicator, TBD by applicant.

ÚÚ

Students feel safe at school and in their community.

ÚÚ

Students live in stable communities.

ÚÚ

Families and community members support learning in Promise Neighborhood schools.

ÚÚ

Students have access to 21st century learning tools.

Student mobility rate (as defined in this notice); or possible second indicator, TBD by applicant.

For children birth to kindergarten entry, the # and % of parents or family members who report that they read to their child three or more times a week;

For children in kindergarten through the eighth grade, the # and % of parents or family members who report encouraging their child to read books outside of school;

For children in the ninth through twelfth grades, the # and % of parents or family members who report talking with their child about the importance of college and career; or possible fourth indicator TBD by applicant; and

# and % of students who have school and home access (and % of the day they have access) to broadband Internet (as defined in this notice) and a connected computing device; or possible second indicator TBD by applicant.

The Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink provides support to Promise Neighborhoods to ensure that all children live in communities of opportunity that enable them to learn, grow, and succeed. promiseneighborhoodsinstitute.org


Expanded Learning Time Promise Neighborhoods are communities of opportunity that allow children to learn, grow, and succeed. Their efforts are necessary to address the significant barriers to educational achievement faced by lowincome communities and communities of color. These barriers are evident even before children begin school, and increase over time.1 The Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink (PNI) promotes equity by supporting Promise Neighborhoods to eliminate barriers to academic achievement at each stage of the cradle-to-college-to-career continuum so that all children—in low-income and affluent neighborhoods alike—have a chance to succeed. Expanded learning time is an essential aspect of successful Promise Neighborhoods

Why Expanded Learning Time? Expanded learning is an essential component of each stage of the cradle-to-college-to-career continuum. A significant barrier for low-income students is a lack of access to quality expanded learning opportunities when compared with more affluent students.2  

Summer Learning Loss: On average, middle-income students experience slight gains in reading performance over the summer months. Low-income students, on the other hand, experience average summer learning loss in reading achievement of more than two months.3 Public School Redesign: The U.S. public education system's six-hour school day and 180-day school year do not provide enough time to prepare young people to succeed in the 21st century. This factor is especially pertinent to children in communities of poverty, as these young people have greater needs for safe, learning-intensive experiences after school or during breaks.4 After-School Programs: Kids who are in afternoon school activities are 30 percent less likely to be involved in criminal activity and kids who are busy at school in the afternoon are 40 percent less likely to be involved with drugs. Ford Foundation estimates that 15 million kids in America have nowhere to go after school.5

The Promise Neighborhood Approach6 All Promise Neighborhood implementation grantees are working with at least one low-performing school,7 implementing strategies that address the effectiveness of teachers and leaders, and the school’s 1

Alexander, K. L., Entwisle, D. R., & Olson, L. S. (June 01, 2007). Summer learning and its implications: Insights from the Beginning School Study. New Directions for Youth Development, 2007, 114.). 2 Alliance for Quality Education: Agenda for School Improvement – Extended Learning Time to Expand Opportunities for Students. January, 2011, Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University. 3 Reading is Fundamental. “Primer on Summer Learning Loss.” Retrieved from: http://www.rif.org/us/literacy-resources/articles/primer-onsummer-reading-loss.htm 4 http://www.fordfoundation.org/issues/educational-opportunity-and-scholarship/more-and-better-learning-time 5 Ubiñas, Luis. (2011, October 25). Ford Foundation President Promotes Expanded Learning Time. Speech presented at the Expanded Learning Time Convening hosted by National Center on Time & Learning, Boston, MA. 6 Information retrieved from Promise Neighborhoods grant applications 7 Low-performing schools are schools receiving assistance through Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended (ESEA), that are in corrective action or restructuring in the state, as determined under section 1116 of the ESEA, and the secondary schools (both middle and high schools) in the state that are equally as low achieving as these Title I schools and are eligible for, but do not receive, Title I funds.


use of time and resources, which may include increased learning time.8 Promise Neighborhoods provide expanded learning time opportunities that enhance and align a wide range of academic and nonacademic offerings. Berea College (Clay, Jackson, and Owsley Counties, KY)  Offers after-school and summer programming for neighborhood K-12 youth. o After-school programs are modeled after 21st Century Community Learning Centers – targeted toward students with greatest need (based on Early Warning System). o Summer program provides six weeks of full-day, structured, supervised activities to keep students engaged in active learning. California State University, East Bay Foundation (Hayward, CA)  Offers after-school and summer programming focused on service learning opportunities with local college students. o Enhances the current federal- and state-funded Out of School Time (OST) program and utilizes AmeriCorps Grant for volunteer support. Northside Achievement Zone (Minneapolis, MN)  Academic case managers identify solutions for individual children both in school and in expanded learning settings. o Expanded learning opportunities are identified using a NAZ Connect tool with student and family data to connect after-school and extended school day offerings to appropriate recipients.  After-school and summer enrichment programs serve K-sixth graders year-round. Eastside Promise Neighborhood (San Antonio, TX)  Established an Out-of-School Zone that utilizes community and school locations for expanded learning opportunities. The zone incorporates external providers offering arts, cultural, fitness, recreational and sports activities that, when appropriate, are aligned with school curricula, including STEM instruction.  Extends school day through academic enrichment at Wheatley Middle School. Buffalo Promise Neighborhood (Buffalo, NY)  In an effort to replicate the success of the Westminster Community Charter School in other local schools, the Buffalo Promise Neighborhood (BPN) offers free after-school and Saturday extended learning times in addition to summer programs linked to the regular academic curriculum.  “BPN Corps,” or young adult service workers, staff summer and after-school programs and ensure academic activities are targeted to needs as identified by teachers.

The Role of Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink in Expanded Learning PNI combines the leadership of PolicyLink, the Harlem Children’s Zone, and the Center for the Study of Social Policy in order to provide resources and guidance to build and sustain burgeoning Promise 8

Increased learning time means using a longer school day, week, or year to significantly increase the total number of school hours. This strategy is used to redesign the school’s program in a manner that includes additional time for (a) instruction in core academic subjects as defined in section 9101(11) of the ESEA; (b) instruction in other subjects and enrichment activities that contribute to a well-rounded education, including, for example, physical education, service learning, and experiential and work-based learning opportunities that are provided by partnering, as appropriate, with other organizations; and (c) teachers to collaborate, plan, and engage in professional development within and across grades and subjects.


Neighborhoods. PNI is uniquely positioned to amplify the quality and quantity of equitable expanded learning opportunities around the country. PNI does this by:     

Managing a hub of high-quality technical assistance providers to help communities become Promise Neighborhoods and enhance expanded learning opportunities. Providing resources to all communities, whether or not they have been awarded a federal grant, to identify and execute effective expanded learning opportunities. Promoting partnerships within communities to build support networks for children both in and out of school. Promoting partnerships between Promise Neighborhoods across the country to share best practices and opportunities for advancement. Identifying proven expanded learning practices in order to lift up what works for all Promise Neighborhoods nationwide.

PNI’s focus on Expanded Learning will greatly assist the sites in their efforts to achieve the following Promise Neighborhoods results:

TABLE 1—EDUCATION INDICATORS AND RESULTS THEY ARE INTENDED TO MEASURE INDICATOR RESULT Children enter kindergarten  # and % of three-year-olds and children in kindergarten who ready to succeed in school. demonstrate at the beginning of the program or school year ageappropriate functioning across multiple domains of early learning (as defined in this notice) as determined using developmentally appropriate early learning measures (as defined in this notice).  # and % of children, from birth to kindergarten entry, participating in center-based or formal home-based early learning settings or programs, which may include Early Head Start, Head Start, child care, Students are proficient in core academic subjects. or preschool.  # and % of students at or above grade level according to State mathematics and reading or language arts assessments in at least the grades required by the ESEA (third through eighth and once in Youth graduate from high high school). school.  Graduation rate (as defined in this notice)  # and % of Promise Neighborhood students who graduate with a High school graduates regular high school diploma, as defined in 34 CFR 200.19(b)(1)(iv), obtain a postsecondary and obtain postsecondary degrees, vocational certificates, or other industry-recognized certifications or credentials without the need for degree, certification, or credential. remediation.


TABLE 2—FAMILY AND COMMUNITY SUPPORT INDICATORS AND RESULTS THEY ARE INTENDED TO MEASURE INDICATOR RESULT Students are healthy.  # and % of children who participate in at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity daily; and—# & % of children who consume five or more servings of fruits and vegetables daily; or possible third indicator, to be determined (TBD) by applicant. Families and community  For children birth to kindergarten entry, the # and % of parents or members support learning in family members who report that they read to their child three or Promise Neighborhood more times a week;  For children in kindergarten through the eighth grade, the # and % of schools. parents or family members who report encouraging their child to read books outside of school;  For children in the ninth through twelfth grades, the # and % of parents or family members who report talking with their child about the importance of college and career; or possible fourth indicator TBD by applicant.  # and % of students who have school and home access (and % of the Students have access to 21st day they have access) to broadband Internet (as defined in this century learning notice) and a connected computing device; or possible second indicator TBD by applicant.


Black Male Achievement Promise Neighborhoods are communities of opportunity that allow children to learn, grow, and succeed. Their efforts are necessary to address the significant barriers to educational achievement faced by lowincome communities and communities of color. These barriers are evident even before children begin school, and increase over time.1 The Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink (PNI) promotes equity by supporting Promise Neighborhoods to eliminate barriers to academic achievement at each stage of the cradle-to-college-to-career continuum so that all children—in low-income and affluent neighborhoods alike—have a chance to succeed. The academic and career achievement of black boys and men is a core focus area for Promise Neighborhoods because this group is disproportionately impacted by barriers to success.

Why Black Male Achievement? Black male achievement serves as a litmus test for the wellbeing of a community. The University of California Berkeley School of Law book, titled Changing Places: How Communities Will Improve the Health of Boys of Color, highlights several studies conducted by national experts which conclude that black men and boys are worse off in nearly every respect as compared to other neighborhood subpopulations. The study concludes that the wellbeing of these young males provides a baseline snapshot of a community’s welfare.2 A December 2010 report released by the Schott Foundation for Public Education, Yes We Can, The Schott 50 State Report on Public Education and Black Males, paints a bleak picture of the educational status of black males nationally: only 47 percent of black males in the United States graduate from high school. Other important indicators include:    

More than two million black men in America lack a high school-level education.3 Black male students are more frequently inappropriately removed from the general education classroom due to misclassifications by Special Education policies and practices.4 Black boys are more likely to attend schools that are under-resourced and performing poorly. Currently, only 15 percent of black students attend schools that are well-resourced and high performing.5 Black students are punished more severely for the same infractions as their white peers. Most often males are punished with out-of-school suspension nearly three times more often than white students. In a report analyzing 2006 data collected by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, more than 28 percent of black male middle school students had been

1

Alexander, K. L., Entwisle, D. R., & Olson, L. S. (June 01, 2007). Summer learning and its implications: Insights from the Beginning School Study. New Directions for Youth Development, 2007, 114.). 2 The Schott 50 State Report on Public Education and Black Males, Schott Foundation for Public Education, December 2010 3 Campaign for Black Men and Boys (December, 2010). We Dream a World: The 2025 Vision for Black Men and Boys. 4 “National Opportunity to Learn Campaign Federal Recommendations,” The Schott Foundation, October 15, 2009. Retrieved from: http://schottfoundation.org/otl/otl-federal-recommendations-final.pdf. 5 Ibid

PromiseNeighborhoodsInstitute.org │1


suspended at least once, which is nearly three times the 10 percent rate for white males.6 Another study found that in 15 of the nation’s largest districts, at least 30 percent of all enrolled black males were suspended one or more times.7 These elementary and secondary statistics have a clear effect on college and career outcomes for black males. They make up barely four percent of all undergraduate students, the same proportion as in 1976. They come into college less prepared than their peers for the rigors of college-level academic work and their completion rates are the lowest of all major racial and ethnic groups in the U.S.8

The Promise Neighborhood Approach The federal Promise Neighborhoods notice requires implementation grantees to conduct a needs assessment and a segmentation analysis.9 This has resulted in local leaders segmenting data by race and other variables, and then building a continuum of solutions10 that improves population-wide well-being results with a specific focus supporting sub-populations like black males to eliminate barriers to success: 

St. Paul Promise Neighborhood (St. Paul, MN): A hallmark of the Saint Paul Promise Neighborhood is to provide culturally-specific interventions to foster children’s success in school and in life. One such intervention is Kofi Services, an evidence-based, culturally-specific schooland home-based program to increase the positive functioning of African American youth. Named for a Ghanaian word meaning “child of growth,” Kofi provides cultural affirmation and role modeling and works to improve behaviors in and out of the classroom. Through intensive individual play therapy, family therapy, parent education, case management, work with the schools, and diligent follow-up, black boys are making tremendous strides in St. Paul.

Cleveland Central Promise Initiative (Cleveland, OH): Jerome Baker recognized the lack of adult role models in Cleveland’s central neighborhood and founded Men of Central, with a mission to recruit men to mentor boys aged eight to 14 years. Men of Central is a group of black men from the neighborhood who recognize the importance of positive male role models in the lives of young men. Men of Central focuses on assisting boys with after-school tutoring, gang prevention, recreation (basketball, boxing, football, swimming, baseball), and the arts.

The Role of Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink in Black Male Achievement PNI combines the leadership of PolicyLink, the Harlem Children’s Zone, and the Center for the Study of Social Policy in order to provide resources and guidance to build and sustain burgeoning Promise Neighborhoods. PNI is uniquely positioned to amplify the quality and quantity of equitable services to support black males that have been systematically disenfranchised on a social and economic level.

6

Losen, D.L. & Skiba, R.J. (2010, September). Suspended Education: Urban Middle Schools in Crisis. Los Angeles: The Civil Rights Project at UCLA. Retrieved from: http:civilrightsproject.ucla.edu/research/k-12-education/school-discipline/suspended-education-urban- middle-schoolsin-crisis/Suspended-Education_FINAL-2.pdf. 7 Losen, Daniel J., Discipline Policies, Successful Schools, and Racial Justice, The Civil Rights Project at UCLA and National Education Policy Center, October 2011 (citing Losen, D.L. & Skiba, R.J. (2010, September). Suspended Education: Urban Middle Schools in Crisis. Los Angeles: The Civil Rights Project at UCLA. http:civilrightsproject.ucla.edu/research/k-12- education/school-discipline/suspended-education-urban-middleschools-in-crisis/Suspended-Education_FINAL-2.pdf.). 8 Lederman, Doug (2012, February 6). When Black Men Succeed. Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved from: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2012/02/06/study-aims-learn-why-some-black-men-succeed-college#ixzz20OUZISDT 9 Segmentation analysis is the process of grouping and analyzing data from children and families in the geographic area proposed to be served according to indicators of need or other relevant indicators. 10 Continuum of cradle-through-college-to-career solutions or continuum of solutions means solutions that—(1) Include programs, policies, practices, services, systems, and supports that result in improving educational and developmental outcomes for children from cradle through college to career; (2) Are based on the best available evidence, including, where available, strong or moderate evidence (as defined in this notice); (3) Are linked and integrated seamlessly (as defined in this notice); and (4) Include both education programs and family and community supports.

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By promoting partnerships and identifying proven initiatives in communities like St. Paul and Cleveland, PNI aims to create a national movement to elevate the inequities facing black men and boys while taking action to help level the playing field in these communities. In the coming months, PNI will release its Black Male Achievement Resource Guide and will launch a Black Male Achievement Community of Practice. The focus of these efforts is to increase awareness of issues impacting black males, share promising practices to support the healthy development of black males, encourage collaboration and learning among the Promise Neighborhoods sites, and to encourage changes in school discipline policies and other policy areas as needed.

PNI’s focus on Black Male Achievement will greatly assist the sites in their efforts to achieve the following Promise Neighborhoods results:

TABLE 1—EDUCATION INDICATORS AND RESULTS THEY ARE INTENDED TO MEASURE INDICATOR RESULT Children enter kindergarten  # and % of children birth to kindergarten entry who have a place ready to succeed in school. where they usually go, other than an emergency room, when they are sick or in need of advice about their health.  # and % of three-year-olds and children in kindergarten who demonstrate at the beginning of the program or school year ageappropriate functioning across multiple domains of early learning (as defined in this notice) as determined using developmentally appropriate early learning measures (as defined in this notice).  # and % of children, from birth to kindergarten entry, participating in Students are proficient in center-based or formal home-based early learning settings or programs, which may include Early Head Start, Head Start, child care, core academic subjects. or preschool. Students successfully  # and % of students at or above grade level according to State transition from middle mathematics and reading or language arts assessments in at least school grades to high school. the grades required by the ESEA (third through eighth and once in high school). Youth graduate from high  Attendance rate of students in sixth, seventh, eighth, and ninth school. grade  

Graduation rate (as defined in this notice) # and % of Promise Neighborhood students who graduate with a regular high school diploma, as defined in 34 CFR 200.19(b)(1)(iv), and obtain postsecondary degrees, vocational certificates, or other industry-recognized certifications or credentials without the need for remediation.

High school graduates obtain a postsecondary degree, certification, or credential.

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TABLE 2—FAMILY AND COMMUNITY SUPPORT INDICATORS AND RESULTS THEY ARE INTENDED TO MEASURE INDICATOR RESULT Students are healthy.  # and % of children who participate in at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity daily; and # & % of children who consume five or more servings of fruits and vegetables daily; or Students feel safe at school possible third indicator, to be determined (TBD) by applicant.  # and % of students who feel safe at school and traveling to and from and in their community. school, as measured by a school climate needs assessment (as defined in this notice); or possible second indicator, TBD by Students live in stable applicant. communities.  Student mobility rate (as defined in this notice); or possible second indicator, TBD by applicant.  For children birth to kindergarten entry, the # and % of parents or family members who report that they read to their child three or more times a week;  For children in kindergarten through the eighth grade, the # and % of parents or family members who report encouraging their child to Families and community read books outside of school; members support learning in  For children in the ninth through twelfth grades, the # and % of parents or family members who report talking with their child about Promise Neighborhood schools. the importance of college and career; or possible fourth indicator 

TBD by applicant. # and % of students who have school and home access (and % of the day they have access) to broadband Internet (as defined in this notice) and a connected computing device; or possible second indicator TBD by applicant.

Students have access to 21st century learning

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Whole School Reform Promise Neighborhoods are communities of opportunity that allow children to learn, grow, and succeed. Their efforts are necessary to address the significant barriers to educational achievement faced by lowincome communities and communities of color. These barriers are evident even before children begin school, and increase over time.1 The Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink (PNI) promotes equity by supporting Promise Neighborhoods to eliminate barriers to academic achievement at each stage of the cradle-to-college-to-career continuum so that all children—in low-income and affluent neighborhoods alike—have a chance to succeed. Whole school reform can be crucial to the success of a Promise Neighborhood, especially those working with under-performing schools.

Why Whole School Reform? Educational problems extend beyond a single department or focus area of a school. Whole school reform—the use of a comprehensive school design to transform a school in an effort to improve student performance2— focuses on systemic change across the entire school, including the structure of the school day and the organizational elements within. The Center on Reinventing Public Education offers seven components necessary for a portfolio strategy that can enhance whole school reform efforts in Promise Neighborhoods:3       

Good Options and Choices for All Families School Autonomy Pupil-Based Funding for All Schools Talent-Seeking Strategy Sources of Support for Schools Performance-Based Accountability for Schools Extensive Public Engagement

Since schools disproportionately fail low-income children of color, Promise Neighborhoods work with schools aiming to strategically reform in order to meet the needs of a diverse student body. Incorporating these components into whole school reform will result in a more equitable school system that provides opportunities for all students, regardless of race or socioeconomic background.

1

Alexander, K. L., Entwisle, D. R., & Olson, L. S. (June 01, 2007). Summer learning and its implications: Insights from the Beginning School Study. New Directions for Youth Development, 2007, 114.). 2 Tucci, Tara. (2009, July). Whole-School Reform: Transforming the Nation’s Low-Performing High Schools. A Policy Brief developed for the Alliance for Excellent Education. 3 crpe.org/portfolio


The Promise Neighborhood Approach In order to build a high-quality continuum of solutions,4 local leaders are required to implement ambitious, rigorous, and comprehensive education reforms that are linked to improved educational outcomes for children and youth in preschool through 12th grade. Buffalo Promise Neighborhood (Buffalo, NY) Buffalo Promise Neighborhood (BPN) opened up the Westminster Community Charter School (WCCS) to provide neighborhood students with the very best education and resources to succeed.5 Led by M&T Bank Corporation in 1993, a collaboration of business, community, and educational representatives transformed one of Buffalo’s lowest-performing schools into one of the highest in Buffalo today. The school officially became a charter school in 2004, espousing the following characteristics:6      

Employs a system of diagnostic analysis to assess students' strengths and weaknesses. Customizes instruction to meet individual student needs. Manages a fine arts program with field trips. Provides computer technology, conflict resolution training, mentoring, and a health clinic. Operates an after-school program open three hours daily, five days a week, and will be mandated for students performing below grade level. Offers teachers professional development opportunities in partnership with the Teachers College at Columbia University.

BPN has entered into a first-of-a-kind shared management agreement with the Buffalo Public Schools that enables them to work with three district schools on school transformation, creating community schools, connecting students to other supportive programming, and accessing student record data to build their data system. BPN is also employing two strongly researched and evidence-based strategies of note: Career Academies7 and Talent Development/Diplomas Now.8 Not only do teachers partner with influential community partners, but also with parents of students at the school. WCCS believes that education is the shared responsibility of the students, parents, family, school and community and that the academic achievement and success of our students depend on the strength of the partnerships developed among these stakeholders. Teachers encourage parents to strategically align activities at home with curricular activities in the classroom.9 For example, the December 2012 newsletter offered sample problems and tips on how best to assist student efforts and align with classroom goals.

4

Continuum of cradle-through-college-to-career solutions or continuum of solutions means solutions that—(1) Include programs, policies, practices, services, systems, and supports that result in improving educational and developmental outcomes for children from cradle through college to career; (2) Are based on the best available evidence, including, where available, strong or moderate evidence (as defined in this notice); (3) Are linked and integrated seamlessly (as defined in this notice); and (4) Include both education programs and family and community supports. 5

http://www.westminsterccs.org/welcome Charter Schools Institute - The State University of New York. Retrieved from http://www.newyorkcharters.org/proWestminsterComm.htm 7 http://www.childtrends.org/Lifecourse/programs/CareerAcademies.htm 8 http://www.tdschools.org/research-results/diplomas-now/ 9 Monthly newsletters are geared towards parents with specific instructions about classroom activities and how parents can assist with student learning. 6


The Role of Promise Neighborhoods Institute at PolicyLink in Whole School Reform PNI combines the leadership of PolicyLink, the Harlem Children’s Zone, and the Center for the Study of Social Policy in order to provide resources and guidance to build and sustain burgeoning Promise Neighborhoods. PNI is uniquely positioned to amplify the efficacy of whole school reform efforts. PNI does this by:    

Managing a hub of high-quality technical assistance providers to help communities become Promise Neighborhoods and partner with schools in their community. Providing resources to all communities, whether or not they have been awarded a federal grant, to improve learning opportunities for all children. Promoting partnerships within communities to build support networks for children. Promoting partnerships between Promise Neighborhoods across the country to share best practices and opportunities for advancement.

Identifying proven educational learning practices in order to lift up what works for all Promise Neighborhoods nationwide, while offering Promise Neighborhoods like Buffalo venues to inform other communities about how to best drive effective whole school reform. PNI’s focus on Whole School Reform will greatly assist the sites in their efforts to achieve the following Promise Neighborhoods results:

TABLE 1—EDUCATION INDICATORS AND RESULTS THEY ARE INTENDED TO MEASURE INDICATOR RESULT Children enter Kindergarten  # and % of three-year-olds and children in kindergarten who ready to succeed in school demonstrate at the beginning of the program or school year ageappropriate functioning across multiple domains of early learning (as defined in this notice) as determined using developmentally appropriate early learning measures (as defined in this notice).  # and % of children, from birth to kindergarten entry, participating in Students are proficient in core academic subjects. center-based or formal home-based early learning settings or programs, which may include Early Head Start, Head Start, child care, or preschool. Students successfully  # and % of students at or above grade level according to State transition from middle mathematics and reading or language arts assessments in at least school grades to high school. the grades required by the ESEA (third through eighth and once in high school). Youth graduate from high  Graduation rate (as defined in this notice) school.  # and % of Promise Neighborhood students who graduate with a regular high school diploma, as defined in 34 CFR 200.19(b)(1)(iv), High school graduates and obtain postsecondary degrees, vocational certificates, or other industry-recognized certifications or credentials without the need for obtain a postsecondary degree, certification, or remediation. credential.


TABLE 2—FAMILY AND COMMUNITY SUPPORT INDICATORS AND RESULTS THEY ARE INTENDED TO MEASURE Students are healthy  # and % of children who participate in at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity daily; and # & % of children who consume five or more servings of fruits and vegetables daily; or possible third indicator, to be determined by applicant  For children birth to kindergarten entry, the # and % of parents or family members who report that they read to their child three or Families and community more times a week;  For children in kindergarten through the eighth grade, the # and % of members support learning in Promise Neighborhood parents or family members who report encouraging their child to schools read books outside of school; and  For children in the ninth through twelfth grades, the # and % of parents or family members who report talking with their child about the importance of college and career; or possible fourth indicator TBD by applicant.  # and % of students who have school and home access (and % of the Students have access to 21st day they have access) to broadband Internet (as defined in this century learning notice) and a connected computing device; or possible second indicator TBD by applicant.


PROMISE NEIGHBORHOODS INSTITUTE AT POLICYLINK 2013 SCOPE OF WORK PNI Accelerator

Administration

Fundraising

Stakeholder Engagement

Communications Movement Building and Policy

Communications

PNI Award

Results Stories

Documentation of PN

PNI Web Site

Director’s Blog

Community of Practice/ Movement Building

Applicant Workshops

Network Convening

Black Male Achievement Affinity Group

Support Planning and Implementation

Continuum of Solutions Webinar Series

Policy

Issue Area Technical Assistance/ Turning Curves Manual

Turning Curves Manual

Annual PN Appropriation

HCZ Practitioner’s Institute

Expanded Learning

ESEA Reauthorization

Leadership Development Program

Boys and Men of Color

Cradle to Career Model Legislation

Expert Coaches

Zero to Five Education

Policy Briefs

Promise Stat

Health

U.S. Dept. of ED Technical Assistance

Build and Maintain Data Platform

Data Platforms

Promise Scorecard

Efforts to Outcomes

U.S. Dept. of ED Technical Assistance


Lessons From The Promise Neighborhoods Program  

2013 Funders Event

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