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Join the global movement for child survival To advance Every Woman Every Child, an initiative launched by the United Nations Secretary-General, partners from the public, private and civil society sectors are uniting around a clear and compelling goal: ending preventable child deaths. For the first time in history we have the knowledge, technical expertise and innovative tools needed to mitigate the risk of young children dying from preventable causes. Evidence shows that tremendous progress is possible, even in the most difficult settings. By pledging support for A Promise Renewed, partners commit to redoubling efforts to accelerate the declines in the number of under-five and maternal deaths, enabling more countries to achieve MDGs 4 and 5 by 2015 and to sustain the progress well into the future. Everyone has a role to play in achieving the goals of A Promise Renewed: • Governments can take the lead in monitoring and strengthening country action plans for maternal, newborn and child survival. • Development partners can align their support with national priorities and targets.

Steady progress has been made, but many more lives can be saved World leaders have been steadfast in their commitment to child survival and well-being – starting in late 1989 with the adoption of the Convention on the Rights of the Child. In 1990, the global community united behind the World Summit for Children. A decade later, world leaders adopted the Millennium Declaration, which led to the subsequent adoption of the MDGs and positioned children at the centre of eight critical targets for human development. In 2002, the United Nations General Assembly passed a landmark resolution to build ‘A World Fit for Children’. This sustained commitment to children has contributed to a remarkable decrease in child mortality that is unprecedented in human history. Over the past two decades, the number of under-five deaths has fallen dramatically, from nearly 12 million in 1990 to 6.9 million in 2011. Yet, even as the global and regional under-five mortality rates have fallen, the number of child deaths still remains unacceptably high. Every year, millions of children die from causes that we have the power to prevent − and diseases that we have the ability to treat.

• Private sector partners can spur innovation and help identify new resources for maternal, newborn and child survival.

The time has come to recommit to child survival and renew the promise to give every child the best possible start in life.

• Civil society can support the communities and families whose decisions and actions have a direct impact on prospects for maternal, newborn and child survival.

Join us.

• Individual citizens can demonstrate support for the principle that every last child, rich or poor, deserves the best possible start in life.

Committing to Child Survival

Facilitated by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF)

A Promise Renewed is a commitment to all children, rich and poor, wherever they live. No child should die of preventable causes.

Photos: Front cover: © UNICEF/AFGA2010-00439/Noorani Inside left: © UNICEF/NYHQ2006-2706/Noorani Right: © UNICEF/NYHQ2011-1795/Pirozzi September 2012

Visit the website for additional information. www.apromiserenewed.org Twitter: #Promise4Children

A Promise Renewed


Committing to Child Survival: A Promise Renewed is a global effort to accelerate action on maternal, newborn and child survival. In June 2012, the Governments of Ethiopia, India and the United States convened more than 700 representatives from government, civil society and the private sector for the Child Survival Call to Action in Washington, D.C. Evidence presented at the high-level forum demonstrated that it is feasible to eliminate the grossest of inequities – the disparate child survival rates that persist between the poorest and richest nations. A modelling exercise showed that most countries can lower national rates of child mortality to 20 or fewer deaths per 1,000 live births by 2035. To make the most of this extraordinary opportunity, governments and partners are uniting under the banner of A Promise Renewed to support concerted action on three fronts:

Renewing the Promise – to every child: It can be done! Many countries have achieved marked declines in child mortality over the past two decades, including some that had very high mortality rates in 1990.

Countries that achieved the greatest percentage declines in under-five mortality rate (per 1,000 live births) since 1990

LAO PEOPLE’S DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC

Globally, reductions in under-five mortality rates, combined with declining fertility rates in many regions and countries, have lowered the number of child deaths from nearly 12 million in 1990 to 6.9 million in 2011.

72% decline

68

Bangladesh

67

Rwanda

65

Nepal

64

Cambodia

64

Strengthening evidence-based country action plans: Participating governments are

Monitoring and reporting: Governments and partners are increasing the availability and accessibility of data and analysis on maternal, newborn and child mortality to encourage stronger accountability for child survival. Each year, UNICEF and partners will release global progress reports to stimulate public dialogue and sustain the political commitment to child survival.

Promoting global communication and social mobilization for child survival: Governments and partners are mobilizing broad-based social support for the principle that no child should die from preventable causes. By harnessing the power of mobile technology, governments and partners are engaging all citizens, especially women and youth, in the search for innovative solutions to maternal, newborn and child survival.

BANGLADESH

67% decline

14,000

U5MR 1990: 139 U5MR 2011: 46

FEWER

LIBERIA

CHILDREN

68% decline

DIED EACH DAY

U5MR 1990: 241 U5MR 2011: 78

IN 1990

Five priority actions Dramatic reductions in preventable child deaths can be achieved through concerted action in five critical areas:

Malawi

64

Madagascar

62

Bhutan

61

Ethiopia

61

Niger

60

Bolivia (Plurinational State of) United Republic of Tanzania

58

54

Azerbaijan

53

Senegal

52

Haiti

51

Eritrea

51

U5MR 1990: 180 U5MR 2011: 54

0

HIGH-BURDEN POPULATIONS

HIGH-IMPACT SOLUTIONS

more than two thirds

25

50

75

100

Percentage change, 1990 to 2011

Note: This map is stylized and is not to scale. It does not reflect a position by UNICEF on the legal status of any country or territory or the delimitation of any frontiers. The dotted line represents approximately the Line of Control in Jammu and Kashmir agreed upon by India and Pakistan. The final status of Jammu and Kashmir has not yet been agreed upon by the Parties. The final boundary between the Republic of the Sudan and the Republic of South Sudan has not yet been determined. The final status of the Abyei area has not yet been determined.

GEOGRAPHY

reduction of

57

Mozambique

70% decline

achieved a

57

Zambia

TIMOR-LESTE

IN 2011 THAN

70

Liberia

U5MR 1990: 148 U5MR 2011: 42

sharpening their country action plans to accelerate progress towards the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and setting five-year milestones to monitor progress from 2015 to 2035.

72 Four countries

Lao People’s Democratic Republic Timor-Leste

Source: United Nations Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation, 2012.

GENDER EQUALITY

MUTUAL ACCOUNTABILITY

Scale up efforts in the 25 countries that

Strengthen health systems to increase

Intensify efforts to address the five

Invest in education for girls and women

Build broad-based political support for

account for 80 per cent of all under-five

coverage among underserved popula-

conditions responsible for almost

and empower them to make decisions

maternal, newborn and child survival;

deaths. While every region of the world

tions, including rural and low-income

60 per cent of child deaths − pneumonia,

that impact their lives. Promote women’s

monitor progress against a set of common

has made progress in reducing the

groups. Coverage of proven interventions

diarrhoea, malaria, pre-term birth

rights, gender equality and inclusive

metrics; and encourage public dialogue

number of child deaths, high rates of

and access to innovative products and

complications and intrapartum-related

economic growth.

on the triumphs and challenges of efforts

child mortality persist, particularly in

strategies must be expanded to reach the

complications.

South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa.

children and families in greatest need.

to accelerate declines in preventable maternal, newborn and child deaths.


Committing to Child Survial: A Promise Renewed