Page 1

BULK

HANDLING Endorsed by: CMA l LEEASA l SAIMechE l SAIMH

SOLVING MINE CHALLENGES THROUGH TECH A SOLUTION TO DEAL WITH DUST POLLUTION

T O D A Y Jan/Feb 2019


BULK

HANDLING Endorsed by: CMA l LEEASA l SAIMechE l SAIMH

T O D A Y Jan/Feb 2019

BULK LING

January/February 2019

Contents

SOLVING MINE CHALLENGES THROUGH TECH A SOLUTION TO DEAL WITH DUST POLLUTION

On the cover: Takraf Africa Tel (011) 201-2300 Email: richard.spath@tenova.com www.tenova.com

T O D A Y

5 4

CMA News

Beltcon 19

Company Profile

31 Analysis of Belt Stresses in the Idler Junction Area. Rig Construction and Calibration

Cover Story 6

Celebrating 100 YEARS of Service

Crushers,Screens, Chutes & Liners 8

Hydro Transportation 38 Going to great lengths

Trucking Fleets

Crusher Survey

40 Safe, reliable and consistent supply

Power Transmission 11 New sealing solutions protect bearings

42

Maintenance

Market Forum

Endorsing Bodies

12 Shaking up the after-market

IoT Sensors

CMA (Conveyor Manufacturers Association)

Earthmoving

LEEASA (Lifting Equipment Engineering Association of South Africa)

SAIMechE (SA Institution of Mechanical Engineering)

SAIMH (SA Institute of Materials Handling) also mailed to members of the RFA (Road Freight Association)

16 Adverting potential disasters 18 Specially-adapted excavators

Petroleum Hub 20 New liquid bulk port on the cards

Conveying 23 Ordering online

Dust Control

27 Mist cannon at work

Copyright

All rights reserved. No editorial matter published in “Bulk Handling Today” may be reproduced in any form or language without written permission of the publishers. While every effort is made to ensure accurate reproduction, the editor, authors, publishers and their employees or agents shall not be responsible or in any way liable for any errors, omissions or inaccuracies in the publication, whether arising from negligence or otherwise or for any consequences arising therefrom. The inclusion or exclusion of any product does not mean that the publisher or editorial board advocates or rejects its use either generally or in any particular field or fields.

Our e-mail address is bulkhandling@promech.co.za Visit our website on www.bulkhandlingtoday.co.za

The monthly circulation is 3 673

Proprietor and Publisher: PROMECH PUBLISHING Tel: (011) 781-1401 E-mail: bulkhandling@promech.co.za www.promech.co.za Managing Editor: Susan Custers Advertising Sales: Louise Cresswell DTP: Sanette Badenhorst Administration: Netta Janse van Rensburg Subscriptions: Please email us at accounts@promech.co.za if you wish to subscribe to “Bulk Handling Today” at R550,00 (excl postage and VAT) per year; R1 380,00 per year for Africa/Overseas. Printed by: Typo Colour Printing, Tel: (011) 402-3468 FSC (Forestry Stewardship Accreditation)

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January/February 2019

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COMPANY PROFILE

Osborn

F

rom design concept and manufacture to installation and commissioning, Osborn provides the world mining and quarry markets with a full range of crushers, feeders and screens. With its reputation as one of South Africa’s foremost materials handling contractors, Osborn also specialises in skidmounted crushing and screening plants. Manufacturing is carried out at Osborn’s head office and factory in Elandsfonten, South Africa. The extensive, modern manufacturing facilities are supported by strong procurement, expediting and management functions to ensure contracts are fulfilled and plants commissioned on time. Osborn was founded in 1919, as a subsidiary of British Steel company, Samuel Osborn. Today the company is a major manufacturer of equipment for Africa’s mining and quarrying industries, with a significant share in the crusher, feeder and screen markets. Osborn is a member of the Astec Industries Inc. group of companies, a leading American manufacturer of plant and equipment for aggregate processing, asphalt road building, pipeline and utility trenching.

6 x 20 Triple Deck Screen Modular

Over almost a century in business, we have forged rock-solid relationships with satisfied customers around the world. From Angola, Australia and China to Siberia and Turkey, our unrivalled machines are successfully operating in the most arduous conditions across the globe. In 99 years, we may have grown substantially, but we still offer the same individual attention and personalised service that has earned Osborn its customer centric reputation. Meeting the needs of every customer is a priority. In addition to our exceptional product range, we offer customised equipment. For our customers, purchasing equipment from Osborn is only the start of a long-term relationship. Our on-call spares and service department operates 24/7. Our field service includes

site and machine evaluations as well as on-site training for customers. Our qualified field service personnel’s engagements ensure a global coverage. Osborn has a comprehensive, national distribution network. We are represented by international agents in strategic locations ensuring our customers experience world-wide back up for our equipment. Osborn has exclusive licence agreements with our principals such as Telsmith (USA) and KPI-JCI (USA). In association with these partners and our network of agents and distributors, we supply their world-renowned equipment to mining, quarrying and industrial markets across Africa. We also supply genuine OEM spares for these leading global brands.

ADVERT 4

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CONVEYOR MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION

M

From The Chairman’s Desk

ay I start by wishing everyone all the very best for the new year. Everyone seems to be looking forward with enthusiasm to a bright 2019. The CMA has started the year with a brand-new web site, bursting at the seams with information on activities, projects, the upcoming Beltcon 20 conference, the CMA training courses, and much more. Please visit the site on www.cmasa.co.za. Your comments would be appreciated. For your diary: Members’ meetings are held at the Bryanston Country Club on 19 February, 16 April, 18 June and 8 October. The AGM is scheduled for 20 August. Jay Pillay

The Annual Golf Day is booked at the Bryanston Country Club for Friday 12 April, and the Annual Dinner is 22 May.

Not to be missed

Training courses are planned throughout the year, and again, I suggest anyone interested in the training arm of the CMA go onto the website for information regarding course content, fees and dates, and information on downloading the application forms. The “Contact Us” form is for Association and training enquiries only, and users are reminded that trade enquiries regarding supply of components and services, including consulting services, should go to the suppliers directly. A list of CMA members with contact details is provided on the website for this purpose.

Jay Pillay, Chairman

Last but by no means least, readers are reminded that the Beltcon 20 conference is scheduled for 31 July and 1 August and will again be held at St George Hotel and Conference Centre in Centurion. The Programme contains some really exciting papers, many from international speakers, and promises to be a bumper event. The Exhibition, which is only open to delegates to the conference, showcases the latest belt conveyor technology. This is definitely an event not to be missed and for more information readers may visit the website at www.beltcon.org.za.

Membership at January 2019 All members subscribe to the CMA Code of Ethics Acrow Limited Actom Afripp Projects Altra Industrial Motion South Africa (Pty) Ltd Bauer Bearings International Belt Brokers Belting Supply Services BMG Bonfiglioli Power Transmissions Bosworth Brelko Conveyor Products CedoTech cc Closeal Manufacturing Collisen Engineering ContiTech South Africa (Pty) Ltd Conveyor Watch (Pty) Ltd Conveyor & Engineering Equipment CT Systems David Brown Gear Industries DRA Projects SA (Pty) Ltd Dunlop Belting Products

Dymot Engineering Company ELB Engineering Services Fenner Conveyor Belting (South Africa) Flexco SA (Pty) Ltd FLSmidth Roymec Giza Technologies (Pty) Ltd Habasit South Africa (Pty) Ltd Hägglunds Drives South Africa Hatch Africa (Pty) Ltd HMA South Africa (Pty) Ltd Hosch - Fördertechnik (SA) International Belting & Marketing (Pty) Ltd Iptron Technology KevConBelt (Pty) Ltd Lesa Mining Equipment and Conveyor Belt Lorbrand Martin Engineering Megaroller Melco Conveyor Equipment Merlin consulting (Pty) Ltd Moret Mining Nautilus Projects (Pty) Ltd

Nepean Conveyors OE Bearings Oriental Rubber Industries SA Osborn Engineered Products Pegasus Industrial Services cc Regal Beloit South Africa Rema Tip Top South Africa Ringspann South Africa Rossi Gearmotors (Pty) Ltd Rula Bulk Materials Handling SENET SEW Eurodrive Shaft Engineering (Pty) Ltd SKF South Africa Tenova Takraf ThyssenKrupp Industrial Solutions South Africa (Pty) Ltd Timken South Africa (Pty) Ltd Transvaal Rubber Company Voith Turbo Weba South Africa (Pty) Ltd WorleyParsons RSA Zest Electric Motors

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Celebrating 100 YEARS of Service Key equipment supplier, Takraf Africa, enters 2019 celebrating a century of service to the African market.

A

s it marks 100 years since the founder of the Takraf Africa heritage, Edward L. Bateman, assumed control of the Allis-Chalmers agency in South Africa, Takraf Africa attributes its continuing success to a comprehensive and evolving product and service offering that is ideally suited to the harsh African conditions and the operational realities that local mining operations face. “Our in-house expertise covering the entire process chain is supported by tried and tested business processes tailored to the needs of small to mega projects,” says Takraf Africa General Manager – Technologies, Richard Späth. “Our commitment to innovation has meant that, while we offer the best of global technologies, we have tailored them to operate efficiently in local conditions, as well as having developed products specifically for the African market. This has enabled us to continuously advance our technology offering and remain ahead of the curve.”

In Africa a 10 000 tph shiploader has been installed at the Port of Nouadhibou in Mauritania Pit to Port

With a century of innovation and technology acquisition behind it, Takraf Africa is one of the few materials handling specialists that services the natural resources industry over the entire process chain, literally from pit to port. “Takraf systems range from heavy duty feeders to technology to convey, stack and reclaim, all of which are designed with state-of-the art materials and flow technology to optimise mass flow behaviour and eliminate blockages,” explains Richard. “For outloading at rail and port terminals, the com-

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pany has supplied the largest number of rapid train loading systems in South Africa, while the global Takraf's port handling equipment, including ship loaders and unloaders, is to be found at terminals all over the world. In Africa, for example, a 10 000 tph shiploader has been installed at the Port of Nouadhibou in Mauritania. “With increasing pressure to reduce environmental impact, Takraf Africa also supplies a comprehensive range of pollution control technology for its materials handling systems, including dust suppression systems, dynamic scrubbers and reverse jet bag filters, cleaning the air over the entire process chain.”

Flagship projects

Takraf Africa’s materials handling reference list has, over the decades, consistently featured many of sub-Saharan Africa’s flagship projects, and has meant that it has worked with almost every coal producer in Southern Africa. “Projects over the past century include Sasol II in the 1970s, one of the biggest coal handling systems in the world at the time, and Zimbabwe’s Zisco project of the 1990s, featuring the longest single flight conveyor system at the time,” says Richard. More recently, over the past decade, projects


COVER STORY have included Sasol Mining’s Tweedraai expansion, in which Takraf Africa incorporated optimised steel structures and designs utilising advanced technologies developed in-house, and the Richards Bay Coal Terminal (RBCT) Phase V Expansion, where the conveyor scope included provision of a new and the extension of existing conveyors to a total of 36 km long. The then BHP Billiton’s Douglas Middelburg Optimization (DMO) project, now DMO South32, involved a total of 27 conveyors being provided, of which five were overland, with the longest being 7 km.

technology developments of the global group. In Chile for example, Takraf's innovative belt conveyor technology is being applied in a 10 000 tph ore transportation system at a massive underground mining complex in order to overcome a number of technical challenges, such as significant elevation change from the underground mine to the surface. The conveyor system features advanced gearless drive technology, with the uphill tunnel conveyors boasting the highest drive power ever to be installed on a belt conveyor."

Ahead of schedule

With references stretching back well into the last century, much of the company’s order book is repeat business from clients such as Sasol, Eskom and RBCT.

Currently, Takraf Africa is well advanced on the supply of a tippler for a major iron ore project in South Africa. The Dual Wagon tippler offers unloading rates in excess of 100 wagons per hour and has the ability to tip two wagons simultaneously. The company is also making good progress on a fast track conveyor project for a coal-fired power station’s tippler extraction system, while the Eskom Kusile project is progressing ahead of schedule. The combined project scope of the Kusile packages covers the stockyard and limestone and terrace handling systems, as well as the coal truck offloading system. “While Takraf Africa has long been established as a leading materials handling specialist in sub-Saharan Africa, the company is now working increasingly across the African continent,” adds Richard. “For example, a recent project involved the supply of conveyors for a gold project in the Republic of Guinea, where the global Takraf group is also currently involved in a major tippler project.”

Firsts

Takraf Africa’s commitment to innovation has resulted in a number of technological breakthroughs from extended carryside and return idler spacing, which are now standard to its conveyor designs, to the first fully enclosed stockpile designed for Skorpion Zinc in Namibia. The first rapid rail load-out station in Africa was supplied by Takraf Africa in the 1970s, and, since then, Takraf Africa’s track record includes load-out stations for the manganese, iron ore and coal sectors. A second rapid rail load out station has recently been supplied to a coal project in Mozambique, while Takraf load-out station technology is currently being applied in a clinker loading contract. “Since joining the Takraf group, we have access to

Total product lifecycle support

“Such longevity means that we will be around to support our clients’ installations over their complete product lifecycle, whether they’re just around the corner in Mpumalanga or far to the north of Africa,” says Richard. “For example, we recently supplied a top and bottom shell for a 60/109 primary gyratory crusher supplied to a mine in the Northern Cape over 40 years ago.”

In Chile Takraf's belt conveyor technology is being applied in a 10 000 tph ore transportation system at an underground mining complex Takraf Africa’s strategy over the past century has been to bring support as close to its customers as possible, providing services from spares supply to refurbishments of machines to restore or upgrade their original capability at a fraction of the cost of a new unit. “For example, refurbishment of a Takraf Bucket Wheel Reclaimer installed some years ago on an iron mine in the Northern Cape required change out of the old bucket wheel and shaft with a new design bucket wheel. Other recent major projects have included the refurbishment of an Apron Feeder at one of the larger mines in the Mpumalanga area and the refurbishment of a rapid train load-out system for a Mpumalanga coal producer,” Richard concludes. Takraf Africa Richard Späth Tel: (011) 201-2300 Email: richard.spath@tenova.com

Eskom materials handling project

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CRUSHERS, SCREENS, CHUTES & LINERS

Crusher Survey FLSmidth SA

Kwatani

Osborn Engineered Products SA

Total Number of Employees

± 500

± 180

250

Employees with tertiary qualifications Number of years operating in SA

20 +

75% 43

100

ISO Accredited

Yes

Yes

Subsidiary of Overseas Principal

Private

Yes

Yes

No Public / Subsidiary of Overseas Principal Yes

5

1

-

▪ Jaw

ü

-

ü

▪ Cone

ü

-

▪ Mineral sizers

ü

-

ü -

▪ Gyratory

ü -

-

ü

▪ Impact Crushers

-

ü

— Horizontal Shaft

-

-

ü

— Vertical Shaft

-

-

ü

— Hammer mill Primary area of expertise: ▪ Design ▪ Manufacture/assembly ▪ Import ▪ Export ▪ Installation and commissioning ▪ Turnkey Contract to supply and install ancillary items such as: ▪ Structures ▪ Screens ▪ Chutes and feeders ▪ Pit civils and front-ends ▪ Grizzly screens ▪ Cyclones ▪ Separators ▪ Liners

-

-

ü

ü ü ü ü ü ü

ü -

ü ü -

ü ü ü ü ü ü ü

ü ü ü ü ü

ü ü ü ü ü ü ü -

ü ü ü ü ü ü ü -

ü ü ü -

-

-

-

1 500 tons

7 000 tons

-

-

30% of orders

-

Yes

Yes

Yes

Name of company

Ownership CAD/FEA and/or CAM facilities BEE rating Type of crushers handled

ü ü -

ü ü ü -

Service support: ▪ Manufacture and delivery to site ▪ Assembly on site ▪ Commissioning ▪ On-site supervision ▪ Personnel training ▪ On-site annual shutdown service ▪ Maintenance contracts Total value of last two contracts Number of projects completed in 2016 Value of largest contract completed in past 5 years Size of largest contract in terms of tons conveyed per hour Number of export orders over past 5 years Professional affiliations

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ü -


CRUSHERS, SCREENS, CHUTES & LINERS

Sandvik Mining & Rock Technology

Takraf

Weba South Africa

Weir Minerals

Total Number of Employees

1600

175

151

1400

Employees with tertiary qualifications Number of years operating in SA

80% 25

86% 100

35

108

ISO Accredited

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Subsidiary of Overseas Principal

-

Private

Subsidiary of Overseas Principal

Yes -

Yes -

Yes 4

Yes -

Name of company

Ownership CAD/FEA and/or CAM facilities BEE rating Type of crushers handled ▪ Jaw

ü

-

-

ü

▪ Cone

ü

-

-

▪ Mineral sizers ▪ Gyratory

ü -

ü -

ü -

ü -

▪ Impact Crushers

ü

ü -

ü

— Horizontal Shaft

ü

— Vertical Shaft

ü ü

— Hammer mill Primary area of expertise: ▪ Design ▪ Manufacture/assembly ▪ Import ▪ Export ▪ Installation and commissioning ▪ Turnkey Contract to supply and install ancillary items such as: ▪ Structures ▪ Screens ▪ Chutes and feeders ▪ Pit civils and front-ends ▪ Grizzly screens ▪ Cyclones ▪ Separators ▪ Liners

ü

ü

ü

-

ü -

ü -

ü ü ü ü ü ü

ü ü ü ü ü

ü ü ü ü ü

ü ü ü ü ü ü

ü ü ü ü ü ü

ü ü ü

ü ü ü -

ü ü ü -

ü ü

ü ü ü ü

ü ü ü ü ü ü ü R 30 m -

ü ü ü ü ü ü ü R 7 400 m 15

ü ü ü ü ü ü ü R5m 5-11

ü ü ü ü ü ü ü -

R 300 m

R 300 m

R3m

-

1 000 tons

1 200 tons

-

400 tons

-

15

35

-

Yes

Yes

SACEEC, DTI

SAIMM, SACPS, IQSA

-

Service support: ▪ Manufacture and delivery to site ▪ Assembly on site ▪ Commissioning ▪ On-site supervision ▪ Personnel training ▪ On-site annual shutdown service ▪ Maintenance contracts Total value of last two contracts Number of projects completed in 2016 Value of largest contract completed in past 5 years Size of largest contract in terms of tons conveyed per hour Number of export orders over past 5 years Professional affiliations

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POWER TRANSMISSION

New Sealing Solution Protects Bearings A new sealing solution prevents costly shaft damage in the event of bearing failure.

O

EB’s many years in the bearing industry have shown that bearing failure often leads to shaft damage. In many cases signs of bearing failure are difficult to detect, which often makes it almost impossible to predict the exact moment of bearing failure. This is particularly true on long conveyors where monitoring is difficult. There are many reasons why bearings fail so OEB has developed a sealing solution to mitigate premature bearing failure.

There are many reasons why bearings fail so OEB has developed a sealing solution to mitigate premature bearing failure Once the cage fails, the rolling elements are no longer guided and disperse in all directions at the bottom of the housing. As soon as the rolling elements stop rolling, sliding friction occurs, flattening the rollers and the shaft starts dropping down. The shaft eventually makes contact with the cast iron housing in the seal area, causing damage to both the housing and the shaft. In many cases it is difficult or impossible to replace the shaft. A new bearing is then fitted to the damaged shaft. But there is now a large gap between the shaft and the housing, resulting in ineffective sealing and allowing dirt to enter this gap, causing premature failure of the new bearing.

Preventing shaft damage

Herman Zandberg, the Mechanical Supervisor at Tronox, was lamenting shaft damage as depicted below on his conveyors. He remarked that it was strange that there was no seal on the market that could prevent such damage. Almost all of OEB’s customers had the same problem and so too did its sales engineers who often assist with fitting the first Split Roller Bearings.

OEB started testing various sacrificial seal materials. They removed the cage and rollers from the test bearing and ran the shaft on the seals, thereby simulating a bearing failure. These tests developed a sacrificial seal carrier that provides effective sealing, yet in the event of failure, the seal carrier would wear away without damage to the shaft. At slow speeds (100 RPM), like a conveyor, the sacrificial seal lasted many hours before wearing away. At high speeds (1 000 RPM), typical of a fan, the wear was quick. However, in all cases there was no shaft damage. This provides the end user with invaluable extra time to spot and address a failed bearing before shaft damage occurs, potentially reducing unforeseen expenses dramatically.

Improving bearing life

In addition to this innovation, engineers subsequently fitted the Split V-Ring seal in an attempt to improve bearing life. The Split V-Ring Seal is held in place on the shaft by a cable tie. The lip runs against the side of the housing, preventing dirt from entering this space. It is important to remember that while this is very effective against premature bearing failure, with time the lip wears off and needs to be replaced regularly. A minor cost compared to bearing failure. “In the past our opposition copied all our designs, namely our “SN” and “SD”, followed by the “SNQ” and “SDQ”. This time we have globally patented our design. Our patent covers Split Roller Bearings, as well as Plummer blocks, since we believe that there will be a demand to retro-fit these seals into existing housings, as well as new housings,” Herman concludes. OEB Nica Smith Tel: (011) 493-4463 Email: nica@oebearings.co.za

Shaft damage in the seal area where the shaft made contact with the housing

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MAINTENANCE

Shaking up the After-market “When customers invest in our products they do so with peace of mind, in the knowledge that they can count on the support of a competent team throughout their product’s life cycle,” states Floris Timmers, Regional Business Line Manager MRS (Mining & Rock Excavation Services).

E

piroc’s after-market division is responsible for all capital ranges across all divisions, covering eleven product lines including Rockdrills & Rotation Units through to drilling (pit viper, FlexiROC, SmartROC) and mining machines (Simba, Scooptram, Boomer). The extensive after-market solution which comprises specialist tooling and tool kits, after-sales service, rebuild, technology, telematics, and training, is delivered to customers and end-users in South Africa as well as direct neighbouring countries.

Differentiators

after-market triad which comprises stock holding, competent technicians and specialised tooling. “Our three-pronged approach is geared to ensure that customers and end-users get the maximum service out of their machines and equipment,” he says, adding that they put all this into a highly competitive package for their customers.

Parts need to get out quickly to maximise uptime for increased productivity and profitability

Stock holding, the first of this value add package, is directly linked to building customer relationships. “This is a big part of after-market because we must be familiar with the customer’s business and exact requirements to enable us to know what stock as well as in what quantities to carry.

Floris notes two factors that differentiate Epiroc’s after-market service: their remanufacturing capabilities and innovative after-market triad, a combination, he says, "Going beyond that, we must get the parts that takes the company out quickly to maximise uptime for to a whole new level in increased productivity and ultimately the after-market space. profitability for the customer.” “We do full machine Floris adds that customers As the machines and parts are remanufacture back to do not have the hassle of rebuilt back to new, we offer full life in accordance finding storage space and with OEM specificawarranties on our workmanship they don’t pay for stock tions at our Jet Park and premium OEM parts lying on the shelves. “They facility in Gauteng. As only pay for stock when they the machines and parts need it.” are rebuilt back to new, we offer warranties on our Regular training workmanship and premium Next in the after-market trio is the OEM parts just like you would team of highly skilled technicians on brand new machines.” who deliver expert, 24/7 support. The technicians receive regular training to stay up The second differentiating factor is the to date on all products, arming them with the necessary maintenance, service and repair expertise. Completing the trio is specialised tooling designed by Epiroc. “No matter how good the product or how qualified the technicians, the use of correct tooling when servicing or repairing equipment is just as essential in ensuring optimum and reliable machine performance.”

The technicians receive regular training to stay up to date on all products

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Not all customers make use of Epiroc’s full after-market offering which Floris admits presents a challenge. “Customers who only buy parts from us don’t know when a service is required on their machines or equipment. Our package removes the headache in the after-sales service space and we strongly encourage customers to make use of our service contract; it is an investment that delivers significant savings over the life span of the equipment.”


log into their fleet to see if the machines are productive, if they are running or drilling, how many metres down they have drilled, as well as fuel consumption. Certiq also checks machine health and alerts the customer if there is a problem with it such as overheating and whether the operator has switched the machine off. “Certiq Our approach is geared to basically extends ensure that customers and endwhat the operausers get the maximum service out of tor is seeing.” their machines and equipment Certiq is currently available on all new Epiroc product lines but is limited to specific models and can also be retrofitted, requiring a simple fitment of hardware on the machine.

No service is complete without training

As no service is complete without training, it is an area that receives a lot of attention from Epiroc. “We regard training as a value added product to our customers. Appropriate The after-market division is responsible for all capital ranges training ensures the correct use of the machine across all divisions, covering eleven product lines which will deliver long life for lowest overall total cost of ownership and rapid return on investment.” The majority of the training is done at Remote machine monitoring “In our endeavour to assist customers in extending the customer’s site both in South Africa and in the the service life of their capital equipment and keep neighbouring territories by fourteen professionals operational costs as low as possible, we recently all with different fields of expertise. These trainers, introduced Certiq.” Floris explains that this web- together with Epiroc technicians, receive training based solution remotely monitors machine activity both locally and overseas from Swedish experts. providing insight into operator activities and pro- Epiroc South Africa ductivity as well as information on the condition of Kathryn Coetzer the machine. Using a mobile device (cell phone, Tel: (011) 821-9000 laptop, tablet or iPad), customers can remotely Email: kathryn.coetzer@epiroc.com

The use of correct tooling when servicing or repairing equipment is just as essential in ensuring optimum and reliable machine performance

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TRANSFORMING FREIGHT LOGISTICS


TRANSNET FREIGHT RAIL

www.transnet.net www.transnetfreightrail-tfr.net


IOT SENSORS

Averting Potential Disasters The network of connected sensors, devices, and appliances commonly referred to as the Internet of Things (IoT) has completely changed the way business works. This is as true of the heavy hauling and freight industry as any other. At any moment, various players in the industry can get a sense of vehicle health, cargo safety, and whether or not any infrastructure is in need of repair.

A

s IoT technologies have become more ubiquitous, so have the threats from cybercriminals however. With more than 20-billion IoT devices expected to be online by 2020, there are more gaps for cybercriminals to take advantage of than ever before. This has massive potential consequences for heavy hauling. A cyber attack at targeted points in a country or region’s network could leave it crippled, preventing people from receiving much-needed goods and services. Fortunately, it doesn’t have to be that way. According to Etion Group Chief Digital Officer,

Maeson Maherry, it’s possible for businesses to reap the benefits of IoT without placing themselves in a compromised security environment. “Connected sensors can provide businesses with useful data that can be easily acted on,” Maeson says. “Sensors in trucks and cargo containers, for example, can tell you when to do preventative maintenance, helping avert potential disasters.”

Can’t rely on technology alone

For this to work, however, people have to be able to act on that data. “If I can send commands to vehicles and machines out in the field, which is what sensors are in the first place, can I do so in a way that makes my business more productive and efficient? “So, for example, if a vehicle is telling me that it’ll need maintenance soon, do I have the power to schedule that maintenance so that the machine is down for as little time as possible?” he asks. “Thus in order to reap the benefits, you have to know that you can trust the information coming from the embedded sensors in your network. The question of who owns the IoT

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IOT SENSORS

devices and sensors in a business environment, therefore, becomes critical. Do they belong to me, or do they belong to the manufacturer?”

medical information then the answer is yes, but if they’re just sending the settings on a machine then the answer might be no.”

Logically, ownership should always lie with the business owner because these devices are used to make decisions with potentially massive business impacts. “You have to ensure that you’ve got owner-controlled security in place,” Maeson advises. “You have to make sure that you can control these devices, and that only your devices plug into your network.”

Finally, integrity entails doing everything you can to prevent your machines from being tampered with. “We’ve already seen what happens when devices are tampered with. In August 2016, cybercriminals used IoT devices to execute one of the biggest DoS attacks in history, bringing down some of the internet’s biggest sites. It’s only a matter of time before someone tries to bring down a freight network.“

Entire system

Even if you own the security, he adds, you still have to know that you can trust the entire system. “You’ve got to be able to trust everything, from the sensors themselves, the way they’re communicating data, all the way through to the information systems that are processing that data and turning it into information for you, so that you can make your own deductions and send back commands.” Thus authentication, encryption, and integrity, become critical. “When it comes to authentication, this allows you to know that a sensor sending you information belongs to you and that when you send information to a sensor it will act on it.“ A lot of the work around encryption, meanwhile, comes down to picking your battles. “Is it something that I need to worry about other people seeing?,” Maeson asks. “If the devices are sending out private

It’s only a matter of time before someone tries to bring down a freight network

Avoidable

Fortunately, says Maeson, such incidents are avoidable. “It’s possible to solve all these issues with the cryptography and technology that we have today, we just have to have the conversations to start with. “The same is true of devices: they’re going to need to be updated in the field, just like your computer or your phone gets updated. You’ve got to make sure that there’s integrity in the code that’s running on these devices, even if it’s embedded. “The advantages are clear but if people are not thinking about the cybersecurity aspect and the ownership aspect, then they are not going to enjoy the benefits of what IoT can really do on a large scale,” Maeson concludes. Etion Group, Maeson Maherry, www.etion.co.za

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Specially-adapted Excavator Tender HPE Africa, specialists in earthmoving and construction equipment, has been awarded a tender by Transnet Port Terminals (TPT) to supply 10 specially-adapted excavators for its Richards Bay facility as part of an initiative to improve operational efficiencies at the port.

TPT selected the 26 ton Hyundai R260LC-9S excavator series for this project. The robust machines meet specific performance specifications, including best in class power and a 6 ton lifting capacity throughout the required working cycle, at the required 12 rpm minimum swing speed,” says Alex Ackron, managing director HPE Africa. “The scope of this project required the excavators to be mounted onto mobile straddle carriers, for the efficient unloading of materials including coal, chrome and manganese, from freight rail cars.

Excavators were supplied with an enhanced operator cab, featuring an improved suspension seat

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Stringent safety regulations

“The TPT-approved straddle carrier design which was developed through TPT and HPE Africa’s team adheres to Transnet’s performance and safety standards. These specially-adapted straddle carriers allow locomotives and rail carriages to pass safely beneath the structure. For additional safety, this design only allows the operator to enter and leave the straddle if the excavator is orientated at 35 degrees to the tracks, preventing an unattended straddle from being struck by a moving train. Excavators have also been fitted with specially-designed 1.6 m³ heavy-duty buckets and 2.5 m³ coal buckets to maximise a railway car’s unloading speed,” says Alex.


EARTHMOVING

As part of HPE Africa’s commitment to support South African business, approximately 35% of the project value for modifications was outsourced to local businesses within KwaZulu Natal – easily exceeding Transnet’s local content requirement for this tender. HPE Africa commissioned a Richards Bay-based engineering company to manufacture the straddle structures for the Hyundai excavators for this project. According to the lead design engineer at the engineering works, the straddle design is pinned instead of bolted, to ensure quick assembly time and reduced maintenance requirements.

Modern day technology

To meet specific Transnet specifications, these excavators were supplied with an enhanced operator cab, featuring an improved suspension seat, operator-friendly control cluster, reverse camera and Hyundai’s Hi-Mate telematics system. Apart from being re-painted the Transnet red, these machines have an efficient centralised greasing and fluid maintenance system. Other features includes a VEI load weighing system, operator presence and engine protec-

35% of the project value for modifications was outsourced to local businesses within KwaZulu Natal tion system, LED lighting and a bucket cylinder protection system. According to Prakash Ramsumuj, Project Manager for Transnet, it was critical to minimise the time period between the arrival of a freight train and unloading of materials. Improved efficiencies within Transnet Freight Rail significantly reduce lead times of materials to export customers. “Due to our challenging operating requirements and the extremely corrosive environment in the port, Transnet and HPE Africa engaged in a highly-effective joint design review process after the tender award,” Prakash adds. HPE Africa Lani van der Watt Tel: (011) 397-4670 Email: lani.vdwatt@hpeafrica.co.za www.hpeafrica.com

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PETROLEUM HUB

New Liquid Bulk Port on the Cards Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA) updated stakeholders at an engagement session regarding progress made on establishing the Port of Ngqura as a new petroleum trading hub for Southern Africa.

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NPA has already completed Phase 1 of the infrastructure required to service the site. It includes the construction of a new access road from the N2 to the location where Oil Tanking Grindrod Calulo Holdings (OTGC), the private terminal operator, will build the new tank farm. TNPA also completed the detailed design of the new Port Entrance Plaza and the new main access road, including the pipeline servitude that will form the link between the new tank farm and the port.

The design caters for 200 000 cbm of bulk storage and final total capacity of 790 000 cbm

Phase 2 includes the landside development, forming the link between the tank farm and the berth. The port authority will provide infrastructure for the new OTGC tank farm by equipping Berth B100 to

function as a liquid bulk berth. It will also construct a new access road from the tank farm to the berth. TNPA will provide all the associated services and construct a new port entrance on the eastern side of the Couga River.

OTGC commitment

According to the build, OTGC will plan, fund, construct, maintain and operate the new liquid bulk handling facility in the port. The concept engineering design and the relevant surveys have been completed and construction started late last year. The design caters for 200 000 cbm of bulk storage and final total capacity of 790 000 cbm. The planned commissioning is at the end of 2020. Phase 1 will cater for dedicated jetty pipelines, bulk storage for up to 200 000 cbm, road loading with a Vapor Recovery Unit (VRU), state-of-the-art firefighting facilities and site drainage facilities. Provisions have been made for the receipt, storage and distribution of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG). The infrastructure will be designed to provide the following services – to accommodate vessel sizes of up to 100 000 deadweight tonnage, road loading facilities, inter-tank transfer/recirculation facilities, stock accounting in real time, office facilities for customers and an independent laboratory.

The partnership

An artist’s impression of the Tank Farm in the Port of Ngqura

OTGC is a majority South African owned Level 1 BBBEE company. This Joint Venture between Oiltanking, the Grindrod Group and Calulo is characterised by international terminal operating expertise, local knowledge and sound experience and business expertise. It is committed to the technical, operational, Health, Safety, Security, Environment (HSSE) and management standards of oil-tanking activities in SA. The deep-water Port of Ngqura is a strategic location for the facility as it can accommodate vessels up to 100 000 deadweight tonnage. The facility has the potential to establish itself as a global transhipment and trading hub for West and East Africa. It will reduce reliance on the Port of Durban for transhipments to coastal ports.

PE tank farm

An aerial view of the site - TNPA has completed Phase 1 of the infrastructure required to service the new tank farm site

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This development in the Port of Ngqura will make way for the decommissioning and remediation of the existing liquid bulk facilities in the Port of PE. As part of the cut over strategy and subsequent to the commissioning of the Ngqura facility, the PE tank farm operators will wind down operations over a period of four months. During this period, it is envisaged that no further related shipments


PETROLEUM HUB

Constructed in 1938, the 80-year old Tank Farm in the Port of PE is nearing the end of its lifetime. Its planned decommissioning date is at the end of 2020

will be received in the Port of PE. TNPA is working closely with the PE tank farm operators to compile a decommissioning and remediation plan, which once approved by Department of Environmental Affairs, will be executed after the four month winding down period.

Cost of the project

The estimated investment by OTGC for Phase 1 of the Port of Ngqura liquid bulk facility will be R800m. TNPA, being the port authority responsible for investment in basic port infrastructure, will invest R 1.2bn in common user infrastructure for

The deep-water Port of Ngqura is a strategic location for the facility as it can accommodate vessels up to 100 000 deadweight tonnage future terminal operators and port users at the Port of Ngqura’s Multi-Purpose Terminal (Finger Jetty) ie, the B and C series berths in the port. Berth B100 is the common user berth where liquid bulk vessels will call and where OTGC will install loading arms to load and discharge cargo for the liquid bulk facility. Other basic infrastructure includes access roads, bulk water and electricity services and an entrance plaza to allow for liquid bulk, hazardous and abnormal cargo to enter the port through a separate entrance which ensures a safe cargo working environment.

Port of Ngqura Olwethu Mdabula Tel: (041) 507-8233 Email: olwethu.mdabula@transnet.net

Rajesh Dana

Jan Beute

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ENDORSER OF “BULK HANDLING TODAY”

LIFTING EQUIPMENT ENGINEERING ASSOCIATION OF SA

• A recognised ECSA Voluntary Association (VA) •

LEEASA is a fully-fledged association devoted to the lifting industry across Southern Africa. Members hale from the crane, forklift, mobile elevated work platform, aerial and suspended access platform, chain hoists, rigging and lifting tackle arenas, etc. Primarily devoted to the LMI’s (Lifting Machinery Inspectors), and LME’s (Lifting Machinery Entities), the association considers safety paramount. As such it serves in an advisory capacity to the SABS, the Department of Labour, various training bodies and the industry at large. LEEASA is recognised by ECSA as a voluntary association. What’s in it for you:

As an Individual member who is registered as a Lifting Machinery Inspector (LMI), you may qualify for any concessionary fee granted by ECSA (this could save you over R1 000 a year).

and other training courses accredited by the association attract ECSA CPD points.

ECSA registered LEEASA members are awarded one Continuing Professional Development (CPD) credit each year. CPD is an ECSA requirement to retain registration.

Members benefit from the collective power of a recognised and established association and collective co-ordination in dealing with authorities in policy making and matters concerning the industry.

Members obtain a discount on LEEASA seminars. Both these

LEEASA has some 650 members (Individuals and Companies).

• • •

LEEASA Occupational Health & Safety Act and Regulations LEEASA Mine Health & Safety Act and Regulations LEEASA Lifting Equipment Inspection & Legal Compliance Register

Available for purchase online at www.leeasa.co.za

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LIFTING EQUIPMENT ENGINEERING ASSOCIATION OF SOUTH AFRICA Head Office: 8 Boris Road, Bordeaux, Randburg, Johannesburg Tel: 074 900 8378 • www.leeasa.co.za Secretary: Arni Sommer • email: arni@leeasa.co.za

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February 2012


CONVEYING

Ordering online Passport, an online product selection programme, now offers users an application-based approach to quickly and easily design and order mechanical products used in belt conveying applications.

A

BB enables customers to design conveyor pulley assemblies and belt conveyors for the first time with its web-based Dodge Passport design tool. These user-friendly programmes allow customers to create and order complete application-based solutions for bulk material handling applications typically found in mining, cement, aggregate and grain industries.

New design applications leverage over 140 years of bulk material handling expertise Select, quote and order Passport’s new

conveyor pulley assembly designer allows users to select, quote and order conveyor pulley assemblies complete with shafting and mounted bearings. Real-time pricing and availability enables customers to make cost-effective selections of readily-available components. After selections are complete, Passport offers add-to-order capability, allowing customers to convert selections into

orders via the PT Place e-commerce platform. For the new belt conveyor design programme, Passport uses application-specific design parameters such as capacity, material characteristics, and conveyor geometry to accurately size gear reducers, motors, conveyor pulleys, shafting, and mounted bearings. The software also delivers a comprehensive summary that includes component details, supporting technical performance data and index selections for future reference. “From Torque-Arm reducer drive packages to conveyor pulley assemblies complete with mounted bearings, Dodge has a product offering for belt conveying applications,” says Matthew Wolford, Electronic Tools Product Manager. “Passport’s new design applications leverage over 140 years of bulk material handling expertise, guiding users through a reliable selection process for all Dodge mechanical products and accessories.” Future Passport capabilities will incorporate additional Dodge mechanical power transmission products, as well as expanding the application-based approach for packaged product solutions to a wider range of common industrial applications. ABB Dodge Shawn Traylor Email: shawn.traylor@us.abb.com dodgepassport.abb.com

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TRACE Inte is a globa anti-br or leading pr party risk

TRACE due diligence solutions are based on internationally accepted best practices and our experience and familiarity with the compliance needs of multinational companies. Services range from a denied parties screening to enhanced due diligence, including TRACE Certified Due Diligence.


International, Inc. globally recognized ti-bribery business organization and g provider of third risk management solutions.


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DUST CONTROL

Mist Cannons Control Dust Pollution Coeymans, a company specialising in dust control solutions has helped a port located along the Hudson River to control fugitive particle emissions at the dock and in the industrial park using atomized mist technology.

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he Port of Coeymans employs two DustBoss DB-60 atomized mist cannons for dust suppression in a variety of activities and applications. One machine is mobile, used to control particle emissions during the unloading and storage of bulk materials. The other is towermounted to suppress particulates at the metal scrapyard. This provides operators with the versatility to address surface suppression and airborne control at different areas of the port, resulting in a drastic reduction in fugitive dust. About 40-50 vessels per year arrive from Greece, Turkey, Egypt and Spain, delivering nearly 30 000 tons per week of clinker, a dry chalky substance used as a binder in cement products. When the ship arrives, large clamshell shovels controlled by tower cranes unload the material from the ship’s cargo hold, over the ship’s deck - from 7.5 metres to as high as to 36.5 metres in the air - to a 6 metre hopper, which discharges into a 36 ton haul truck. The truck drives the material the short distance to the adjacent industrial park, where it is stored for further transport.

A dusty environment

“The most dust is produced when the substance is dropped into the hopper, and although it has a bag house attached, a percentage would still

escape,” explains Stephen Kelly, Vice President of Sales and Business Development at the Port of Coeymans. “We realised that we also needed dust suppression for scrap metal storage and other operations in the industrial park. Our goal was to improve air quality for the safety of our employees and the surrounding community.”

Using mist cannons offers some clear benefits over the use of hoses, which need to be manned The 91.4 metre wide dock receives vessels of up to 228.6 metres in length. With no beam restrictions, it accepts ships with a depth of 9.4 metres. In addition, a 91.4 metre by 18.3 metre inlet channel with a 4.5 metre draft allows loading/unloading from both sides. Like many other facilities handling bulk materials, the Port of Coeymans limits fugitive dust emissions by employing a couple of simple methods. One is limiting the distance the dust-emitting cargo travels from the ship’s hold to the dock. This is done by using a clamshell shovel

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Your boutique business destination Surrounded by lush gardens in the hub of Johannesburg’s northern suburbs, The Peartree in Craighall Park caters for groups of fifteen through to 100 guests in three well-appointed and equipped business suites. Breakfast meetings, working lunches, indoor or outdoor dining, half-day and full-day packages including all welcome refreshments, teas and lunches are offered in Standard, Gold and Platinum packages. Secure parking, Wi-fi, lockable space, all underpinned by highly qualified and helpful staff dedicated to ensuring your event is a success, make The Peartree a destination of choice.

www.thepeartree.co.za e-mail: info@thepeartree.co.za Tel: 011 781 1401 41 St. Albans Ave, Craighall Park

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DUST CONTROL suspended from a crane to slowly unload the material into a tall portable hopper with a baghouse dust collection system. To further mitigate dust, crane operators reduce the amount of material collected by the shovel. Although this extends the unloading time, it curbs the amount of material escaping from the top or sides of the shovel and thus further limits dust emissions. Another area that needed dust suppression was in the industrial park. Located about 213 metres inland from the Hudson River with no natural wind barrier, the surface is a combination of concrete, packed earth and gravel. Scrap metal from various sources (demolition projects, old cars, dismantled ships, etc, is transferred from barges and deposited into storage piles. During windy conditions, the unprocessed metal can emit dust both during offloading from vessels and loading onto ground transport. The industrial park also stores mounds of various raw commodities. These well-organised piles, stretching as high as 20 feet (6 metres), are exposed to outdoor conditions and can emit dust in moderate winds, during offloading by haulers, disruption by front loaders and loading into trains or trucks. Additionally, this heavy ground equipment can kick up its own dust during normal operations.

Mist cannons to control dust

BossTek, manufacturer of the DustBoss series of industrial atomized mist cannons was contacted and the port decided to rent two of the mid-sized DB-60 units to test them out. Mounted on a heavy-duty wheeled carriage with a pintle hitch, the DB-60 has a specially designed barrel with a powerful fan on the back end and a circular manifold with 30 atomizing spray nozzles on the front. The fan forces air through the cannon and past the manifold, launching millions of tiny atomized mist droplets 50 to 200 microns in size.

leading to a booster pump that raises the pressure up to 160 PSI, with a maximum of 250 PSI. The unit only requires a constant supply pressure of 10 PSI, and when a non-potable water source is used, the DB-60 can be equipped with an in-line 30 mesh, 595-micron filter system. There are some clear benefits over the use of hoses, which are required to be manned and can use up to 100 gpm (378 lpm). The DB-60 uses far less water (only 26.7 gpm /101.1 lpm), delivering a much larger coverage area and requiring no labour for ongoing operation. Workers at the port simply place it in the desired location, point it in the right direction, hook up the hose and power, turn it on and walk away.

By introducing droplets roughly the same size as the dust particles, the droplets are able to travel with the particles, collide with them and drag them to the ground before they drift onto the dock area or across the site line Result

Operators report that air quality at the port has significantly improved during the unloading of clinker and other dusty materials, and that fugitive dust emissions have not been seen leaving the site since adding the units to the facility’s dust management plan. The cannons are easily positioned on the dock, taking up little room and covering a large area, allowing crane operators to transfer material from hold to hopper more efficiently. The industrial park has experienced a noticeable improvement in air quality, especially when a DB-60 is in operation during dry and windy periods. BossTek Stephen Kelly Email: info@bosstek.com www.bosstek.com

By introducing droplets roughly the same size as the dust particles, the droplets are able to travel with the particles, collide with them and drag them to the ground before they drift onto the dock area or across the site line. A 25 HP fan producing 30 000 CFM (849.50 CMM) of air flow propels the engineered mist in a 60 metre long cone that reaches high over the deck of the ship. This type of coverage offers simultaneous surface suppression to material in the cargo hold and airborne suppression through the shovel’s path from the hold to the hopper.

Easily transported

Approximately the height and length of a standard golf cart and weighing around 816 kg, the unit is easily moved on its wheeled carriage by a pickup truck or fork lift from the port to the industrial park. There, operators can cover more than 11 613 square metres of the storage and traffic area using the 359Âş degree oscillation. The Port of Coeymans uses municipal water through a hose with a cam-and-groove quick disconnect coupling

The DB-60 combines a specially designed ducted fan with an atomized misting ring to deliver wide coverage

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BELTCON 19

Analysis of Belt Stresses in the Idler Junction Area. Rig Construction and Calibration

N S De Andrade

T J Sheer

This research report describes the creation of a unique experimental facility for investigating localised stresses that can develop in conveyor belting during operation. High localised stresses can cause premature failure of conveyor belts, requiring expensive replacement. A key objective of carrying out research in this field is to gain a fundamental understanding of the stress that develops in various types of conveyor belting as it crosses over idler rollers. An experimental facility was developed which will be able to measure the stress and the deformation for different types of belting, such as solid woven/PVC and ply belting, in different belt classes. Particular attention was given to the various effects at the junction point caused by different idler configurations.

I

dler arrangements are configurable in the 24 metre-long test facility for inline, offset and belt-friendly types. Belt stresses at the idler junctions of these configurations are measured by applying strain gauges and load cells. The offset distance can be varied to determine the effect this has on the developing idler junction stress. This allows comparison of the stresses as the class of belt increases for each type of belt. The value of doing so is to determine the effect that the weft strength or stiffness has as the belt is forced into the idler junction. The test facility which was designed and built was shown to meet the requirements of the project. The instruments were calibrated to an acceptable uncertainty. The test facility can handle the full range of planned tests in terms of the design strength and is modular enough to handle a variety of other research initiatives. The establishment of a large, specialised experimental facility constitutes the first phase of an ongoing research programme into improving the design standards for belt conveyor systems.

Introduction

Conveyors are the arteries of the bulk materials handling

industry, moving large amounts of material from the source point to its destination. The basic components of a conveyor are the idlers, conveyor belt, pulleys and drives. The most important component, because of its relatively high cost and wear rate, is the belt itself. The conveyor belt is subjected to different dynamic loading actions as it rides loaded on the carrying idler rolls in the one direction and unloaded on the return idler rolls in other direction. The interaction between the conveyor belt and the idler rolls is therefore extremely important as the idler rolls come into contact with the belt most frequently.

Purpose of the study

The aim of this investigation is to attempt to better understand the stresses occurring within the conveyor belt, in particular in the idler junction area. How do the various idler configurations impart stress into this area and which configuration would impart the least stress? The fact is that despite a long history of development of design theories, designers still need to apply the accepted safety factors of 10 for fabric belts and 6.67 for steel cord belts. This reveals that there remains scope for improvement in the field of conveyor design. By gaining a greater understanding of the dynamic forces acting on a conveyor, it is possible to design idler configurations which reduce the stresses in conveyor belting. This in turn allows conveyor designers to reduce the class of conveyor belt for a particular application, thereby offering the industry considerable savings, not only in capital but also in the operational cost over the life of a conveyor belt.

Figure 1. Three-roll inline troughing idler

Research background

The debate in the bulk materials handling industry on whether offset idlers are 'gentler' on the belt compared to inline idlers has raged for many years. This debate was exacerbated by the introduction of

Figure 2. Three-roll offset troughing idler

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BELTCON 19

the socalled 'belt friendly idler' which has an even greater offset between the rolls than the conventional offset idler, as noted in the national standard (SANS 1313-1, 2012).

is supposed to be, preventing the roller retention brackets from cutting into the belt, as would occur on a conventional offset idler.

Damage and delamination of the conveyor belt layers is on the rise and an emerging trend in the industry is that this increase in belt damage is thought to be related to the dynamic action occurring at the junction between idler rolls. Of the single roll, two-roll vee, three-roll and five-roll carrying idler configurations being used in the industry, the three-roll idler configuration is by far the most common.

It is important to note that there is no documented historical data to support the supposition that this mode of belt damage is a major threat or cost to the industry.

In the carrying idler designs, there are three methods of arranging the idler rolls in relation to the cross member. This research focuses on the three configurations:

Inline

As the name suggests, the three rolls are arranged in a troughing configuration (at the desired angle) with the rolls being inline, as can be seen in the side view , as shown in figure 1.

Offset

In the offset configuration, the centre roll is offset relative to the wing rolls. The offset distance is governed in South Africa by the SANS 1313-1 standard, which stipulates that: 'the horizontal distance between the axis of the centre roll and the axis of an offset roll, when the rolls are aligned parallel to each other, shall, subject to a tolerance of +5mm be as follows: a. 150mm in the case of idlers the nominal diameter of which is less than or equal to 150mm, and b. 180mm in the case of idlers the nominal diameter of which exceeds 150mm.� (SANS 1313-1, 2012)

Offset Belt-friendly

The offset distance in the 'belt-friendly' configuration, as shown in figure 3, is greater than that of the standard offset idler because the diameter of the cross member is included in the offset distance. The concept of the belt-friendly idler is that if the centre roll failed and dislodged, then the cross member would effectively carry the belt across the full length of where the roll

Research motivation

The primary purpose of this investigation is to determine the influence on the stress in the belting with respect to the positioning of the support rollers for the configurations mentioned here. Specifically, what the distance between the centre roll and the wing roll should be to optimise the performance of a conveyor belt and does that distance vary with the type of conveyor belt employed for a particular application? (Figure 4). As the focus of the study is on determining which of the idler configurations has the least effect in terms of stress within the belt, comparing the range of idlers from inline to various distances between centre lines of offset, only three roll idler configurations are evaluated.

Research objectives and scope

The goal of this research is to set up the foundation for a truly comprehensive model that can help conveyor designers, and afford conveyor maintenance operators the knowledge and insight into the best choice of idler configuration for a given conveyor belt, in order to maximise the belt life by reducing stress. The problem identified is that the stress which develops as the belt passes over the idlers is not yet clearly understood. This study attempts to define the different stresses developed on the most commonly utilised idler configurations in South Africa, ie, three-roll inline, offset and belt-friendly idlers. In order for factual information to be compiled, data needs to be collected for analysis. To this end, a comprehensive test facility was constructed, complete with sensing and measuring instruments to make interpretable data available. It was important that the integrity of the data not be compromised by the design and construction of the test facility, and reflect a true application despite numerous constraints such as cost, complexity and limitations on current instrumentation. Further consideration was given to understanding how the selected instruments function to obtain maximum value in terms of the quality of data.

Figure 3. Roll offset belt-friendly troughing idler

The research has three definitive phases: 1. Design and manufacture of the test facility, and validation that the design meets the desired outcomes. This is the subject of this research report. 2. Running the tests to capture the data and finally, the conversion of the data into information.

Figure 4. Illustration of offset distance (SANS 1313-1, 2012)

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BELTCON 19

3. Comparison with the results obtained from FEA modelling. Ideally, the comparison will validate the FEA studies, resulting in high levels of confidence in the use of FEA modelling applied to other belt widths and idler configurations.

runs on rails (l). The rails allow for the belt to move a distance of up to 1.5 m. An important step is to create movement over the extent of the area. The measuring equipment is positioned to coincide with the area which is at the centre of the structure.

This research report covers the first aspect of the entire research scope (which is Phase 1 mentioned above) while further studies will be conducted to complete the next two phases.

The belt moves through the area collecting data. Most pertinent is the area preceding the junction, through the idler junction and beyond.

Assumptions made

The tension is transmitted through the steel wire cable (j) and around the sheave wheels (d). The sheave structure (d) houses two sheaves, the larger sheave is the load-bearing element while the smaller sheave is there to direct the cable tension.

Certain assumptions were made to simplify the test parameters and guide the design. The most pertinent are listed as: 1. The operating range of the conveyor belting is in the linear region. The strain is linearly proportional to the stress in the test operating conditions. 2. These configurations are evaluated in terms of load with different types of conveyor belting, namely fabric and solid woven. Other factors such as roll diameter and the type of roll (polymer or steel) are assumed to not have any tangible effect on the evaluation and are thus be ignored.

The cables carry a maximum load of 20 tonnes, therefore the sheave frame holder (m) needs to be able to withstand a load in the order of 40 tonnes. The sheave frame holder is embedded into a cube of concrete with the dimension of 1 200mm length per side. The soil conditions were soft and unstable, thus to accommodate the soil condition a larger

3. The influence of weft strength or stiffness on the results is offset by the selection of a high, middle of the range and low class belt, for each type of belt. Steel cord belting is not included in this research as delamination does not occur between the cords and the rubber filler material. A probable reason for this is that the carcass is made of cords and surrounded by rubber, which can withstand a large amount of elongation, therefore, the carcass cannot crease, and over time fatigue occurs, followed by delamination.

Design and development of the experimental test facility

To achieve the objectives of this project, construction of the test facility had to fulfil certain requirements. Of Figure 5. Image of the sheave structure and belt attachment importance was the ability to measure stress in the belt, particularly in the idler junction region. Historical data reveals that the highest levels of failure occur on convex curves. Thus, the test developed for this study is in the form of a convex curve. Note that regardless of the relative loading on a belt, the idler junction pressure is accentuated on a convex curve. The test facility should allow for repeatable test measurements, and the various test parameters should be easily adjustable. Important test parameters include the testing of various trough angles. A modular design facilitates testing beyond the scope of this project. De- Figure 6. Components of the test facility sign features should include the ability to handle loads and operate safely. The above should be achieved while considering certain constraints. The first and foremost was cost, this would shape which test instrumentation could be selected and the overall design of the test facility. There were also the limitations of the sponsors, in terms of their technical capabilities and what they could provide in a certain time frame. Another major factor having a bearing on the design was the space available for the construction of the test facility and the resources needed to erect it.

The operation of the experimental facility

The labels 'a' to 'n' describe the major components of the test facility, shown in Figure 6. The belt is tensioned via the hydraulic puller (a) which Figure 7. Belt attachment in operation

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BELTCON 19

area was excavated. The concrete was reinforced and braced with steel members. The cable is connected to a shackle of the belt attachment (k). The adjustable belt attachment allows for the belt to be troughed from zero to 90 degrees. This design reduces time for the various setups as the trough angle is increased from 0 degrees. In the initial design concept, a pulley was proposed. Therefore, the belt would be carried on the idlers and then be pulled around the pulleys and the two belt ends would be tensioned after that. This idea posed two major challenges: 1. The strain gauges could not tolerate the strain of going around the pulleys in a continuous cycle. This might exceed the maximum strain limit of the gauges and each successive cycle of the belt would yield a different strain value for the same load. 2. The second hurdle was to accommodate the transition distance to normalise the stress (change of the trough shape from a flat belt to having a trough angle of up to 90 degrees). This would increase the length of the test facility dramatically. (All the equipment had to be built under cover due to the sensitive electric equipment). Thus, the belt attachment and sheaves were designed to overcome these challenges. As shown in Figure 5 and Figure 7, the steel wire rope is threaded around the pulleys and also connected to the belt attachment. Figure 7 shows a closeup view of the belt attachment which is set at 35 degrees. The belt attachment allows for the tension from the wire rope to be distributed into the belt (h). The belt is set at a radius of 35m on a convex curve. The belt is connected to the belt attachment via a mechanical splice. The length of the testing facility and the maintenance of the troughed shape was viewed as of the utmost importance to eliminate the stress effects of the transition distance. The transition induces additional stress and so the added length of the three idlers on each side of the three centre idlers, where all the measurement would take place, was included

Figure 8. Magnetic encoder used on the testing facility

Figure9. Illustration of important zones in the test setup, top view

to circumvent this issue or at least to lessen its effects. The belt is supported by the universal idler frames (i), which rest on the column supports and support base (b). The column supports bolt directly into the base frame and allow for easy repeatable and accurate assembly. The universal idler frames are versatile in their design. The trough angle can be varied from 0 to 90 degrees with a simple jacking bolt arrangement. The offset distance can reach a maximum of 450mm, while the wing rolls can be set at up to 5 degrees of forward tilt. The universal idlers are designed to be very strong and rigid structures to minimise deflection and accommodate large moment loads generated by the offset. The overhead structure (e) provides the mounting for the belt profiler (f). The overhead frame needs to have negligible deflection and as such, a deep I beam section was chosen. As the name suggests, the belt profiler moves in three orthogonal directions and is able to map the profile of the belt. There are three magnetic encoders used for the linear measurement along each axis (Figure 8). The probe of the belt profiler comes into contact with the belt and is moved across the weft direction of the belt a predefined distance so that a comparison of the different types of belts is obtained. The belt profiler uses magnetic encoders which provide precise repeatable results without any calibration required. The belt profiler caters for the variation from the highest point in the belt trough to the lowest point. There are various load cells placed on the testing facility to capture the necessary data. A tensile load cell (g) measures the tension applied to the steel wire cable. Under the idler frames, compression load cells are placed to measure the force being applied from the belt, the convex curve and material that is loaded onto the belt. The stress within the belt is measured by means of strain gauges applied directly to the belt. The provision for the belt to move over the idlers is essential as it allows for the belt to move from a stress zone prior to the idler junction, past the idler junction zone, to the zone after the idler junction. It is important to ascertain whether there is a stress change from before to after the idler junction and the distance that it takes to normalise the stress in the belt after the idler junction (Figure 9). The RTDs (resistance temperature detectors) (PT100) measure the temperature on the top and bottom belt cover and that of the ambient temperature of the test facility. There are two distinct setup options available, each with a specific purpose. Figure 10 illustrates the straight setup option in dimetric view while Figure 11 shows a front view of the setup. This indicates that there may be five rows of idlers, which can also be varied to four rows of idlers. The value of varying the number of idler supports is to determine the effect of sag tension on the idler junction, effectively noting the effect of idler spacing. Figure 12 and Figure 13 illustrate the convex setup. The convex setup exacerbates the stress in the junction region. This is as a result of the additional loading that is experienced by the idlers due to the curvature of the belt. BULK HANDLING TODAY

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BELTCON 19

The support structure was designed to hold the idlers (idler roll and idler base), the load due to the convex curve, and the mass of the belt and the material (if present). The belt is maintained in the trough configuration to reduce the stresses that are induced as a result of the transition distance from where the belt changes from its troughed state to the flat state as it goes around a pulley. The troughed state is maintained by means of a section of steel, the belt attachment, that has its geometry adjusted to conform to the trough of the belt. The belt attachment is then connected to a steel rope to which the load is applied. The belt gantry lifter (n) is used to lift the belt under tension. This allows the universal idlers’ trough angle and forward tilt to be adjusted without removing the tension.

Experimental programme

Due to the large number of testing parameters, as tabulated in Table 1, a systematic procedure needs to be conducted to expedite the process. The programme will commence after this research project has proved that the test facility is capable of performing the tests as outlined below. Each type of belt being tested, PVC and ply, will have the trough angle varied in increments of 15 degrees starting at zero and ending at 90 degrees. For every trough angle the offset distance of the centre roll will be varied in 25mm steps

to a maximum of 450mm. The forward tilt of the wing rollers can also be varied in discrete values of 0, 2 or 5 degrees. The loading on the belt, through the hydraulic puller, can also be varied but may not exceed the strain limit of the strain gauge. The stress will be measured at key points along the conveyor (Figure 14). These points are at the belt edge (1) and the centre of the belt (5). This will allow a comparison of the calculated stresses at these points to measured stresses. Other areas of interest will be at the centre of the wing roller (2) so that the stress distribution can be more accurately quantified, immediately preceding (3), immediately after (4) and in the idler junction (6). Location (7) represents a string of strain gauges so that the maximum or peak stress can be accurately located. Table 1 illustrates the presentation of data that would be expected from the test facility.

Calibration

The calibration process is of utmost importance to ensure reliable and accurate output of results. Calibration and validation work was undertaken to ensure that the results obtained are accurate and repeatable. The DAQ equipment was utilised during the calibration process, making it easy to apply the correct scaling of the live readings during testing. The major components calibrated were: 1. The load cells. The load cells were calibrated from an initial state to the maximum state. a. Two tonne load cells b. Twenty tonne load cells 3.

Figure 10. Experimental facility depicting the straight setup, dimetric view

Strain gauges on belting.

a. Strain gauges were attached to the belting in the warp and weft directions. Tests will be conducted to determine if stress on the surface of the belt is similar to that in the carcass (validation of the assumption that the stress does not vary through the thickness of the belt, ie, the carcass and covers see the same stress and strain). The magnetic encoders are a digital system and as such do not require any form of calibration.

Range and scope of the test facility Figure 11. Experimental facility depicting the straight setup, front view

Figure 12. Experimental facility depicting the convex setup, dimetric view

Figure 13. Experimental facility depicting the convex setup, front view

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The test facility is flexible in a variety of ways; it can handle many different experiments. This report outlines one particular research application for the test facility. However, the versatile design allows for other projects to be conducted. Some of the range of tests that could be carried out are: 1. Idler junction testing on SANS standard 1050 belt width (which is the focus of this design project). 2. Investigation of transition normalsation distance. 3. The test facility can accommodate idler roll length variations where he wing and the centre rolls can be of different lengths and diameters. 4. The centre roll may be longer with a larger diameter and bearings to accommodate a higher load. 5. Idler junction stress with different wing and centre roll dimensions.


BELTCON 19

experiences strain; does it vary across and along the belt sample? 4.

Due to the large number of tests, it would be ideal to refine current measurement methods to more easily obtain data and convert the data intouseful information, such as separating loading and unloading cycles to better extrapolate data to find better ways of obtaining trends which could be used in full scale testing.

5.

Further investigate the ISO 9856 specification to determined how much permanent stretch is in a belt and how many cycles of testing are required in order to adequately remove this permanent stretch.

Recommendations for future work

Figure 14. Location of stress measurement, top view Belt

Forward Tilt

Trough Angle

Offset

Load %

Stress 1...n

Load Cell 1...k

Encoder 1...3

Belt 1...6

0-5 Deg

0-90 Deg

0-450 mm

80100%

xxx

xxx

xxx

Table 1. Layout of data to be collected from test facility

6. Does the roll diameter have an effect on the magnitude of the stress? In other words, would a larger roll diameter have a lower stress impact due to the larger contact area? 7. The effect of misalignment of the idlers can be more accurately quantified. 8. Different types of idler rolls can be used to determine stress effects; steel versus polymer rollers. 9. Determining the ideal idler junction gap and whether the gaps given in SANS 1313 specifications are appropriate. 10. Looking at the effect of pressure on the idler face with and without idler forward tilt. 11. Should the centre roll be leading or trailing? The force imparted into a belt may give an indication of tracking ability. This would determine if the centre roll should be leading or trailing in terms of the effect of stress experienced by the belt. 12. Look at friction factors between various troughing angles, is there a relationship between trough angle and friction factor?

Next steps

Once the following work items have been completed, full scale tests can commence. 1. Continue with the belt sample testing, in order to fully understand which size of gauge is most suitable (5 mm or 10 mm gauge). Also, which type of adhesive, a polymer (SC2000) or a cyanoacrylate (super glue) would yield the most consistent results? 2. Understand more thoroughly the stress variation across the belt sample and across the various sample pieces. 3. Consider the use of DIC (digital image correlation) tecniques in order to understand how the entire belt sample

This research report describes how the test facility has proven to be fit for its intended purpose. It can be used to measure strain, force, displacement and temperature. The items described in the section above are the immediate next steps that should be completed along with ensuring that the hydraulic system can deliver the 20 tonne output tension required and a system to move the belt and steel cables at a constant speed. A full scale test programme with a straight and a convex configuration could be initiated. The straight configuration would have five idlers all in a straight line while the convex configuration would have nine idler frames in the shape of a convex curve. Various other parameters would be considered, such as the type of belt; ply or solid woven. There would be various strengths or classes of belt that would be tested. The various idler parameters would be tested, which would involve tilting the wing rollers forward and incrementing the trough angle in 15 degree increments. The centre roll would be offset in increments of 25 mm up to a maximum of 450 mm and finally, the load could be varied up to 120% of the operating tension. A control experiment would be used as a basis for evaluation, which would be the 0 degree configuration. The belt would be formed into the trough shape as the trough angle is increased in set increments. The stress within the belt would be determined by measurement and compared with the results obtained from FEA modelling. Ideally the comparison would validate the FEA studies, resulting in high levels of confidence in the use of FEA modelling on other belt widths and idler configurations. It would be useful if meaningful results from the data could be drawn to conclude whether an optimal distance for the offset distance between the centre idler roll and the wing roll exists for a given configuration.

This paper was first presented at the Beltcon Conference in 2017. Copyright is vested with IMHC. www.beltcon.org.za Nelson De Andrade University of the Witwatersrand Email: nelsonsdeandrade@gmail.com Professor Thomas John Sheer University of the Witwatersrand Email: john.sheer@wits.ac.za

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HYDRO-TRANSPORTATION

Going to Great Lengths In the high-stakes game of mining today, margins are tighter and under more pressure than ever. To remain viable, mining companies are becoming more scientific and are employing the latest technologies to ensure sustained profitability. Increasingly, they are turning to technology partners to provide advanced technical solutions to various mining challenges.

O

ne such example is an international mining major’s recent project in South America which required a cost-effective means of transporting copper concentrate 23km from the relevant mine to the nearest harbour. Intensive investigations revealed that hydro-transportation would be the best means of achieving this. The solution called for two, 23km, 200mm nominal bore (nb) high-pressure HDPElined pipe systems.

The decision to manufacture in South Africa was based on the fact that Robor had already successfully completed a project for the same client at one of its Zambian operations. In South Africa For a value-adding hydro-transportation solution, the mining company turned to the US-based com-

pany Aegion. The mine which Aegion supplied is a large open-pit copper project under development with phased commissioning having taken place during 2018, with continued ramp-up over 2019. This project will increase production at the mine from 70Mta to 85Mta, with concentrate production increasing from 150 000t to 270 000t annually. To supply the required ‘spools’ or pipeline sections, Aegion took the decision to manufacture the 46km of pipe spools at Aegion South Africa, its local subsidiary, the majority shareholders of which are Robor South Africa (40%) and Aegion International (60%). The decision to manufacture in South Africa was based on the fact that Robor had already successfully completed a project for the same client at one of its Zambian operations. “Regarding the Zambian tailings management facility, it is a great example of one of this client’s best managed and operated lines; and went a long way in affirming the level of value which can be generated when technology is combined with services,"


says Johann Scholtz, General Manager of Aegion South Africa.

Exacting specifications The pipe sections or spools that the company supplied needed to meet very exacting specifications. The completed pipeline had to be able to withstand the massive internal pressures required to pump concentrate over a distance of 23km. For the client, the unquestioned integrity and reliability of the pipeline was a key consideration, as the hydro-transportation system would be transporting high-value copper concentrate. "Fortunately, we have the most advanced hydrotransportation intellectual property at our disposal; as well as pan-African pipeline engineering excellence," comments Johann. The challenges in undertaking this project were significant in a number of aspects. After initial technical consultations, the client opted to manufacture the recommended high-pressure HDPE-lined steel spools in 18m lengths. Manufacturing spools to this length is not conventional practice, due to the technical challenges encountered in manufacturing, the logistics hurdles and the high transport costs. However, the value-add for the client was considerable. For pipeline operators, from an installation, operating and maintenance perspective, the best solution is one continuous pipeline with no joints at all, as the cost of joints can comprise as much

as 20% of the cost of a spool. However, in terms of construction and topographical challenges, in reality this is not practical.

Complete re-engineering “In this instance, our decision to manufacture in 18m spool lengths resulted in a 10% saving on project costs for our client," explains Johann.

After initial technical consultations, the client opted to manufacture the recommended high-pressure HDPElined steel spools in 18m lengths This required the complete re-engineering of Aegion SA’s Johannesburg manufacturing facilities, and the construction of a brand-new plant to build the exceptionally long spools. Notably, this new, technically-advanced plant took a mere 80 days to construct and, once in production, produced 700 metres of pipes / spools daily. “For our industry, this level of production set a new benchmark," continues Johann. This heightened production was essential to meet the client’s tight shipping schedule with 2 770 abnormal lengths needing to be shipped from Johannesburg to South America in a period of nine weeks. Aegion South Africa www.aegion.com

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Safe,Reliable and Consistent Supply The heavy transportation sector is the veritable lifeblood of South Africa's economy, with goods transported daily by thousands of trucking fleets on the country's roads. Essential to this reliability and safety is the quality of the aftermarket components with which these vehicles are fitted.

A

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leading supplier of premier OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) aftermarket components to the heavy transport sector for the past 20 years, Johannesburgbased Transportation Components emphasises the importance of quality, safety and consistency of supply at all times.

from the OEM,” explains Transportation Components Chief Financial Officer (CFO), Andre Gouws.

“From the outset in 1998, we have never sacrificed quality for price. When we look at a new product to add to our range, there are three things we consider: safety, reliability and if there is a consistent supply

The business features a complete ‘parts portfolio’ offering in each of these focus areas, with products which are also considered the ‘gold standard’ in their sectors.

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Currently, Transportation Components’ four main focal areas and relevant OEMs are: cooling (Borg Warner, Kit Masters, Behr); suspension (SEM Lastik); friction material/brakes (Duroline, Eren): clutch systems (Eaton).


TRUCKING FLEETS

Andre Gouws, Transportation Components

To ensure optimal availability and the shortest possible lead-times, the company has developed a comprehensive footprint of distributors and resellers throughout South Africa.

that part will have a shorter life span and may not perform as well as the original OEM part. When it comes to heavy vehicle brakes, for example, this is a critical consideration,” he emphasises.

“Even away from the urban centres, wherever there is an aftermarket component requirement, we have someone who can order the part and have it delivered to the customer within 24 hours," asserts Andre

The reason that Transportation Components is able to offer original parts at competitive prices is that they effectively shorten the supply chain between the OEMs and the end-user. In the mainstream parts supply chain, there are a number of separate businesses involved.

To ensure consistent quality, the company’s international OEMs carry out rigorous and routine quality testing, and are ISO-rated. Transportation Components also has an in-house testing facility and tests components on a regular basis.

The price of buying cheap

However, the heavy transportation industry is very competitive and fleet procurement departments are under fierce pressure to save costs. Nevertheless, Andre points out that when buying a part for a couple of thousand rand, for a vehicle costing R1.8 million, cost-saving should not be the sole consideration. "In buying the cheapest component possible, fleet owners need to be aware that they could well be sacrificing quality for price. This not only results in a shorter product lifespan, but also a diminished interval between repairs and costly downtime. “Inferior quality parts fitted to heavy vehicles are a critical risk factor as there is the real potential of costly damage to the vehicle as a result of a component failure, or worse still, an accident in which people are critically or fatally injured. “Fleet owners need to be made fully aware of the quality of parts that are being fitted to their vehicles; and that they could be paying a premium for lesser quality and safety in the long run,” he adds.

The real thing

Sometimes, it is very difficult to differentiate between parts supplied by a second-tier manufacturer from the genuine OEM component, as the second-tier manufacturer has used an OEM part creating the mould for their products, Andre explains, "Because the raw material used in the manufacture of second-tier part is often inferior,

"The difference is that we can supply directly from premier international OEMs such as Borg Warner, Behr and Duroline; and still retain all the original warranties and excellent after-sales support: for example, in the expediting of warranty claims,” he continues. In addition, Transportation Components will examine the component to determine the cause of the failure.

We need to take responsibility for sorting out any issues to the customer’s satisfaction, effectively providing our clients the shortest possible route to the OEM. The face

"As we are very much the ‘face’ of our OEMs here in South Africa, we need to take responsibility for sorting out any issues to the customer’s satisfaction, effectively providing our clients with the shortest possible route to the OEM." By taking responsibility, and handling any customer queries thoroughly and diligently, the company has been able to retain many loyal customers. "We would never want to be seen as simply being ‘box-droppers’, as this would mean we were not providing premier quality to our customers, which is one of our key differentiators,” he adds. “But even beyond quality, safety and consistency of supply, our over-arching concern is ultimately to ensure the lowest possible cost-per-kilometre for every heavy vehicle fleet operator in South Africa,” Andre concludes. Transportation Components www.trancom.co.za

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MARKET FORUM

Live fire testing in risk-specific areas Recently I-Cat conducted live fire testing on a fully operational conveyor belt in conjunction with Sasol. “This was a world first, and resulted in a new specification for conveyor belt protection that has already been adopted by various mines,” Andro Gibhard of I-Cat Fire Division comments. The Sasol test determined that conventional powder systems are totally inefficient when it comes to Class A rubber fires, including conveyor belts and rubber tyres on mining vehicles. The rubber retains the heat and, if not cooled properly, will simply result in the fire re-igniting. I-Cat has also designed systems specifically to assist with underground fires to scrub smoke and allow people to evacuate any effected area safely. “The technology has already been proven in some of the harshest working conditions imaginable,” Andre says.

Our systems are particularly efficient because they offer cooling as the primary means of suppression. Most systems are designed to reduce oxygen and suppress the fire with a smothering effect. However, the problem here is that, as soon as you introduce more oxygen, the fire

will re-ignite, rendering the equipment defenceless". Andro Gibhard I-Cat Fire Solutions Tel: 086-112-4228 Email: info@i-cat.co.za www.fire.i-cat.co.za

Fall restraint key on mobile cranes With crane crews needing regular access to the top decks of mobile cranes, it is important for the industry to be constantly improving safety measures in line with the aim of zero harm, according to Cedric Froneman, Johnson Crane Hire’s executive for safety, health, environment and quality (SHEQ). “There are a range of protocols and requirements stipulated by construction regulations when it comes to ensuring safety in lifting operations, and safety levels have been considerably raised through industry compliance. But there remain some unique challenges when dealing with large mobile cranes,” he says. Full risk assessments are conducted with regard to climbing on and off mobile cranes

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Unlike many other construction environments,

there are sometimes no attachment points directly above the head of a crew member working on top of a mobile crane, to which their lanyard, connected to their body harness, can be attached. “Instead of working with a fall factor of zero, which requires an anchor point above the head, we generally have to work with a more dangerous fall factor of two, as the only attachment points are at waist level or below.” The result is that fall-arrest systems are not always effective, and more attention must be paid to the use of fall-restraint systems to avoid the fall in the first place. While original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) do provide fall-arrest devices or designs for their mobile cranes, these are often not issued as standard. This requires those users most concerned about safety to commit to extra investment, creating a potential commercial disadvantage.

Johnson Crane Hire Cedric Froneman Tel: (011) 455-9242 www.jch.co.za


Over 2 000 rope access points installed

MARKET FORUM

FLSmidth has launched re-engineered trommel chassis and associated screen media package. The new trommel designs have been engineered using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) design calculations to ensure they are structurally sound and will offer excellent service life. The re-engineered trommel frames use a modular design and standardised construction principles that produces a frame with less mass while maintaining maximum structural integrity. The new design employs screen media that is custom designed to be easy and safe to install and service. They have been engineered and checked from top to bottom using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) design calculations throughout the design process. The screening media weigh less than 25kg each and are fitted to the trommel using friction grip rails that use no extra parts like bolts or pins. This means panel fitting and

Riggers Steeplejacks specialises in permanently installed systems, commonly known as building maintenance units (BMUs). The company’s systems are designed, manufactured, installed, and maintained in compliance with a number of industry codes and regulations, namely SANS 51808, SANS 50795, SANS 1903, SANS 10295, Driven Machinery Regulations DMR 18, and Construction Regulations 2014. Riggers Steeplejacks Project Director, Hentie Wessels, says that the company has to date installed over 2 000 anchor points for rope access suspension using the fischer M12 express anchor, which can hold up to 1.2t. “Our engineer specified the fisher brand due to its strength and ease of installation. We also use fischer M10, M12, M16 and M20 anchors extensively on the brackets of our units.” In addition the company uses the Milwaukee M18 CHPX cordless hammer drill, which delivers up to 4.5 joules of blow energy, and which can drill up to 28mm in concrete and 13mm in steel for safe and speedy installations. The Stabila LD 520 laser distance measurer is used to determine heights. “This tool is also great in determining rope lengths and for general measurement purposes,” says Hentie. The Stabila LD 520 enables precision measurements up to 200m, both indoors and outdoors. Upat Alison Thomet Tel: (011) 624-6700 Email: alison.thomet@upat.co.za www.upat.co.za

Separating materials

maintenance activities can be carried out quickly and safely using simple tools, reducing the time it takes to perform routine maintenance activities. Discrete Element Analysis (DEM) software is available to customers through FLSmidth. This simulates the operation of the trommel and allows an analysis of pulp flow through the trommel. Engineers can advise on how to optimise pulp flow through the trommel to improve both throughput and wear life of the screens. The trommel chassis are largely pre-engineered but can still be custom made to suit specific requirements. Global sourcing plans are already in place and, in combination with the modular features incorporated in the new designs, mean trommel chassis can be fabricated closer to customer sites, providing faster delivery. FLSmidth, William Leahy Email: wil@flsmidth.com

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MARKET FORUM

New earthmoving company for Port Elizabeth Doosan has strengthened its position in the earthmoving equipment sector with the recent opening of a new

branch in Port Elizabeth. This operation is well-positioned to meet demand for the dependable supply and support of

earthmoving equipment in the Eastern and Southern Cape. “Through the Doosan outlet, the company extends its services to a broader customer base – particularly in plant hire, civil engineering, construction, agriculture, mining, scrapyards and general engineering,” says Tienie Ferreira, Director for Doosan Port Elizabeth. “The new outlet, situated in the Newton Park area, carries a substantial stockholding of new and used Doosan equipment, including excavators, wheel loaders, articulated dump trucks (ADTs).” The branch also offers a spare parts, repair and field service facility in the region. The company has made a substantial investment in the latest tooling and equipment at the workshop facility, which is supported by the field services team, which attends to breakdowns at the Doosan facility, at customers’ premises and also on site.

Seen in front of Doosan ADTs at the new Doosan Port Elizabeth from left are : Darryn Harmer, Sales, Tienie Ferreira, Director, Yolande Joubert, General Administration and Part sales.

Effective collision avoidance with PDS

Thys explains that in order to comply, mine management teams need to understand how to undertake effective risk assessments, they also need to understand PDS control systems’ effectiveness and how to implement traffic management plans that remove people from harm’s way. They must also understand that by the time TMM or alternatives become mandatory where risk exists, the technology will not be fool-proof and mine owners will still need to look at other ways to reduce the risk.

Aspasa (Aggregate and Sand Producers Association of SA) is working with the Government to ensure its members understand and adhere to new requirements relating to proximity detection systems (PDS) for mobile machines in surface mining operations. New legislation promulgated by the Department of Mineral Resources requires mines to take steps within the next two years to physically prevent contact between mobile machines and humans or to install PDS on trackless mobile machinery (TMM) for effective collision management. These measures need to be in place by no later than December 2020. Failing to adhere to this deadline means severe action will be brought against responsible parties and mine owners.

Doosan, Tienie Ferreira Tel: (041) 007-0750 Email: tienie@doosanmiddelburg.co.za www.doosan.co.za

Nico Pienaar of Aspasa

Thys Greyvenstein of the Minerals Council South Africa says, “This is not as straightforward as it may seem as proper risk assessments need to be done first in order to know how to comply and it is precisely for this reason that Aspasa is holding workshops and developing documentation that will guide our surface mines in future.”

“With fatalities on mines increasing, there is no way the industry can ignore the requirement but should rather embrace it and find the right solutions that will work on individual mines. It is also important to know that there are alternatives to expensive technology if mines compile proper traffic management plans and implement them effectively,” he says. Aspasa, Nico Pienaar, Tel: (011) 791-3327 www.aspasa.co.za

find out if you qualify to #joinourtable at pps.co.za PPS is an authorized Financial Services Provider.

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MARKET FORUM

Efficient new screen saves money Processing equipment supplier, ELB Equipment, has released an ultra-efficient three shaft screen which is capable of dealing with overburden for use in rehabilitation or to stockpile materials as a saleable by-product of mining. The new Powerscreen Warrior 2100 is able to reduce processing cycles by dealing with unprocessed overburden and significantly shorten production times in the separation of materials either for rehabilitation or as saleable commodities. Its efficient handling of materials and economical powerplant derives further saving for miners or contractors onsite. According to Heath Dickson, area sales manager, the machine is specially designed for work alongside mining operations in different terrains and has flexible screening options and generous stockpile heights to accommodate a wide range of loading types. It also offers quick setup times and an improvement with quick screen media changes when required. “Being able to effectively screen overburden reduces the requirement to blast, eliminating the associated environmental impact while also saving time and money. We can now utilise overburden material and turn it into a valuable product.

The Warrior 2100 uses the manufacturers’ triple shaft technology which was first developed for the successful Warrior 2400 screen which is widely used in South Africa and across the world. This triple shaft technology, unique to Powerscreen heavy duty mobile screens, is designed so the 4.8m x 1.5m screen box is highly effective and efficient while maintaining exceptional throughput productivity. “The extreme screening acceleration offers the Warrior 2100 screen improved capabilities over its class rivals, especially in sticky scalping applications. With amplitudes and accelerations in excess of 16mm and 6g respectively, the triple shaft screen is more prolific at removing and breaking up clay materials than any of its class rivals,” says Heath. He adds that the machine is designed with economy in mind, with reduced fuel

The Warrior 2100

consumption being offered through a lower engine running speed of 1 800rpm and enhanced hydraulics. With media solutions which include Bofor Grizzly, Finger Modules, Punch Plate and new 3D Punch Plate, the Warrior 2100 screen is extremely efficient in scalping, screening and recycling applications. It also boasts impressive mobility with a two-speed tracking system as standard. ELB Equipment, Heath Dickson, Tel: (011) 306 0700 Email: heathd@elbquip.co.za www.elbequipment.co.za

Northern Cape gets three excavators Goscor Earth Moving (GEM) Kathu, has continued its growth in the Northern Cape mining region with the recent delivery of three Sany SY500H excavators to the AMG Group (Africa Mining Group). This major new manganesemining client currently has a fleet of ten excavators, ten load-haul dump trucks, and six front-end loaders. The three Sany SY500H excavators were procured to assist in extending the AMG Group’s existing mining area, thereby boosting monthly production, Chief Operating Officer Scott Yuan explains Commenting on the decision to opt for Sany equipment, Scott highlights that comparative brand research conducted by the AMG Group, necessitated by the significant capital outlay of this acquisition, revealed that Sany was both cost-competitive and featured superior performance.

"In addition, the back-up service and technical support we receive from GEM Kathu is great." With a rated power output of 298kW, a dig depth of 8 255mm, and a bucket breakout force of 275kN, the Sany SY500H is ideal for heavy-duty mining operations. Additional features include a removable counterweight that reduces travel restrictions and cuts transport costs, while the large engine compartment facilitates maintenance. Service cycles are extended even further due to longlife oil and filters. The optimised cabin ensures maximum operator comfort, visibility, and safety.

Goscor Debby Marx Tel: (011) 230-2600 Tel: (011) 393-5512 Email: dmarx@goscor.co.za www.goscor.co.za

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MARKET FORUM

Celebrating 90 years of Business in SA BMG which acquired FPT Distribution SA (Fenner Power Transmission) over 20 years ago celebrated Fenner’s 90th year of business in South Africa last year. “The BMG team is proud to be the exclusive distributors of Fenner products, which have been manufactured in South Africa for longer than any other power transmission brand,” says Carlo Beukes, business unit manager, Power

Transmission, BMG. Fenner, which was established in England in 1861, remains the premium brand in power transmission that generations of professional engineers have depended on and trusted.

all sectors of industry.

Because standardisation and sparesholding costs are a high priority for most production operations, Fenner applies a policy of low-frequency product changes throughout its portfolio, with design improvements implemented only where these will offer significant customer benefits.

A strategic decision was made by BMG earlier last year to expand the portfolio, with the addition of Fenner conveyor belting products making it the exclusive distributor of Fenner conveyor belting products locally and in sub-Saharan Africa.

BMG’s Fenner range which consists of transmission and drive chains, vee and wedge belts, tyre and grid couplings, timing belts, sprockets and pulleys and shaft mounted speed reducers enables BMG to work with

The company also services the industrial and mining replacement and re-sale markets and is a supplier to original equipment manufacturers.

Fenner conveyor belting products, which include steel cord and solid woven conveyor belting, are manufactured at the Isando plant, according to stringent international quality standards. BMG Carlo Beukes Tel: (011) 620 -558 Email: carlob@bmgworld.net

Crane to maintain cyclones Ever aware of the handling complexities during cyclone maintenance, Multotec Process Equipment has developed a jib crane installation which can be mounted on top of the cyclone cluster distributor. This then facilitates removal and installation of the cyclones and any other component.

safety during these activities. In addition to making it easier to handle the cyclones and componentry, the maintenance crew will be able to attach their safety harnesses to the cross member when working at height.

It is typical for cyclone installations to be at the highest level of a process plant, and there is often no crane available. In addition, where plants are in more remote locations access to cranes or materials handling equipment is limited. It is anticipated that having a dedicated crane available will not only reduce downtime and costs associated with maintenance but will also enhance

46

BULK HANDLING TODAY

January/February 2019

Multotec Group Vivienne Murray Tel: (011) 923-6000 Email: marketing@multotec.com www.multotec.com


The Local Manufacturing Expo Aims to:

21 – 23 MAY 2019

Promote local manufacturing

EXPO CENTRE, NASREC,

Demonstrate Southern Africa’s export potential

JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA

Provide access to global markets

A Showcase of Southern Africa’s Manufacturing Capabilities Who Will Exhibit?

Networking opportunities Develop public / private partnerships Public / private sector collaborations Identify industry challenges and opportunities for growth

Manufacturers across a variety of sectors, including:

Agriprocessing

Automotive

Business Process Outsourcing

Capital Equipment

Chemicals

Construction

Engineering

Food and Beverage

Furniture

ICT and Electronics

Metals

Mining

Plastics

Textiles/ Clothing/ Footwear

Transport

www.localmanufacturingexpo.co.za In association with:

Endorsed by:

Implemented by:

Brought to you by:


High security welded mesh

Pallisade

Gates

Gate Automation

Razor wire and more ....

What is High Security Weld Mesh HIGH Security Weld Mesh is wire fused and welded at a Horizontal distance of 76.2mm and a vertical distance of 12.7mm also known as 35B/3510 where 3 denotes 3”(distance between vertical wires), 5 denotes 0.5” (distance between horizontal wires), and B or 10 denotes gauge of wire

Salient Features • Difficult to Climb: The spaces between the Horizontal wires are too narrow for fingers to have grip • Impregnable: Extremely difficult to cut with a hand cutter as the beak of a wire cutter will not be able to penetrate the horizontal wires • Excellent Replacement option to Solid Wall as: 1. More economical than a solid wall 2. Faster to install than a solid wall 3. CCTV Camera has a clear view • Further upgrade possible with electric security system • Anti-corrosive & low maintenance

Standards

• Manufactured according to BS EN 10016-2 • Wire Sizes in accordance with BS EN 10218-2 • Tolerance on Mesh Size in accordance wiht EN 10223-7 • Tolerance on Panel Size in accordance with EN 10223-4 • Welding Strength in accordance with BS EN 1461 • Zinc Coating in accordance with EN 10245-1 • Anti Corrosion in accordance with BS En 3900 E4/F4

Tensile Strength • Wire has a tensile strenght of min 550 MPA

MARK: 083 454 6488

Email: mark@palifence.co.za

www.palifence.co.za

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Bulk Handling Today Jan/Feb 2019  

Bulk Handling Today Jan/Feb 2019  

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