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VOLUME 3 ISSUE 2

profileedmonton.com

OCTOBER | 2011


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OLGA MESSINIS

BENTLEY HOUGHTON

CODY + JESSE

COLETTE + MEAGAN

BIRKLEY DOLL

JAY TOMLINSON

CHERYL WIWAT

NICOLE CAMPRE

SALIM VALJI

PUBLISHER

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ART DIRECTOR

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The CJSR office is underground and it used to be a bank. That’s got to be the most pirate-radio sounding thing I’ve ever heard. The bank vault is where we broadcast. There are two studios—recording studios where we do some shows, make ads and record bands. How did you become a host for CJSR? I ended up getting involved in CJSR about five years ago. When I was at the U of A I desperately wanted to be a radio DJ. I grew up listening to a neighbour’s show that was on CJSR. It seemed so cool to me. These guys were playing music that you otherwise would never hear on commercial radio. It was unique and it was music that I was drawn to. The opportunity wasn’t there at that time. I came on as a guest host on Hit and Run Radio about five years ago. A friend of mine who was doing it thought it would be nice to have a fresh voice. Between his musical tastes and mine it ended up being this fun and eclectic drive time show. That guest host spot turned into a permanent thing. I began volunteering at CJSR doing my own show co-hosting from three to five pm after that. And the show you host now? It’s called Rock and Roll Must Be Destroyed. It’s on every Wednesday from eleven to midnight. It’s a rock focused show—anything new and anything old. What kind of stuff do volunteers do beyond hosting—for the mic shy out there? There’s everything from filing records to producing and recording ads—which is one of the ways I got involved. Sometimes you have events requesting a live DJ. The opportunities are almost endless. It’s more about finding the right fit. How can people get involved? CJSR hosts these volunteer orientation sessions. You can check their website for those dates. They’re for anyone who wants to look into it. Additionally our doors are always open for anyone who wants to come in and find out how they can get involved. There are some really great people here doing really cool things behind the scenes. How do you pay the bills? I work for the City of Edmonton in their special projects division doing traffic control. It was something that always interested me. It made sense to go into it, but it’s a very serious—serious—job. Just like radio.


ROCK AND ROLL MUST BE DESTROYED

OLGA MESSINIS


Let’s start with what’s obviously the most important question. If you become a rich, decadent artist—what would you do with your vast fortune? That’s tough. I’d probably throw really decadent parties. Might try to bring back dandyism—really try hard to be an upper class fop. I might buy a large hunting dog. An observatory? If the funds allowed it, yeah. It wouldn’t be my first project but if I had enough space on my grounds. Yeah, I’d need a grounds keeper on that note. I think Picasso might have been pretty rich. Looking at a lot of your paintings, animals seem to pop up a lot as a theme. I think animals allow for a lot of room to explore. There are so many different variations you can do. I’ve never been very interested in still life—and there’s some really great stuff out there—but whenever I’ve done it I’ve never been totally satisfied with what I produce. I’ve done paintings of flowers—but that was always for a class. It’s interesting to learn how to do it, but it’s not the direction I want to go in. There’s a sense of motion to a lot of what I’ve seen. I’d think that might be tough to do with… a vase. I try to tie it all together. Hopefully when you look at one painting in a series you think it could be part of the same world as another in that series. I guess it’s a stylistic thing. Where does that style come from? In the last couple of years I’ve developed a style I’m quite happy with. It’s not totally drawing from any one thing, rather from picking up little things here and there. Sources are tough. Definitely cartoons like Calvin and Hobbes or Ren and Stimpy. I like the sense of emotion some of those put out and I try to carry that over into my paintings. You’ve started blogging your work? I’m definitely interested in the Internet as a medium for getting art out there. There have been places online to put stuff for a while. It’s nice to get stuff out there without, you know, having to leave the house. more info @

bhoughton.tumblr.com


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CODY + JESSE KENNEDY YOU REALLY CAN’T BE SHY


How does one get into nightlife videography? I can’t imagine you just... show up. It literally began with there being a few shows we wanted to go to. We had the gear so I approached the guys at Easy Love. They had a photographer but they needed a video guy. Thought we could try it—see if we wanted to roll with it. It’s been working out really well since then for almost two years now.

People see a camera and they definitely start acting a bit. It’s really nice to see the natural side—when people aren’t nervous or pretending to go crazy when they weren’t a second before because of the camera. That can ruin it. It sounds like almost like working for national geographic—if gazelle could wear axe body spray and spray tan. I don’t want to reference that Planet Earth series, but you see those birds puffing up their feathers and you can’t help but see certain people trying to do that.

Who have you guys worked with? We work with Easy Love, Pearl Entertainment and we’ve done a little bit of stuff with Urban Metropolis. We’ve done occasional shows for new promoters as well.

more info @

chantmedia.blogspot.com

Your stuff has a really distinct vibe to it. What’s your main focus? We’ve really just been trying to do something new—to make people feel like they’re there rather than just watching someone filming. We try to go for that dirty, in the crowd, shaky feel. You really can’t be shy. You’ve got to interact but try not to just film single people dancing, posing and cheering. It takes away from the people who weren’t there being able to enjoy it. I gather from looking at a lot of the nightlife videos and photos that are out there that getting a truly candid moment must be tough.

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How many of these robots do you have? And perhaps more importantly did you ever think someone would be asking you that question? We have seven. The technical term is human patient simulator—and we’ve got them in various age groups. Sometimes they’re called high fidelity simulators. They’re designed to replicate a human being. In health care we use them to recreate high context, hospital-like environments. They’re substitutes for human patients to allow students to make mistakes and learn from those mistakes. So the Seinfeld episode where Kramer gets work as an actor faking symptoms lied to me? You can use something called a Standardized Patient Actor. Let’s say though I wanted to teach a student how to intervene in a heart attack. An actor can fake that—but as soon as the student goes to check the pulse or listen to the heart it stops being believable. We want to help students suspend their belief. It’s better for learning. Makes sense. What can the simulators do? We can change his pulse. He can sweat. His fingernails can turn blue. All of the physiological findings are congruent with the presentation of the patient. Actors though are great for say, faking a hallucination. It’s about picking the right tool. How has the field changed over the years? It used to take a pretty big room just to house the mainframe. Now the simulator is just one little box— most of it is just off of a laptop. It used to look like Star Trek. Then most nurses couldn’t learn with it, as it was just too expensive. Grant MacEwan agreed to pull together a learning center for the third year of the program. After a few years we bought our own. MacEwan has definitely become known as a center for excellence in simulation. We have a very active simulation practice community—not just in Edmonton but internationally. We try to help people all over the world. We’re lucky enough to have six people, but most places just have the one. We were supported here and it’s been great to see it expand. So the field has grown? It’s become a pedagogy all on its own. It’s a fun way to learn and it recreates emotional experiences in students. You really can’t forget the first time you interact with a mannequin and it’s similar to how you feel when you have to deal with a real patient.


COLETTE FOISY-DOLL + MEAGAN LEHMAN IT’S BECOME A PEDAGOGY ALL ON ITS OWN


What do you guys at the University of Alberta Marketing Association do? We represent all of the marketing students. We try to make sure that they have a well-rounded experience. We try to connect students to industry professionals. We try to make sure they get to meet corporates, get volunteer experience and generally feel comfortable. And you specifically? My job as the president is to run the club—make sure everything goes smoothly. You guys have to go out and talk to businesses— people in the real world? Scary. Always. Just to run the club we need funding to provide services for these students. We need to build relationships with these people and companies. It can work towards getting students job, or just really good mentors. Mentorship is a big part of it, even within the club. Different companies help in different ways. Some help getting speakers; others are willing to give money for sponsorships. How did you get working with the association? When I was a first year business student I wasn’t extremely involved. I did little things here and there but nothing huge. My neighbor was a VP of the association and I decided I wanted to get involved. He said that I should apply—thought I’d be good for the position. I applied and actually got it. It’s been great so far. You can’t really do anything without a great team, and they’ve been wonderful. What would you say to people outside the faculty looking in—to people curious about marketing?

BIRKLEY DOLL MENTORSHIP IS A BIG PART

People look at marketing and they think sales, but there are tons of different areas. I think of marketing as a way of producing results.


Before we get to business—I understand you do your fair share of volunteering? I grew up in inner city Edmonton myself, so I knew I wanted to try to give back to the community. I’ve been doing that for about eight years now. I coach community basketball—it’s inspiring to get to shape a group of young men. They’re a group of really solid guys I’ve been coaching for a few years now. Before that I worked with Edmonton Green Shack. It’s a summer project that gives inner-city youth a place to go. I was that kid at one point so it’s been great to give back. You’re only as good as the people you surround yourself with, so I try to be a good role model for them. And you enjoy it? If there was anything I could do professionally it would be coaching. I think setting goals is important—so being in that field has taught me how to motivate others. It’s how I try to run my business as well. How did you transition into the professional world before real estate? I was fortunate enough to get to work with the Edmonton Eskimos for the last eight seasons. I worked as an equipment assistant in the locker room. I took a lot from the work ethic and professionalism you see in the players. I learned that all of those guys have dreams and goals and the ones who made it are the ones who went and pursued them. Now you’re working in real estate. Has that been the big goal all along?

JAY TOMLINSON YOU’RE ONLY AS GOOD AS THE PEOPLE YOU SURROUND YOURSELF WITH

Real estate was a dream I had that I was able to chase after. Even at a young age—eight years old—I’d stay up late watching the directory channel seeing the listings scroll across the top. It really is something that always interested me. I just like homes. I was at a point in my life where I was reevaluating what I wanted to do. It became clear when I started pursuing it that it was exactly what I wanted. Everyone needs a place to live and I hope to be someone who can put a new spin on real estate for people.


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How did you become the host of Balcony TV? A friend of mine who I met while I was at Grant MacEwan started up Balcony TV in Edmonton. They were looking for a girl to host it. They didn’t know quite what they were looking for. He knew I liked music and that I had friends involved in the music scene. I’d done some small drama productions though, so he asked me to come try out. The rest just went from there. I really enjoyed it and we all got along really well. How did Balcony TV start? It’s got a pretty big following from what I’ve seen. It started in Dublin in 2006. It’s just moved on from there. There are twenty some different cities doing it now around the world. The guys that started it here saw it online, realized it was something we could do here and sent the original creator an email. The two worked really hard on it—took it very seriously. After that our balcony was up and running. There have been a lot of really strong local acts you guys have put out for people who can’t make it to shows to hear. It goes to show all the talent we have here. There’s so much to showcase. How do you find them? Generally they come to us. We listen to their music and see what they’re doing to put their music out there. We’ve been getting all kinds. It’s been almost overwhelming now. It hit the ground running. It’s something new for bands. It’s a completely different forum. It’s an alternative to Myspace and all of those—a new kind of social media that bands can use for free. It’s free promotion. Is this the kind of work you used to think you’d be doing? I went to Grant Mac where I graduated with a commerce degree in management. It doesn’t directly apply to what I’m doing, but it sure doesn’t hurt. It comes back to marketing and promotion and all of those things that are central in the music industry.

more info @

www.balconytv.com/edmonton


CHERYL WIWAT

THERE’S SO MUCH TO SHOWCASE


At what point did you know you wanted to work as a fashion designer? To be honest as a teenager I didn’t really know what I wanted. Near the end of high school I started getting into fashion. I was inspired so much by Alexander McQueen and some of the crazier English designers. Their stuff might not have been practical, but it certainly was inspiring. I started drawing, then I started sewing, then I started having shows and then I went to school. Not the typical evolution for a designer I’d imagine. It’s been quick. Within four years I’ve been able to have a couple of shows. I’ve been pretty lucky. What do you try to do when you start working on a piece? I’d like to design to inspire I think you could say. I want there to be a balance. I want it to be unique and different, yet still be down to earth. Ready to wear stuff really allows a person to wear what they want to wear while still affording it. What are your goals in fashion? My big goal comes after I learn as much about the industry as I can. I want to do that before I jump into it. I want to learn about factories and other designers. I want to absorb so that I can eventually take what I know and apply it. Eventually I’d like to have my own line. That’s the plan. You’ve got your work in Edmonton Fashion Week this year. What direction did you go in with that?

NICOLE CAMPRE I WANT IT TO BE UNIQUE AND DIFFERENT

A German cellist who played at the Fringe last year inspired me. He was amazing—it’s hard to even describe. It was pouring rain and everyone stood outside holding tarps around him. I wanted to kind of give a baroque feel to it. The fabrics are ornate and antique looking and the silhouettes are cello shaped. It’s an eveningwear collection.


How did you get your start as a sports writer? When I was in grade six I had a letter to the editor published in the Edmonton Journal. I went to a charter school so it was pretty well written. There had been some recent bad press about charter schools—I was defending them. It was great coming to school the next day to find people recognizing me. I felt like a bit of a celebrity. I had a knack for it and I was able to develop it. Why write about sports? I love sports. I’ve loved hockey, baseball and football since I was a kid. I obviously don’t really have the body to play any of those sports. I look at the game from a different view compared to some of my friends. My writing reflects that I think. I figured why not combine a talent and a passion into one? What is that viewpoint? I look at the game from a numbers perspective. I try to look at sports as a business. It can be run like a business. There are things you can do—like managing salary caps—and my articles try to look at sports like any other business. That’s where my point of view tends to come from. What sport do you write about most? I mostly write about hockey as I really have a lot of access to it here. It’s been pretty close to my heart since I was little. Who do you write for? I write for a few different ones. Grant MacEwan’s paper The Griffin and Hockeywriters.com. Through that I’ve been credentialed by the Western Hockey League and Hockey Canada. It’s great to meet players and it’s great to meet other guys who are also realizing their dream in the same way as myself. I understand you’re studying to be a teacher. With success in writing—why make the shift?

SALIM VALJI I LOOK AT THE GAME FROM A DIFFERENT VIEW

Journalism is a changing field. I don’t have any journalistic training whatsoever and I’ve interviewed over thirty National Hockey League first round draft picks alone. In that respect I think it’s going to be a very uneasy time for journalists in the future. I’ve got a tremendous amount of respect for teachers. If it weren’t for a lot of teachers I wouldn’t be where I am today—and if I ended up teaching for the rest of my life it would be a privilege.



Profile Edmonton October'11