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ISSN 1742-3030

ISSUE 147 // APRIL 2011 // MAG.BENT.COM

THE STUD ADVANTAGE With Dorian Black

Rikki Beadle-Blair

Alexander Bracq

Carsten Andersson


Editors Words

APRIL 2011 // ISSUE 147 Publisher Terry George Editor Gordon Hopps 08712 246 511 editor@bent.com

Page 32 The Stud Advantage

Advertising Director Darrell Hirst 08712 246 529 darrell@bent.com

Page 30 Carsten Andersson

Page 34 Terry George in Rio

With the world in disarray; what with earthquakes, tsunamis, people uprising against autonomous self-serving oligarchs and the continued tension throughout the UK as prices hit an all-time high, the jobless figures are through the roof and there appears to be no future for the country’s youth, why am I, a middle aged, comfortably well off, happily married gay guy… so bloody angry with everything? There are things that I cannot influence, there are those things that even if I could influence I would perhaps choose not to and yet the feeling of futility is all pervading. I know there are some who fall to their knees in prayer and call on some ephemeral character to put the world to rights. Alas, as people have been doing this for thousands and thousands of years, and we’re still no better off, I think we can forget about the chances of divine intervention. Despite this, I feel the need to do something. I could send all my money to a charity but… I have always been dubious about such organisations. There is no doubt that some do a fantastic job but there are many that don’t and I play the caution game before I dip into my pocket. Also, I often wonder why a country of our supposed wealth actually needs a charity base? I may be very naive here but couldn’t we fund everything from public money? After all our government bodies seem happy to waste our taxes on the most stupid things - I am referring to the fact that the Ministry of Defence recently reported that they pay £22 for a 65p light bulb and of course this is but one of the many misuses of our finances.

bankers and big corporates play in this deceit… but it only makes me even angrier. To relax, I watched a game of football. I’m not particularly partisan but the sight of watching 22 healthy young guys in shorts, running around displaying their skills for 90 minutes, has aesthetic qualities other than the actual game. One of the teams wore a very nice blue strip, while then other team wore a rather fetching cerise (some might call it a deep pink) shirt that had the commentators agog with wonder. Of course we grown-ups don’t bat an eyelid over a colour but, the retarded folk who pontificate on the game seemed horrified at such an ‘effeminate’ transgression. Perhaps they’d like to share their views with the various rugby teams that have been wearing pink in support of a charity for a couple of years now. Alas, this attitude in football makes it more and more difficult for gay players to come out (and bless the young Swedish player who has the balls to do just that) when these dumb fucks conjure up ‘demons’ where there aren’t any. Oh hell, I better go lie down as I can feel I’m getting angry again and I don’t want to take it out on the Bent office boy… oh well… maybe it will make me feel a bit better! “COLIN… get your arse in here!”

I could go on and list other such financial black holes… and the part that politicians, accountants, 4

Page 42 Kick Off

Gordon

Features Editor Adam Lowe adam.lowe@bent.com London Editor Simon Savidge simon.savidge@bent.com Designer Stephen Lubbock designer@bent.com

Photo Editor Mark Hawkins, mark@bent.com IT Support Chris Chrisostomou Finance Director Ian Ellis Accounts Louise Lee 08712 246 516 accounts@bent.com Publishing Director Michael Rothwell Astrologer Philip Garcia Cover Dorian Black Courtesy of Justin Monroe

Contributors: Beyonce, Lee Hudson, Chris Amos, Jason Guy, Johan Volny, Les Lea, Darrell Hirst, Terry George, Adam Lowe, Alex Wiggan, Adrian Gillan, Mark Gray.

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© Copyright, Bent Ltd. 2011. No Part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in an electronic or other retrievable system, or transmitted by any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photo-copying, recording or otherwise without the prior permission of the publisher. Advertisers are reminded of their obligations under the 1984 Trade Protection Act. Advertisers are responsible for the content of their copy under the terms of the Act. The appearance or mention of any establishment, product, individual or organisation within this publication, should not be taken as an endorsement by the publishers of the same unless otherwise stated. The appearance, mention or likeness of any individual or organisation within this magazine should not be construed as an indication of either the sexual preference or political persuasion of the same, unless otherwise stated. Contributions are welcomed on the understanding that any unsolicited manuscripts that they may be published without further correspondence, with a fee (if applicable) paid at standard rates as specified by Bent Ltd. Work cannot be returned to the author unless agreed by the publisher.

A product of a sustainable resource

BENT MAGAZINE APRIL 2011 // MAG.BENT.COM


The Stud

It’s no secret we are a culture consumed by image. Consider the following: Over his career, a good-looking man will make £100,000s more than his least-attractive counterpart.

By Mark Gray It’s called the “beauty premium”: the idea that pretty people, whatever their aspirations, tend to do better in, well, almost everything. Handsome men earn, on average, 5 percent more than less-attractive men. They get more attention from teachers, bosses, and mentors; even babies stare longer at good-looking faces (and we stare longer at good-looking babies). A couple of years ago, when the economy was thriving, we might have brushed off those statistics as superficial. But in 2011, when employers have more hiring options than ever, looking good is no longer something we can dismiss as frivolous or vain. When it comes to the workplace, its looks, not merit, that all too often rule. We spoke with former US model turned business financier, Dorian Black, on how his beauty has helped him rise up the corporate ladder.

Has anyone ever told you that you look like Robert Downey Jr.? I have heard that. It depends on the day. When I am unshaven, I get Hugh Jackman. Do you agree that being attractive has opened doors for you? I believe attractiveness is more then just good looks; it’s an overall appeal. If one presents with confi dence, his energy and passion will be evident and people will subconsciously gravitate toward him. What role have your looks played in your quick rise up the corporate ladder? My rise up the corporate ladder wasn’t due to good looks. So much of my business takes place overseas. Oftentimes I’m at my desk holding meetings via conference call so clients can’t even see what I look like. Still, I admit my looks can be an advantage when I eventually meet a client in person to close the deal. Do you rely on your looks to close a deal? No, it’s more accurate to say I rely on my polished presentation. I think a well-presented businessman is always going to come off as organized, successful, and driven. My looks are a small part of it. The confi dence I exude plays a much larger role. Do you believe you would have that same confi dence if you were 5’ 6” tall and 200 pounds? Confi dence doesn’t depend on weight or height. I work with all facets of individuals, large and small, who know they are great and aren’t afraid to show it off.

32

Have you mastered the art of infl uencing people and getting them to like you? Before every meeting, I do my research on the companies and the executives I will be in front of that day. Recently, I met with an oil tycoon from Texas. Through research, I discovered he enjoyed 18th century art that focused on polo championships. In the first hour of our meeting, most of our conversation was centered on his love; particular artists and styles. We eventually got to discussing business and within 15 minutes, he agreed to invest with my company.

What about the briefcase? If you are going to splurge, splurge on a great briefcase. It may sound strange, but it is something that everyone notices. It is an accessory that spells out the type of client and employee you can and will be. I recently scored, finding a £1500 Zegna briefcase for 80% off – now that’s a bargain! How important is it to be up on football and golf stats?

So you infl uence people by pretending to have an appreciation for what they enjoy?

I have found discussing sports before a meeting is a cop-out. It’s too general. If you do the research on the executives you will be meeting with, then you can lead the conversation to more polished subject matters that they will be interested in.

I strive to build a connection to their world. That allows them to trust me. Its not manipulation; its communication.

Is there something else the wellgroomed man should know if he wants to fi t in with the white collar set?

What do you do to maintain your looks?

My father always told me, “be willing to spend money to fly first class, because you never know who you will be sitting next to”. It could be your next boss or client.

I do 45 minutes of cardio every morning, followed by weight training in the afternoons and diligent boxing twice a week.

Have your looks ever been a detriment in the board room?

How important is diet? I eat six small meals a day, with limited amount of sodium. And yes, I get one day off a week to eat what I like. But, I have found that lately, I prefer to eat healthy even on my days off. How important are clothes? Clothes are essential to the presentation. I wear labels but I never buy them unless they are on sale. Recently, I bought a Prada Suit that was 60% off. I advise guys to spend £250-£300 on a suit. Spend a bit more on the tie and shoes and wear a shirt that requires cufflinks.

No, but my youth has. Not everyone is willing to take a CEO in his early 30s seriously. But, as long as I maintain my confidence, without going overboard and falling into cockiness, I’m usually able to convince them I’m the right man for the job. What advice can you offer men on how to raise their attractiveness to get more attention on the job? Eat well, exercise, and be the best you can be. The well groomed man is polished and exudes confidence. You will find that being attractive requires not just a good suit, but also a great attitude and a lot passion.

BENT MAGAZINE APRIL 2011 // MAG.BENT.COM


“I believe attractiveness is more than just good looks� Photos by Justin Monroe


WHO’S HOT

k c a l B n a i r o D the picture of

Photography by Justin Monroe

He’s a fabulous socialite with a famous trainer boyfriend. He also takes a pretty mean picture, but don’t ask him what his day job is – we still have no idea… 64 DNA


DNA: Can you explain your day job for us? Dorian Black: My job is quite complicated. My partner, Marc, never knows exactly how to describe it to people when they ask. He simply says, “I don’t know, something complicated, something finance.” Truth be told, my job description is quite a mouthful. Essentially, I raise capital from large institutions or wealthy individuals to buy participation into loans made by a bank on behalf of a borrower with an insurance-backed solution that protects our capital funds and sources. How do you think this shoot will go down among your work colleagues? My shoot is my shoot. My background and experience in front of the camera go back to the late ’90s when I was an underwear model after university. I keep the labels I modelled for a secret, as most people won’t recognise me since the best part of being an underwear model is that my face on the box of undies is missing. I don’t believe my current shoot is “risqué” or “wrong.” This is who I am – I’m more than the suit and tie guy in the office. I’m an avid boxer, swimmer and athlete, friend, partner, uncle and son. Does the rest of the company look as good? If so we’re transferring our accounts there. [Laughing] I don’t really think of my employees and colleagues in that manner. When at work, I am professional and try to create a cleancut environment where personal lives are not discussed. One thing I will say is that we all look like a diverse group; every religion, race, gender and sexual orientation is represented at my firm and we are proud of it. We imagine Wall Street to be quite homophobic. Has that been your experience? I think there’s a misconception about Wall Street. We see misrepresentations of it in film and television. Wall Street may be a boy’s

playing field, but it’s not closed-minded. Wall Street deals in terms of big numbers and, in my particular field, big investors. Gay society, worldwide, offers an exclusive membership to the class of wealthy. As gay men and women, we aren’t confined to the home with the stresses and schedules of our heterosexual counterparts, like soccer practice, tennis lessons and having dinner on the table at 7pm. We work hard and can stay at the office until late. Because of this, and many other reasons, we have become successful businessmen and Wall Street gravitates toward this. Recently, I attended the Los Angeles PFLAG Autumn charity event, which was hosted by one of Wall Street’s largest financial institutions. In professional life, where do you sit between hiding your sexuality and flaunting it? As mentioned, I believe in a very structured corporate environment where personal lives are left at home. I do believe one must not hide who they are, but I don’t think walking around and flaunting it is appropriate. Don’t get me wrong, if I had an employee or colleague that was a cross-dresser and chose to dress to work in clothing that the opposite gender would wear, I would not stop them; that is not flaunting it but being true to oneself. Flaunting sexuality inappropriately is distasteful. Are you concerned your underwear model past could come back to haunt you one day? No, not at all. I didn’t model anything that I feel was in bad taste or inappropriate. I modeled underwear for some of the largest fashion houses – to me that’s impressive. While it was short-lived due to the fact I am a forever student who wanted to go back to school, I don’t hide from it. We understand you’re quite a socialite. Can you describe for us a typical weekend?

A socialite? Wow. Well, my weekends are jampacked. Come Friday evening, my partner and I usually share some wine at home and recap our weeks, then it’s off to the races! No weekend is complete without a spinning class on a Saturday morning for 90 minutes, taught by my fitness guru and partner, Marc. From there its brunch with friends, some possible retail therapy, then an afternoon of polo or horseback riding for me. And of course a great Saturday night dinner and outing in Los Angeles, followed by a Sunday morning hike with our three dogs to the Hollywood sign and then afternoon tea at my parent’s home. We are South African and English – that’s the way we do it. It must be handy having a boyfriend who is a fitness trainer. Staying healthy is the only option when with Marc and I wouldn’t have it any other way. He is the most dynamic trainer and life coach, who not only puts my life in order but his clients’ as well. I’ll be honest, sometimes he’ll find me in the fridge pulling out ice cream and will shoot me a look from across the kitchen as if to say, “Are you sure you want to eat that?” It only comes from a place of love, of course. He is always giving me new programs and new ways to enjoy being healthy. He’s quite famous in America, isn’t he? Marc is famous! The funny thing is, we have been approached to do a reality series about the two of us – since we both have interesting careers that are so different to one another. Furthermore, since we both come from South Africa and have had very traditional English upbringings. If you Google Marc, I think he has pages and pages of fans. Marc’s approach to fitness is more than just going to the gym and doing cardio or lifting weights – it’s about a lifestyle change. His approach to his clients involves life coaching and I think when you merge them all together, he produces one fantastic product. He is also extremely good-looking and the South African accent certainly doesn’t hurt. What’s your ultimate ambition? My ambition is always to remain successful, in an all-rounded aspect. I want to look back on my life and say, “I did everything I wanted to do.” I would hate to wake up and be 85 years old and say I have regrets. Success isn’t defined by the money in your bank account but by the relationships that shape us. My late grandfather died surrounded by his entire family and legacy. I know he felt that what stood beside him and in front of him was true success. I also believe that a big part of my journey is to give back. I believe that if we are blessed to be financially successful in this world, we must share it. I am a big believer in charity, but I don’t believe it needs to be flaunted. So you won’t find me on the cover of the social section announcing a big donation, but rather you’ll find me under anonymous donor. DNA 65


66 DNA


WHO’S HOT

k c a l B n a i r Do the picture of

DNA 67


68 DNA


WHO’S HOT

k c a l B n a i r Do the picture of

DNA 69


T he Stud Advantage By Mark Gray

What role have your looks played in your quick rise up the corporate ladder? My rise up the corporate ladder wasn’t due to good looks. So much of my business takes place overseas. Oftentimes I’m at my desk holding meetings via conference call so clients can’t even see what I look like. Still, I admit my looks can be an advantage when I eventually meet a client in person to close the deal. Do you rely on your looks to close a deal? No, it’s more accurate to say I rely on my polished presentation. I think a well-presented businessman is always going to come off as organized, successful, and driven. My looks are a small part of it. The confidence I exude plays a much larger role.

It’s no secret we are a culture consumed by image. Consider the following: over his career, a good-looking man will make $250,000 more than his least-attractive counterpart. It’s called the “beauty premium”: the idea that pretty people, whatever their aspirations, tend to do better in, well, almost everything. Handsome men earn, on average, 5 percent more than less-attractive men. They get more attention from teachers, bosses, and mentors; even babies stare longer at good-looking faces (and we stare longer at good-looking babies). A couple of years ago, when the economy was thriving, we might have brushed off those statistics as superficial. But in 2011, when employers have more hiring options than ever, looking good is no longer something we can dismiss as frivolous or vain. When it comes to the workplace, its looks, not merit, that all too often rule. We spoke with former model turned business financier, Dorian Black, on how his beauty has helped him rise up the corporate ladder. Has anyone ever told you that you look like Robert Downey Jr.? Dorian Black: I have heard that. It depends on the day. When I am unshaven, I get Hugh Jackman. Do you agree that being attractive has opened doors for you? I believe attractiveness is more then just good looks; it’s an overall appeal. If one presents with confidence, his energy and passion will be evident and people will subconsciously gravitate toward him.

Do you believe you would have that same confidence if you were 5’ 6” tall and 200 pounds? Confidence doesn’t depend on weight or height. I work with all facets of individuals, large and small, who know they are great and aren’t afraid to show it off. Have you mastered the art of influencing people and getting them to like you? Before every meeting, I do my research on the companies and the executives I will be in front of that day. Recently, I met with an oil tycoon from Texas. Through research, I discovered he enjoyed 18th century art that focused on polo championships. In the first hour of our meeting, most of our conversation was centered on his love; particular artists and styles. We eventually


got to discussing business and within 15 minutes, he agreed to invest with my company. So you influence people by pretending to have an appreciation for what they enjoy? I strive to build a connection to their world. That allows them to trust me. Its not manipulation; its communication. What do you do to maintain your looks? I do 45 minutes of cardio every morning, followed by weight training in the afternoons and diligent boxing twice a week. How important is diet? I eat six small meals a day, with limited amount of sodium. And yes, I get one day off a week to eat what I like. But, I have found that lately, I prefer to eat healthy even on my days off. How important are clothes? Clothes are essential to the presentation. I wear labels but I never buy them unless they are on sale. Recently, I bought a Prada Suit that was 60% off. I advise guys to spend $250-$300 on a suit. Spend a bit more on the tie and shoes and wear a shirt that requires cufflinks. What about the briefcase? If you are going to splurge, splurge on a great briefcase. It may sound strange, but it is something that everyone notices. It is an accessory that spells out the type of client and employee you can and will be. I recently scored, finding a $2000 Zegna briefcase for 80% off – now that’s a bargain! How important is it to be up on football and golf stats? I have found discussing sports before a meeting is a cop-out. It’s too general. If you do the research on the executives you will be meeting with, then you can lead the conversation to more polished subject matters that they will be interested in. Is there something else the well-groomed man should know if he wants to fit in with the white collar set? My father always told me, “be willing to spend money to fly first class, because you never know who you will be sitting next to”. It could be your next boss or client.


Have your looks ever been a detriment in the board room?

No, but my youth has. Not everyone is willing to take a COO in his early 30s seriously. But, as long as I maintain my confidence, without going overboard and falling into cockiness, I’m usually able to convince them I’m the right man for the job. What advice can you offer men on how to raise their attractiveness to get more attention on the job? Eat well, exercise, and be the best you can be. The well groomed man is polished and exudes confidence. You will find that being attractive requires not just a good suit, but also a great attitude and a lot passion.


It’s no secret we are a culture consumed by image. Consider the following: over his career, a good-looking man will make $250,000 more than his least-attractive counterpart.

Have you mastered the art of influencing people and getting them to like you? 

It’s called the “beauty premium”: the idea that pretty people, whatever their aspirations, tend to do better in, well, almost everything. Handsome men earn, on average, 5 percent more than less-attractive men. They get more attention from teachers, bosses, and mentors; even babies stare longer at goodlooking faces (and we stare longer at good-looking babies).

Before every meeting, I do my research on the companies and the executives I will be in front of that day. Recently, I met with an oil tycoon from Texas. Through research, I discovered he enjoyed 18th century art that focused on polo championships. In the first hour of our meeting, most of our conversation was centered on his love; particular artists and styles. We eventually got to discussing business and within 15 minutes, he agreed to invest with my company.

of years ago, when the economy was thriving, we might e Ahavecouple brushed off those statistics as superficial. But in 2011, when

ntag a v d A d The Stu rk Gray By Ma

employers have more hiring options than ever, looking good is no longer something we can dismiss as frivolous or vain. When it comes to the workplace, its looks, not merit, that all too often rule. We spoke with former model turned business financier, Dorian Black, on how his beauty has helped him rise up the corporate ladder.

Has anyone ever told you that you look like Robert Downey Jr.? Dorian Black: I have heard that. It depends on the day. When I am unshaven, I get Hugh Jackman.  

Do you agree that being attractive has opened doors for you?

Photos: Justin Monroe

16

I believe attractiveness is more then just good looks; it’s an overall appeal. If one presents with confidence, his energy and passion will be evident and people will subconsciously gravitate toward him.  

What role have your looks played in your quick rise up the corporate ladder? My rise up the corporate ladder wasn’t due to good looks. So much of my business takes place overseas. Oftentimes I’m at my desk holding meetings via conference call so clients can’t even

see what I look like. Still, I admit my looks can be an advantage when I eventually meet a client in person to close the deal.  

Do you rely on your looks to close a deal? No, it’s more accurate to say I rely on my polished presentation. I think a well-presented businessman is always going to come off as organized, successful, and driven. My looks are a small part of it. The confidence I exude plays a much larger role.  

Do you believe you would have that same confidence if you were 5’ 6” tall and 200 pounds? 

Confidence doesn’t depend on weight or height. I work with all facets of individuals, large and small, who know they are great and aren’t afraid to show it off.  

So you influence people by pretending to have an appreciation for what they enjoy? I strive to build a connection to their world. That allows them to trust me. Its not manipulation; its communication.  

What do you do to maintain your looks?

I do 45 minutes of cardio every morning, followed by weight training in the afternoons and diligent boxing twice a week.  

How important is diet?

I eat six small meals a day, with limited amount of sodium. And yes, I get one day off a week to eat what I like. But, I have found that lately, I prefer to eat healthy even on my days off.  

How important are clothes? 

Clothes are essential to the presentation. I wear labels but I never buy them unless they are on sale. Recently, I bought a Prada Suit that was 60% off. I advise guys to spend $250-$300 on a suit. Spend a bit more on the tie and shoes and wear a shirt that requires cufflinks.

What about the briefcase? If you are going to splurge, splurge on a great briefcase. It may sound strange, but it is something that everyone notices. It is an accessory that spells out the type of client and employee you can and will be. I recently scored, finding a $2000 Zegna briefcase for 80% off – now that’s a bargain!

How important is it to be up on football and golf stats? I have found discussing sports before a meeting is a cop-out. It’s too general. If you do the research on the executives you will be meeting with, then you can lead the conversation to more polished subject matters that they will be interested in.  

Is there something else the well-groomed man should know if he wants to fit in with the white collar set? My father always told me, “be willing to spend money to fly first class, because you never know who you will be sitting next to”. It could be your next boss or client.  

Have your looks ever been a detriment in the board room? No, but my youth has. Not everyone is willing to take a COO in his early 30s seriously. But, as long as I maintain my confidence, without going overboard and falling into cockiness, I’m usually able to convince them I’m the right man for the job.

What advice can you offer men on how to raise their attractiveness to get more attention on the job? Eat well, exercise, and be the best you can be. The well groomed man is polished and exudes confidence. You will find that being attractive requires not just a good suit, but also a great attitude and a lot passion.

17


COVER

GRAB DORIAN

MILLION DOLLAR LLAR MAN By Max Jiminez

When it was revealed that high powered Manhattan real estate agent Fredrik Eklund was a former gay porn star, many assumed it would be the end to his career. Five years ago, Eklund performed in films Guilty Pleasures and Hole under the name Tag Eriksson. Today, his $58-million real estate portfolio includes clients like Cameron Diaz, Justin Timberlake, and the Olsen twins. The public’s laissez-faire reaction baffled some and was a relief to others in similar circumstances, including leading financier Dorian Black. Today, Dorian Black is COO of an alternative asset management firm. Five years ago, before graduating business school, he was an underwear model and shot images he worried might come back to haunt him. Surprisingly, it’s not corporate America’s approval he fears; it’s the reaction from

20

GRAB Magazine

family. Like Eklund, who descends from a prominent Swedish family, Black is of the British aristocracy. Several of his cousins hold titles as Baronesses, MPs and Officers of the Order of the British Empire. His mother’s family built the largest timber business in all of Africa while his father’s family founded Video Library which later became Blockbuster Video. So what has changed in America that we are now willing to accept the naughty pasts of people in prominent positions? Have we been desensitized by celebrity sex tapes and crotch images of pop princesses? Or has America finally grown up? Max Jiminez: While making your millions on Wall Street, did you fear your images might come back to haunt you? Dorian Black: I really didn’t. I’m proud of my underwear modeling career. Whether good

February 1, 2011

or bad, I believe our pasts may shape us, but they don’t define us. I like to think we are no longer judged by where we come from, but rather how we can contribute today and tomorrow. With hard work comes reward. M.J: Did you see Republican Scott Brown’s nude photo in Cosmopolitan Magazine? D.B: I did and I was happy to see that the image didn’t cost him his senate seat. M.J: How did you end up in modeling? D.B: I was dating a well known male model at the time and I joined him at shoots. One day, the photographer asked if I would be willing to step in front of the camera. I said sure and took my shirt off. M.J: How long did you model? D.B: Not very long. Not because I didn’t enjoy it, but because I was a student and


COVER

my mind was focused on business school.

M.J: Let’s talk money. How have you managed to make money in these hard times? M.J: What did you learn from D.B: My company manages your time in front of the camera? client funds by offering attractive D.B: As a model you get to see returns in this heightened economic time. Minimum the world and experience investment is $1,000,000. We different cultures and people. I are paid for managing the met some incredible people process effectively and correctly from all walks of life. I also saw for our clients. some of the world’s greatest cities. M.J: What’s the biggest mistake gay men make with M.J: What led you to Wall their money? Street? D.B: My father has always had a passion for success and a knack for finance. I have incredible respect for him. So when he came to me with a business model, I couldn’t refuse the opportunity to join him. M.J: Do you like being a suit and tie man? D.B: Oftentimes, if I know I’ll be spending the day in front of the computer, you'll find me in sweat pants at my desk. M.J: Are you out in the office? D.B: Everyone knows I am gay and regards my partner as my other half, but like religion, it is not discussed at the office. I believe in a corporate structure where personal lives are left at home. However, if someone in a board meeting were to ask me about my wife, I would simply say, "His name is Marc.” M.J: Is it difficult to be a gay man in the board room? D.B: The other day, I was pleasantly surprised that the gentlemen across from me happened to be someone I had met at a gay funding raising event. We recounted our last meeting and the other men and women in the meeting simply listened and smiled. Society has changed and so has the boardroom.

22

GRAB Magazine

D.B: Many gay men get lost in the DINK (double income, no kids) and SINK (single income, no kids) mentality. Many of us have nothing to tie us down, so we are always on the go: traveling and spending, living in indulgence. I'm guilty of it as well. It’s important that we plan and save for our retirement. Maxing out the 401K and Roth accounts are great ways to keep an eye on the retirement road ahead. M.J: What are you investing in

February 1, 2011

these days? D.B: Real estate. Some might argue that real estate is a depreciating asset, however, it is probably one of the only longterm investments that will see great dividends in years to come. The key is in years to come. M.J: Who has $200K to buy a house? D.B: Anyone can start the real estate dream with FHA loans. They require sometimes as low as 3% down. Owning a home is the first step to financial freedom. M.J: What do you like best about your job? D.B: There is nothing sexier to me then seeing lots of zeros in a savings account – now that’s hot. M.J: What advice do you have for guys feeling stuck in their career? D.B: I recently had dinner with a friend in that circumstance. I asked him what his passion was and he said he wanted to merge his love of fitness and cuisine with his own healthy food catering business. To do so, however, he would need to attend culinary school which he couldn’t afford and his current work schedule wouldn’t allow for it. I suggested his first step to living his dream would be to get certified as a personal trainer. Once certified, he could leave his current job, work part time as a trainer and attend culinary in the evenings. M.J: Where there is a will, there is a way. D.B: The worst thing is for someone to look back on their past and say, "I should have done that with my life." M.J: How important is it to be passionate about what you do for a living? D.B: Passion is everything. With


COVER

passion comes drive and if you have drive you can do anything. Also, if you are passionate, others will follow and believe. M.J: What defines success for you? D.B: Truthfully, the money in my bank account doesn’t define success for me. Success is the feeling I have when I am home sitting on the couch with my partner, playing with my three dogs or hanging out with my family. M.J: But money in the bank doesn’t hurt. D.B: It certainly doesn’t. M.J: Fredrik Eklund is in talks with Bravo to star in a reality show about New York real estate brokers. Do you have your eyes on a possible reality show of your own? M.J: I wouldn’t be opposed to it. I'm not sure what my show would be about. By day, Dorian Black’s a corporate financier. At night, he hits the runway in his underwear… Move over cake and wedding shows. 2011 will be the year of the underwear! Photos by: Justin Monroe

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February 1, 2011


‘11 RESOLUTION 2011: Resolve to rub elbows Ways to get out and about this month. by Hannah Clay Wareham associate editor

Raise your voice! The Boston Gay Men’s Chorus is looking for a few good men! The group is holding auditions for new members on Sunday, Jan. 9 from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. E-mail auditions@ bgmc.org for more information, or to make an appointment. Fuse with friends. Melissa Ferrick is headlining at The Human Rights Campaign’s “Her HRC Boston” event on Saturday, Jan. 15 at 8 p.m. at the Middle East in Cambridge (472 - 480 Massachusetts Ave.). You can expect everything from a musical comedy duo to burlesque dancers, a female

rock n’ roll wrestling act, trans artist Lucas Silveira from the Cliks, and lesbian hip hop artist EJ Labb. Visit hrc.org/your_community/15172.htm. Take in some culture. The Boston Museum of Fine Arts (MFA) is celebrating Richard Avedon’s career as a famed fashion photographer until Jan. 17. Catch a glimpse of the good life! Visit mfa. org. Celebrate the search for a cure. Rep. Sarah Peake will be honored by the Massachusetts Breast Cancer Coalition for her commitment to working toward breast cancer prevention on Saturday, Jan. 22 at 8:30 p.m. at the Brookline Holiday Inn (1200 Beacon St.). Visit mbcc.org. Brush up on your style. Tabatha Coffey of Bravo’s “Tabatha’s Salon Takeover” will be at the Brookline Booksmith (279 Harvard St.) on Friday, Jan. 28 at 7:30 p.m. to discuss her new memoirs, It’s Not Really About the Hair: The Honest Truth About Life, Love, and the Business of Beauty. Visit brooklinebooksmith-shop.com.

Bay Windows | January 6, 2010 | Page 11

Cut a rug with your cutie! Out to Dance offers LGBT dance classes, and their January schedule has never looked foxier. Take a class in West Coast Swing, Waltz, Country, Latin Club, Salsa, Bachata, Ballroom, Hip-hop, or Cumbia and show your friends what’s what on the dance floor! Visit outtodance.com/glbt-dance-classes. Calm down. Take a deep breath and welcome the New Year with a peaceful spirit! Shambhala Meditation Center hosts an LGBT meditation group on the second Sunday of each month. Each program includes group meditation, discussion, and socializing. Learn about dharma and get your chi in order to help prepare for 2011. E-mail Bruce at windhorse13@gmail.com, call (617) 734-1498, or visit boston.shambhala.org for more information. Be proud! Registration opened this week for Boston Pride 2011. Visit bostonpride.org to find out how you can volunteer, purchase a booth, and prep for Pride.

Million dollar man How the story of an underwearmodel-turned-Wall-Street-mogul can help you steer your way onto the road of financial success in the New Year. by Max Jiminez

contributing writer When it was revealed that high-powered Manhattan real estate agent Fredrik Eklund was a former gay porn star, many assumed it would be the end to his career. Five years ago, Eklund performed in films Guilty Pleasures and Hole under the name Tag Eriksson. Today, his $58-million real estate portfolio includes clients like Cameron Diaz, Justin Timberlake, and the Olsen twins. The public’s laissez-faire reaction baffled some and was a relief to others in similar circumstances, including leading financier Keith Black.

Today, Keith Black is CEO of Trith Capital, a Wall Street investment firm. Five years ago, before graduating business school, he was an underwear model and shot provocative images he was sure would come back to haunt him. Surprisingly, it’s not Wall Street approval he is afraid of. He doesn’t believe corporate America will bat an eye to the photos. It’s his family. Like Eklund, who descends from a prominent Swedish family, Black is of the British aristocracy. Several of his cousins hold titles as Baronesses, MPs, and Officers of the Order of the British Empire. His mother’s family built the largest timber business in all of Africa while his father’s family founded Video Library, which later became Blockbuster Video. Keith Black fears the reaction from the bluebloods over his blue boy images. So what has changed in America that we are now willing to accept the naughty pasts of people in prominent positions? Have we been desensitized by celebrity sex tapes and crotch images of pop princesses? Or has America finally grown up?

‘11 RESOLUTION

January 13, 20, 27 This January, Bay Windows, New England’s largest paper serving the LGBT community, offers a special health, beauty and fitness advertising section focusing on the all important New Year’s Resolution. Contact us today to place your ad.

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KEITH BLACK and one of his assets. (Justin Monroe)

Bay Windows: While making your millions on Wall Street, did you fear your images might come back to haunt you? KB: I really didn’t. I’m proud of my underwear modeling career. Whether good or bad, I believe our pasts may shape us, but they don’t define us. I like to think we are no longer judged by where we come from, but rather how we can contribute

today and tomorrow. With hard work comes reward. BW: Did you see Republican Scott Brown’s nude photo in Cosmopolitan Magazine? KB: I did and I was happy to see that the image didn’t cost him his Senate seat.

see KEITH BLACK, page 16


Page 16 | January 6, 2010 | Bay Windows

Keith Black Continued from page 11 BW: How did you end up in modeling? KB: I was dating a well known male model at the time and I joined him at shoots. One day, the photographer asked if I would be willing to step in front of the camera. I said sure and dropped my pants! BW: How long did you model? KB: Not very long. Not because I didn’t enjoy it, but because I was a student and my mind was focused on business school. BW: What did you learn from your time in front of the camera? KB: As a model you get to see the world and experience different cultures and people. I met some incredible people from all walks of life. I also saw some of the world’s greatest cities. BW: What led you to Wall Street? KB: My father has always had a passion for success and a knack for finance. I have incredible respect for him. So when he came to me with a business model, I couldn’t refuse the opportunity to join him. BW: Do you like being a suit and tie man? KB: Oftentimes, if I know I’ll be spending the day in front of the computer, you’ll find me in sweat pants at my desk.

BW: Are you out in the office? KB: Everyone knows I am gay and regards my partner as my other half, but like religion, it is not discussed at the office. I believe in a corporate structure where personal lives are left at home. However, if someone in a board meeting were to ask me about my wife, I would simply say, “His name is Marc.” BW: Is it difficult to be a gay man in the board room? KB: The other day, I was pleasantly surprised that the gentlemen across from me happened to be someone I had met at a gay fundraising event. We recounted our last meeting and the other men and women in the meeting simply listened and smiled. Society has changed and so has the boardroom. BW: Let’s talk money. How have you managed to make money in these hard times? KB: My company manages client funds by offering attractive returns in this heightened economic time. Minimum investment is $1,000,000. We are paid for managing the process effectively and correctly for our clients. BW: What’s the biggest mistake gay men make with their money? KB: Many gay men get lost in the DINK (double income, no kids) and SINK (single income, no kids) mentality. Many of us have nothing to tie us down, so we are always on the go: traveling and spending, living in indulgence. I’m guilty of it as well. It’s important

that we plan and save for our retirement. Maxing out the 401K and Roth accounts are great ways to keep an eye on the retirement road ahead. BW: What are you investing in these days? KB: Real estate. Some might argue that real estate is a depreciating asset; however, it is probably one of the only long-term investments that will see great dividends in years to come. The key is in years to come. BW: Who has $200K to buy a house? KB: Anyone can start the real estate dream with FHA loans. They require sometimes as low as 3% down. Owning a home is the first step to financial freedom. BW: What do you like best about your job? KB: There is nothing sexier to me then seeing lots of zeros in a savings account—now that’s hot. BW: What advice do you have for guys feeling stuck in their career? KB: I recently had dinner with a friend in that circumstance. I asked him what his passion was and he said he wanted to merge his love of fitness and cuisine with his own healthy food catering business. To do so, however, he would need to attend culinary school which he couldn’t afford and his current work schedule wouldn’t allow for it. I suggested his first step to living his dream would be to get certified as a personal trainer. Once certified, he could leave his current job, work part time as

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a trainer, and attend culinary [school] in the evenings. BW: Where there is a will, there is a way. KB: The worst thing is for someone to look back on their past and say, “I should have done that with my life.” BW: How important is it to be passionate about what you do for a living? KB: Passion is everything. With passion comes drive and if you have drive you can do anything. Also, if you are passionate, others will follow and believe. BW: What defines success for you? KB: Truthfully, the money in my bank account doesn’t define success for me. Success is the feeling I have when I am home sitting on the couch with my partner, playing with my three dogs, or hanging out with my family. BW: But money in the bank doesn’t hurt. KB: It certainly doesn’t. BW: Fredrik Eklund is in talks with Bravo to star in a reality show about New York real estate brokers. Do you have your eyes on a possible reality show of your own? KB: I wouldn’t be opposed to it. I’m not sure what my show would be about. BW: By day, he’s a corporate financier. At night, he hits the runway in his underwear… KB: Move over cake and wedding shows. 2011 will be the year of the underwear!



DORIANBLACKPress