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Friday, September 18, 2015

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CODE THE TOWN A ‘BRIGHT SPOT’ IN HISPANIC EDUCATION

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By Julie Silva

ission’s own Code the Town initiative was among several local programs named a “bright spot” in Hispanic education by the White House this week. More than 230 agencies nationwide are being recognized in the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics’ Bright Spots in Hispanic Education National Online Catalog. Programs selected showed they were furthering the education of the Hispanic population in one of the following areas: early learning, K-12 education and college access, postsecondary

completion, STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education and Latino teacher recruitment. Other initiatives in the area that were recognized include the HESTEC program at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, the early college program at South Texas College and VIDA: Valley Initiative for Development and Advancement. Alex Meade, president of the Mission Economic Development Corporation, pointed out Code the Town is the only EDC-driven program amongst the 200-plus projects on the list. Yes, the Mission EDC’s job is to recruit businesses, and it’s doing that, Meade

said, but in order to lure hiring paying jobs, the community needs an educated workforce. That’s where MEDC’s Code the Town comes in to the picture, teaching students and adults computer programming. The MEDC partnered with Sylvan Learning Center and Border Kids Code to make it happen. Traditionally, manufacturing companies come to the Valley, Meade said. “It’s very rare that you have a company say, ‘Hey, I need 100 employees. Let me go to the Valley.’ Because we’re good at working with our hands, and there’s nothing wrong with that, but I think it’s about time

that if we really do want to change the poverty level, and just the trajectory for the Valley, we really do have to focus on STEM education,” Meade said. “Once we have a large pool of an educated workforce, then they’re going to seek us for our minds and our hands.” In the last year, 600 children have written 83,000 lines of code through the MEDC’s program. Counting teachers and adults who have gone through the program, nearly 100,000 lines were written, Meade said. Code the Town was so successful, Meade said, that Royal Technologies approached the MEDC earlier this year to launch a similar

GOING GOLD

program, Enginuity, which will target young students who want to pursue a career in engineering. Meade has high expectations for Enginuity, as the MEDC will partner again with Sylvan Learning Center as well as Royal Technologies, which will potentially employ students who have gone through the program. Meanwhile, Hispanic Engineering, Science, and Technology (HESTEC) at UTRGV also was recognized for its work in STEM. According to a news release, HESTEC, which was created more than 10 years ago has reached more than 7,700 educators, 37,000 students and 2,000 college students

through its annual career expo. “We wanted to invest in the education attainment of Hispanics from cradle to career. With the support of leading organizations and communities around our nation, we concentrated our efforts on Hispanic education, particularly in the advancement in the STEM fields. Today, our students are finding many opportunities to excel in their studies and advance their careers,” said Congressman Rubén Hinojosa, one of the organization’s founders. For more information on the Hispanic education initiative, visit www.ed.gov/ hispanicinitiative.

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with the city. “You can’t put a price on loving the city of Palmview,” he said. “I’m not asking for anything crazy. I want to see the city grow.” New positions in the budget include a full-time police officer, two part-time officers who will be bumped up to full time, one new full-time firefighter, two additional part-time firefighters, one public works supervisor and a courts/permits clerk in city hall. Also, the starting pay for firefighters was increased from $24,500 to $30,000. When the city went through the annexation process last year, it promised citizens more patrol units on the road. Currently, a minimum of two officers are on the road at all times in Palmview. With the additional staff, that number will be bumped up to three, but Segovia said most of the time there will be four, five or even six officers patrolling at any one time. Palmview Fire Chief Jerry Alaniz was able to juggle hours to create a full-time position with no impact to the budget, Segovia said. Some people are budgeted at 32 hours each week, and they only use 25 or 26. Those extra hours add up to a new firefighter, he said. Currently, there are four fulltime firefighers, including Alaniz. The additional staff will help, Alaniz said, as Palmview begins to service Peñitas as well. As for public works, the additional supervisor will enable the crew to split into two, covering different areas. Also, the current supervisor struggles with English, Segovia said. An English-speaking supervisor can get training – particular-

Palmview budget grows with city

By Julie Silva

MCISD, La Joya ISD honor child cancer patients

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By Lea Victoria Juarez ith two weeks left of chemotherapy for Ewing sarcoma, 7-year-old Kaitlyn Sifuentes was diagnosed with pneumonia in her left lung – the lung that was already partially removed because of a tumor. The doctor ordered a stop to chemotherapy for those two weeks because it was lowering Kaitlyn’s blood cell count, according to her mother, Roxanne Navarro. Still, when the family returned to the doctor about three weeks later, Kaitlyn was told she was cancer free. “I would tell her ‘Kaitlyn, you need to pray and ask God.’ So I think she already knew that she was cancer free,” Navarro said. “So when I told her, she was so calm about it, like if she already knew that God had healed her.” At the Sept. 12 Mission Veterans vs. Juarez-Lincoln football game, Kaitlyn was

one of seven children recognized in honor of Childhood Cancer Awareness Month. Gold ribbons lined the bleachers, spectators wore gold shirts and the football players donned gold sweatbands in honor of the month. Mission CISD and La Joya ISD banded together with the Faith Family Friends Foundation to honor children in the school districts who have cancer or are in remission. The students recognized were: • Cesar Campos of Mission, who is in remission from liver cancer • Domenique Reyna of Peñitas, who is a Leukemia survivor • Geremmy Trejo of Mission, who is living with Leukemia • Kahlia Espinoza of Mission, who has spleen cancer • Victoria Tejada of Palmview, who is living with Leukemia

See GOING GOLD 10

TOP: Pediatric cancer patients from the area are recognized at the Mission Veterans vs. Juarez-Lincoln football game for Childhood Cancer Awareness Month. BOTTOM: Leukemia patient Victoria Tejada of Palmview is escorted by her family to the middle of the Tom Landry football field. Progress Times photo by Luciano Guerra

“From one day to another your life changes. So it’s better to do something now than when it’s too late.” --Roxanne Navarro

ecent annexations have doubled the size of Palmview, and this week the city adopted a budget that reflects it. The budget increased from $4.6 million this fiscal year to $5.3 million for 20152016. The tax rate dropped from 47.90 cents per $100 property valuation to 47.51 cents. However, because the annexations expanded the city’s tax base, the lower rate is the rollback tax rate, the maximum tax rate the city can adopt without voter approval. The effective tax rate, or the rate that would bring in the same amount of revenue as this fiscal year is 45.85 cents. “I really think we’ll be doing a lot with what we have,” City Manager Ramon Segovia said. “We have to make sure there’s enough coverage on the road.” The budget includes a 3 percent across-the-board raise, new equipment for the public works department and several new positions. Also, Segovia will receive an $8,000 raise and the city will name an assistant city manager. All those changes will take place Nov. 1, Segovia said, because on Oct. 1, the city will begin a regional 9-1-1 dispatch and he doesn’t want to overwhelm employees. On Segovia’s raise, Mayor Jerry Perez said the city manager job is 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The city manager is integral to the city, he said. “There’s no doubt the leadership that the city of Palmview has, and we’re going to take the city to the next level,” Perez said. Segovia, who was named city manager two years ago, said he’s growing right along

See BUDGET 10

INSIDE

Man accused in 2-yearold’s death

The 25-year-old Sullivan City man kept his face from cameras as he was arraigned on a capital murder charge in the death of his girlfriend’s son. See story page 3

INDEX

Entertainment | pg. 2

Lifestyle | pg. 8

Texas A&M to expand into RGV

Diamondbacks remain undefeated

Letter of intent signed by university, McAllen and Hidalgo County ‘agrees to pursue the creation of a teaching facility’ within Tres Lagos development. See story page 3

Opinion | pg. 4

Sports | pg. 6

The return of many starters has proven a plus for Sharyland Pioneer as the team faces La Feria tonight at Richard Thompson Stadium. See story page 6

Obituaries | pg. 9

Classifieds | pg. 11


entertainment

Walking and texting may be hazardous to health

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USTIN – Between 2007 and 2011, the State of Texas spent $37 million on grants to help high-poverty middle schools reduce obesity through physical education. The grant program, called Texas Fitness Now, provided grants to the poorest 24 percent of Texas middle schools in 2007-09, and it made grants to the poorest 40 percent of middle schools in 2009-11. Yet a new article by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin reports that Texas Fitness Now had no effect on children’s weight. Middle school obesity rates held steady during Texas Fitness Now, both in schools that received the grants and in schools that did not. The article, written by Paul von Hippel and Kyle Bradbury at UT Austin’s LBJ School of Public Affairs, is the largest study ever conducted of a physical education (PE) program. Using publicly available data, the authors analyzed obesity rates at more than 1,150 middle schools enrolling more than 770,000 students per year. Schools spent most of their grants on sports and fitness equipment, according to the article. Although the

grants did not reduce obesity, they did increase fitness. The fitness benefits were greatest in measures of strength, and greater for girls than for boys. As a result of the grants, both boys and girls in high-poverty middle schools could complete more pushups and a faster shuttle run, the researchers found. Girls could also complete more curlups, a higher trunk lift, and had a better sit and reach. But the grants did not increase shoulder flexibility or help children run a mile more quickly. State guidelines for Texas Fitness Now predicted that the program would improve academic achievement because “through increased fitness, students’ cognitive ability will improve.” Yet the article reached mixed conclusions on the grants’ academic effects. On average, the grants had no effect on math or reading scores, but they may have improved scores among seventh- and eighth-graders who spent two to three years in participating schools. The research was funded in part by the St. David’s Foundation in Austin, Texas, and published in the peer-reviewed journal Preventive Medicine.

Texas Fitness Now launched in 2007. The program received widespread news coverage, including a segment on the HBO documentary “Weight of the Nation.” Texas Fitness Now expanded in 2009 but ended in 2011 when the economic recession forced cuts to the state budget. The termination of Texas Fitness Now had no adverse effects, according to the article. Schools kept their grant-purchased equipment, and after termination, participating schools did not see obesity, fitness and achievement levels worsen relative to nonparticipating schools. PE, obesity, and achievement Although research has demonstrated that PE can improve fitness, it is unclear whether PE reduces obesity. The American Heart Association and the Institute of Medicine endorse using PE to reduce child obesity, yet a recent review in the New England Journal of Medicine classified the idea that PE classes reduce obesity as a “myth.” The American Academy of Pediatrics strikes a middle ground, endorsing PE but describing child obesity programs that rely on activity alone as “somewhat disappointing to date.” A 2013 review by the Cochrane Collaborative found that, out of 11 child obesity programs that relied on

physical activity alone, none significantly reduced weight gain in boys, and only one very small program, in France, significantly reduced weight gain in girls. Programs that combine physical activity with diet have had better results. On paper, Texas Fitness Now required schools to spend 25 percent of their grant funds on nutrition. But the nutrition requirement was not enforced; in 2009-10 only 7 percent of grant funds were spent on nutrition, according to the University of Texas article. The question of whether PE improves academic achievement is also controversial. In a recent exchange in JAMA Pediatrics, different authors came to opposite conclusions. One set of authors concluded that “participation in physical activity is positively related to academic performance,” but other authors, reviewing the same data, concluded that “physical activity is not related to performance at school.”

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SaberStagers to present ‘The Diviners’ STC Theatre announces auditions next week E DINBURG – The public is invited to come out and enjoy an evening—or an afternoon— of theatre at the Robert Vela High School new performing arts center. According to Michael Moralez, theatre arts director, “The Diviners” will be presented by the school’s SaberStagers theatre group tonight through Sunday, Sept. 18 to 20, at the Robert Pulido Performing Arts Center located at 801 E. Canton. The original play, written by Jim Leonard Jr., was first performed in 1980 and tells the story of a tragedy surrounding mentally-challenged “Buddy” who has a unique gift of “divining” (intuitively finding) water. With the angst of the intricacies of all human relationships, the plot brings togeth-

er the stories and driving motives of the residents of small-town Zion, Indiana. There will be performances on Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m. with additional 2 p.m. matinees on Saturday and Sunday. Admission is $5 at the door. Three more productions are planned for the 2015-16 season. The second, “In the Heights,” follows on Dec. 3 to 6 with performances at 7 p.m. on Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. The troupe’s U.I.L. One-Act Play will be presented March 21 and 22 at 7 p.m. each day. They close out with “Cabaret” on May 6 to 8 with shows at the same 7 p.m. and 2 p.m. time slots. For information, call Moralez at 289-2650, Ext.6456.

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cALLEN – South Texas College Theatre will hold auditions for its November, 2015, production of Beth Henley’s “The Miss Firecracker Contest.” It will be held on Sept. 22 and 23, from 7 to 10 p.m. both dates at the Cooper Center located at 3201 W. Pecan Blvd. in McAllen. All STC and Rio Grande Valley community members, ages 18 and over, are welcome to audition. A cold reading from the script will be made available at the audition. The director is looking for two men and four women for the play. Set in Brookhaven, Mississippi just days before

the Fourth of July, Carnelle Scott, A.K.A. “Miss Hot Tamale,” is rehearsing furiously for the Miss Firecracker Contest in the hopes of salvaging her tarnished reputation and leaving town in a blaze of glory. When her cousin, Elain, and eccentric brother, Delmount, come home for a visit, their pasts and secrets catch up to them, causing all kinds of challenges for Carnelle. The hilarity begins when everyone rallies to help Carnelle win the pageant while trying to escape their problems. “I fell in love with this play the first time I saw it when I was in college,” says Joel Jason Rodriguez, director for the play. “I believe the reason I love it so much has to do with Carnelle’s desire to be accepted and what she learns about herself by trying to make that happen. This play is just filled with so many hilarious situations and off the wall characters. I think, we can all identify with them at some level.” The Miss Firecracker Contest is scheduled to take the STC Cooper Center for Communication Arts Main Stage on Nov. 19 to 22. For more information, call 872-2639 or email jrodriguez@southtexascollege.edu or agarza_5463@ southtexascollege.edu .

September 18, 2015

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NEWS | SPORTS | ENTERTAINMENT | PHOTOS

Coming Attractions

September 23 DGE Concerts celebrates 10 years with guests The Maine – Free For All Tour. Gates open for the 100% free show at 6:30 p.m. at Las Palmas Race Park, 9209 N. Taylor Rd. in Mission.

tickets online at ticketmaster.com or by calling 800-745-3000.

September 29 He’s coming to the Valley! Internationally acclaimed Ricky Martin and his “One World Tour 2015” arrives at State Farm Arena in HiSeptember 25 dalgo for one night, one State Farm Arena in performance show beHidalgo is where the ginning at 7 p.m. Doors next Bellator MMA open at 6 p.m. Tickets cage action takes place. ranging from $66.50 to It’s Warren vs. Davis in $172 are available at the Bantam Weight di- ticketmaster.com or by vision main event and calling 800-745-3000. Beltran vs. Grove in the Middleweight co-main October 5 event for the evening’s They’re closing shop excitement. It starts at and its hard rock met5:30 with doors opening al fans’ last chance to at 5 p.m. Tickets range get down with Motley from $20 to $100 per Crüe and Alice Cooper person. Call 800-745- in their “Final Tour”! 3000 or go to ticketmas- They will make a stop ter.com to purchase. at State Farm Arena in Hidalgo at 7 p.m. Doors September 26 open at 6 p.m. Ticket Disco Donnie and prices run from $22.50 Global Groove present to $182, available onExcision 2015 Tour with line at ticketmaster.com TJR and Lny Tnz in the or by calling 800-745“Out of this World” 3000. performance at Boggus (To see the complete Ford Events Center, Coming Attractions cal3000 N. Cage in Pharr. endar, go to www.ptrgv. It begins at 7 p.m. Buy com.)

Guilty plea leads to marriage

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ccording to a press release from the Association of Mature American Citizens, a man in Smith County, Texas confessed to a judge that he punched his girlfriend’s ex-boyfriend for insulting her. The judge accepted his guilty plea and told the young man he had the choice of 15 days in jail or marriage. The prisoner opted for life with his sweetheart. But the story doesn’t

end there. Smith County Court-at-Law Judge Randall Rogers came under fire by advocates for the separation of Church and State filed a protest almost immediately after he pronounced his sentence. It is unclear whether they were protesting the marriage option or the fact that Judge Rogers also ordered the defendant to read the Bible and copy verses from the good book.

pper Valley Art League (UVAL) members have been working all summer preparing their creations for the “Art in the Park” exhibit opening this Saturday, Sept. 19, at the National Butterfly Center (NBC) in Mission. The public is invited to the opening reception which will be held from 6 to 8 p.m.at NBC, located at 3333 Butterfly Park Drive, next to Bentsen State Park. Regular NBC admission rates apply.

All works, created in a variety of mediums, went from beginning to completion between June 7 and Aug. 20 this past summer. Subject matter was to be drawn from observations of creatures and features at the Butterfly Center. Artists were competing for prizes in two categories—student and adult, and judging was completed last week on Sept. 8. Winners will be announced at the Sept. 19 reception.

‘Art in the Park’ exhibit opens at NBC U


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Texas A&M University announces expansion plans Reminiscing...

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cALLEN — It’s history in the making for the City of McAllen. Officials with the Texas A&M University System, the City of McAllen and Hidalgo County took the first steps Tuesday to expand the university’s presence in the Rio Grande Valley. McAllen Mayor Jim Darling, Texas A&M University System Chancellor John Sharp, Texas A&M University President Michael K. Young and Hidalgo County Judge Ramon Garcia signed a letter of intent at a joint meeting of the McAllen City Commission and the Hidalgo County Commissioners Court. Under the letter of intent, all entities agree to the creation of a teaching facility on approximately 100 acres of land within the Tres Lagos development on the north side of McAllen.

Tres Lagos is a 2,571-acre planned community located in McAllen’s extraterritorial jurisdiction. “We are excited to be exploring this opportunity in McAllen and we look forward to expanding Texas A&M’s presence here,” Sharp said. “We hope to establish first a teaching center and ultimately a branch campus that will provide students an outstanding option for higher education in the Valley.” The City of McAllen, in conjunction with Hidalgo County, is offering the 100 acres, plus $10 million toward a teaching facility and $8 million to install utilities and infrastructure. Texas A&M will seek the necessary approvals to provide academic programs such as engineering, engineering technology, biomedical sciences, and agriculture and life sciences as well as

helping to fund construction costs associated with building the teaching facility. Courses will be taught by Texas A&M faculty and graduates will receive the iconic Aggie ring. Mayor Darling said the landmark agreement will change the educational landscape in South Texas. “The establishment of a Texas A&M campus in McAllen will have a major impact on the educational opportunities for our Valley students. Having the two

largest Texas university systems here in the Valley is a statement of the recognition of the importance of our area to Texas,” Darling said. “This event is so historic that it is difficult, if not impossible, to put into words. We have worked so hard the last 18 months to make this a reality. For the city of McAllen to be able to announce that we are bringing Texas A&M University to McAllen is almost unbelievable,” said City Manager Roel “Roy” Rodriguez, P.E.

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Cameron, Starr and Webb – and each county had its own name for the operation. Hidalgo County is owed $1.7 million in unpaid child support, but that amount hasn’t been accumulated over any specific time, according to Texas Attorney General representative Dionisio Salinas. For example, a parent could have neglected to pay for either 15 years or one year and it still contributes to the $1.7 million owed. During the three-day operation, officers visited

homes early in the morning before anyone had a chance to leave for the day, Chavez said, and that is how they were able to make the arrests. Tactical patrol units, teams and vehicles were used, but no additional staff came on board and the operation didn’t cost the county any money. Although Rodriguez did not have any exact statistics on hand, he said most of the individuals arrested were male, and majority of the arrests were made on the final day.

Jail time is situational, but the arrested parents could face up to six months in jail. Cash bonds used for bail go to child that was neglected and the custodial parent. According to Regional Investigator of Special Enforcement Operations Dagoberto Chavez, parents who are unable to make child support payments due to unemployment can secure employment through the Noncustodial Parent Choices program with the Attorney General’s Office.

By Lea Victoria Juarez

and health coordinator. The district’s website lists the employee as Leticia Ibarra. The athletic booster club’s president also serves as the district’s director of transportation. As per the MCISD booster club guidelines, the president is supposed to meet with the treasurer to review the organization’s financial position. The director of transportation is listed as Carlos Lerma. Lerma is also Ibarra’s brother-in-law. The volleyball program at Veterans Memorial is headed by Carlos Lerma’s wife, Norma Lerma, who is Ibarra’s sister. MCISD spokesman Craig Verley said new officer forms for the 2015-2016 school year have not been submitted yet. In addition, the parents

fter an eight-week regionwide initiative, 85 arrests were made for parents who neglected to pay child support, 51 of those arrests were in Hidalgo County. Hidalgo County Sheriff’s deputies teamed up with investigators from the Texas Attorney General’s office for Operation Reveille, known statewide as Operation Endeavor Armadillo. The search took place in four counties – Hidalgo,

Council approves $101 million budget

By Kathy Olivarez The Mission City Council approved a budget of $101,838,067 for the fiscal year 2015-2016 in its Monday, Sept. 14, meeting. This includes a general budget of $44,529,135 and a utility budget of $26,181,525. It also includes a golf course fund budget of $1,157,133 and a capital golf course budget of $59,165. The solid waste budget amounts to $5,736,074. The special revenue fund budget amounts to $8,694,369, while the capital projects budget was set at $8,173,254. The budget for group health is $3,844,958 while the debt service budget is $3,472,554. In other action, the council approved an ad valorem tax rate of $0.4988 per $100 property valuation, which includes a total of $0.988 for the interest and sinking fund and $0.4000 for the maintenance and operations fund. Mission Economic Development Authority was granted a budget appropriation of $228,200. Jesse Lerma, civil service manager for the city, said under an agreement, the Mission Fire Department received pay increas-

es. A firefighting cadet starts at a base salary of $25,000. Entry-level firefighters receive $37,000 and that rises to $42,048 after the probationary period ends. Salaries increase based on level of duties to $57,220 for the fire marshal and deputy fire chiefs, who receive $57,220. In addition to these base salaries, firemen receive a longevity pay of $60 per year up to a maximum of $1,200. Seniority pay starts with those at three to four years of service receiving $2,500 and continues rising to $15,000 annually for those with 19 or more years of service. Certification pay ranges from $2,000 to $3,000 annually. Education pay ranges from $400 per year for those with 30 college hours to $1,600 for college graduates holding a bachelor’s degree. Firefighters who have specialized training, such as special operations (dive, Haz-mat, and fire prevention training), will receive an additional $1,500 to $4,000 per year. Lerma also presented the updated salaries for police officers working in Mission. A police cadet starts at $25,000 a year. An entry-level officer

See COUNCIL 10

This Week

Mims Elementary opened for classes More than 500 students and 30 teachers took over the 32-classroom building. The students at Mims had been assigned to Bryan and Pearson schools while construction was finished. Local educator was named to post Rebecca Hamlen, marketing and distributive education teacher at Mission High School, has been elected Area 4 president of the Marketing and Distributive Education Teachers Association.

Sullivan City man faces charges in 2-year-old’s death

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By Julie Silva

Regional operation nets 51 arrests in Hidalgo County

By Lea Victoria Juarez

30 Years Ago

25-year-old Sullivan City man has been charged with capital murder in connection to the death of a 2-year-old boy. Hidalgo County Sheriff Eddie Guerra said the boy died Saturday, Sept. 5, after his mother brought him to La Joya Police Department for help. Fire department personnel performed CPR and he was taken to a local hospital, where he was pronounced dead. Guerra said an autopsy showed signs of physical abuse. He refused to give details but said the autopsy revealed a history of past abuse. The sheriff said the mother’s boyfriend, Juan Del Toro, was the last person with the boy while he

was alive. The mother left the two alone at a home in the 1900 block of Huisache Street while she went to the store. When pulled in for questioning Sept. 12, Guerra said Del Toro implicated himself, stating that he tried to perform CPR on the boy, and when that didn’t work, Del Toro went to a neighbor for help, but the neighbor wasn’t home. When the boys’ mother came home, she noticed the child not breathing and that’s when they took him to La Joya Police Department. Guerra said the boy’s mother will not be charged in connection to the death. Del Toro has been charged with capital murder. If convicted, he faces either life in prison or the death penalty.

VMHS athletics called into question

A group of parents from Veterans Memorial High School expressed concerns about the athletic booster in a public comment at the Sept. 9 school board meeting. The parents questioned the quality of fairness within the organization, among concerns about the volleyball program. The most recent guidelines for parents and booster organizations for Mission CISD state that an employee of the district cannot serve in a financial capacity of a parent/booster for the school at which they work. However, Veterans Memorial High School’s athletic booster club treasurer is also MCISD’s physical education

also alleged they suspect meal vouchers for the volleyball team’s on-the-road games might have been forged. Verley said no one from the district would comment on the matter, but the following statement was released. “Mission CISD is aware of concerns raised by parents regarding the volleyball program at Veterans Memorial High School and has taken appropriate actions. School officials are not at liberty to address specifics with members of the media. However, officials will continue to work directly with those involved to focus on moving forward, and providing a positive and successful season for the student athletes at VMHS.”

While the VMHS team was playing at McAllen Memorial High School on Aug. 8, Maribel DeLuna was granted permission to take her daughter Alexandra Jimenez home by signing her out with the coach, she said. Later on, a teammate told Jimenez that she saw her signature on the meal voucher form, but Jimenez had not signed the form because she went home with her mother that day. Smiley Contreras said he also signed his daughter out on Aug. 8. “Come to find later that my daughter’s signature was on the meal voucher as if she had eaten with the team. She didn’t,” Amanda Contreras

See VMHS 5


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opinion By Ed Sterling Texas Press Association

STATE CAPITAL HIGHLIGHTS

USTIN — Gov. Greg Abbott traveled to Mexico last week to meet with President Enrique Peña Nieto and other officials in Mexico City. On Sept. 8, the governor’s office announced an agreement between the Texas Department of Transportation and the Ministry of Communications and Transportation of the United Mexican States “to promote and increase bilateral collaboration on future border infrastructure projects.” Also announced was the creation of an energy task force “to foster economic growth on both sides of the border by finding new and innovative energy solutions.” Abbott said the agreements signify Texas’ and Mexico’s “intent to expand highway infrastructure, encourage economic development and facilitate bilateral trade on both sides of the border.” The governor’s office quoted Claudia Ruiz Massieu, Mexico’s secretary of foreign affairs, who said “such a deep and diverse relationship as the one Mexico and Texas share flourishes when there is communication and mutual understanding. Governor Abbott´s visit reflects the will to take that path.” On Sept. 6, the governor’s office announced that in 2014, Texas exported more than $100 billion in machinery, technology and other commodities to Mexico, about 35 percent of the state’s total exports. Perry suspends campaign Rick Perry suspended his campaign for the presidency on Sept. 11. Perry, who served as governor of Texas from 2001 to 2015, made the announcement at a rally of the conser-

vative Eagle Forum in Missouri. Perry’s first run for the presidency was in 2012. Mitt Romney, a former governor of Massachusetts, won the Republican Party’s nomination and lost to Democrat Barack Obama in the general election. Comptroller begins tour Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar on Sept. 8 announced plans for a 27-city, twomonth “Good For Texas” tour, during which he will meet with local officials and citizens to talk about the future of the Texas economy. First stops were in New Braunfels and Kerrville on Sept. 9. Plans are for Hegar to visit every economic region of the state before his last stop in El Paso on Nov. 9. Hegar said that since taking office on Jan. 2 he has “emphasized efforts to increase transparency and accountability at the state’s chief financial agency, while improving customer service. The town hall tour is intended to facilitate those efforts and help keep Texans informed of economic issues in their own backyards.” Sales tax revenue is down Comptroller Hegar on Sept. 10 reported state sales tax revenue in August was $2.6 billion, down 0.4 percent compared to August 2014. “The slight decline in sales tax revenue was due to reduced receipts from oil and gas-related sectors, offset by growth from other sectors,” Hegar explained. Higher collections from retail trade, restaurants and services indicated continued growth in consumer spending, while receipts from construction also grew, he added. Cities, counties, transit systems and special purpose taxing districts will receive

$638.1 million in local sales tax allocations for September, an increase of 1.7 percent compared to September 2014. Texas’ fiscal year ended Aug. 31. Hegar said “All Funds” revenue for the year finished at $109.5 billion, slightly less than the $109.7 billion projected in the comptroller’s Biennial Revenue Estimate. Also, sales tax revenue for the year was 0.6 percent below estimate, at $28.9 billion. The forecast was $29.07 billion. Energy chief applauds ruling David Porter, chair of the Texas Railroad Commission, applauded a ruling last week by U.S. District Court for the Western District of Texas that overturned the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s listing of the lesser prairie chicken as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Two months ago, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reported an abundance of spring rainfall and ongoing management efforts helped increase the lesser prairie chicken’s population about 25 percent from 2014 to 2015. Cucumber warning issued Texas Department of State Health Services on Sept. 4 warned that recalled cucumbers may be contaminated with Salmonella. Certain cucumbers that entered the market in various states including Texas were sold under the brand name “Limited Edition.” “This type of cucumber is dark green, typically seven to 10 inches long and usually sold in bulk bins and may not be easily identified by label or sticker. People should talk to their retailer or supplier about whether their cucumbers were part of the recall,” the health department suggested.

September 18, 2015

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NEWS | SPORTS | ENTERTAINMENT | PHOTOS

McAllen may spend $2.5 M on presidential debate By Davis Rankin FUTURO McAllen McAllen City Commission Monday, Sept. 14, 2015 ot many people showed up to comment on the budget at the regular McAllen City Commission meeting on Monday, but there’ll be another chance to speak later in the month. Commissioners held a public hearing on their proposed budget for next year (10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016), a contingent of Valley Interfaith members showed up and three of their members addressed commissioners on the proposed spending of $2.5 million on a 2016 presidential debate at the convention center. Spokesman Frank Perez asked how spending that much money on a debate will benefit the “sick, those without transportation, those who cannot afford housing and our precious children who need after school programs?” No one besides Perez and Ninfa Guerra spoke on the budget, or on the $0.4763 tax rate proposed for next year.

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That’s 47.63 cents per hundred dollars of property valuation, the same as last year. After the public hearing, City Manager Roy Rodriguez hastened to explain that McAllen would spend the money only if awarded a debate and only if it can be reimbursed to the tune of 90%. In the interest of full disclosure, Nedra Kinerk, the president of FUTURO McAllen, also spoke on behalf of the organization, praising the 3 percent staff pay raise in the document as well as the city keeping up police staffing levels and adding that they need to keep working to make it easier for builders and remodelers to “do business” with the city. The next opportunity to talk to commissioners about the budget is set for Monday, Sept. 21, at 5 pm, at McAllen city hall. We’ll have more on the budget later in the month. For gluttons for punishment, you can go online to mcallen.net, go to the Government drop down tab, then Management and Budget under Departments, scroll down and there is a button to click on for all 1,000 pages. Contracts the let

Young baseball players are a little closer to playing on the new fields voters approved in the 2013 bond election. Commissioners agreed to a professional services contract with ROFA Architects, Inc., of McAllen, to design 12 fields at 29th Street and 5 Mile Line. ROFA will get 7.5% of the construction cost, or $750,000. Commissioners also agreed to share costs with Hidalgo County to widen to five lanes Mile 5 (Auburn) from Taylor to Ware Roads, and to widen Monte Cristo Road from Ware Road east to North 10th Street. A sad time The meeting began on a somber note, with the declaration of Monday, Sept. 14, 2015, as Scott C. Crane Day. Crane was first elected to District 1 (northeast and north McAllen) in 2001 and was last re-elected in 2013. An organizer of the McAllen holiday season marathon, Crane collapsed and later died during the December 2014 event. Crane left a wife, Sasha, and daughter Taylor and son Diego, who were present to view a short video tribute.

Abbott visits VA Health Care Center

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ov. Greg Abbott visited the VA Health Care Center and the University of Texas Health Science Center in Harlingen to discuss ways to expand healthcare options for veterans in the Rio Grande Valley. Abbott participated in a roundtable discussion with U.S. Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert McDonald, U.S. Sen. John Cornyn, and members of the Texas congressio-

nal delegation. “Men and women who have put their lives on the line to fight for freedom in this country have bled, sweated and toiled for the freedom that we all enjoy today. Yet, they are stuck in waiting lines, unable to get appointments, some even losing their lives, not on foreign battlefields, but waiting for access to healthcare that was promised to them as part of their service

to protect our freedoms,” Abbott said. “Today is a step toward solving those problems. Our veterans have waited too long. Their care and their need is too high. The time is now when we can come together in this state, in the United States Military, in Congress, and in the Obama administration to work to serve our men and women who have served us by giving them the urgent care they need.”

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1217 N. Conway • Mission, TX (956) 585-4893 MEMBER 2015

TEXAS PRESS ASSOCIATION

The Progress Times (USPS 971-420; ISSN 0890-2666) is published each Friday by Mission Publishing Co., 1217 N. Conway, Mission, Texas 78572, (956) 585-4893. Subscriptions $20 annual in Hidalgo County; $25 outside of Hidalgo County. Second class postage paid in Mission, Texas 78572. ©2015 Mission Publishing Company, Inc. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the PROGRESS TIMES, P.O. Box 399, Mission Texas 78573.

LETTER GUIDELINES

Letters to the Editor are welcome but must conform to certain guidelines. All letters must be original, dated, signed and bear the complete name, address and phone number of the writer/signer. No photo copied letters will be printed. No letters addressed to others will be printed. Letter content must be relevant to concerns and interests of Mission and the surrounding area. Relevance is determined by the editor. Anonymous cards or letters are neither read nor printed. Letters may be submitted by e-mail to letters@progresstimes.net, but must include the author’s name and daytime phone number.


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Top VA official welcomes collaboration Mission to discuss food trucks once and for all with UTRGV to serve Valley veterans

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By Kathy Olivarez

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By Gail Fagan cALLEN – U.S. Army veteran Frank Martinez was one of nearly 300 veterans who traveled to McAllen’s Veteran’s War Memorial on Monday to hear from U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert A. McDonald. McDonald was on his first trip to the Rio Grande Valley – home to more than 40,000 of the state’s 1.6 million veterans. Martinez, who works as a program coordinator for the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley’s Veteran Services Center, served two tours in Iraq. A UT Pan American alumnus and current UTRGV graduate student in rehabilitation counseling, he was pleased to see McDonald visiting the Valley. “I appreciate his coming down here and identifying the Valley as a place that is not just in need but deserving of additional, and more thorough, services,” Martinez said. McDonald was invited to the Valley by U.S. Sen. John Cornyn, who accompanied him earlier in the day on a visit to the UTRGV Regional Academic Health Center in Harlingen, along with Texas Gov. Greg Abbott and members of the Valley Congressional delegation. Also participating in Harlingen were UTRGV Founding President Guy Bailey; Francisco Fernandez, founding dean of UTRGV’s School of Medicine (via teleconference); and Dr. Leonel Vela, UTRGV’s School of Medicine senior associate dean for education. While there, officials participated in a roundtable discussion about UTRGV’s plans for the medical school and toured the

UTRGV Simulation Center, located on the second floor of the VA’s Outpatient Clinic in Harlingen. McDonald, a U.S. Army veteran and former CEO of Proctor & Gamble, told veterans and community leaders – assembled at the memorial and at a luncheon at the McAllen Convention Center hosted by the McAllen Chamber of Commerce – that the Department of Veterans Affairs is working hard to clear its backlogs and improve its customer service. “Nevertheless, if we have one in the backlog, it is one too many,” McDonald said. Having adequate space, and providers, is critical to giving veterans proper access to care, so establishing partnerships with medical schools like the UTRGV School of Medicine, which is pending accreditation, is essential, he said. “The best doctors we have who typically work in the medical schools and the VA simultaneously do all three legs. They do research with us. They also teach in the medical school and in the hospital through residencies. And, third, they do clinical work. So those relationships are critically important,” McDonald said. “I talked with the dean this morning about how we

VMHS said. “(District representatives) already asked my daughter, they pulled her out of class at school – the investigator with the school district – and she confirmed that was not her signature.” DeLuna said she request-

could create a stronger relationship and a broad relationship with the medical school here.” He said partnerships with hospitals and the School of Medicine are the better way to serve the health care that veterans need and deserve now, rather than building a new inpatient facility here, as many veterans locally have requested. “In the federal government, if we started building a hospital today, it wouldn’t be built for a minimum of five years,” he said. “We want to focus on the objective of making sure that the veterans get the care they have already earned.” Homer Gallegos, an Air Force veteran who served in Vietnam and received both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from UT Pan American, is optimistic that veterans will be better served with the creation of the UTRGV School of Medicine. “Having a medical school in the area is certainly a big plus for education, for our youth and for the veteran community,” said Gallegos, who worked as a VA readjustment counselor before retiring and is now a VFW post commander. “The 20-county South Texas region has more than 70,000 veterans and is rich in history and service to

ission Mayor Beto Salinas once again protested the use of food trucks within the city during discussion of a conditional use permit to allow a Valeria’s Tacos mobile food unit at 1801 W. Griffin parkway in the Southern Oaks Subdivision. Salinas said the mobile food units unfairly compete with restaurant owners who pay property taxes to the city by offering lower prices for the same goods. City Manager Martin Garza pointed out the mobile units do pay sales tax to the city, but Salinas stood by his position that the mobile units were unfair competition to business owners who pay property taxes within the city and said he wanted the item tabled so city officials could decide once and for all how they were going to handle the requests. Councilman Ruben Plata said he did not believe the mobile units were safe for customers. Plata said often the area around the mobile unit is not clean and the units were located too close to the

streets for safety. He agreed with the mayor that the city needed to put a stop to their use. Councilwoman Norie Garza wanted to take another look at the ordinance that allows their use within the city, and the item was tabled for further consideration. A C-2 zoning request by Dan and Martha Hamilton for a lot on Shary Road that was denied at the planning and zoning level also brought controversy to the council. Dan Hamilton read a letter to the council, pointing out several sites along Shary Road that are already zoned commercial. However, most of the sites he mentioned were at the intersection of Business 83, FM 495 or other major roads. The lot he wants to rezone was in the middle of what is now a strictly residential area. Salinas said eventually all of Shary Road would be mostly commercial, but he realized the location of the lot in question was in a residential area. Councilwoman Garza said she would prefer to grant a C-1 zoning that would limit uses to primarily offices.

The C-2 zone offers other uses that are not suitable for a residential area, she said. At Garza’s suggestion, the council voted to approve the rezoning request but making it only C-1 instead of C-2 zoning. In other action, Armando Requenez was nominated for the Hidalgo County Appraisal District Board of Directors. Hollis Rutledge was authorized to provide grant-writing services for the city on a local border security grant application. The Mission Police Department was authorized to accept a $42,000 crime victim’s services grant. During citizens’ participation, a group of 15 people, relatives of people who were killed in the Valley, were present to express how important the services were as they supported “A Day of Remembrance for Murder Victims.” The Mission Police Department was authorized to purchase one new police car and all equipment needed for it at a cost of $36,277.70. Funds will come from the current Stonegarden Grant.

See UTRGV 10 from pg 3

ed a copy of the form from that date, but she said Athletic Coordinator David Gilpin told her the district would handle the situation. “I have seen the principal, the athletic director, the superintendent,” DeLuna said

in the public comment. “I’ve gone around in circles and have not received any help. We are coming here to you to try to see if you all can help us before we decide to take further action.”

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Undefeated Diamondbacks look to go 4-0

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By Doug Young hat a difference a year makes. Though Pioneer High School had a decent season in 2014 for a first year program, the return of many starters this year has been a plus for the 2015 edition of the Diamondbacks. Reflecting on last week’s 16-13 rain-dampened road win over Corpus Christi Ray, head coach Jason Wheeler said “The guys played well against Ray. We have a lot of returning starters, and they’re a lot more mature than they were last year.” A large part of the success at Ray was the defense. With a half-time lead of 167, Wheeler’s kids stepped up the intensity and protected that lead. “Ray’s strength is their run and we pretty much shut down their running attack,” said Wheeler. “There’s no doubt the win in

Corpus Christi was the best win we’ve had in the program so far. We expect to do as well against La Feria.” But, overconfidence is something Wheeler is aware of, and he’s told his team they have to guard against that. While in Corpus Christi, the Diamondbacks played a 6A team with more depth than Pioneer. The Ray game may have been his team’s best effort, but Wheeler is right to bring up the oldest cliché in football. “We have to be sure we play one game at a time.” And the Lions present some problems for Pioneer. Last year, La Feria handed the Diamondbacks a 28-13 loss, despite being a smaller 4A team. “I wouldn’t call it a revenge game,” said Wheeler, “but I think we have some motivation to win this year. We certainly can do better than we did last year.” With a quarterback who

can throw well and can scramble when flushed from the pocket, the Lions also have two very good receivers. La Feria will present a different challenge than CC Ray’s run oriented attack and should keep both the defensive line and the defensive backs busy. The Diamondbacks have played two of their three games on the road so far, and it will also be good to be back in front of the home crowd. Alex Ramirez will again start under center. The senior quarterback has improved in each game and has become a solid leader. However, the cautious Wheeler added “We do need to take care of the ball a little better than we did against Corpus Christi Ray.” The La Feria game is the last tune-up for Pioneer before district play begins. Kickoff is at 7:30 tonight at Richard Thompson Stadium.

Veterans Memorial’s Adam Solis fights off a Juarez-Lincoln defender as he catches a 23-yard touchdown reception during the first quarter of the Patriots’ 52-14 win over the Juarez-Lincoln Huskies Saturday. Progress Times photo by Luciano Guerra

Lobos and Gladiators set to battle

Palmview’s Arturo Gutierrez scores the Lobos’ second touchdown of the game during their 50 – 26 win over the PSJA SW Javelinas last Thursday evening. Progress Times photo by Luciano Guerra

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By Luciano Guerra or more than 650 years, people flocked to arenas across the Roman Empire to watch armed and highly trained gladiators engage in combat that oftentimes resulted in death. Contests were typically single combat between two men of similar size and experience. In some cases, however, referees oversaw the action and would stop the battle as soon as one of the participants was seriously wounded. Tonight, the 3-0 Roma Gladiators will be marching into La Joya ISD Stadium to battle the 2-1 Palmview Lobos. While the stakes will not be as high as they were in ancient Rome, the combatants on both sides of the field will have at least two things in common with the original gladiators. They will all be highly trained and armed – not with harpoons, swords or tridents but with size, strength and speed. One of the Lobos’ deadliest weapons so far this season has been running back Joel Pina. In just three games Pina has run for nearly 700 yards and scored 11 touchdowns. When asked what the secret to his success has been Pina said, “What I’ve been doing is showing up for weights…weights, weights

and that’s all I do. That’s really helped me a lot. Having the big offensive line we have helps too. They go hard and we go hard; that’s teamwork.” With three touchdowns scored so far this season, senior wide receiver Damian Quintanilla has been one of Lobos’ quarterback Andrew Puente’s favorite targets. As a third-year varsity player, Quintanilla who had seven receptions for 101 yards in the Lobos’ 35-34 overtime loss to Rio Grande City last week, has seen the Lobos go from a 1-9 team just two years ago to bi-district champions last year. Such a dramatic turnaround in just one season is not something that happens every day. Quintanilla credits the Lobos’ sudden success to two things. “It’s all about work ethic and a desire to win,” Quintanilla said. “The players we have right now all want to make history. We all remember how good things went last year and how it felt. We have a lot of seniors on this team and we’ve been talking about this moment since we were freshmen.” Having been part of the first Lobos team to qualify for the playoffs, Quintanilla shared how he and his teammates are out to surpass last year’s success.

“We have a lot of goals,” Quintanilla said. “One of our goals is to win the district championship. This is something that we’ve been talking about since our freshman year. We get together after games to talk about how we did and that is one thing we talk about.” While the Lobos are hoping to make the undefeated Roma Gladiators their next victims, Palmview head football coach Margarito “Mage” Requenez knows they will be going toe-to-toe against a worthy opponent tonight. “We know they’re tough,” Requenez said. “They have an outstanding running back just like we do. It’s going to come down to who executes and who can stop who first.” The Gladiators three wins this season came against La Joya (16-7), Laredo Cigarroa (34-3) and Uvalde (3013). The Lobos conquered Brownsville Lopez (53-7) and PSJA SW (50-26) to open their non-district schedule before falling to the Rio Grande City Rattlers (35-34) in overtime last week. Last year, the two eventual bi-district champs’ head-to-head Week 4 battle ended in a 7-7 tie. Tonight’s game is scheduled to kickoff at La Joya ISD Stadium at 7:30.


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Veterans Memorial Patriots storm past Juarez-Lincoln Huskies

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he Veterans Memorial Patriots improved their record to 2-1 by defeating the now 1-2 Juarez-Lincoln Huskies by a score of 52-14 at Tom Landry Stadium Saturday afternoon. The game, which was originally scheduled to be played under the Friday night lights, was postponed until Saturday afternoon, like so many others across the Valley, due to the thunderstorms that moved through our area Friday night. Surprisingly enough it

was the Huskies that struck lightning-quick when just 1:15 into the game Luis Jasso intercepted a Diego Hernandez pass and ran it back 63-yards for a touchdown. However the Patriots would go on to rain down 52 unanswered points on the Huskies, with the help of six Hernandez touchdown passes completed to four different receivers. Patriots that scored on touchdown passes from Hernandez were Buda Gonzalez (5-yards), Adam Solis (23

and 19-yards), Bobby Tovar (81-yards) and Roman De Leon (4 and 7-yards). The Patriots’ two other touchdowns were scored on a 75yard run down the sideline by Solis and a 41-yard interception return by Matthew Guerrero. The Huskies lone offensive touchdown of the game was scored by Livan Pequeno on a 75-yard run up the middle of the Patriots’ otherwise stingy defense with only 1:38 remaining in the game.

After the game Huskies’ head Coach Tomas Garcia credited the Patriots for their play while accepting the blame for his team’s failure to execute. “Obviously they outplayed us in all three phases of the game,” shared Garcia. “It’s my coaches’ and my responsibility to get our players ready and they weren’t ready today. We never like these rain-delayed games but we’re not going to use that as an excuse. The bottom line is that they executed when they

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scheduled to travel to Laredo to play the 2-1 Alexander Bulldogs. The Bulldogs opened their season with a 25-21 loss to the Alice Coyotes but have since bounced back with wins over Laredo Martin (24-14) and Laredo Nixon (6-0). Last year, the Bulldogs eked out a 36-35 win over the Rattlers making it the only non-playoff loss an Adame coached Rattlers team has suffered prior to this season. Whether Sharyland will be able to avenge that loss should be a good indicator as to what kind of season lies ahead for Rattlers’ fans. Veterans Memorial at PSJA North The Veterans Memorial Patriots will be closing out their non-district schedule tonight on the road against the PSJA North Raiders. Having already racked up impressive wins over Mission (23-2) and Juarez-Lincoln (52-14) and losing to the sixtime state champions Odessa Permian Panthers (63-7), the Patriots will be looking to improve to 3-1 against all 6A competition, going into their bye next week. Coming off a 4-2 District 31-6A season in which they qualified for the playoffs, the Raiders opened this season with a 78-26 rout of the PSJA Bears. They have since followed that up with back-toback losses to the Veterans Memorial Chargers (49-31) and the Los Fresnos Falcons (27-13). Last year, the Patriots defeated the Raiders in Week 4, 47-29. With this being their last game before their crucial matchup with the Sharyland

Rattlers in two weeks, the Patriots will be looking to go into that game on a roll. Therefore, look for quarterback Diego Hernandez, who threw six touchdown passes against the Huskies last week, and his talented core of teammates to go all out for the win tonight. Edinburg at Mission The Mission Eagles are still looking for the right formula to regain the respectability Eagles’ teams of the past have earned. Their 1810 win over the Donna North Chiefs last week was a step in the right direction but defeating a second-year, and still winless, Chiefs team is

not in-and-of-itself anything to crow about. While a win is a win, a better indicator of whether the Eagles are on the right track will be how they fare against the Edinburg Bobcats tonight. At 0-3 thus far, the Bobcats are not exactly a powerhouse, but like the Eagles, they are a long-established program with a long tradition of success. Their 2-0 win over Mission in Week 4 last year should have the Eagles looking for payback and should be all the motivation they need to make the Bobcats sorry they ever stepped onto the turf at Tom Landry Stadium.

Rattlers, Patriots and Eagles seeking back-to-back wins

By Luciano Guerra oing into Week 4 of Valley high school football, the 3-0 Pioneer Diamondbacks are the only undefeated Big 7 team. The Lobos and the Patriots, both 2-1, are the only two other Big 7 teams with winning records, while the Rattlers, Eagles, Huskies and Coyotes all emerged from Week 3 at 1-2. With the Huskies and the Coyotes both scheduled to play last night (after presstime), the remaining five teams will be taking to the gridiron tonight – barring any weather related postponements or cancellations. Here is a preview of three of those games: Sharyland at Laredo Alexander Just three games into their schedule, the Rattlers have already lost as many if not more games than they’ve lost in each of their past six seasons. The good news is that those losses will have absolutely no effect on their district standing or playoff chances. The bad news is that their 1-2 record is an indication that for the first time in Ron Adame’s tenure as head football coach the Rattlers are no longer one of the Valley’s elite teams. Does that mean that the Rattlers will not be in the thick of District 31-5A’s playoff race? Most certainly not; however, it does mean that for the first time since 2011, Sharyland will most likely not be entering the playoffs as district champions. Tonight, the Rattlers are

Prep Schedule Non-District Football – Sep. 17/18 7:00 p.m. La Joya High at Weslaco East (Thurs) Juarez-Lincoln at Edinburg Economedes(Thurs)7:00 p.m. 7:30 p.m. Roma @ Palmview High Edinburg High at Mission High 7:30 p.m. Sharyland High at Laredo Alexander 7:30 p.m. La Feria at Sharyland Pioneer 7:30 p.m. Veterans Memorial at PSJA North 7:30 p.m. Saturday Volleyball – Sep. 19 Sharyland Pioneer at Vela La Joya High at Palmview Juarez-Lincoln at McAllen Memorial Roma at Veterans Memorial Sharyland High at Laredo United* *Non-district Game

12:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m.

Tuesday Volleyball – Sep. 22 Mission High at La Joya High Palmview at Nikki Rowe McAllen High at Juarez-Lincoln Sharyland High at Roma Veterans Memorial at Sharyland Pioneer

6:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.

had to and we didn’t.” The Patriots’ win came one week after a lopsided loss to the famed Odessa Permian Panthers. With that loss still fresh in their minds, the Patriots seemed to take their frustrations out on the Huskies Saturday. “We had some questions to answer about ourselves as far as how we were going to respond after last week’s loss,” Veterans Memorial head football coach David Gilpin said. “At the end

of the day we got our tails whooped by that bunch so it was up to us to respond. We didn’t have our tails between our legs after that game and while the score was not very good, the positives we took out of it far outweigh the negatives.” “It was still going to be a challenge to get back on the horse that threw us last week and see how we would respond; and our kids did well,” added Gilpin.


lifestyle Events Calendar

September 18 – Raul Garza, park ranger at the Santa Ana Wildlife Refuge, will head a program on native reptile and amphibian species in the Valley and the role they play in the ecosystem at the Edinburg World Birding Center, 714 S. Raul Longoria Rd. Admission is free. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. for the 6 p.m. program. Call 381-9922 for information. September 19 – The Aglow International McAllen Community Lighthouse will host a complimentary Prayer Breakfast from 9:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. This month’s speaker is Evangelist Hector L. Barreiro. He was ordained to the ministry from Iglesia International, La Nueva Esperanza in Reynosa, Mexico in 1997 under the pastorship of Melvin Leslie. For location and directions, call Criselda Alvarado, president, at 534-7941. September 19 – The next International Museum of Art & Science (IMAS) Scout Workshops will focus on requirements for the Boy Scout weather merit badge from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and the Webelos scientist badge from 1 to 4 p.m. All workshops are led by certified merit badge counselors. Program capacity is 25 scouts. Admission rates are $5 for IMAS members and $10 for nonmembers. Call 682-0123 to register. IMAS is located at Nolana and Bicentennial in McAllen. September 19 – The Edinburg World Birding Center, 714 S. Raul Longoria Rd., will host “Animal Tracks Detectives” from 2 to 4 p.m. for a clue-finding program to learn about animals and their footprint tracks. Fee for this program is $3 for adults, $2 for senior citizens, students, and children, and ages 5 and under free. Call ahead to register at 381-9922. September 19 – Celebrate National Public Lands Day volunteers are invited to lend a hand to clean up trash and debris at the Bahia Grande Unit of Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge from 8 to 11 a.m. Families, school groups, scouts and individuals are encouraged to attend. The clean-up will take place at the paved parking area five miles south of Port Isabel off State Highway 48. Participants are asked to bring gloves and a water bottle, water refills and trash bags will be provided. To register a large group, or for more information, contact Ranger Mason at 748-3607, Ext. 119. September 20 – The public is invited to “Coffee with the Curators,” an informal visit with the curatorial staff in the Museum of South Texas History Grand Lobby at 2 p.m. for an open exchange with curatorial staff members: Lisa Adam, collections curator and registrar; Phyllis Kinnison, archivist; and Melissa Peña, archival assistant. There will be an introduction to the museum’s latest temporary display, “Caretakers of Heritage: Hispanic Families of South Texas” open through Oct. 7. The program is included in the regular museum admission price. September 26 – The International Museum of Art & Science annual “Collage: Legacy of Service” celebrates 37 years as a fundraiser for the museum. It runs from 6 p.m. to midnight at the museum, 1900 Nolana in McAllen. Cost is $150 for IMAS members and $175 for nonmembers. Tickets include valet parking, dinner and the Après Fête (After Party). Call 682-0123 or stop by the museum to purchase tickets. September 26 – The Edinburg World Birding Center is hosting a Native Plant Day & Sale from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. with experts giving presentations on creating butterfly gardens and landscaping with native plants. There will also be a plant walk. Admission is free. The EWBC is located at 714 S. Raul Longoria Rd. Call 381-9922 for information. September 29 – The annual Empty Bowls event, benefitting the Food Bank of the Rio Grande Valley, runs from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Boggus Ford Events Center, 3000 N. Cage in Pharr. There will be food from over 40 restaurats, mystery boxes, drawings, live music and more. Presale ticket are $25 and available at foodbankrgv.com or at 724 N. Cage Blvd., Pharr. Tickets at the door will be $30. October October 1 – Explore the prehistoric world with Session II of the Dinosaur Survival Series challenge at the Edinburg World Birding Center. This week continues the series with “Roughing it: How to Survive in Prehistoric Times.” Participants must attend one of the first three sessions to qualify for the challenge overall. Registration is required for each date, and the fee is $2 per person, per course. It is recommended for ages 10 and up, but ages 6 and up will be allowed to participate. Call 381-9922 to register or visit www.EdinburgWBC.org for information. October 2 – The 26th Annual 4-H Country Hoedown begins at 6 p.m. at Las Palmas Race Park in Mission. The evening includes a concert featuring Roger Creager, dinner, live auction and drawings to raise money for scholarship funds for Hidalgo County 4-H seniors. To purchase individual tickets or a table for 10 or to donate an auction item or to make a monetary donation, contact Mary Kelley at 929-4767 or via email at 4hfoundation@gmail.com. To see an extended Events Calendar for the coming weeks, go to www.progresstimes.net.

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NEWS | SPORTS | ENTERTAINMENT | PHOTOS

Beach cleanup set for Sept. 26 A USTIN – Volunteers are signing up now for the nation’s biggest coastal cleanup on Saturday, Sept. 26. The 2015 Texas General Land Office Adopt-A-Beach Fall Cleanup takes place at 30 of Texas’

most popular tourist beaches. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m., and clean-up will be from 9 a.m. to noon. Volunteers can sign up online at www.texasadoptabeach.org. Each volunteer will be given data cards, gloves,

pencils and trash bags. All volunteers are advised to wear closed-toe shoes, bring sunscreen and plenty of drinking water. The Texas General Land Office AdoptA-Beach Cleanups are held rain or shine.

Mission Historical Museum to host TAM retreat

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ISSION – The Mission Historical Museum staff will be hosting the Texas Association of Museums (TAM) council’s annual retreat September 20 to 21. Luis Contreras, MHM director, currently sits as an at-larger member of the council. With other museum professionals from across the state of Texas, the council works toward strengthening the museum community by maintaining the strategic framework designed to nurture and train museum leaders, develop and celebrate the field, and voice the public worth of museums. “This trip to Mission will be a first for the majority of the council members,” said Contreras. “It is important for the council to visit a region with a profound mu-

seum culture and to afford museums the opportunity to meet TAM representatives,” The council will begin on Sunday, Sept. 20, conducting several work sessions at the Riverside Club in Mission finishing with a historical boat tour. On Monday, a special reception for local and neighboring museum professionals will be held at the historic Shary Mansion in Palmhurst followed by the TAM council meeting. The Texas Association of Museums is a nonprofit 501 (c) (3) organization established for educational purposes, to provide a network among museums, to improve the level of professionalism within the museum community, to encourage the use and enjoyment of museums by all Texans, to serve as an information clearinghouse

for and about museums, and to serve as a liaison between museums and museums-related agencies and organizations. “This is an excellent opportunity for Mission to lead by providing such an insightful opportunity for its fellow museum organizations,” said Contreras. “The City of Mission and the Mission Historical Museum board of directors are equally excited to welcome our guests to Mission.” 2 or 3 col cutline— Luis Contreras, Mission Historical Museum director, and the MHM staff are preparing for meetings with museum professionals from across Texas. He is pictured with Ruth Ann Rugg, executive director of the Texas Association of Museums, who will be in attendance.

Juan Guzman, San Antonio; Jose Benito Hernandez Sr., Abram; Cesar Perez, Rio Grande City; Rene Ramirez, Hebbronville; and Luis Valdez, Brownsville. Special recognition will be given to Jose Garza Carreon, Edinburg; Arturo Estrada, Monterrey, N.L., Mexico; Roy Garcia, Los Fresnos; Ponciano Garza, Hebbronville; Felipe Montemayor, Monterrey; Joe Rodriguez, Brownsville; and Francois Romney, Monterrey. The mingling and ceremony is free and open to the public, but a brisket plate lunch, including rice, beans and condiments, will be available for $7 a plate. Water and sodas are $1 each. Funds raised support the next year’s event.

Walk” Sept. 25

44th annual Leo Najo Day is Oct. 3 Take a “Full Moon

T

he 2015 Leo Najo Day celebration, induction ceremony and luncheon will be held on Saturday, Oct. 3, according to Vicente Estevis, organization president. This is the 44th annual event honoring the memory of Leo Najo, Rio Grande Valley baseball legend who was recognized in the United States and Mexico. The Mission Community Center opens at 9 a.m. for mingling with the Valley baseball old-timers and displays of Leo Najo for visitors to view. Mrs. Leo Najo and other family members will be present. Ceremonies begin at 11 a.m. Six ball players will be honored this year: Cesar de la Garza, Brownsville;

M

cALLEN – Celebrate the beginning of the fall season with a Full Moon Walk at Quinta Mazatlan on Fri., Sept. 25, from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. The event will feature a trail walk experience in the moonlight with activities for all ages themed around the creatures of the night and the coming of the full moon. Dr. John Gerling and others will be set up at the end of the trail adventure with scopes to begin the sky observation. Visitors may bring flashlights if they want. Admission is $3 for adults and seniors, $2 for children and ages 4 and under are free. For more information, call 681-3370.

UTRGV receives $240K to help small businesses

By Jennifer L. Berghom up to $1.2 million over the next five years from SBA, D I N B U R G / said Maria Juarez-Serna, asB R O W N S V I L L E sistant executive director of – The University of UTRGV’s Centers for BusiTexas Rio Grande Valley ness Development. announced on Sept. 11 it has The SBA created its received a $240,000 ScaleUp ScaleUp America initiative America award from the U.S. to help small businesses on Small Business Administra- the verge of growth to extion, to help grow existing pand, hire more employees small businesses. UTRGV is and have a greater impact on one of seven recipients of the the local and national econoSBA funding, and one of two mies, according to the Scalein Texas. Up America website. The program begins Sept. UTRGV, through its Cen29. Selected businesses ters for Business Developshould begin training ses- ment, will use the money to sions in January or Febru- provide training, counseling, ary. UTRGV can receive financing and other support

E

to small businesses looking to take their operation to the next level. The program will be available to existing small businesses in Hidalgo County that have existed for at least two years and that have an annual revenue of $150,000 to $500,000, Juarez-Serna said. The Centers for Business Development houses the Small Business Development Center, the Rio South Texas Procurement Technical Assistance Center and the Veterans Business Outreach Center.

2016

Mission/Sharyland Duchess & Princess Anna Pageants 2016 Mission/Sharyland Duchess Contest 1st Week of October 2015

At The Texas Citrus Fiesta Office 220 E. 9th

Application Deadline: September 25, 2015 Duchess must be 16-19 on or before Jan, 31, 2016 Must reside in these areas or attend these school districts.

2016 Princess Anna Pageant Saturday, October 19, 2015

2pm at the Mission Community Center

Application Deadline: Friday, October 5, 2015 Must be 6 years old on or before Jan. 31, 2016. Participants from all over the Rio Grande Valley are encouraged to participate. 5 princesses will be selected to be a part of the 2016 Texas Citrus Royal Court. Call Texas Citrus Fiesta For Information About These Events:

(956) 585-9724


September 18, 2015

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page 9

MCHS students earn AP Scholar Awards

Twelve students at Mission Collegiate High School have earned AP Scholar Awards in recognition of their exceptional achievement on Advanced Placement exams. The College Board’s Advanced Placement Program

provides motivated and academically prepared students with the opportunity to take rigorous, college-level courses while still in high school, and to earn college credit, advanced placement, or both for successful performance on the AP exams.

obituaries

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Celso Cardoza ISSION - Celso Cardoza, 79, passed away on Friday, Sept. 11, 2015, at Doctors Hospital in Edinburg. Mr. Cardoza was born on April 5, 1936, in Mission. Survivors include his wife, Benita Cardoza; children, Juanita Guerra, Rosario Vela, Ricardo Cardoza, Elena Ybarra, Eduardo Cardoza, Julia Colon, Celso Cardoza

Jr., Julio Lopez, Carolina Gonzalez and Corina Cardoza; and 19 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents, Luciano Cardoza and Julia De Luna. A funeral mass was held on Sept. 14 at Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church in Mission. Burial followed at Valley Memorial Gardens in McAllen.

Escolastica Canchola MISSION – A funeral mass for Escolastica Canchola was held on Friday, Sept. 11, 2015, at Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church in Mission. Burial followed at Valley Memorial Gardens in Mission. Donald Hilbery MISSION – A funeral service for Donald Hilbery was held on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015, at First United Methodist Church in Mission. Burial followed at Valley Memorial Gardens in Mission. José Hinojosa MISSION – José Hinojosa, 81, passed away on Sunday, Sept. 13, 2015, at Mission Regional Medical Center. A funeral service was held on Sept. 16 at Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church in Mission. Burial followed at Valley Memorial Gardens in Mission. Donald Lester MISSION – Donald Lester, 81, passed away on Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015, at Senior Care Health and Rehabilitation Center in Edinburg. Cruz Loera MISSION – A funeral service for Cruz Loera was held on Friday, Sept. 11, 2015, at

Ric Brown Family Funeral Home in Mission. Burial followed at Garden of Angels Cemetery in Abram. Irma Martinez MISSION – A funeral service for Irma Martinez was held on Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2015, at Lord and I Funeral Home in Peñitas. Burial followed at Lord and I Cemetery in Palmview. Monica Adriana Martinez ALTON – Monica Adriana Martinez, 31, passed away on Monday, Sept. 14, 2015, at McAllen Medical Center. Her remains were cremated on Sept. 16 at Val Verde Memorial Gardens in Donna.

Notices

All obituaries must be submitted by the funeral home. Obituary notices are run FREE OF CHARGE in the Progress Times if they are submitted in a timely manner to run the same week of the date of death. Otherwise, there is a fee for notices submitted later than the closest possible publication date. Late obituaries will be subject to a $50 charge. Obituaries can be found online and are updated as they are received. Visit www. progresstimes.net to stay current with obituaries and other news that matters to you.

The College Board recognizes several levels of achievement based on students’ performance on AP exams. One student qualified for the AP Scholar with Honor Award. This is granted to students who receive an average score of at least 3.5 on all AP exams taken, and scores of 3 or higher on five or more of the exams. Senior,Dayana Garza Gonzalez, earned the AP Scholar with Honor Award.

ProgressTimes

Eleven students qualified for the AP Scholar Award by completing three or more AP exams with grades of 3 or higher. The AP Scholars in the current senior class are: Jonathan Perez, Bianca Rodriguez, Joselyne Rodriguez, Ismael Trevino, John Espinoza, Monique Martinez, Christian Navejar, Kenya Oyervides. The juniors earning AP Scholar Awards are: Doris Sarabia, Cristina Briseno, Josue Gutierrez.

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ChurCh DireCtory BREAD OF LIFE CHURCH 2820 N. Conway Ave. • 581-1411 CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD 2322 N. McColl. - McAllen 682-2092 CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 5609 S 29th St. - McAllen 682-4881 CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS Missonaries • 580-2570 CHRISTIAN SCIENCE CHURCH 911 N. Main - McAllen 686-4241 CONWAY AVENUE BAPTIST CHURCH 2215 N. Conway • 585-2413 EL FARO BIBLE CHURCH 15 miles W. of Mission on Exp. 83 Sullivan City, TX • 585-5617 EL MESIAS UNITED METHODIST 209 E. 6th • 585-2334 FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH 3 miles N. Shary Rd. • 581-1465 FAITH FELLOWSHIP BIBLE CHURCH 1 mile N. Exp. 83 on Tom Gill Rd. 519-6311 FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 1302 Doherty • 585-1442 FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH 12th and Miller - Mission 585-7281 FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 1102 Ash St. • 585-4829 for worship schedule.

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 1101 Doherty • 585-1665

NORTH MISSION CHURCH OF CHRIST 1410 E. Mile 3 Rd. • 585-0146 Palmhurst

FREEDOM LIFE CHURCH 2214 W. Griffin Pkwy. • 519-7000 Mission

NORTH PALMVIEW APOSTOLIC CHURCH 7612 W. 6 Mile Ln.

GRACIA DIVINA MINISTRY 11809 N. Shary Rd. • 584-3112

ONLY THRU JESUS 1511 E. Mile 2 Rd. Mission • 918-760-1625

GREAT OAKS COMMUNITY CHURCH 2722 N. Conway • 451-5500 Mission IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL SEPTIMO DIA 1725 W. Griffin Parkway 581-9008 IGLESIA BAUTISTA BETANIA 851 S. Breyfogle Rd. • 585-5688 IGLESIA BAUTISTA CRISTO EL REY 1600 E. Bus. 83 - Mission IGLESIA BAUTISTA COLONIAL 3713 N. La Homa Rd. • 585-5332 IGLESIA BAUTISTA DEL VALLE 217 W. Mile 3 Rd. • 424-1602 Palmhurst IGLESIA DEL PUEBLO 7500 West Expressway 83 581-1900 IGLESIA DEL DIVINO REDENTOR 1020 North Los Ebanos Rd 585-5898 LA RESPUESTA CHURCH 405 W. 12th Street • 585-0787 MISSION CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 1 mi. E. 495 • 585-6683 NEW HOPE AT THE BORDER 905 N. Conway • 369-3603

OUR LADY QUEEN OF ANGELS One-half mile South Leo Avenue La Joya • 585-5223 OUR LADY OF FATIMA CHURCH 6634 El Camino Real • Granjeno OUR LADY OF LOURDES CHURCH 2.5 miles S. Conway (FM 1016) Mission OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE CATHOLIC CHURCH 620 Dunlap • 585-2623 OUR LADY OF THE HOLY ROSARY CHURCH 923 Matamoros St. • 581-2193

RIVER OF LIFE CHURCH 901 S. Shary Rd. (Located in the Holiday Inn Express Conference Room) 451-4838 SAN CRISTOBAL MAGALLANES & COMPANIONS PARISH

3805 Plantation Grove Blvd., Ste. 5

Mission • 580-4551

SAN MARTIN DE PORRES 5 mi. N. Conway, 1/2 Mile West Alton • 585-8001 & 585-8002 SPIRIT OF PEACE EV. LUTHERAN CHUCH 3104 Los Milagros Mission • 581-1822 ST. JOHN OF THE FIELDS CATHOLIC CHURCH 1052 Washington Ave. • 585-2325 ST. PAUL'S CATHOLIC CHURCH 1119 Francisco • 585-2701 ST. PETER & ST. PAUL EPISCOPAL CHURCH 2310 N. Stewart Rd. 585-5005

PALM VALLEY CHURCH 1720 E. Griffin Pkwy. 585-3203

SHINING LIGHT BAPTIST CHURCH 6 1/8 N. Doffing Rd. (FM 492) 580-4078

PEÑITAS BAPTIST CHURCH 1/3 Mile S. of Exp.83 on FM 1427 583-6236

TEMPLO BIBLICO 5 Mile/Conway 581-4981or 585-3831

PRIMERA BAPTIST CHURCH Corner of 6th & Oblate 585-4711

TEMPLO EVANGELICO, M.B. CHURCH La Joya

PRIMERA IGLESIA DEL VALLE APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY 210 N. St. Marie. • 585-8651

TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH 3905 W. 3 Mile Line • 585-3261

PROMISE LAND CHURCH 2300 E. Palm Circle (Corner of 495) Mission, TX 78572 • 624-9307

VALLEY FELLOWSHIP 1708 E. Griffin Parkway Mission • 424-7200

MISSION AUTO ELECTRIC, INC. DBA

ER MAE EPQOU IW PMENT

Commercial Lawn Equipment “Since 1954”

915 West Bus. 83 • Mission, tX 78572 • (956) 581-7433

KING, GUERRA, DAVIS & GARCIA ATTORNEYS AT LAW

DAVID H. GUERRA

DARRELL DAVIS

301 E. Tom Landry • Mission • 585-1622

IMPLEMENT COMPANY, INC. MISSION 585-1618

  

 





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UTRGV our country. We have been neglected in the past. “This visit means that the VA will realize that there is a medical school close by that it can partner with to better serve veterans,” he said. Richard Sanchez, UTRGV’s associate vice president for Governmental Relations, said McDonald’s visit indicates the rest of the state and the nation have taken notice of the Rio Grande Valley and the new UTRGV

September 18, 2015

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School of Medicine, which can help with the problems of addressing healthcare for veterans. “There is a shortfall in the amount of access to care for veterans,” he said. “The medical school, with its private hospital partners, can help address that. We can expand on collaborations already in place by Valley Baptist and McAllen Medical with the VA, where we currently have medical interns cycling

through.” “We can increase the amount of care if we have more slots for interns in these institutions,” he said. “We want more private hospitals in the Valley to partner with the VA and with us. Once we have more partners, we can put in more programs, like dedicated family medicine and family medicine psychiatry training.” The UTRGV School of Medicine is pending accreditation and is on schedule to open in fall 2016. Learn more at the UTRGV website.

COUNCIL earns $40,000 while on probation and goes up to $41,200 after the probation. A police corporal receives $45,320, while a sergeant receives $48,925. A lieutenant receives $52,530. A police officer receives $70 for longevity for each year of service. Seniority pay starts at three to four years with $2,500 annually and goes to $15,000 for those who serve 19 years or more. Certification pay goes from $900 for intermediate certification to $2,100 for master’s certification. Education pay ranges from $800 for 30 college hours to $2,400 for a

from pg 3

bachelor’s degree. Assignment pay ranges from $1,200 for an evidence technician to $1,600 for SWAT pay. Administrative staff, criminal investigation and narcotics investigators receive $1,200 annually. Mayor Beto Salinas said he was proud to say the salaries Mission now pays are comparable to any in the Valley. “These men work hard and put their lives on the line every day they go to work,” he said. “No officer knows what kind of trouble he or she will face when they ar-

GOING GOLD • Ricardo Garcia Jr. of Mission, who was not present but still recognized, also has Leukemia. Each child was announced during the pregame. They walked hand-in-hand with their family to the center of the field where they received hugs and a yellow rose from the MCISD superintendent, board and Veterans Memorial High School principal. “If we can go pink in October, how come football teams can’t go gold in September?” asked Maritza Esqueda, the foundation president. “Obviously I can’t call the NFL to get it done, but I know a bunch of people in the Valley. We can start here and every year we can get it bigger, and we can spread awareness that way.” Every Friday for the month of September, the Faith Family Friends Foun-

rive at work each day.” Salinas said he has worked with civil service for the past three years to bring the salaries up to the current levels because he felt the salary increases would help Mission have the best firemen and policemen available because most Valley cities do not offer as good of pay. “I am satisfied we have done a good job of offering good salaries to Mission police and firemen. Next year I will be looking at how to do some other things that need to be done in the city,” he added. from pg 1

dation will honor pediatric cancer patients during the football games. MCISD will participate again this week during the Mission High vs. Edinburg High School game Sept. 18. The goal, Esqueda said, is provide more funding for research. According to Esqueda, less than 5 percent of funding for cancer goes to pediatric patients. Kaitlyn had been battling cancer since she was five years old. She had a tumor about the size of a softball removed from her left lung and was undergoing radiation and chemotherapy for about 11 months for a tumor in her hip. “You hear about it but you just never think it would happen to you, especially to your child,” Roxanne Navarro said. “Maybe it doesn’t hit people close to home. It

didn’t hit me either. My life was different; my kids were healthy. But from one day to another your life changes. So it’s better to do something now than when it’s too late.” Navarro said her daughter underwent both physical and emotional changes while undergoing chemotherapy. She dropped to 34 pounds, her confidence lowered and she shied away from people. But after nine months in remission, Navarro said Kaitlyn has returned almost fully to her old self. She likes to get her nails painted, get dressed up and be out of the

BUDGET ly in vector control – and come back and teach the rest of the employees. The city also is looking at taking out a $130,000 loan to purchase new equipment for public works. The city’s

house. “At the beginning it took a lot for me to understand and comprehend everything,” Navarro said. “But we are very close to God ... and I think that’s how she got through it too.” Although Kaitlyn is from Mission, she attends E.B. Reyna Elementary in Palmview and represented La Joya ISD, but she was an embodiment of two districts together for one cause. “This isn’t about the game,” MCISD Superintendent Ricardo Lopez said. “It’s about the kids.” from pg 1

backhoe and tractors were purchased 19 years ago. Payments will be stretched out over several years, so the city doesn’t face the full brunt of the cost at once, Segovia said.


September 18, 2015

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La Joya ISD touts plan for $1 million in energy savings

he Texas Public Energy Alliance recently assisted the La Joya Independent School District in negotiating an electricity contract that will save the district more than $1 million. The district will save about $363,000 per year under the new contract. “We wanted to take advantage of current market lows, and the Texas Public Energy Alliance utilized their expertise to give us an

opportunity to receive competitive offers that meet public bidding requirements from the top electricity providers in Texas,” said Alfredo Vela, assistant superintendent of finance. The contract will take effect May 2017 and will be in place for 36 months at a rate of $42.27 per MWh (4.2 cents per kwh) with Source Electric & Gas. The contract is for full requirements and

includes all ancillaries. It also contains a provision that allows the district to add or delete a specific amount of load at the contract price. The new contract gives La Joya ISD even greater savings from the current contract negotiated by Van Brunt & Associates that reduced electricity costs by 29 percent from 2014 through 2017. Vela said LJISD is actively

theclassifieds buy • sell • trade • rent • hire

this page is your oyster opening up to a world of opportunity

Mission Towing inc. 1515 w. 3 MilE rd. Mission, TExas 78573 (956) 585-8245 • Fax 581-6668 Tdlr VsF lic. no. 0551944

Personal classified rate: $7 for 15 words

25¢ each additional word thereafter

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EscalEra wrEckEr inc. 1515 w. 3 MilE rd. Mission, TExas 78573 (956) 585-8245 • Fax: 581-6668 Tdlr VsF lic. no. 0548371

PURSUANT TO THE PROVISION CONTAINED IN RULE 85.703. SUBCHAPTER F, FROM CHAPTER 85, PART 4 OF TITLE 16 IN THE TEXAS ADMINISTRATIVE CODE, WE ARE OFFICIALLY NOTIFYING YOU THAT THE BELOW DESCRIBED MOTOR VEHICLES HELD IN OUR CUSTODY ARE TO BE PICKED UP, REMOVED AND ALL CHARGES PAID WITHIN (45) DAYS OR THESE VEHICLES WILL BE DECLARED ABANDONED ACCORDING TO TEXAS LAW. YEAR MAKE MODEL VIN# BALANCE 2004 FORD F-150 1FTPX12574NB95760 $489.00 2008 DODGE AVENGER 1B3LC46K48N182872 $530.00 HOME MADE TRAILER 6X8 $520.00 TOTAL CHARGES CANNOT BE COMPUTED UNTIL VEHICLE IS CLAIMED. STORAGE CHARGES WILL ACCRUE DAILY UNTIL VEHICLE IS RELEASED.

HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY OF MISSION

1300 EAST 8TH STREET MISSION, TEXAS 78572 PUBLIC NOTICE

Public notice is given that the Housing Authority of the City of Mission, Texas will open the waiting list and start taking housing applications effective WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2015 AT 8:00 a.m. (the process to be utilized to issue housing applications will be held the 2nd Wednesday of the month, effective October, 2015). The opening of the waiting list was a decision by unanimous vote of the Board of Commissioners of the Housing Authority at its August 19th, 2015 Regular Board of Commissioners Meeting.

NOTICIA PUBLICA

Estamos notificando que el Housing Authority de la cuidad de Mission, Texas abrira nuevamente la lista de espera y aceptara solicitudes para asistencia de viviendas el 14 de OCTUBRE, 2015 a las 8:00 a.m. (el proceso que se utilizara para aceptar solicitudes sera una vez al mes - el segundo Miercoles del mes, a partir de Octubre, 2015). La decision de abrir nuevamente la lista de espera fue tomada por unanimidad de los miembros de la Mesa Directiva de Comisionados del Housing Authority en una junta que se llevo abaco el dia 19 de Agosto, 2015. Joel A. Gonzalez, Executive Director/Director Ejecutivo

ORDINANCE NO. 4276

ORDINANCE NO. 4271

AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR THE BASE SALARIES FOR CIVIL SERVICE EMPLOYEES OF THE MISSION POLICE DEPARTMENT; PROVIDING FOR EMPLOYEE INCENTIVE PAY FOR MEMBERS OF THE MISSION POLICE DEPARTMENT SUCH INCENTIVE PAY BEING LONGEVITY PAY, SENIORITY PAY, CERTIFICATION PAY, EDUCATIONAL PAY, ASSIGNMENT PAY, AND CLOTHING ALLOWANCE; ESTABLISHING THE RATE OF PAY FOR SUCH INCENTIVE PAYS, ESTABLISHING THE CRITERIA FOR QUALIFICATIONS FOR SUCH PAY; PROVIDING FOR PUBLICATION; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY, AND ORDAINING OTHER PROVISIONS RELATING TO THE SUBJECT MATTER THEREFORE. READ, CONSIDERED AND PASSED, THIS THE 14TH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 2015. Norberto Salinas, Mayor Attest: Anna Carrillo, City Secretary

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF MISSION, TEXAS ADOPTING APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE SUPPORT OF THE MISSION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION FOR FISCAL YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER 1, 2015 AND ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2016 READ, CONSIDERED AND PASSED, THIS THE 14TH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 2015. Norberto Salinas, Mayor Attest: Anna Carrillo, City Secretary

ORDINANCE NO. 4274 AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR THE BASE SALARIES FOR CIVIL SERVICE EMPLOYEES OF THE MISSION FIRE DEPARTMENT; PROVIDING FOR EMPLOYEE INCENTIVE PAY FOR MEMBERS OF THE MISSION FIRE DEPARTMENT SUCH INCENTIVE PAY BEING LONGEVITY PAY, SENIORITY PAY, CERTIFICATION PAY, EDUCATIONAL PAY, AND ASSIGNMENT PAY; ESTABLISHING THE RATE OF PAY FOR SUCH INCENTIVE PAYS, ESTABLISHING THE CRITERIA FOR QUALIFICATIONS FOR SUCH PAY; PROVIDING FOR PUBLICATION; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY, AND ORDAINING OTHER PROVISIONS RELATING TO THE SUBJECT MATTER THEREFORE. READ, CONSIDERED AND PASSED, THIS THE 14TH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 2015. Norberto Salinas, Mayor Attest: Anna Carrillo, City Secretary

working on initiatives to reduce the utility component of the district’s energy costs. “The consulting firm utilized by TPEA provides unique online tools that assist the LJISD finance and maintenance departments in load evaluation,” Vela said. “Together we have reduced electricity usage district-wide by over 18 percent from 2012 levels.” In 2012, La Joya ISD used ap-

ORDINANCE NO. 4269 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF MISSION, TEXAS MAKING APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE SUPPORT OF THE CITY OF MISSION FOR THE FISCAL YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER 1, 2015 AND ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2016; APPROPRIATING MONEY TO A DEBT SERVICE FUND TO PAY INTEREST AND PRINCIPAL DUE ON THE CITY’S INDEBTEDNESS; AND ADOPTING THE ANNUAL BUDGET OF THE CITY OF MISSION FOR THE 2015 – 2016 FISCAL YEAR READ, CONSIDERED AND PASSED, THIS THE 14TH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 2015. Norberto Salinas, Mayor Attest: Anna Carrillo, City Secretary

ORDINANCE NO. 4272 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF MISSION, TEXAS ADOPTING APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE SUPPORT OF THE MISSION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER 1, 2015 AND ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2016 READ, CONSIDERED AND PASSED, THIS THE 14TH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 2015. Norberto Salinas, Mayor Attest: Anna Carrillo, City Secretary

autos

2014 CHEVY MALIBU, 23k miles, silve, 4 cyl., great a/c, all power, $10,000 obo, call 956-222-9000. CHEVY MALIBU LT 2014, nice car, must see, Eddie Vargas, 956-4514008. CHEVY SONIC 2014, great on gas, must see, call Eddie Vargas 956451-4008. 2008 HONDA CRV E-320, brilliant silver metallic, 1 owner, under 43k miles, $16,500, call 956534-2094 or 956581-7298. 2014 HYUNDAI SANTA Fe, fully loaded, low miles, $28k, call for more

proximately 70 million kwh per year in electricity. In 2015, the district is on track to use 57 million. “The La Joya ISD school board and administration have done an outstanding job of focusing on identifying energy management opportunities and it is their leadership that has led to significant savings,” said Annette Van Brunt, of Van Brunt & Associates, consultant to TPEA.

Make it happen, we’re located at 1217 N. Conway in Mission, TX Come on in! Our hours of operation are Mon. - Fri. 8 - 5 p.m. If you can’t drop by, mail it! P.O. Box 399, Mission, TX 78573 Order by phone 585-4893 with a major credit card. The deadline to get your classified in is Tuesday at 3 p.m.

information ask for Paula, 956-6164016. 2014 NISSAN MAXIMA, super clean, sunroof, bluetooth, low miles, $20k obo, call for information 956616-4016. NISSAN SENTRA 2014, SV auto, all power, must see, call Eddie Vargas 956-451-4008. 2013 CHEVY MALIBU, super clean, low miles, rims, must see, $14k, call 956-616-4016.

forrent 2 BEDROOM, 2 bath, furnished house in Enchanted Valley, for information call 303-6428317.

legalnotice ORDINANCE NO. 4268 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF MISSION, TEXAS GRANTING A CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT FOR RICO SUAVE DRIVE-THRU #2 CONVENIENCE STORE, 3300 N. INSPIRATION ROAD, LOT 1, GOMEZ ESTATES SUBDIVISION READ, CONSIDERED AND PASSED, THIS THE 14TH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 2015. Norberto Salinas, Mayor Attest: Anna Carrillo, City Secretary

ORDINANCE NO. 4275 AN ORDINANCE ADOPTING THE CLASSIFICATIONS FOR THE MISSION POLICE DEPARTMENT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2015-2016. READ, CONSIDERED AND PASSED, THIS THE 14TH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 2015. Norberto Salinas, Mayor Attest: Anna Carrillo, City Secretary

ORDINANCE NO. 4267 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF MISSION, TEXAS GRANTING A REZONING OF THE WEST 131.17’ OF THE EAST 181.17’ OF THE SOUTH 129.93’ OF LOT 160, ADDITION ‘A’ OF SHARYLAND ORCHARDS SUBDIVISION, FROM R-1A (LARGE LOT SINGLE FAMILY) TO C-1 (OFFICE BUILDING) READ, CONSIDERED AND PASSED, THIS THE 14TH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 2015. Norberto Salinas, Mayor Attest: Anna Carrillo, City Secretary

forsale

MOBILE GARDENS 55+, several mobile homes, possible contract, prices right, plus lots for rent, 956-5328600.

garagesale

C L O T H E S , GAMES, KEYBOARD, weeder, mower and misc. items, 9-19-15, 8am-1pm, 221 Wheel Dr Mission, TX, come and have fun.

driver license, social security on hand, must provide with own pick up truck, call for interviewing 956-240-4979. NOW HIRING LICENSED Professional Barber, for more information call Henry at Tatan’s Barber & Styling Shop, 956-5857406 or 956-7390012.

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SWIMMING POOL SERVICE job, full time in the Mission area, must have

ORDINANCE NO. 4273 AN ORDINANCE ESTABLISHING THE CLASSIFICATIONS FOR THE MISSION FIRE DEPARTMENT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2015-2016 READ, CONSIDERED AND PASSED, THIS THE 14TH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 2015. Norberto Salinas, Mayor Attest: Anna Carrillo, City Secretary

ORDINANCE NO. 4266 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF MISSION, TEXAS GRANTING A REZONING OF 3.92 ACRES OUT OF LOT 205, JOHN H. SHARY SUBDIVISION, FROM AO-I (AGRICULTURAL OPEN INTERIM) TO C-3 (GENERAL BUSINESS) READ, CONSIDERED AND PASSED, THIS THE 14TH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 2015. Norberto Salinas, Mayor Attest: Anna Carrillo, City Secretary

ORDINANCE NO. 4270 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF MISSION, TEXAS LEVYING AN AD VALOREM TAXES FOR USE AND SUPPORT OF THE MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT OF THE CITY OF MISSION FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2015-2016; PROVIDING FOR APPORTIONING EACH LEVY FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES; PROVIDING WHEN TAXES SHALL BECOME DUE AND WHEN SAME SHALL BECOME DELINQUENT IF NOT PAID; AND PROVIDING FOR EXEMPTIONS FOR THE ELDERLY AND FOR THE DISABLED READ, CONSIDERED AND PASSED, THIS THE 14TH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 2015. Norberto Salinas, Mayor Attest: Anna Carrillo, City Secretary

REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS INSURANCE BROKER/CONSULTATION SERVICES CITY OF PALMVIEW EMPLOYEE BENEFITS PLAN

The City of Palmview, Texas is accepting “Qualification Statements” from license Insurance Brokers and or Agents (hereafter “Broker/Agent”) for the purpose of providing professional insurance brokerage and consulting services for the employee benefits plan. The Broker/Agent must have a proven track record of successfully providing insurance benefits for employers of comparable size and complexity and will work directly with City Administration in the administration and delivery of the employee’s benefits plan. The employee plan begins November 1st through October 31st. This RFQ is being done with the objective of evaluating our current Broker/Agent relationships relative to other interested parties and their ability to provide proper coverage. The anticipated duration for the initial Broker/Agent is for a period not to exceed 2 years. The duration may be reviewed from year to year at the City’s sold discretion, and the City may further extend the relationship on an annual basis. Conversely, City reserves the right to terminate the relationship at any time should it be determined that the Broker/Agent is not fulfilling services as expected. The Broker/Agent relationship is expected to commence immediately following the selection process, to include fulfilling all service requirements for a smooth open enrollment in October 2015 for the plan year beginning November 1st, 2015. The final selection is subject to approval by the City Council of City of Palmview. Resumes/Qualifications/Letters of Intent must be submitted in writing and may be dropped off, no later than Monday, September 21st, 2015 at 12:00p.m. at: Palmview City Hall 400 West Veterans Blvd. Palmview, TX 78572


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September 18, 2015


September 18, 2015 - Progress Times Issue