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Q

November 7, 2019

Stepping Out in Condom Couture

inform | inspire

n o i p m a h C s up d n a t s n e i L LGBTQ-AT ueer causes for q

Tom Goss Opens New ‘Territories’ 10 Local Queer Clubs We’ll Miss in the 2020s Promises & Intention Won’t Fix Your Boo

Queer Agenda 10 Queer Things Q Shots The Weekly Print Publication of Project Q Atlanta


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EDITOR’S NOTE Q Q MAGAZINE THE WEEKLY PUBLICATION OF PROJECT Q ATLANTA PUBLISHERS INITIAL MEDIA, LLC MIKE FLEMING PUBLISHER & EDITOR MIKE@THEQATL.COM MATT HENNIE PUBLISHER & BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MATT@THEQATL.COM RICHARD CHERSKOV PUBLISHER & GENERAL MANAGER RICHARD@THEQATL.COM

Reigning

CHAMPS

FOR OUR 100TH ISSUE, Q celebrates exactly two years since our

decade-old website went into print and raised the bar on local LGBTQ hard-copy coverage.

ART DIRECTOR JOHN NAIL JOHN@THEQATL.COM

For our next trick, we go from weekly to twice

monthly. Of course, we’ll remain the go-to local source for Atlanta-based news, events, photos

PROJECT Q ATLANTA PATRICK SAUNDERS EDITOR PSAUNDERS@THEQATL.COM CONTRIBUTORS IAN ABER LAURA BACCUS GABRIELLE CLAIBORNE BUCK COOKE CHARLES E. DAVIS JON DEAN BILL DICKINSON JIM FARMER BRAD GIBSON JAMES L. HICKS BENTLEY HUDGINS TAMEEKA L. HUNTER HEATHER MALONEY ERIC PAULK KYLE ROSE JAMES PARKER SHEFFIELD VINCE SHIFFLETT ALEXANDRA TYLER VAVA VROOM RUSS BOWEN-YOUNGBLOOD NATIONAL ADVERTISING RIVENDELL MEDIA SALES@RIVENDELLMEDIA.COM 212-242-6863 LOCAL ADVERTISING SALES@THEQATL.COM 404-949-7071

and features.

The new schedule means our written coverage will

go more in-depth. Our previews will give you more MIKE FLEMING EDITOR & PUBLISHER

time to plan. Our industry features will become

resources you will refer to again and again. Our

special issues will be bigger and more impactful.

And of course, fresh content we’re known for at Project Q Atlanta will continue be updated online every single day at theQatl.com.

The subjects in this week’s issue know all about topping the competition too.

Meet a community champion, groundbreaking founders of a fun and worthy

new event, an artist with quite a story to tell, local nightlife mavens and queer Atlanta history makers.

Adah-Duval Pittman-Delancey literally has “champion” in her title at Atlanta Bicycle Coalition, and she deserves it in her role with Teach for America’s

LGBTQ initiative as well. She may be the cover girl, but she lets the organiz-

ers of Condom Couture put the bass in their walk with a runway show championing safe sex, body positivity, women’s rights and queer inclusion.

We take our first of several looks ahead into the 2020s by way of the ‘00s and

‘10s in the 10 Queer Things feature. Gone-but-not-forgotten nightclubs start us off in our rundown of things we’ll miss, and stay tuned for icons passed, businesses shuttered, and organizations we loved.

As always, this issue publishes Q Shots photos, the Queer Agenda of events, and The Q advice column. Reach me about all of it at mike@theQatl.com,

and get in on ad deals to reach our vast online and print readerships via my co-publisher Matt Hennie via matt@theQatl.com.

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE VOLUME 2 ISSUE 50 NOVEMBER 7, 2019

BIG REVEAL

Tom Goss’ New Territories

COVER

12 11

Good on You

Adah-Duval Pittman-Delancey

10 QUEER THINGS

13 8

25 Sister Act

Decades

New series opens with 10 clubs we’ll miss in the 2020s Q EVENTS

19 FEATURES

10 Queer Things

6

8

The Queer Agenda

20

Q Shots

25

The Q

30

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Project Runway

26 Hidey Hole

Condom Couture stomps looks for every body

30 28 So Hard


Richard Cherskov

Michael Birnholz

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Q

10 QUEER THINGS

F

or the end of 2019, we’ll look back at gone-but-not-forgotten icons of the last 20 years as we head into the next. First up, places we’d party, from 20-30 LGBTQ bars in 2000 to just a handful today.

Backstreet Reunion parties still wring memories from attendees of Atlanta’s 24-hour gay dance club, which closed in 2004.

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Hoedown’s (3-Legged Cowboy) What was an iconic bar owned by Deena Collins, first on Cheshire Bridge and then in Monroe Pavillion, went down as Hoedown’s in 2007 when a new owner went to prison for corruption. Collins reopened under the 3-Legged Cowboy moniker, and that bar shuttered its doors for the last time in 2011.


Jungle In November 2017, the gay club Jungle became the latest victim of a changing Cheshire Bridge Road when owner Richard Cherskov, who also co-owns Project Q Atlanta and Q Magazine, was pushed out by developers.

Traxx The party crew lives on for specialty events, but this sprawling club on the outskirts of DeKalb was the premier party place for black gay Atlanta for a quarter century.

The Metro Don Hunnewell ran the show — for drag, for dancers, for outlandish parties and strong drinks — at 12th and Peachtree for some two decades. The name and the house itself went away with gentrification of the area.

Loretta’s One of Atlanta’s oldest drinking establishments, gay or straight, this black gay hangout finally succumbed to the changing times in Red Chair just the last couple The restaurant by evening and club by night years. You might see in Amsterdam Walk was the “it” place to random LGBTQ events go for a good while. The owner went on to there under Club Xcess Wild Mustang, which became Jungle. or Club 708.

The Armory Spawning such icons as the Armorettes and memories of what it was like to party like it’s 1999, this dance bar with attached cabaret room went the same way as Backstreet to make way for the same condo tower.

WetBar & Blu Spring Street had its big gay moment in the early ’00s when these two adjoining clubs thumped into the night. Owned at the time by the same people who ran Blake’s, they hosted entertainers and DJs regularly, and dance parties every week.

Bellissima The lesbian bar in Amsterdam Walk drew big crowds but not enough to perpetuate the business. The female party crew Swank by Bellissima owner Anna Ragghianti was spawned after the club went down. theQatl.com

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MUSIC Q

New ‘TERRITORIES’ Tom Goss album takes on polyamory, domestic violence with fresh sound By Buck C. Cooke OUT SINGER TOM GOSS IS MAKING THINGS PERSONAL. Well, his music has always been personal, but this time it’s even more heart and soul than he’s already known for. On the new album Territories, Goss opens up about his relationships with his husband, his boyfriend and lays bare some hard queer truths. “I’ve written six albums about my husband,” he says. “To write material about intimate thoughts and feelings about someone other than my husband, it was so different.” The singer-songwriter made time to chat with Q about the new material during his promotional tour for an album he calls “electro-groove-pop.” This album feels especially revealing and intimate. Is it different than your previous work? The creation of everything about the album was different. Previously, I wrote by siting with an instrument, a chord, or a chord progression, and I would just spend time with that sound and take inspiration from what I was feeling. I approached this album with the lyrics first instead of music first. I had to sit down and think about what those experiences meant and how to articulate what I was going through, so other people would understand and be sympathetic to that. I wanted to connect with people, not alienate people. What’s been the reaction from fans? It’s been overwhelmingly positive. I think, as queer people, we are so used to being rejected that we fear rejection. But what we forget is that we are part of a community of people who have faced so much rejection — and have had to do more emotional work in their own lives than maybe some other people — that we work hard to be empathetic, and not reject one another.

I talked about him and it turns out that we had all wanted to work with one other, so we made it happen.

The thing we want people to take away from this video is that people have a choice. Domestic violence shows up in many forms. It’s complicated. Lives are complicated. It’s not beautiful, or bad, it’s both. We have a choice for how we live our lives and who we want to live our lives with. I hope people watch the video and are inspired by that and decide that they want to be the best version of themselves possible. Speaking of Daniel, you have some more videos with him coming up. It’s a trilogy consisting of the songs “Berlin,” “Quebec,” and “Regretting.” Daniel is in “Quebec” and “Regretting.” These three videos tell the story of the album in 12 minutes. I go to Berlin and fall in love. I tell my husband in Quebec and we fall apart. Then, in “Regretting,” we find a way for things to come back together. What do you hope people will take away from this album? Ultimately, my music is always about love and truth. I want people to live their truth and love the way that they love. I want them to understand that love doesn’t always look the same for everyone. Sometimes it looks different. Whether you’re in a traditional relationship or a nontraditional relationship, you should be proud of the love that you share. “Territories” is out now. Visit tomgossmusic and read more of our interview at theQatl.com.

Tell us about the video for “La Bufadora,” which is about domestic violence. I had talked to Daniel Franzese over the years, and we had a friendly relationship and conversations about body positivity for big and tall men.

theQatl.com

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Q

COVER

‘Every

COVER AND INSIDE PHOTOS BY JON DEAN jondeanphoto.com 12

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Moment’

LGBTQ ATL-ien fights for queer youth and a bikeable ATL By Patrick Saunders

A

dah-Duval Pittman-Delancey has a unique job title: “Atlanta Bike Champion.” But that best sums up her work with the Atlanta Bicycle Coalition, which works to make the city a better place to navigate when on two wheels instead of four. The 36-year-old Grant Park resident could also claim the title “Queer Youth Champion,” because in addition to biking advocacy, the do-gooder serves as a board member for Teach for America’s LGBTQ initiative. She took a few minutes with Q to talk about growing up in Miami, faith and sexuality, the movie musical she knows word-for-word, and what more Atlanta could be doing for our queer youth. What kind of kid were you? I grew up mostly in Miami, Fla., between Carol City and Liberty City. I was heavily involved in extra-curricular activities and a good student. Growing up in Miami was pretty unique based on it being a really multicultural city. It wasn’t easy for me to be open about my sexual orientation while I was in school based on my perception of nonacceptance from my classmates and what I understood of my Christian faith at that time. What brought you to Atlanta? My father was in the military, so we lived here in the ‘80s. I’m not sure if it was the fact that my first real friendships were formed here, or if it was the fact that it’s the last place I had my whole family together, but Atlanta always felt right like home. theQatl.com

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ADAH continued Q

‘I think it’s great to witness queer Atlanta’s political involvement and power, primarily because we’re in the South. I think we should do all we can collectively and independently to advocate for queer youth.’ ‘

I moved here after graduate school in 2007, left for D.C. 2012-2015, and came back after marriage equality passed. My first impression as a young adult was that I could be open about my sexual orientation here. What are the challenges and rewards of your job at Atlanta Bicycle Coalition? It’s an advocacy organization, so it’s rewarding to know that the work we do actually affects people’s lives. The most challenging part of the job is learning of fatalities due to traffic collisions and being the person responsible for drafting messaging to inform and advocate for change. So at times I have to manage my emotions to get the job done. It’s not farfetched for me to tear up while working, especially in cases where a child loses their life. What are your impressions of queer Atlanta? I think it’s great to witness queer Atlanta’s political involvement and power, primarily because we’re in the South. I think we should do all we can collectively and independently to advocate for queer youth. We definitely have organizations here committed to our queer youth and they’re doing amazing work. I also look at places like New York and San Francisco, and although I’m no expert, those cities seem to have more resources and support options for queer youth. What’s the best advice you ever received? Be present in every moment. It’s made me a more active listener,

a better friend and happier in general. I’d lose the pleasure and experience of moments allowing my Photo by Russ Bowen-Youngblood mind to drift ahead, or pulling out my phone to capture things to share on social media. Now, I’m so focused on the present, even though I plan for the future. Being in the now reduces stress for me. What’s something people would be surprised to know about you? Grease is one of my favorite movies, and I can recite every word of the movie, songs included. If you could have dinner with any three people in history, who would it be and why? Ben & Jerry. That may be cheating, but they were the first CEOs that I learned about who incorporated social responsibility into their business model. Dianne Warren. She’s a songwriter, and I’ve been a fan of her work since I was like 10. She’s written for everyone from Patti Labelle to Celine Dion, and she has a career of hits that spans over 30 years. I wanted to be a songwriter when I was growing up, so it’s fitting. Jay-Z, because anyone that really knows me knows I keep a Jay-Z line on hand to transition conversations or pass along advice. Find Atlanta Bicycle Coalition on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, and at atlantabike.org. Learn more about Teach for America’s LGBTQ initiative at teachforamerica.org. theQatl.com

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Condomania

Rubbers for a cause, but make it fashion By Mike Fleming

WHEN MODELS STRUT THE RUNWAYS IN COLORFUL, masquearade-themed looks this weekend, they do so to benefit Planned Parenthood Southeast. The organization is on the front lines of its ongoing efforts against Georgia’s anti-abortion law and the anti-woman stances of the Trump/Pence administration, and to provide safe and affirming healthcare to women around the state. Style and sister support would make the event worth a mention on their own, but when each and every look is made of condoms promoting safe sex, the queer-inclusive designers and models are of every shape and size, and one of the performers is by Atlanta’s own drag fave Nicole Paige Brooks, we are all in.

EVENTS Q

WHERE: Westside Cultural Arts Center 760 10th Street NW WHO: You in festive attire of course. But in addition to Nicole Paige Brooks on stage, look for designs by 14 LGBTQ-inclusive artists, including transgender gadabout and drag performer Mo’Dest Volgare on the runway.

The queers just keep on coming as femme burlesque goddess Royal Tee works the crowd. Comedian Annie Lockwood is in the house, too.

It’s like the ultimate unconventional materials challenge, and the underlying messages are just clear, says Cathleen Madrona, co-founder of Condom Couture. “Our ‘why’ is to spark a dialogue on the importance of Planned Parenthood care in our community, to promote body inclusivity and sex positivity, and to protect human rights,” Madrona says. “Condom Couture ATL is an opportunity to creatively present condoms in an inclusive social event.” To that end, photos on this page hint at the fun, plus here are five fast facts. WHAT: More than 1,000 condoms went into designing spectacular garments on a carnival/masquerade-themed runway. WHEN: Saturday, November 9, 8 p.m.

Photos by Scott Clinton

WHY: Because in tough times, it’s all about intersectional support, and we have to stick together.

Find Condom Couture ATL on Facebook, Instagram and at their website condomcoutureatl.com theQatl.com

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Q

THE QUEER AGENDA The Best Queer Things To Do in Atlanta This Week

Ek Shaam Raksha Naam

Meet queer storyteller and activist

November 6 – November 14

Amita Swadhin during this 21st annual event from the organization that fights violence against immigrants and works

for justice for Atlantans of South Asian

descent @ Westin Atlanta Perimeter North, 6:30 p.m. raksha.org

Condom Couture

A fashion show of attire made of rubber, all to benefit the cause for choice with Planned Parenthood Southeast

@ Westside Cultural Arts Center,

7 p.m. Read the Q preview in this issue. condomcoutureatl.com

SUNDAY, NOV. 10 Sampson McCormick

The hilarious, award-winning queer

comic spins through town with a set worth staying out on a Sunday for @ My Sister’s Room, 7 p.m. mysistersroom.com 

Photo by Jon Dean

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 6 Neonblk

Queens of color show up and show out, this time with the theme “Black to Life, Black to Reality” @ Mary’s, 10:30 p.m. marysatlanta.com

FRIDAY, NOV. 8 Swell Party

Local gay playwright Topher Payne’s period piece sends up 1930s society people, family dynamics, show business and a little problem of murder @ OnStage Atlanta, 8 p.m.

Runs through Nov. 24. theprocesstheatre.org

SATURDAY, NOV. 9 Charis 45

The little lesbian feminist bookstore that could celebrates an amazing lifespan with a sale, with readings, and with cake @ Charis Books & More, 10 a.m. charisbooksandmore.com 20

theQatl.com

Sampson McCormick


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THE QUEER AGENDA continued

Q

SUNDAY, NOV. 10 The Armorettes

The camp crazies for a cause

throw their weekly show

against HIV @ Midtown

Moon, 8 p.m. facebook.com/ midtownmoon

MONDAY, NOV. 11 TR/ST

He’s queer. He’s finally here.

Atlanta's first urban winery, intimate music venue, restaurant, bar & private event space

from vine

to venue

Get used to it — well, for one

night @ Terminal West, 8 p.m. terminalwestatl.com

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 13 Mommie Dearest

Faye Dunaway chews the scenery for the

record books when Wussy screens the

camp classic. Rock a look for the contest,

too @ Plaza Theatre, 7 p.m. wussymag.com Schitt’s Creek: Up Close & Personal

The cast and creators of the

queer-inclusive cable comedy hit the stage to chat about their breakout hit

@ Coca-Cola Roxy, 8 p.m. cocacolaroxy.com

THURSDAY, NOV. 14 A Night on Point

The Point Foundation raises funds in its ongoing mission to award scholarships to LGBTQ

students @ Suada Studio, 7:30 p.m.

pointfoundation.org Holy Sh!t

Q contributor Ian Aber’s comedy series

with an edge continues @ Sister Louisa’s Church of the Living Room, 10 p.m. sisterlouisaschurch.com

Find more queer things to do in the expanded edition of the Queer Agenda at theQatl.com.

indulge your senses 650 north ave ne, suite 201, atlanta, ga 30308 404-winery1 | citywinery.com/atlanta

theQatl.com

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HALLOWEEN FROM HELL AT MY SISTER’S ROOM

Full gallery on Project Q at theQatl.com

Q SHOTS Q

PHOTOS BY RUSS BOWEN-YOUNGBLOOD theQatl.com

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Q

Q SHOTS

HIDEAWAY COSTUME CONTEST

Full gallery on Project Q at theQatl.com

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PHOTOS BY RUSS BOWEN-YOUNGBLOOD


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Q

THEQ?! The Problem WITH PROMISES

Your worry and their words won’t fix anything

Q

I’ve got a big issue with my partner that I don’t feel equipped to handle. When we moved in, I carried the load

of the bills. They were in school at the time, but now that they’re employed, they still aren’t paying their fair share.

I still make more, and the house is in my name, but they promised that costs would be shared when the diploma was on the

wall. Since then, they’ve said they’ll start paying bills, but haven’t. On the one hand, is it fair to hold them to their word and ask

that they kick in, since I can technically afford it? On the other, is it fair to ask me to bear the whole burden?

It also bugs me that the onus appears to be on me to bring it up over and over. And when I do, how do I make it less awkward than I already feel? Dear Sugar: Unless your precept is Ma Morton-style — “When you’re good

to Mama, Mama’s good to you” — it’s not only fair to bring it up, but well advised to do so for their good and your peace of mind.

Hint: Your frustration is understandable, but it solves nothing. You may feel ill-equipped to bring it up because your emotions are so

intricately interwoven with the facts. Makes sense — relationships, money and personal responsibility are fraught topics for everyone. Hone the situation down to its essence, and you can totally handle it. You’ve got a house, manage an income and take responsi-

bility in myriad ways, so all the skills required to have a conversation are well within your grasp.

Hint: Their promises to participate in the future solve noth-

ing. Assurances without follow-through are just empty words.

Chances are that they feel just as awkward and don’t know how to broach the subject in a practical way either.

Communication and action are the keys to salvation for both of you. 30

theQatl.com

Not bringing it up is actually more awkward than bringing it up.

“This is hard to say because we care so much about each other, but

let’s sit down and figure out how and when to start sharing the bills.” The rest is just details. Either base contributions on a sliding scale with level of income, or base payments on who uses what the

most. Say, electricity and water are shared equally, but the person who watches the TV pays the cable.

Getting on the same page with a plan will not only relieve your individual burden of the bills and the grudge, but it may make them feel better for doing their part and relieve the unspoken stress between you.

The Q is for entertainment purposes and not professional counseling. Send your burning Qs to mike@theqatl.com.

ILLUSTRATION BY BRAD GIBSON


Profile for Q Magazine Atlanta

Q Magazine Atlanta | November 7, 2019  

Adah Duval of Atlanta Bicycle Coalition and Teach for America’s LGBTQ initiative, Tom Goss, Condom Couture ATL, icons of Queer Atlanta past,...

Q Magazine Atlanta | November 7, 2019  

Adah Duval of Atlanta Bicycle Coalition and Teach for America’s LGBTQ initiative, Tom Goss, Condom Couture ATL, icons of Queer Atlanta past,...