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SUPPLY CHAIN Endorsed by: CCF l CGCSA l CILTSA l CSCMP l SAAFF l SAEPA l SAPICS l SMART X l

T O D A Y

Nov/Dec 2018

Report-back on the Prestigious Regional Connectivity Forum Caution: Potential to Bring Down a Freight Network


Purveyors of information The most satisfying aspect of being a publisher is putting people, ideas and concepts in touch with each other. When I was at university, the role of the editor was described as that of ‘gatekeeper.’ Press releases arrive daily in our Inbox about new and not-so-new developments in the industry, we attend seminars, conferences and work visits where we get up close and personal with the subject. Then there are meetings with figures in supply chain who are each interested in making a difference. Some have developed a new rack protection system, through to government heads tasked with setting the scene for supply chain and logistics at a macro level. The editor’s job is to sift through the ‘noise’, the occasional over-inflated and sometimes downright crooked claims to arrive at a balanced informative distillation of what is new in supply chain right now and what is coming down the pike. In our travels, a common thread is private sector saying government goes ahead willy-nilly without consultation. On the other hand, government tells us they invite private stakeholders who don’t turn up for the meeting or workshop. “Supply Chain Today” thus determined to put together a forum in which the public and private sectors could talk equally and freely. We partnered with the well-known PR company, CVLC, which specialises in the supply chain arena, together with Ciltsa logistics expert, Gerard de Villiers, aided by Fesarta and strongly supported by the Gauteng Department of Roads and Transport. To a man (woman), each of the 56 delegates and speakers, split equally between the public and private sectors, told us that the right people arrived to talk about the right topics in the right format and right setting. The role of the gatekeeper remains valid to this day. Publications have traditionally filled this role and still do, but they are now amped up as purveyors of quality information by websites, newsletters and good old-fashioned one-on-one networking. Susan Custers, Managing Editor, BA.Comm

SUPPLY

CHAIN

T O D A Y

On the cover Tata www.tata.co.za

Contents

ENDORSING BODIES

Forklift Survey 4 Overview of the Industry

Afritag (div of Smart Card Society)

Climate Change 6 New Shipping Opportunities

CGCSA (Consumer Goods Council SA)

Regional Connectivity Forum 8 Making Inter-state Transport Work in Africa Customer-Centric 20 Leading the Pack Blockchain 22 Breakthroughs on the Horizon Industrial Warehousing 26 A Milestone Achievement

CCF

(Cold Chain Forum)

CILTSA (Chartered Institute of Logistics & Transport: SA) SAAFF (South African Association of Freight Forwarders) SAEPA (SA Express Parcel Association) Sapics (Association for Operations Management of SA) CSCMP (Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals) Also mailed to RFA members

Better Performance 29 Digitising Integrated Poultry Forklifts 30 Making the Switch 2019 Sapics Conference 33 Surviving and Thriving in Turbulent Times IoT Sensors 34 Averting Potential Disasters 41 Market Forum

MEC Dr Ismail Vadi, Gauteng Province Department of Roads and Transport

Copyright

All rights reserved. No editorial matter published in Supply Chain Today may be reproduced in any form or language without written permission of the publishers. While every effort is made to ensure accurate reproduction, the editor, authors, publishers and their employees or agents shall not be responsible or in any way liable for any errors, omissions or inaccuracies in the publication, whether arising from negligence or otherwise or for any consequences arising therefrom. The inclusion or exclusion of any product does not mean that the publisher or editorial board advocates or rejects its use either generally or in any particular field or fields.

Proprietor and Publisher: PROMECH PUBLISHING Tel: (011) 781-1401 E-mail: supplychain@promech.co.za, www.supplychaintoday.co.za Managing Editor: Susan Custers Advertising Sales: Louise Cresswell (071 886 1263)

Production Manager: Anne Rotteglia Administration and Circulation Manager: Belinda Siegruhn

Subscriptions: Please email us at accounts@promech.co.za if you wish to subscribe to “Supply Chain Today” Printed by: Typo Colour Printing, Tel: (011) 402-3468 FSC (Forestry Stewardship Accreditation)

Supply Chain Today

November/December 2018

3


SURVEY

Forklift Survey Name of Company Number of Employees

Branches in:

Forklift Brand Name/s Represented

A Square Forklift

Avis Forklift Centre

57

42

Barloworld Handling

Forkman

300

30

Goscor Lift Truck Company

Jungheinrich

1 000

+/-50

Durban, Cape

Cape Town, Durban, EL

Alrode South,

Cape Town,

Town, PE,

Alberton, KZN,

Durban,

EL, Nelspruit,

Cape Town

Johannesburg

Welkom,

Nelspruit, PE,

Richards Bay

Pmb

Nichiyu, Mitsubishi’

Hyster, Utilev, Maximal, Liftstar

Combilift

Combilift, Bradshaw

Gauteng

Johannesburg,

Johannesburg, Durban, Cape Town, (PE,EL service centres)

Tailift, Bradshaw,

Crown, Doosan,

Jungheinrich,

Flexi

Bendi, Hubtex

Ameise

TYPE OF BUSINESS OPERATIONS l New machine sales

ü

ü

ü

ü

- Distributor

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

- Agent

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Used machine sales

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Rentals

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Leasing

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Refurbishing

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Repairs

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Attachments

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Walk behind

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Ride-on

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l 1.5 to 5.0

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l 5.0 to 10.0

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l 10.0 to 20.0

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

PALLET TRUCKS

Lifting capacity range (tons):

l 20.0 to 50.0 l Over 50

ü

Power options: l Battery

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Diesel

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l LPG

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Petroleum

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

Services/extras offered: l In-house training after sales

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Ongoing training

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Battery service contracts

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Engine repair contracts

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Tyre replacement or conversion

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Onboard weighing systems

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Barcode facilities l Status monitoring

4

Supply Chain Today

ü ü

ü

November/December 2018

ü

ü ü

ü


SURVEY

Forklift Survey Name of Company Number of Employees

Branches in:

Linde Material Handling

Manhand Materials Handling

Manitou SA

Shamrock Handling Concepts

Saficon Industrial Equipment

+/-220

81

+/-120

20

+/-1 000

Gauteng, Durban, Cape Town, PE

Johannesburg, Durban, Cape

National footprint Cape Town

Town, PE

with sub-dealers throughout SA

Moffett, Agrimac, Forklift Brand Name/s Represented

Linde

Manhand

Manitou

Combilift, AisleMaster

JHB, CT, PE, Durban, 12 national depots, 12 international dealers Toyota Forklifts, Konecranes, Bullmor, BT, Raymond, Flexi, JCB, Terberg

TYPE OF BUSINESS OPERATIONS l New machine sales

ü

ü

ü

ü

- Distributor

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

- Agent

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Used machine sales

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Rentals

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Leasing

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Refurbishing

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Repairs

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Attachments

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Walk behind

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Ride-on

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

PALLET TRUCKS

Lifting capacity range (tons): l 1.5 to 5.0 l 5.0 to 10.0

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l 10.0 to 20.0

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l 20.0 to 50.0

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Over 50 Power options: l Battery

ü

ü

l Diesel

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l LPG

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

l Petroleum

ü

Services/extras offered: l In-house training after sales

ü

ü

ü

l Ongoing training

ü

ü

ü

l Battery service contracts

ü

ü

ü

l Engine repair contracts

ü

l Tyre replacement or conversion

ü

l Onboard weighing systems

ü

ü

l Barcode facilities

ü

ü

l Status monitoring

ü

ü

ü ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü

ü ü

ü

Supply Chain Today

November/December 2018

5


COVER STORY CLIMATE CHANGE

Climate change is impacting ice hazards for shipping, freeing up new trade routes in some areas, while increasing the risk of ice in others. Arctic ice has been thinning and retreating over the past 40 years, bringing new opportunities for shipping.

New shipping opportunities

T

here was a milestone for Arctic shipping in early 2018 when a specially-designed LNG tanker became the first commercial ship to travel the Northern Sea route in winter without the assistance of an ice breaker. The Eduard Toll successfully journeyed from South Korea to Montoir, France via northern Russia, shaving around 3 000 nautical miles off the traditional transit via the Suez Canal. It followed the transit in August 2017 of another specially-designed tanker, the Christophe de Margerle, which became the first merchant ship to sail across the Arctic Ocean without the aid of an icebreaker. It took just 19 days to reach South Korea from Norway, almost a week faster than going via the Mediterranean.

Arctic ice has been thinning and retreating over the past 40 years, bringing new opportunities for shipping, but also serious environmental concerns. Research shows the mean centre of shipping activity moved 300km north and east, closer to the North Pole, over a seven-year span.

Advantages vs disadvantages

“Climate change could open up new shipping routes in the Arctic, such as the North West Passage, and routes across Russia and Canada. These routes will have advantages as well as disadvantages. For example, a collision in a remote hostile environment like the Arctic could prove challenging, and would be a long way away from salvage teams,� says Volker Dierks, Head of Marine Hull Underwriting, AGCS Central & Eastern Europe.

It took just 19 days to reach South Korea from Norway, almost a week faster than going via the Mediterranean

6

Supply Chain Today

November/December 2018


CLIMATE CHANGE

In February 2018, China announced plans for an “Arctic Silk Road” by developing shipping lanes opened up by global warming. China says it will encourage infrastructure development and conduct commercial trial voyages in Arctic waters, with plans to build its first Polar expedition cruise ship by 2019. At the beginning of 2017 the International Code of Safety for Ships Operating in Polar Waters (polar code) came into force. The code introduces mandatory requirements for shipping in polar regions, principally relating to ice navigation, manning and ship design. “The Polar Code continues to be refined,” says Captain Andrew Kinsey, Senior Marine Risk Consultant, AGCS. “And the normal International Maritime Organisation review updates are too slow. For these new shipping routes, we need to find faster ways to disseminate information and the lessons of successful transits.”

Conditional areas

Outside the Arctic and Antarctic, a number of so-

called conditional areas also carry a higher risk of ice, including the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Alaska, Sakhalin, Russia and the Baltic Sea. There is also a threat of ice hazards in more southerly shipping routes from icebergs. At the end of 2017, the US Coast Guard’s International Ice Patrol warned shipping companies that an unusual number of icebergs were drifting into shipping lanes. It found that over 1 000 icebergs had drifted into North Atlantic shipping lanes in 2017, marking it the fourth consecutive season where the danger has been classified as ‘extreme’. “Such extraordinary conditions require complementary training for crew, as well as additional routing support,” Arnaud Gibrais, a Senior Marine Risk Consultant at AGCS, based in Paris, concludes. Volker Dierks, Head of Marine Hull Underwriting, AGCS Central & Eastern Europe

Supply Chain Today

November/December 2018

7


REGIONAL CONNECTIVITY FORUM

Making Inter-state Transport Work in Africa

South African logistics is a huge lever which can improve regional performance, said Gauteng Roads and Transport MEC Dr Ismail Vadi at the inaugural Regional Connectivity Forum held in October. The Forum, a highlevel event, comprised leaders from both the public and private sectors.

About the Regional Connectivity Forum Held in partnership with the Gauteng Freight Forum, representing the Gauteng Department of Transport and Roads, the government delegation was headed up by Freeman Masuku, Chief Director, Policy and Planning from the Gauteng Department of Roads and Transport. This interactive, high-level, boutique event is an initiative of FESARTA (the Federation of Eastern and Southern African Road Transport Associations), “Supply Chain Today”, CVLC Communication and was facilitated by logistics expert, Gerard de Villiers. These discussions were the closing highlight of Transport Month.

MEC Dr Ismail Vadi, Gauteng Province Department of Roads and Transport

T

he one-day Regional Connectivity Forum provided a unique platform, where government and industry stakeholders shared thoughts and aligned strategies to achieve their respective objectives in improving regional connectivity. It was all about a fair and equitable discussion between the private and public sectors. In his opening address, Vadi said that intermodal transport was the most flexible and cost-efficient solution to boost connectivity in the SADC region, adding that intra-regional trade accounted for around only 16% of total regional trade value. “We are not tapping into our own markets in Africa,” said Vadi. “What can we do to change this and propel ourselves forward? If we can get the right kind of infrastructure and integration, we can achieve short-term growth. This is key.” Vadi emphasised that South Africa has significant capabilities – we have fairly modern systems in place. “The challenge is that there is disjuncture,” he said.

Opportunities

Although Sub-Saharan Africa ranked poorly as a

8

Supply Chain Today

November/December 2018


REGIONAL CONNECTIVITY FORUM

Private investment in transport infrastructure across world regions ($ billion) aggregate value 2008 - 2018

Source: The European House - Ambrosetti elaboration on IATA data, 2018

performing region in terms of logistics, it had a high level of variability and heterogeneity among countries in terms of logistics performance and at intra-country level among different logistics and mobility ambits, signalling the existence of bottlenecks. The good news however was that, “heterogeneity indicates vast opportunities and room for intervention that could be unleashed by a common strategy, policy streamlining and aligned standards and regulations,” said Vadi.

and the EU (European Union). The country’s strategic location at the core of major routes affirms itself as a key hub for local, regional and global trade flows. In addition, South Africa ranks 15th globally in terms of rail network extensions.

Infrastructure deployment was key – closing the infrastructure gap in the region would bring SADC countries an additional GDP growth of 2.6% per annum.

Opportunities for EU SADC Cooperation

Major hindrances

Vadi said that, with a co-ordinated approach and collective efforts however, major hindrances could be solved. These included: • sub-optimal private investments in infrastructure in Sub-Saharan Africa. Investments into the SADC region accounted for only 2% of the world total in 2017, down by 36% in 2016 and by 67% in 2015. • poor level of integration and standardisation in rail. Currently, 80% of intra-SADC trade uses roads and trucks.

Freeman Masuku, Gauteng Department of Roads and Transport

Vadi highlighted several opportunities for cooperation between SADC and the EU, including: • Infrastructure projects in SADC countries provide opportunities for private players • Air transport could be a strategic area for co-operation boosting growth, productivity and jobs • Cross-country programmes for professional education, vocational training and upskilling • Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the rail

• high transport and trading costs, which are higher than any other region in the world. This is partly due to the shortage of skills and competences in logistics and digital technology.

Logistics Excellence the Lever to Performance

South African logistics performs even better than OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries

Supply Chain Today

November/December 2018

9


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REGIONAL CONNECTIVITY FORUM

World Bank Logistics Performance Index (relative score: 0 = poor, 5 = good), 2017 or latest available data

Officer of the Maputo Development Corridor Logistics Initative (MCLI), a non-profit organisation focussed on the promotion and further development of the Maputo Development Corridor (MDC) as the region’s primary logistics transport route.

Source: The European House - Ambrosetti elaboration on IATA data, 2018

sector, electrification, digital logistics, ports, intermodal hubs and services, engineering and construction and ICT (Information and Communication Technology) Larger EU companies should act as trailblazers for European SMEs in these sectors. Vadi added that the SADC region is a potential growth point over the next decade. To achieve this however requires shared vision, political will and commitment of all stakeholders, provincially, nationally and region. Effective partnerships between government, industry, academia and communities are essential. There are important opportunities for targeted investments in transport infrastructure, rail and freight and the logistics sectors. Education, skills development and training however remain key, as is integrating ICT platforms in SADC region and developing new digital platforms. “Governments in SADC are also seriously looking at improving rail connectivity and increase investment in rail network, rolling stock and systems,” he added. Policy reform and compatibility across SADC region/ common operational procedures will also need to be developed. Road networks need to be improved, and an inland port in Gauteng developed. “To take advantage of these opportunities we need to be flexible and agile,” noted Vadi. “We also need to set targets and work towards them: if we don’t, we won’t make progress.”

Barbara Mommen – MCLI

Partnerships are key to the success of regionally connectivity, said Barbara Mommen, Chief Executive

11

Supply Chain Today

November 2018

Sharing some of the successes of MCLI and the Corridor, Barbara said that key factors that had contributed to Connectivity were infrastructure and communication. Infrastructure included improved systems and an improved trade facilitation environment, as well as effective institutional arrangements which have delivered on stakeholder mandates. Regular engagement between stakeholders is key. “Regional connectivity will not happen without infrastructure – soft (systems, processes, partnerships) and hard infrastructure,” she said.

Historical Throughput of the Maputo Corridor

Barbara highlighted some of the successes of the Maputo Port Development Company, since the commencement of the concession period: • Volume growth of 200% • Investment to date of more than US$735m • Dredging, sheds, slabs, roads, gates, IT systems and equipment, berths. • Dredging of the Channel -14.3m. • Dredging of berths allowing a move in reception from Handymax and Handy size vessels to Panamax, Pos Panamax and Cape Size Vessels. • Efficiency improvement of cargo handling rates with the acquisition of 2 x mobile harbour cranes (with two more to arrive in January 2019). • Human Capital development contributing to efficiency gains (crane moves per hour increased from 10 to 22). In the years since its establishment, MCLI has encountered a number of challenges, including lack of political will, corruption and non-compliance, lack of implementation of agreements and disconnect between policy and implementation. “Regional integration is difficult when it is not aligned with national interests,” said Barbara.

Barbara Mommen, CEO, Maputo Corridor Logistics Initiative

Supply Chain Today

She explains that regional connectivity can only be achieved through communication, transparency, accountability, as well as genuNovember/December 2018

11


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REGIONAL CONNECTIVITY FORUM

Historical Throughput of the Maputo Corridor

Godwin Punungwe, TTTFP, Transport Co-ordinator for SADC

ine, workable institutional partnerships between public and private sector. “Regional Connectivity demands vision and maturity and an enormous conceptual shift to look at things differently,” she concluded.

Tripartite Transport and Transit Facilitation Programme (TTTFP)

Progress to date on the Tripartite Transport and Transit Facilitation Programme (TTTFP) were shared by Godwin Punungwe -TTTFP Transport Co-ordinator for SADC.

cating a range of laws, regulations and standards, developing and integrating transport information systems, as well as variable geometry. The Programme had adopted a four-phase approach: • Stage 1: Establish Statutory Basis

TTTFP was formed to facilitate the development of a more competitive, integrated and liberalised regional road transport market in the COMESA (Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa), East African Community (EAC) and Southern African Development Community (SADC) regions.

• Stage 2: Institutional Capacity and Development of Systems (eg, Operator, TRIPS, Interfaces)

Godwin said that the entire project hinges on the harmonisation and liberalisation of road transport. These include the signing of agreements, domesti-

Cross-Border Initiatives

• Stage 3: Project Implementation of Systems • Stage 4: Execution in selected corridors, Monitoring, Evaluation and Roll-out Strategy The newly-established Cross Border Road Transport Regulators Form (CBRT-RF) was established to


LOGISTICS CONNECTIVITY FORUM REGIONAL

address the region’s multitude of challenges, constraints and impediments facing cross-border road transport operators as they conduct operations between and across countries in SADC and the Tripartite.

Freight Forwarders. The WCO (World Customs Region) currently has 22 members

SMART Corridors are the Future

Trudie Nichols, a Partner at Bowmans, outlined some of the Sibulele Dyodo – Executive According to Sibulele Dyodo, responses to the existing chalManager, Stakeholders Executive Manager of Stakelenges of cross-border compliance, Relations, Cross-Border Road holder Relations at the Crossranging from Continental, Triparite Transport Agency Border Road Transport Agency, and REC level initiatives. “Neither one of the key functions of the Continental nor Regional agreements CBRT-RF is to support, promote and have been successful because they have implement the development of SADC Guidenot been implemented,” she said. lines on regulatory frameworks for inter-state road transport. The CBRT-RF comprises representatives Focusing on the future of Cross-Border transport, from Zambia, Namibia, Mozambique, Trudie said that success would be achieved by embracing the 4th Industrial Malawi and Zimbabwe. Revolution: the Internet of Establishment of a Things, SMART Corridors, and a paperless supply Private Sector chain. “SMART CorGrouping in the ridors are focused ESA region on Safety, Mobility, The establishment Automation, and of a private sector Real-Time Traffic grouping in the Management,” she ESA (East South Juanita Maree, SA Association explained. “The adAfrica) region would Trudie Nichols, Parner, of Freight Forwarders vantages of SMART Bowmans play an important role Corridors include savin bringing trade to our ing transport time and region, said Juanita Maree costs, increasing safety and from the South African Association of


REGIONAL CONNECTIVITY FORUM

security, simplifying trade while increasing efficiency, opening-up of landlocked countries and enhancing competitiveness.” Hubs and SEZs (Special Economic Zones), as well as Free Trade Areas in Africa, are critical success factors.

offers Trade Corridor Performance Benchmarking and Collaboration services.” Services could include Fuel, Cold Chain and Driver Management, Asset Utilisation, E-Marketplaces and Green Lanes. “Commercial trade corridor stakeholders who use these services will simultaneously improve asset utilisation, reduce costs and delays and improve governance and compliance,” said Alwyn.

“Agile governance is what Professor Alwyn Hoffman, is needed to fully address NWU: Potchefstroom Campus our challenges,” said Trudie. “The impact of the 4th Industrial Revolution is exponential: It Collaboration will have a huge impact, with things “Collaboration is key to the changing daily. Governments will therefore need success of road transport operato respond far quicker. This is about governments tors, said Justin Blythe, CEO understanding this is a multi-stakeholder approach. of Manline Energy, outlining They need to focus more on policy and less on some of the challenges trucking regulations.” companies face cross-border. “We need a stable IT platform, Industry 4.0 and Cross-Border we need harmonisation and Justin Blythe, CEO, Tracking and Tracing Manline Carriers we need standardisation of There are a myriad of opportunities for Trade Corpaperwork requirements,” he ridors to benefit from the application of Industry emphasised. 4.0 principles. These were highlighted by Alwyn Hoffman from North West University, who preChallenges sented a number of success stories. “All industry Doing cross-border trade and transport is high 4.0 principles developed for the Manufacturing risk, with road freight operators encountering chalsector are equally applicable to Logistics Tracking lenges both at the border posts and in country. and Tracing solutions,” explained Hoffman. “A good Numerous challenges are experienced at border example of a practical application is a system that posts, including: poor networking functionality,


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REGIONAL CONNECTIVITY FORUM

Weight of intra-regional trade on total regional trade (% share of region’s total trade), 2017 or latest available year

islands of technology. Data sharing however is key. Once again collaboration is vital: institutional collaboration and Public/private collaboration. Johann highlighted initiatives around the world such as London’s Open Data, in which open data sets are available to developers to realise innovative Value Added Services (VAS) and gain insight from data that could have commercial benefits. Data is provided free of charge, according to Transport Data Terms & Conditions. At the end of 2017, there were 11 000 developers, 600 travel apps had been developed in the UK, and 42% of Londoners were using apps powered by this data feed.

Source: The European House - Ambrosetti elaboration on IATA data, 2018

systems not harmonised, human capacity constraints, lack of capacity of clearing agents, large cash requirements, queries and associated delays, as well as poor/limited parking and ablution facilities. Once in a country, drivers encounter a different set of challenges in different countries: different road transport authorities with different rules and regulations, unscrupulous law enforcement, road infrastructure challenges, quality of fuel and fuel costs, high communications costs (data), limited technical support and limited medical support.

Big Data – Big Opportunities, Big Challenges

Big data has a massive role to play in Regional Connectivity. The opportunities are limitless and the outlook exciting. “We are in the early days of realising the value of big data in the Transport sector,” said Johann Andersen, CEO of Techso. “Technology allows for on-time and accurate monitoring, diagnosis and evaluation. Currently there is very little leverage by government on sensing, communication and Dr Johann Andersen, data technologies in freight transCEO, TECHSO port.” The opportunities are there to create open data platforms and improve data exchange and to connect

According to Johann, Dubai has also recognised the power of open data. Citizens can now see how their tax dollars are spent. They can access government services more conveniently. Software developers can create new apps and online services for urban residents In October 2017 the Dubai Data Law was passed, which requires all government departments to share their data with each other and with private sector organisations and city stakeholders. This allows for an integrated digital platform for data access. “It is vital however that there is a balance struck between making data available and maintaining data security,” Johann emphasises. “We are moving from data poor to data rich. We are transitioning from being data averse to data hungry. Advances in sensors, telecommunications and the connected vehicle are driving a new wave of data. Many of the challenges have already been addressed outside of transport. We are entering a “results-driven” era in transport in which there is a need for quality decision information and the movement towards management of transport as a system,” concluded Johann.

Aviation and Regional Connectivity

Aviation connects African business to world markets and plays a critical role in facilitating and driving Regional Connectivity, said Bongiwe Pityi Vokwana General Manager, OR Tambo International Airport at Airports Company South Africa.

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REGIONAL CONNECTIVITY FORUM Bongiwe outlined the Single African Air Transport Market (SAAMT), a grouping that was formed with the aim of ensuring intra-regional connectivity in Africa. Launched in January 2018, SAATM is a flagship project of the African Union and aims to create a single unified air transport market in Africa.

of self-service options. These include self bagdrops, self-boarding and Smart security”.

Corridors

“Transport is usually regarded as responding to demand (derived demand) and this is in particular true with passenger Bongiwe Pityi-Vokwana, transport,” said Gerard de VilGeneral Manager, OR Tambo lers of the Chartered Institute International Airport, Airports “South Africa’s geographical Company of South Africa of Logistics and Transport: South location can enhance its ability to Africa (CILTSA), who facilitated the develop a well-connected network, ie, Forum. “However, in the case of freight the establishment of a hub by capturing transport, it could be said that transport is both intra- and inter-regional trade,” said Bongiwe. an inducer of development, as good accessibility and mobility surely contributes and encourages She highlighted ACSA’s Airport Master Plan, key development. The link between transport, develto which was integration with the surrounding opment and trade is clear and there is no doubt transport network. “With global passenger travel that the effective functioning of corridors or supexpected to double by 2035, reaching 6 billion, ply chains depends on good access and mobility we need to address the challenge of longer queues to facilitate development and stimulate trade”. and waiting times for passengers at each step of their journey,” she explained. “The vision of the Way Forward Fast Travel initiative is that, by 2020, 80% of “It is no longer companies that compete in today’s global passengers will be offered a complete suite global markets, but supply chains,” said Freeman Masuku, Chief Director at the Gauteng Department of Roads and Transport. “If we don’t resolve the challenges, we won’t succeed. Our focus needs to be on reducing the cost of logistics. South Africa’s competitiveness is being eroded by other regions. Dialogue between the public and private sectors and collaboration is key to achieving true Regional Connectivity”. Gerard de Villiers, Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport

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LOGISTICS

Leading the pack While the public sector has a long way to go, effective data management has proven it packs a powerful punch in thwarting corruption and driving municipal efficiencies.

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ustomer-centric businesses could see their projected profit growth rates increase from 5.3% this year to 7.4% in 2020, according to a 2018 survey by KPMG Canada, while companies that are strongly customer-centric are 60% more profitable than companies that aren’t.

Analysing the reasons for losing customers when this happens, and also looking closely at how often and why the company is re-awarded business This latter finding is detailed in a report compiled by Deloitte Ireland in 2014, and four years on it remains as relevant as ever. A customer-centric philosophy helps companies grow revenue, improve efficiency and drive performance, and has become a business imperative for entities that genuinely want to stay ahead of rising competition. “Customer-centricity is so much more than just great customer service,” says Bruce Thoresson, International Logistics director for Bidvest Panalpina Logistics (BPL). “It’s about creating an experience from the moment we first engage with a client until after our services have been rendered. We put the customer at the heart of our decision-making and service delivery throughout that process, providing a service uniquely customised for their needs.” Owned by services, trading and distribution powerhouse Bidvest, and the local partner of Swiss-owned

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Panalpina Group, BPL has seen incredible growth since its early days as privately-owned Safcor. Offering an end-to-end supply-chain solution across a number of industries, the company has a global reach, with 500 offices in 70 countries through Panalpina’s network.

Anticipate not dictate

Locally, BPL has a loyal and long-lived client list, some of whom they’ve been servicing for more than 15 years. Steve Smith, Warehousing Director at BPL, attributes this partly to analysing the reasons for losing customers when this happens, and also looking closely at how often and why BPL is re-awarded business. “It’s important to measure customer-centricity, so we do this on an annual basis,” he adds. Customer-centric businesses typically start with assessing a customer’s needs, rather than selling a service or product that may or may not have relevance. Services and products are then designed or adapted to meet those preferential needs. Ideally, customer-centricity allows a business to anticipate, at some point in the process, services or products that a client wouldn’t have already thought of, and then delight them with these. Bruce believes that while client engagement should be comprehensive, the administrative side needs to be simple and as automated as possible, to allow client engagement to remain problem-free throughout the transaction. BPL has a dedicated


CUSTOMER-CENTRIC LOGISTICS

Customer feedback is of course, vital, and BPL uses independent service providers to assess performance. Aside from the daily client-supplier interaction that occurs at an operational level, customer-service surveys are undertaken biannually, and regular customer meetings also provide meaningful feedback.

administrative structure that includes sales, servicing and key account-management staff who specifically address customer engagement from the initial sales process to managing an ongoing relationship and providing value-added services. For a business like BPL, which has a global reach through its partnership with Panalpina, this requires additional special attention, as it’s “impossible to shoehorn every customer into a fixed service offering without understanding their needs”, says Bruce. “The challenge on the international logistics side is that our services encompass many different elements, largely fixed in one way or another, such as customs legislation at origin and destination, or flight and shipping capacities and schedules, and then you have a customer with their own specific shipping requirements.”

Flaming hot service

The operations teams focus on the ‘doing’ and communicating with customers on how the shipment process is unfolding and what joint decisions need to be made to achieve efficiency, Bruce explains. “We continually urge our staff to remain aware of their actions that will impact customer service, with value-added services tracked,” he remarks. Staff are nominated for ‘flaming hot service’ awards on a quarterly basis, based on feedback and compliments from clients, and there’s also an annual overall winner.

Part of BPL’s service offering is comprehensive warehousing solutions, and here, says Steve, the relationship with the customer is every bit as important. “Customers nowadays require enhanced flexibility and increased visibility into their supply chains, so we’re introducing business-intelligence tools and integrating with customers’ systems. “This provides a live view of operations in the warehouse that encompasses receipts, storage, picks and dispatches, and it’s all aimed at enabling the customer to make informed decisions based on ever-changing needs. We also analyse stock turn and provide advice to customers on slow-moving products.”

Ideally, customer-centricity allows a business to anticipate, at some point in the process, services or products that a client wouldn’t have already thought of, and then delight them with these Everybody on board

Customer-centricity as a business philosophy only works when it’s understood and embraced by employees at every level of a business. “If a business is genuinely customer-centric, then adherence to this philosophy needs to run throughout the organisation, from the exco to the lower operations or business units,” Bruce points out. “A business isn’t truly customer-centric, and is unlikely to be seen as such, if some business units are making decisions with and for their customers, but others are doing this based on other criteria.” The right questions need to be asked. “What does the customer want? What impact would this have on our customer as opposed to what we’re able to offer? And what impact would this have on our cost of production? In essence, a customer-centric business tailors its entire organisation, from services and products delivered, to the processes followed, and even to policies and culture within the organisation, to giving the customer a sense that their needs are being met every single step of the way,” Bruce concludes. “It’s the only way to stay relevant.” Bidvest Panalpina Logistics www.bpl.co.za

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BLOCKCHAIN

Breakthroughs on the Horizon Trade finance has long been ripe for digitisation, and electronic trade documents are already in use by some supply chain participants.

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lockchain technology has the potential to take digitisation to the next level by providing a shared, tamper-proof ledger of digital records.

provides insights into how companies are pursuing the blockchain promise, with many respondents actively working with or planning to investigate the technology.

Developments at HSBC and ING underpin the promise of blockchain technology for trade finance.

Notably, several respondents are looking to expand the scale (and budgets) of blockchain projects for trade finance. Also, a number of them are working with several types of trade documents.

Notably, several respondents are looking to expand the scale (and budgets) of blockchain projects for trade finance The banks participated in a live transaction that facilitated an electronic letter of credit covering a shipment of soybeans between Argentina and Malaysia. The trade finance application, based on R3’s Corda platform, processed the transaction in 24 hours, versus 5 to 10 days that it might normally take. The Chain Business survey and research brief

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However, survey respondents point out that there are some serious hurdles to overcome, such as integrating blockchain-based solutions with other trade finance and accounts receivable/accounts payable (AR/AP) systems. Encouragingly, the survey points to many initiatives to develop blockchain solutions for trade finance, with several being driven by a consortia of financial institutions. The takeaway from an analysis of survey responses is that while blockchain has yet to prove its worth


BLOCKCHAIN

Key Insights Gathered

Technologies being explored

Hyperledger and Ethereum are the most common blockchain platforms being experimented with. Smart contract technologies are also being widely explored. This was no surprise, given Hyperledger’s association with IBM, and Ethereum’s widespread support among enterprise players. Both platforms support smart contracts.

Level of Interest/Participation Nearly 45% of respondents are either planning or working on a proof-ofconcept or pilot project, or are already in live production.

Trade Documents in Play

Most popular were the bill of lading and certificates of inspection and insurance. Letters of credit were often cited, followed by commercial invoices, certificates of origin and health certificates.

as a trade finance solution, the level of activity among those experimenting with it suggests that it is advancing rapidly.

About the survey

From December 2017 to February 2018, Chain Business Insights conducted a survey to find out how blockchain might be applied to trade finance applications. Participants were asked about their level of interest in blockchain as a trade finance solution, the projects they are working on, the primary advantages of the technology and the obstacles to adopting it.

This was a survey of 48 trade finance professionals representing companies of all sizes. Nearly one-third of respondents had annual revenues of less than $1 million, and one-third had more than $1 billion in annual revenues, with the remaining respondents in the middle tiers. Respondents included banks/finance providers, insurers, shippers, freight forwarders, ocean carriers, third-party logistics providers, vendors and consultants who collectively operate in every region of the world. www.chainbusinessinsights.com

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A milestone achievement The Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport: South Africa (CILTSA), recently partnered with the Goscor Lift Truck Company (GLTC), for a networking event aimed at highlighting new developments in warehousing and logistics.

I

n recent years, modern logistics has changed the face of industrial warehousing. Amid modern globalisation where international businesses are now shipping their products outside of their regions, logistics has become a significant part of many companies. Industrial warehousing has since become integral to the process.

Recently became the first forklift supplier to attain both the ISO 9001: 2015 and OHSAS 18001 accreditations in South Africa These are some of the issues that warehouse expert, Martin Bailey, tackled at a recent CILTSA networking breakfast, which was hosted in partnership with GLTC in October. Mar tin explored new developments in warehousing and logistics, as well as the future of the industry. Some of the topics of discussion included the trend towards more automation in warehouses; better systems to drive workers; better WMS; better labour management; better interfaces; better storage; better picking; and more energy efficient machines. This was followed by a facility tour of Goscor’s premises. The tour included GLTC offices and its 24/7 call centre, as well as the workshop, repair bay and the recently-launched world-class merSETA accredited training centre.

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In a milestone achievement, GLTC recently became the first forklift supplier to attain both the ISO 9001: 2015 and OHSAS 18001 accreditations in South Africa. Meanwhile, to build a pool of technical skills it needs to better support its product range, the company recently established its own merSETA-accredited training centre. The facility is aimed at breeding new forklift technicians, as well as offering skills improvement, refresher courses and continuous product upgrade training.

Partnership

The Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT) is the international professional body for Logistics and Transport professionals. With a network of National Councils and Sections in over 30 countries, CILT services the interests of over 30 000 members. GLTC has been a member of CILTSA for several years in support of its endeavours regarding training and upliftment of the industry, wherever possible. “We have worked closely with Martin Bailey for decades, and when this opportunity presented itself, it was only natural to be able to be part of the drive to impart knowledge and growing technological advancements within the industry – to the industry,” says Kasha Vorster, marketing manager at GLTC.

Doosan 7 Series showcase

Guests at the event were also treated to a


INDUSTRIAL WAREHOUSING

ABOUT THE GOSCOR GROUP Industrial equipment group Goscor is a BUD Group Company. Goscor represents leading equipment brands across several sectors. These include Crown, Doosan, Bendi, Hubtex and Taylor Dunn (forklifts and materials handling equipment); Bobcat (compact & construction); SANY (earthmoving); Tennant, Elgin, Maer, Delfin, Kaivac and HighPoint (industrial cleaning equipment); HPower, Weima, Meiwa and Rato (industrial power solutions); Genie (aerial lift equipment); Sullair and Ozen (compressed air solutions), and many more. new product showcase. GLTC displayed all of its latest forklifts and materials handling equipment. However, it was the unveiling of the new Doosan 7 Series, the latest forklift range on GLTC’s arrival lounge, that took centre stage. The new Doosan 7 Series forklift range ticks all the right operational boxes, from maximum productivity to cost-effective and safe operation across an array of applications – attributes that are high up on every warehouse or DC manager’s checklist when evaluating and selecting materials handling equipment. “With the launch of the Doosan 7 Series, we are offering an ideal tool for a range of applications, all the way from lifting building materials, fibre and paper handling, chemicals, wood, to recycling, industrial equipment manufacturing and wholesalers, among many others,” explains Patrick Barber, Sales Director at GLTC. With five diesel models – the D20, D25, D30, D33S-7 and the D35C-7 – operating capacities vary from 2t to 3,5t. The range is powered by a Yanmar 3.3L diesel engine built to meet the latest emission regulations. The in-line, 4-cylinder, water-cooled, overhead valve engine provides high torque (191Nm) at low engine speeds (1 600rpm) in applications

requiring ramp loading and unloading, fast lift speeds and heavy hydraulic flow. Safety has become a major parameter when it comes to the operation of any forklift under any circumstances. In response to customer needs, this forklift range comes with an array of features aimed at increasing safety on sites.

It was only natural to be able to be part of the drive to impart knowledge and growing technological advancements within the industry – to the industry At the forefront is the Operator Sensing System (OSS). The OSS prevents any unintended forklift movements when the operator is not seated. “Tilt, lift and lowering functions are disabled if the operator is not in the seat, even when the ignition is on. An audible alarm will sound if the operator leaves the seat without applying the parking brake. A seat belt warning light on the dashboard reminds the operator to fasten their seatbelt,” Patrick concludes. GLTC Kasha Vorster Tel: (011) 450-2231 / 2241 Email: kvorster@goscor.co.za www.goscor.co.za

Increased visibility means the company can track items from receipt to quality control, through to final dispatch and delivery. GLTC displayed all of its latest forklifts and materials handling equipment.

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BETTER PERFORMANCE

Digitising integrated poultry

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n the fast moving, volatile and critical poultry industry, control over processes within various divisions and sites is essential. Linking different divisions with each other and the business to provide an integrated view of the entire organisation provides accurate insights to ensure better performance. Management via manual processes and Excel spreadsheets simply doesn’t achieve the results needed to remain competitive. This archaic approach hampers productivity, accuracy and efficiency.

The digitalised factory floor solution provided the organisation with the agility to make quick price adjustments at any time

this, two major divisions went live on the same day, with no interruption to business activities. The ability to produce rapid financial reporting on the live system is a benefit for the production and the financial team,” adds Heilet. The use of a standard solution across the entire poultry division ensures that the customer can see a single view of its financials through consolidated reporting at group and subsidiary levels. With a flexible, digitalised ERP solution, productivity is increased during manufacturing cycles. “Throughout the warehouse loading and picking process, the producer now has the ability to see case level details about each pallet. This data was previously not available, and the visibility of product and stock has substantially improved,” Heilet concludes.

One leading South African integrated poultry producer recognised this need for digitisation in the industry and hatched a plan with Infor Ln and Softworx. Its previous attempt to modernise the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system was unsuccessful.

“With the introduction of scanners and an integrated mobility application, inventory control processes and factory operations have been greatly enhanced. The mobility solution is hand-held, mobile and offers a highly intuitive user interface, ensuring real-time access to information, when its most needed.”

The solution was not flexible, and it was not possible to update selling prices in real time based on fluctuations in commodity prices. Nevertheless, the producer remained steadfast in its commitment to digital transformation.

www.softworx.co.za.

To scale

“With four large poultry producing divisions, each employing its own unique processes, costing standards and reporting methodology, the customer had no single view of the truth,” confirms Heilet Scholtz, Executive at Softworx, Infor’s Master Partner in Africa. “It was essential to offer ultimate flexibility in operations, technology and scale. This would empower this poultry producer to adapt quickly to an ever-changing environment.”

Heilet Scholtz, Executive at Softworx

The digitalised factory floor solution provided the organisation with the agility to make quick price adjustments at any time. Catch weight and other industry-specific functionalities ensured efficiency improvements and increased data accuracy. The solution offered easy integration through a commitment to open standards, and greater flexibility based on proven system design and architecture.

Production team

“On any given day, 937 000 eggs are hatched. Despite Supply Chain Today

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FORKLIFTS

Making the Switch Multi-national beverage manufacturer, Kingsley Beverages, has become the first large-scale company in South Africa to make the switch from internal combustion-engine forklifts to more productive and efficient electric machines from Linde.

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ith a fleet of over 80 forklifts, the company has steadily begun replacing its fleet of 2.5 and 3 ton internal combustion forklifts with smaller 2 and 3 ton electric models which are equally as effective inside the factory as they are outdoors in the loading yards. According to the company’s experienced maintenance team, Jakes Olivier and Fanie Horn, the reason for the switch is a simple case of mathematics in which the electric machines clearly outperform the internal combustion diesel and gas forklifts in all departments, including fuel consumption and performance, as well as having a positive effect on driver productivity.

Business decision

Says Jakes, “The primary reasons behind the switch

relate to improving the overall cost-of-ownership and availability of our forklift fleet as far as possible. For example, we calculate that the cost of fuel for our Malvern fleet has decreased from approximately R10 000 per day to a bill of less than R2 000 per day for electricity. “The same applies to our other facilities throughout the sub-region and will certainly be used as a basis for our plants in Dubai, the UK and planned plant in the USA. What’s more, the electric units require considerably less maintenance and take less than a third of the time usually required to service an equivalent gas or diesel machine. “This type of availability improvement across our fleet effectively means that we can move the same amount of product with fewer forklifts. And, the benefits extend even further when reliability is taken into consideration, as the electrics work in all weather conditions and endure the same punishment as our diesels. Yet they easily keep up and require less maintenance in the long-run,” he adds.

All-rounder

Fanie Horn explains that in terms of maintenance, thus far, the longest serving electric forklift has racked

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FORKLIFTS

up an impressive 6 000 traction-hours and has not required any unscheduled maintenance. Even tyre wear is minimised due to the even application of power, as well as controlled stopping and turning that is afforded by the electrical controls. And there is more, in the hygienically clean beverage environment the benefits are still greater with no emissions whatsoever and as a result no need for costly particle filters. In addition, the oil and coolant free motor and running gear reduces the risk of oil spills and contaminants in the environment making the electric forklifts more environmentally friendly too. “By comparison, our previous all-diesel and gas forklift fleet would generate nearly a ton of used oil per year, as well as crates full of other maintenance items such as filters, cambelts, water pumps and other service items. All considered, we are actually racking up a massive saving on parts and maintenance alone, notwithstanding fuel savings, increased availability and improved productivity.”

Solid reputation

Jozua Coetzee of Linde Materials Handling South Africa, stresses that in the fast-moving consumer goods industry, suppliers such as Kingsley Beverages have to maintain tight delivery schedules in order to uphold their reputation for reliability. It is therefore important to ensure the entire supply chain operates flawlessly from delivery of raw materials, to production and distribution. Considering each litre produced by Kingsley is handled by a forklift at least eight times in the production process, it is easy to see why the company places such a high value on the reliability and productivity of its fleet. Jozua explains, “The company has always used Linde forklifts to optimise productivity, making use of our brands’ unique handling abilities and precision hydraulic transmission with auto-levelling suspension to carry more loads per shift. Even so, the client’s forward-looking technical staff were still prepared to trial an electric truck which quickly convinced them that the future is electric.

“Since then they have never looked back and the electrics have outperformed the diesels in every department, both indoors and outdoors. Able to run up to one-and-a-half shifts per battery, there is no downtime for refuelling etc. The move to electric has had only positive effects on the productivity with loading staff reporting faster and safer loading with better overall availability of the forklifts.”

Futuristic models

The Linde E20PH and Linde E30/600 supplied to Kingsley are designed for high throughput applications where they outperform traditional machines in terms of stacking, transporting, loading, and unloading of a wide variety of goods in multiple application types. The high productivity capability of the machines is due to Linde’s patented compact Combi-Axle technology, which features two three-phase traction motors integrated into the front axle as well as unique maintenance-free brakes.

All considered, we are actually racking up a massive saving on parts and maintenance alone, notwithstanding fuel savings, increased availability and improved productivity The forklifts are suitable for loads between 2 000 and 3 000 kilograms and can be adapted for use in almost any application. A number of different varieties, such as a compact model for areas where space is at a premium, or a tall truck with a long wheelbase for tall, bulky loads are also available as required. In addition, the new charger and Linde energy management technology ensures smart, easy-to-understand energy management. Linde Material Handling South Africa Linki de Jongh-Brown Tel: (011) 723 7000 Email: linki.dejongh@linde-mh.co.za www.linde-mh.co.za

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High securtiy welded mesh

Pallisade

Gates

Gate Automation

Razor wire and more ....

What is High Security Weld Mesh HIGH Security Weld Mesh is wire fused and welded at a Horizontal distance of 76.2mm and a vertical distance of 12.7mm also known as 35B/3510 where 3 denotes 3”(distance between vertical wires), 5 denotes 0.5” (distance between horizontal wires), and B or 10 denotes gauge of wire

Salient Features • Difficult to Climb: The spaces between the Horizontal wires are too narrow for fingers to have grip • Impregnable: Extremely difficult to cut with a hand cutter as the beak of a wire cutter will not be able to penetrate the horizontal wires • Excellent Replacement option to Solid Wall as: 1. More economical than a solid wall 2. Faster to install than a solid wall 3. CCTV Camera has a clear view • Further upgrade possible with electric security system • Anti-corrosive & low maintinance

Standards

• Manufactured according to BS EN 10016-2 • Wire Sizes in accordance with BS EN 10218-2 • Tolerance on Mesh Size in accordance wiht EN 10223-7 • Tolerance on Panel Size in accordance with EN 10223-4 • Welding Strength in accordance with BS EN 1461 • Zinc Coating in accordance with EN 10245-1 • Anti Corrosion in accordance with BS En 3900 E4/F4

Tensile Strength • Wire has a tensile strenght of min 550 MPA

MARK: 083 454 6488

Email: mark@palifence.co.za

www.palifence.co.za


2019 SAPICS CONFERENCE

Surviving and Thriving in Turbulent Times Blockchain, artificial intelligence, automation and 3-D printing are among the technologies that are revolutionising supply chains. Thus supply chain managers aiming for success must expand and improve their traditional skills and knowledge, says Mungo Park, president of Sapics, the Professional Body for Supply Chain Management.

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eflecting the challenges and opportunities that abound for supply chain professionals in today’s increasingly complex, disruptive, digital business arena, Sapics has announced that the theme of their 2019 Conference is ‘Survive and Thrive’. “These are turbulent times; the conference aims to equip delegates with everything they need not just to stay afloat, but to flourish,” says Mungo.

The conference aims to equip delegates with everything they need not just to stay afloat, but to flourish Now in its 41st year, the annual conference is Africa’s leading knowledge sharing and networking event for supply chain professionals. It takes place in Cape Town from 9 to 12 June 2019.

Call for speakers

Sapics has opened the “call for speakers” for the 2019 event, and invites dynamic professionals in the supply chain and operations field to share inspiring or educational experiences, enlightening expertise and insights, new technology and concepts, and case studies. “The Sapics Conference is the ideal platform for

supply chain professionals to make a valuable contribution to the annual update of our profession’s body of knowledge,” Mungo states. “By sharing your supply chain experiences and expertise, fellow professionals from around the globe will be able to benefit from your knowledge. Being a speaker at our annual conference is also a way to give back to the supply chain community and to grow professionally.”

Early birds

Registration has opened and ‘early birds’ who register for the 2019 event before 28 February 2019 can qualify for discounted fees. “In these tough times, we are pleased to be able to offer delegates a guaranteed price for June 2019 if they take up the Early Bird offer. By enabling companies and individuals to budget now, we hope to ensure that they don’t miss out on Africa’s leading supply chain conference,” Mungo concludes. Sapics Tel: (011) 023 6701 Email: info@sapics.org.za www.conference.sapics.org

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IOT SENSORS

Averting Potential Disasters The network of connected sensors, devices, and appliances commonly referred to as the Internet of Things (IoT) has completely changed the way business works. This is as true of the heavy hauling and freight industry as any other. At any moment, various players in the industry can get a sense of vehicle health, cargo safety, and whether or not any infrastructure is in need of repair.

A

s IoT technologies have become more ubiquitous, so have the threats from cybercriminals however. With more than 20-billion IoT devices expected to be online by 2020, there are more gaps for cybercriminals to take advantage of than ever before. This has massive potential consequences for heavy hauling. A cyber attack at targeted points in a country or region’s network could leave it crippled, preventing people from receiving much-needed goods and services. Fortunately, it doesn’t have to be that way. According to Etion Group Chief Digital Officer,

Maeson Maherry, it’s possible for businesses to reap the benefits of IoT without placing themselves in a compromised security environment. “Connected sensors can provide businesses with useful data that can be easily acted on,” Maeson says. “Sensors in trucks and cargo containers, for example, can tell you when to do preventative maintenance, helping avert potential disasters.”

Can’t rely on technology alone

For this to work, however, people have to be able to act on that data. “If I can send commands to vehicles and machines out in the field, which is what sensors are in the first place, can I do so in a way that makes my business more productive and efficient? “So, for example, if a vehicle is telling me that it’ll need maintenance soon, do I have the power to schedule that maintenance so that the machine is down for as little time as possible?” he asks. “Thus in order to reap the benefits, you have to know that you can trust the information coming from the embedded sensors in your network. The question of who owns the IoT

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IOT SENSORS

devices and sensors in a business environment, therefore, becomes critical. Do they belong to me, or do they belong to the manufacturer?”

medical information then the answer is yes, but if they’re just sending the settings on a machine then the answer might be no.”

Logically, ownership should always lie with the business owner because these devices are used to make decisions with potentially massive business impacts. “You have to ensure that you’ve got owner-controlled security in place,” Maeson advises. “You have to make sure that you can control these devices, and that only your devices plug into your network.”

Finally, integrity entails doing everything you can to prevent your machines from being tampered with. “We’ve already seen what happens when devices are tampered with. In August 2016, cybercriminals used IoT devices to execute one of the biggest DoS attacks in history, bringing down some of the internet’s biggest sites. It’s only a matter of time before someone tries to bring down a freight network.“

Entire system

Even if you own the security, he adds, you still have to know that you can trust the entire system. “You’ve got to be able to trust everything, from the sensors themselves, the way they’re communicating data, all the way through to the information systems that are processing that data and turning it into information for you, so that you can make your own deductions and send back commands.” Thus authentication, encryption, and integrity, become critical. “When it comes to authentication, this allows you to know that a sensor sending you information belongs to you and that when you send information to a sensor it will act on it.“ A lot of the work around encryption, meanwhile, comes down to picking your battles. “Is it something that I need to worry about other people seeing?,” Maeson asks. “If the devices are sending out private

It’s only a matter of time before someone tries to bring down a freight network

Avoidable

Fortunately, says Maeson, such incidents are avoidable. “It’s possible to solve all these issues with the cryptography and technology that we have today, we just have to have the conversations to start with. “The same is true of devices: they’re going to need to be updated in the field, just like your computer or your phone gets updated. You’ve got to make sure that there’s integrity in the code that’s running on these devices, even if it’s embedded. “The advantages are clear but if people are not thinking about the cybersecurity aspect and the ownership aspect, then they are not going to enjoy the benefits of what IoT can really do on a large scale,” Maeson concludes. Etion Group, Maeson Maherry, www.etion.co.za

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TRANSFORMING FREIGHT LOGISTICS


TRANSNET FREIGHT RAIL

www.transnet.net www.transnetfreightrail-tfr.net


MARKET FORUM

Supply Chain Compendium The Unisa Graduate School of Business Leadership’s (SBL) Professor Douglas Boateng, Africa’s first ever appointed Professor Extraordinaire for supply and value chain management, launched the second edition of the world’s first compendium on Supply Chain Management (SCM) in Accra, Ghana. The second edition of the book titled, “Executive Insights Series: Compendium of Supply Chain Management Terms” is supported and endorsed by the SBL and contains thousands of detailed definitions and information to help public and private sector officials understand and apply aspects of

supply chain management thinking to their respective value chains, support industrialisation and competitiveness, and improve service delivery quality. Prof. Boateng says he has witnessed spectacular transformations of economies like South Korea, China, Singapore, South Africa and Rwanda and believes Ghana as a country can improve if we understand the interconnectivity between the various aspects of the value chain. “In Africa what we’ve been doing is just buying; not procuring and not strategically sourcing hence our dear old continent has become a dumping

ground for fake, or counterfeit products. If we do not change our mindset through supply chain thinking, how are we going to be able to create muchneeded jobs for the youth of today and tomorrow? This is not just a Ghana problem or African problem; there is a general lack of understanding of supply chain management.” “We’re all aware that doctors, lawyers, accountants, engineers have their ‘bible’; in supply chain management we don’t have one. So, I decided to develop one at my own cost. It took me 1 885 days to develop the first compendium. The second one took me 912 days to come up with at my own cost, but for me I did it for a reason. If the world understands supply chain management, it will a better place for the African child.” Sibongiseni Ngamile, Plato Connect Tel: (011) 886-0211 /079 908 2362 Email: sibo@platocomms.co.za

Sustainable growth The Eastern Cape (EC) is the only port in the whole of South Africa that has licensed offshore Bunkering operations. Durban, Cape Town and Richards Bay are all well-known ports to the global shipping and industries however, Algoa Bay is now firmly a leading bunker and ship service provider to a wider market, not restricted to port calling ships but general passing traffic. Algoa Bay is well positioned as a stopover en-route to

various destinations. The bay is located just a few miles off the heavily trafficked shipping lanes and busy East –West routes. Aside from the fuel oil supply from the bunker barges, ship owners also use other services available. “Since the beginning of our operations, the project has experienced significant progress and has managed to amass an experienced crew, which comprises transport, lodging, vessel supplies and technical services,” Siyamthanda Maya, MD of South African Marine Fuels, highlights. “Currently we have three barges, which are charted and operated by South African Marine Fuels. This is important because when operations are managed and directed locally, it ensures that the industry and expertise are fully introduced to the country.”

Launch of bunkering Services: SA Marine Fuels Managing-Director, Siyamthanda Maya (left) and MEC for Finance, Economic Development and Environmental Affairs and Tourism, Lubabalo Mabuyane (right).

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Coega Simlindele Manqina: Corporate Communications & Stakeholder Manager Tel: 078 322 3464 or 041 403 0487 Email: media@coega.co.za or simlindele.manqina@coega.co.za


MARKET FORUM

others the capital cost and running costs of a power-hungry HVAC system makes it impractical. Wim D essing, managing director of Apex Strip Curtains & Doors, says that a cost- effective and practical alternative to an HVAC system is Apex General Purpose Strip Curtains.

INCREASING PRODUCTIVIT Y While an adequate heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system can play an important role in ensuring the comfort of workers, this is not always a feasible option. In some instances, the plant design does not lend itself to the inclusion of an HVAC system. In

“Some parts of South Africa are considered to be desert, while other parts have a temperate climate and yet others are subtropical. Such extremes in temperature and humidity require careful attention to design and engineering detail to ensure

a strip curtain that works effectively, irrespective of the location,� says Wim. In addition to being able to control the influx of cold or hot exterior air, the Apex General Purpose Strip Curtains are designed to reduce the levels of dust as well as the ingress of birds, rodents and insects. In industries where hygiene and cleanliness are critical, these strip curtains can prevent the passage of unwanted contaminants, but still allow for the unhindered and safe passage of people and forklift trucks. Another added benefit is the reduction of noise levels, from either inside the plant facility or from outside. Apex Strip Curtains Wim Dessing Tel: (011) 452-8723 Email: WimSnr@apexstrip.co.za www.apexstrip.co.za

Mali Logistics Hub Logistics Hub (MLH), will have inland container depots (ICD) and Container Freight Stations (CFS) that will facilitate the import and export of goods. The hub will be located on the main road corridor from Dakar, Senegal to Bamako and close to the Dakar-Bamako rail line and will be capable of handling 300 000 TEU (twenty-foot equivalent unit), 4 million tons of bulk and general cargo. The first phase of the project, with an estimated initial investment of $50 million, will support the growth of the Malian economy by streamlining the import and export of goods. Construction is expected to start in 2019 and is to take approximately 18 months to complete. DP World will also provide the Republic of Mali with three locomotive trains to boost cargo and passenger traffic along the rail system.

Suhail Al Banna, Chief Executive Officer and Managing Director, DP World Middle East and Africa, and Moulaye Ahmed Boubacar, Minister of Equipment and Transport, the Republic of Mali, during the signing of the concession agreement in Dubai

Global trade enabler DP World has signed a 20-year concession with an automatic 20-year extension with the Republic of Mali to build and operate

a 1 000-hectare modern logistics hub outside of Bamako, the capital and largest city of Mali. The multimodal logistics platform, Mali

Furthermore, the Mali logistics hub will significantly reduce processing times for products entering the Malian market as part of efforts to reduce obstacles to trade and economic development. DP World will also implement its online paperless facilitation platform to accelerate the movement of goods as part of the agreement. DP World www.DPWorld.com

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In September, at the Eskom Business Investment Competition (BIC) awards function in Johannesburg, Sandtonbased Prodeliver Group’s name was named the overall winner of the annual competition. Founder and CEO Nyadzeni Makhado, who has a BSc Honours degree in mining engineering from Wits University, is passionate about continually The Eskom Development Foundation is tasked with implementing Eskom’s CSI strategy in sectors including enterprise development, education, healthcare, social and community development learning and improving himself. He and he thought that was it. He joined Nyadzeni says they pride themselves is a member of the Engineering Counup with his partners and bought a truck on offering faster turnaround times, and cil of South Africa and his company as a start, but while running the busiare able to give their clients peace of is incubated under Shanduka Black ness they soon discovered that doing mind through cargo security and insurUmbrellas. it part time was difficult as they would ance, cargo location updates and cover

Winner in logistics

The Prodeliver Group provides logistics and mining services including transportation of commodities and palletised materials to both the private and public sectors. Nyadzeni used to work in gold mines before starting the business in 2014.

On his way to and from work, he used to travel behind trucks transporting materials from the mines to gold plants. Nyadzeni had always wanted something that could make him passive income

be underground most of the time and out of reach of their clients. They then quit their jobs to focus on the business on a full time basis. Prodeliver offers its transport solutions to producers, receivers, manufacturers and suppliers. They have volume trucks, side tipper trucks as well as flat-deck trailer trucks. Among other commodities, the company transports steel, timber, cables, pipes, cement, tools and equipment.

from rain and/or wind. “We are able to transport normal day-to-day goods including dry-freight and food related products. We are flexible enough to offer our clients customised transportation solutions,” he concludes. Eskom Development Foundation Manana Maboe Communication Manager Tel: (011) 800-4438 Email: MaboeMC@eskom.co.za

Director appointed SAPICS has appointed Kamogelo Mampane to the board of directors. Kamogelo is the founder and chief executive officer of TK Global Experts. He serves as advisory board chairperson on the State Owned Enterprises Procurement Forum (SOEPF), and is also the chairperson of the Tshwane University Supply Chain and Logistics Advisory Board. He is a fellow of the Chartered Institute of Procurement and Supply in the United Kingdom (CIPS). CIPS fellowship (or FCIPS) is the institute’s highest grade of membership and is awarded by the CIPS Fellowship Board in the UK to professionals who demonstrate high ethical standards and who continuously support and contribute positively to the advancement of the procurement profession.

Kamogelo Mampane, SAPICS

SAPICS Tel: (011) 023-6701 Email: info@sapics.org.za www.sapics.org

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Distributor Management System Accenture is helping AB InBev the world’s largest brewer, better manage its sales and distribution operations in Africa with the Accenture NewsPage Distributor Management System (DMS). A fully-integrated distributor management and sales force automation system, Accenture DMS covers the complete downstream supply chain, providing consumer goods companies with accurate, reliable data on secondary sales to help them control promotions; improve productivity; and streamline inventory and sales processes and distributor claims. Under the terms of the three-year contract, Accenture is helping AB InBev implement the latest version of DMS for its operations in Africa. This includes the initial roll-out of the system in Mozambique, Zambia, Ghana and Nigeria, as well as the upgrade of the system in Tanzania and Uganda, where AB InBev

Lee Dawson,AB InBev, Vice President

has already been using DMS for more than three years. The DMS implementation will enable AB InBev to track its distributor network and increase visibility into its product stock and sales in Africa. By consolidating all product transactional information — from activities of the sales force and distributors— DMS gives AB InBev’s sales teams the data they need to build relationships with distributors and customers and to closely track product promotions and performance. The DMS software, which is integrated with the Salesforce-based solution that ABI uses to drive its contact strategy with its customers, will be used by more than 1 570 mobile and 620 back-office users and made available to more than 100 of AB InBev’s distributors. www.ab-indev.com

Automated Storage and Retrieval Systems Market The automated storage and retrieval systems market is expected to grow at 7.6% during the period 2018-2028. North America is likely to maintain its lucrativeness in automated storage and retrieval systems, accounting for nearly 30% revenue share of the global market in 2018. Sensing the rising awareness among industrial end-users about the extraordinary benefits of employing warehouse automation technologies, the market will witness excellent growth during the forecast period. “Automated storage and retrieval systems are mainly driven by the digitisation of

warehousing and intralogistics operations. Leading manufacturing companies are investing in automating their storage facilities with the help of next-generation automated storage and retrieval systems,” says lead analyst at Fact.MR. The Fact.MR study projects that the retail and e-commerce sector will account for the largest share in the automated storage and retrieval systems market by the end of the forecast period. According to the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), e-commerce in Asia Pacific is expected to grow 37% annually through 2020, making it the world’s largest

marketplace for e-commerce companies. This market is undergoing radical changes with players such as Dematic Corporation and Honeywell Intelligrated, introducing software platforms to maximise uptime and operational performance of automated storage and retrieval systems with intelligent features. Market players are also adopting advanced technologies, such as cloud computing and augmented reality, to enhance the efficiency of automated storage and retrieval systems with real-time visibility of assets. www.factmr.com/report/1869/automatedstorage-and-retrieval-systems-market

find out if you qualify to #joinourtable at pps.co.za PPS is an authorized Financial Services Provider.

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Transparency Limited. The investment being made by GemCap will provide a springboard to expand and grow the existing business and its digital solutions within the freight and logistics sector.

Nick Hoffman COO Linebooker

African Rainbow Capital Investments subsidiary, GemCap has acquired online transport management business, Linebooker from Oceana Group (Pty)

The opportunity presented by Linebooker is a real-time logistics application that efficiently and transparently matches trucks to loads.

Linebooker, through its interactive mobile-friendly bidding platform provides customers with instant access to multiple pre-approved transport companies. This not only ensures the best price of the day, but also alleviates vehicle shortages over periods of high demand. The customer enjoys access to the Linebooker execution desk where a dedicated logistics coordinator oversees the execution of their load.

The company was established in February 2017 as South Africa’s first commercial, online transport bidding platform and to date, has completed over 3 400 loads. 100 reputable commercial transport companies have joined the Linebooker platform. Collectively, these transport companies have a truck complement of over 5 000 vehicles that essentially make up a ‘virtual fleet’ to meet customers’ transport demands within an hour of posting a load request.

The transport industry is currently fragmented and not guided by pricing standards. This is further exacerbated by limited, or no transparency between customers and transport companies alike.

Linebooker Nick Hoffman Email: nick@linebooker.com www.linebooker.co.za

Import sector “South Africa is an import economy. With this in mind, companies need to examine the affordability of goods, identify buying trends, compared with what is available from an online perspective. Digital solutions can improve import efficiencies by streamlining the supply chain and enabling importers to be more bespoke with their approaches.” Many companies are factoring their debtors book with financial institutions. With the ability to access capital limited as banks are increasing retentions, businesses are looking for partnerships that enable growth. Dr Greg Cline, Head of Corporate Accounts at Investec Import Solutions

Even though the number of imports in key product lines has increased, South African retailers are focusing on a narrower approach to delivering customer value. Dr Greg Cline, Head of Corporate Accounts at Investec Import Solutions, says this presents importers with new prospects in challenging economic conditions. “Previously, people experimented

with a variety of import goods that reflected an enthusiastic online shopping environment. However, physical stores have shifted their strategies and started delivering more specific ranges built around product recognition and quality. Of course, contributing to this is the tightening of household budgets especially when it comes to luxury goods,” says Greg.

“This has seen companies move away from a one-dimensional way of importing to one that is more reflective of the economic conditions. Being innovative enables importers to consider the business goals more closely and understand the capital needs required to hit future targets. Those who are open to this shifting environment, will be the ones who are positioned strongly for the competitive market,” concludes Dr Cline. www.investec.co.za

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DRI V ER L E A RNERSHIP PRO GR A MME Volvo Group Southern Africa has invested R1.9 million in the advanced development and training of 20 unemployed commercial vehicle drivers. Locally, this programme is supported by Volvo Group brands Volvo Trucks and UD Trucks, with product-specific training provided by the brands’ highly-skilled driver trainers. “We are very proud to be able to make a tangible contribution to the development of the local transport industry. With an acute need for

qualified and skilled drivers, we believe this programme will start to address this industry-wide problem in a very practical yet impactful way,” says Marcus Hörberg, vice-president of Volvo Group Southern Africa. The first intake of drivers started their learnership in July 2018, and after they have completed Linebooker the 12-month learnership in June 2019, will graduate with a National Certificate in Professional Driving from the Commercial Transport Academy (CTA) in Bredell. The qualification, which is approved

by the Transport Education Training Authority, is based on both theoretical and practical modules. “Learnerships are not new, however the alignment of new knowledge and its application in the workplace differentiates this programme,” says Nicci Scott, founder of CTA. “We purposefully select unit standards that speak to stakeholder management, be it the customer, the employer or the driver’s role in acting responsibly, with safety as the key focus. “Additionally, we ensure that via our strategic partnership with Trucklogix, our learners spend a minimum of 400 hours driving over four seasons and across nine provinces.” www.volvotrucks.co.za

top honours at Steel Awards WSP in Africa, one of the largest multidisciplinary engineering consulting firms on the continent, received multiple awards, including Overall winner, at the Southern African Institute of Steel Construction (SAISC) Steel Awards 2018. One of their winning projects was the Shoprite Checkers Cilmor Distribution Centre This greenfield project received accolades in two categories, including the Safintra Factory and Warehouse Category and the Global Roofing Solutions Metal Cladding Category. The Shoprite Group’s centre located in Cilmor Street in Brackenfell, Cape Town, is described by the group as one of the most technologically advanced distribution centres on the continent. Spanning 123 000m², the DC consolidates the activities of five different distribution

centres spread across Cape Town. Construction began in February 2016 and the completed built project consisted of multiple buildings, where the main buildings comprise warehouses for Drygoods and Returns and a Cold Storage Facility. As part of this project, external peripheral buildings were also constructed, namely, truck and truckwash facilities, offices, guardhouse, truck refuelling and central generator plant. WSP was appointed for the full project scope (stage 1-6) for the following services: structural design of warehouse floors and super structures; HVAC, wet services, electrical, smoke detection, vertical transportation, fire (CFD modelling only), bulk fuel storage, refrigeration and insulation. www.wsp.com

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keeping cool and green Commercial Refrigerant Solutions (CRS) of Johannesburg recently used the Rapid Recovery high-speed refrigerant recovery solution from A-Gas South Africa on a range of major projects. The two companies have been collaborating successfully for a year, ranging from Woolworths in Alberton to the Southgate and Brooklyn shopping centres, with Eastgate on the cards as well. CRS MD Stephen Spence explains

that, while Woolworths has been a long-standing client, it has subsequently expanded further into the supply-chain industrial market over the past decade. Upgrading a Woolworths store, for example, to a CO 2-based system, or one based on the latest refrigerant, requires that any existing refrigerant gases be removed first, which is where A-Gas South Africa’s Rapid Recovery service comes into play, Sales Manager Michael Labacher highlights. “Our service ensures that companies like CRS have a total solution that encompasses all technical, compliance, and legal considerations when it comes to refrigerant recovery. This, in turn, gives CRS’s major clients such as Woolworths peace-of-mind that they are up to date with the country’s

environmental laws, while downtime is reduced to a bare minimum. “Our equipment recovers refrigerant ten times faster than traditional systems on the market, at a rate of about 500kg to 700kg per hour,” Michael reveals. This recovered refrigerant is packaged safely in cylinders, and then sent for reclamation, whereupon a compliance certificate is issued. This certificate is the end user’s guarantee and proof that the recovered refrigerant was handled in an environmentallyresponsible manner. A-Gas, Michael Labacher Tel: (011) 392-4791 michael.labacher@agas.com www.agas.com

Promech Publishing wishes all its readers a wonderful December break and a prosperous New Year

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Two worlds, one idea.

PUT TOGETHER THE BEST OF TWO WORLDS. THIS IS THE IDEA OF BAOLI.

A unique and innovative opportunity in the world of lift trucks. Attention to costs and the best guarantee for reliability, simplicity and efďŹ ciency of the most advanced technologies are put together for the ďŹ rst time. This is Baoli: the energy of a new Chinese enterprise and the strength of a great German group. www.baoli-emea.com

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