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profileedmonton.com

DECEMBER | 2010

VOLUME 2 ISSUE 4


PRESENTS


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W W W. V I N Y L R E T R O L O U N G E . C O M

T H I S I S N ’ T T H E 7 0 ’ S - P L E A S E D O N ’ T D R I N K A N D D R I V E . D R I N K R E S P O N S I B LY.


EDITOR

SCOTT FRANCIS WINDER

ART DIRECTOR

MATTHIAS EDWIN SMALE

PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN BY

CRAIG ROY HOBBS

ENTERPRISE

CONTACT STICKS & STONES Suite 5 9908 109 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T5K 1H5

MARCUS COLDEWAY

FASHION

MO OSSOBLEH

sticks@andstones.ca PHONE 780 801 0909 FAX 866 634 5344

POST-PRODUCTION BY

MATTHIAS EDWIN SMALE

COORDINATOR

andstones.ca profileedmonton.com

JORDAN DAVID BLOEMEN JULIAN WILLIAM THOMAS FAID

PROFILE ME profileedmonton.com/me

ACCOUNTS

AD INQUIRIES ads@andstones.ca

JORDAN WATSON NAVNEET SINGH JOSAN

ART + DESIGN

MALORIE URBANOVITCH

CAMPUS

PETS

AZRAEL & PIERRE

CAMPUS

MITCH BYRT

JILLIAN SCHWARTZ

NIGHTLIFE

MUSIC

THOMAS PATTERSON

Cert o. nSW -COC-208 3

COMMUNITY

PATRICK LUNDEEN

JOE NOLAN


derks.ca

Tell me a bit about yourself. I’m an artist by name, a graphic designer by trade. I say that because I started off being a painter and a sculpture, but in the latter years of university I got into architecture and sculpture. I had a lot more success there. I exploded out of university with the Jubilee selecting one of my pieces to be on the grounds for four years, we’re hoping they’ll purchase it at the end of that period. I basically taught myself how to do it, didn’t take a lot of courses. I’m self made, used the internet and books to teach myself the trade. What kind of work have you done in the city? Through the years I’ve been able to build myself as a bit of a trendsetter, doing a lot of joint venturing with other business’s to build our businesses, combining skill sets to do larger media and production projects. I’ve done a lot of media and social awareness campaigns. I did some Dj’ing and modeling before I got the opportunity to work for a small media company, which is where I was able to hone all of my skills. So business is booming? The future looks really bold and bright right now. I enjoy that I’m an excellent blend of professional and leisurist, using networking and the nightlife I’m so accustomed to. I’ve got a good network of business professionals that I work with, I’m friends with, I joint venture with. I think that balance is really important. I like spreading ideas through design, music, fashion and everyday life.

ENTERPRISE

Between working with other people, and on your own projects, what do you focus most on? My primary project is my own business. It really uses all of the elements that come from my realm, be it fashion, design, art or music.I do a lot of creative consulting, in which companies basically pay me for my mind. I see.


I DO A LOT OF CREATIVE CONSULTING, IN WHICH COMPANIES BASICALLY PAY ME FOR MY MIND.

MARCUS COLDEWAY


thevestiary.tumblr.com

You’ve traveled a lot, lived in a lot of different places--do you think that has influenced your style? It’s definitely influenced the way that I try to express myself through how I dress. My interest in fashion, and my interest in music, my decision to go into cultural anthropology, it was all motivated by my being in japan at such a young age. I think 15 and 16 is really when you come to define who you are, and that’s when I was there. You wear a uniform five or six days a week, so those one or two days a week when you can express yourself through how you dress, people go to the limit. It was really interesting to see how people in North America limit themselves based on how they think people will react to how they dress, rather than how they feel they should dress. British and Japanese fashion are the most interesting to me for that reason. That sounds like loads of travel and foreign living -- sounds like an interesting life story. I was originally born in Somalia, I moved to Austria, then England, then to Canada. I go back to England just because I have so many relatives there. Japan was a cultural exchange. I was there for about a year. Must have been an interesting transition. High school was so strange. Even though I’d done some before I went, coming back was completely strange. I think I’ve got a bit of a nomadic nature. I like being in a position where I don’t know anyone, don’t know anything, don’t know the language. I like throwing myself in face first. That’s been really integral in building an identity. That nomadic nature, has it played into how you approach fashion?

FASHION

MO OSSOBLEH IT’S ABOUT HOW YOU WEAR IT, AND YOUR CHARISMA.

Totally. I think gleaming bits of style, little references from places you wouldn’t expect it from--It’s fun and interesting, more so than just saying “I want to dress like I’m from the sixties.” Maybe one thing from the sixties, mix it with something organic, something that doesn’t fit. I like it when something doesn’t quite match with everything else, when something’s just a little off. Taking a look and adding something that’s purposefully off. I have a hard time believing in fashion faux-pas. Potentially, a guy could wear a dress and come off looking masculine. It’s about how you wear it, and your charisma. Favourite designer? Nicolas Ghesquière from Balenciaga, I think he’s a genius.


unionhall.ca

How did you get into DJ’ing? I’ve always really been into music, and after a buddy of mine from high school started working at a bar, Dj’ing on thursday nights, he asked me to come along. I taught myself how to use everything, I brought some of my own music the next night and gave it a shot. I really enjoyed it. That was a couple years ago, and I’ve done it at very least once a week since then. What do you think of the Edmonton nightlife? I think the Edmonton nightlife is getting a lot better. The fact that music is a lot more accessible these days helps a ton. People come out, and they want to hear songs they’re familiar with, which is great, as people are really familiarizing themselves with more diverse stuff--more than just what’s on the radio. Hearing you play, a lot of your stuff sounds older, funkier even. Think that’s where the trend is moving? I’ve been playing stuff with a bit more of a disco feel, a jazzy feel to it. Trends kind of recycle. I can see disco coming back a little bit, there’s tons of straight up disco being made. A year ago if I played a song like that, it wouldn’t be well received at all. Now people seem to really like it. It might not be a shift that way, it’s just that peoples tastes are expanding. Do you try and play music that appeals to your tastes, or is it more about entertaining the crowd?

NIGHTLIFE

THOMAS PATTERSON I WAS ONCE BOUGHT A BOTTLE OF CHAMPAGNE... I MADE IT RAIN.

It changes throughout the night. At the start of the night the stakes are lower, so I can play stuff I really just enjoy. The middle of the night is where things pick up and the bar gets busier, I veer towards songs I know people will like, and as the night goes on I play songs that I think people might like. I’ve noticed you try and engage with the audience a lot, do people react well to that? Oh yeah. I was once bought a bottle of Champagne, sparkling white wine technically, and I made it rain. Make it rain homie.


profileedmonton.com ART + DESIGN

RACHELLE BUGEAUD

I THOUGHT I KNEW DESIGN HERE, BUT YOU GO THERE AND THE EXPERIENCE IS JUST INSANE.


You seem to move back and forth between industrial design and art. A lot of people that take the program have to choose design or fine arts, so most try to at least balance out between the two. I’ve always been artistic, so I try and continue working in fine arts. Design is focussed but it can also be restrictive, art lets you let loose. Design is what I want to pursue, art I do on the side. At this point in my career it’s also a lot easier to sell art. You’ve studied in Europe, how’s the design community over there? It was a real eye opener. I thought I knew design here, but you go there and the experience is just insane. The amount of design schools, the way design is included in museums and galleries, and the design you just find in the street--installations and happenings, it’s amazing. The school I was at in Cologne has twelve different types of design in their program, here we’ve got two. The fields a lot broader in Europe. Twelve? They’ve got some strange ones. The new one is economic design, design in gender, service design, product design, furniture design, audio visual design, interactive design, graphic design, typography. I’m missing a few. It’s in Germany where design kind of started, and the school really reflects that mentality. That’s definitely a lot more than I knew existed. What initially drew you to design living here, in a place that’s maybe not that design conscious? I think it comes from my family, there’s a lot of creativity there. My Dad’s a jazz musician, my Mom paints and draws, and we live in an architecturally designed house that’s a little more on the radical side, so I guess I’ve always noticed the effects of design. I graduated high school and it popped into my head. I keep trying to figure out exactly where it came from but can never quite get it. Out of those different kinds of design, which are you considering pursuing most? I’m leaning more towards product design than furniture, though I was introduced to service design which is actually really interesting--basically designing a service. It gets overlooked a lot, it’s a mix of business and design, designing the whole experience. I’m not totally sure, I tend to just go with the flow and see where things take me. My goal is to keep doing design, however that may be. Maybe even start that thirteenth route.


profileedmonton.com PETS

TRY TO BE THE NEW KEYBOARD CAT? NO, THAT KIND OF LIFE ISN’T FOR ME.


You’re named Azrael, care to give us a little background there? I’m a pureblood Russian blue. People have this habit of calling us the archangel cat because we originally came from the Archangel Isles of Russia. I was named Azrael, after the archangel of death. You see how it all comes together. That’s a little grim, the angel of death. No, I think it’s actually pretty fitting. I’ve got an air of mystique, quite menacing. Seriously though, not a lot of people know that the angel of death isn’t evil, he’s a pretty peaceful guy. He comforts you, helps you out on your way. So how does a cat named after the angel of death pass his time? I’ve got a brother, Pierre, he’s a Russian black. We live a pretty good life, very relaxed. We hang out around the house, enjoy the view, lounge. Pretty typical cat stuff. Being adorable? Yeah, that takes up a fair bit of our time. Looking up with wide and hopeful eyes, cuddling, jumping around with glee--it’s all a part of it. We try and balance it out though, keep people guessing. There’s nothing worse than a cat that only knows how to be cute. We try and mix things up, prove that there’s more to us than our absurd cuddle-ability. Ever thought about a job in show business? Cute cat videos online are pretty big right now. Try to be the new keyboard cat? No, that kind of life isn’t for me. I’m much too happy right here at home. Things are pretty lush here, pretty comfortable. That life is way too fast paced. I do play a mean keyboard though. Play me out keyboard cat? That’s not funny.

AZRAEL & PIERRE


vinylretrolounge.com CAMPUS

MITCH BYRT

THERE’S A WHOLE COMMUNITY.


MTL – 4.5% You’re the VP internal for Campus Saint Jean, what exactly is involved in that? It involves keeping track of everything within the UFSJ, the student union at Campus Saint Jean. My job is to plan the parties, talk to the bars, talk to the halls, plan the fundraisers. We’ve got about twenty clubs here, so I’m in charge of helping them get all of their funds as well. I try to make sure that they’ve got all of their money and that they’ve got lots of fundraising opportunities.

Affligem – 6.8%

Do you guys work with the main University of Alberta campus a lot? Not a whole lot, no. My job is pretty centralized here, where as we have a VP external that branches out to the main campus. We did actually have our homecoming party this year with the nursing faculty. We’re hoping to do more of those kind of collaborations in the future.

Achel – 8%

There are bars and there are parties, a lot of places for students to spend their leisure time, what’s the importance of student based events? I know if there were no events like we’ve got now, in first and second year, I probably wouldn’t have stayed in school. People just getting here need to know that there’s more to school than just classes, there’s a whole community involved. Especially here, it’s so tight knit. It’s got a high school feel to it, everyone is your buddy.

Edelweiss – 5%

What made you want to be the guy organizing the student community? It sounds pretty intense. Some buddies of mine ran it last year, they ran the whole council. we watched them, and after half a year on council last year watching them do their thing, we thought we should keep it going. They did a great job, had a great year, and we all wanted to roll with their ideas.

Konings Hoeven – 10%

You’re wearing a jersey. Do you play? I play for Saint Jean Hockey team. We’ve got a great campus rec team. We play against the engineers, science teams, some of the frat houses at the main campus. We’re kind of the little Golden Bears of our campus.

Floris Kriek – 3.6%

Represent.

8738 109 street 780 433 5382 dacapocaffe.com


vinylretrolounge.com

You were one of the pioneers of the Student Undergraduate Nurses group (SUN), what exactly is that? It’s the largest club at Grant MacEwan. Almost everyone who comes into nursing signs up, I think we have around 700 members, which was more than the SA had ever seen. The policies surrounding how clubs are formed has had to change based on the size.

JILLIAN SCHWARTZ

Why did you want to become a registered nurse? I originally went into nursing to become a doctor, I thought I’d get my undergraduate in nursing and take it from there. My first day of nursing completely changed my mind. Nursing is a caring profession. You don’t just nurse, you are a nurse. I absolute love being able to go into work with someone and change their life for that day, to let someone unload everything onto me, and help them at very least have a smile on their face. It’s about making a difference on an individual level, which in turn creates a societal movement. What’s involved with the nursing program at MacEwan? It’s about teaching us to be an advocate. A lot of our degree is focused on critical thinking, viewing the patient as a whole person, rather than just their disease. It’s about more than just handing out medication, but thinking about what we can do to facilitate their recovery or treatment or healing process holistically. Do you think there’s a big sense of camaraderie in the nursing community? Nurses get involved like nobody’s business. The second they heard there was something to do with them, they signed up. In the last four years we’ve done lots of social events, which has been what I run. I’m the vice president of social events with SUN, doing fundraising, parties, ski trips. You name it, I’ve been involved, but as it winds down I’ve been trying to mentor in a new person. Crazy nurse parties?

CAMPUS

The way I’ve come to understand it, is that nurses work hard and they play hard. We try and have one huge blowout every semester. We’re having a big Christmas party at a bar, and usually 150 to 200 people come out to the party, all nursing students, and they tend to get a little wild.

IT’S ABOUT TEACHING US TO BE AN ADVOCATE.


profileedmonton.com COMMUNITY

PATRICK LUNDEEN

I WANTED TO CREATE A SMALL COMMUNITY.


Why did you start the Edmonton Common Grounds Arts Society (ECGAS)? I had this idea that I wanted to create a small community of people consisting of visual artists, dancers and musicians-eventually putting together some kind of company. The long term goal was a theatre company, but the short term was a night with music and everything all together. I can’t imagine it would be a solo operation? I met up with Nicholas Mayne--a friend from high school, who was having a similar idea. The big thing was representing all the different performing elements that we could. Avenue theatre was the first venue we looked at for the show, the price was right, and more than anything it had that underground vibe. The space had a history of young people running it, and potential for more of that in the future. Potential? Yeah, like it could really only go up. We threw the first Edmonton Show, and we had a good time so we threw another a month later, which was crazy to do back to back--yet we managed to do even better than the first. After that show the management at Avenue approached me, brought me on as theatre manager. What does that entail? I do everything from managing the theatre, to booking shows, to pulling janitor duty. It’s been a huge learning curve. After those first shows, they saw my business plan for ECGAS, and my mission objectives, which I think is why they brought me on, why they allowed me to use the theatre as a base to make that happen. What were those mission objectives? Trying to give emerging artists of all different disciplines a way in, allowing them to try and promote themselves and perform, just get their work out there to be seen. What do you think the benefit this kind of group showcase has for artists, over say playing at a bar or other venue? For emerging artists--people with paintings sitting in their basements, all of a sudden getting a call saying that there’s a space putting up art, maybe even getting a shot at selling their first piece. For a band just starting out, who could maybe only draw fifteen people, suddenly playing to a crowd of a hundred people all there to see other bands just like them. The band gets seen, maybe sells a couple cd’s, suddenly they’re booking shows.


profileedmonton.com

How did you get started in music? I picked up my dads guitar when I was eleven or twelve, started playing with a slide (which sounded terrible), showing off to my aunts and uncle. My dad played some, so he showed me my first song. I hermited in my room for a few months trying to get down this first song, I think it was a Neil Young track, and after that it just became second nature.

JOE NOLAN

And when did you start writing your first stuff? Probably around fourteen. I started singing in front of people at about sixteen. That’s about when I started playing shows. My first time was at this school celebration. I was so nervous, after the first song it felt right, felt great, and I started going to all these open stages around the city. You play a lot around the city, what do you think of the Edmonton music scene? I’ve been to Toronto and Edmonton, just to check out theirs, and honestly Edmonton is just so strong. It’s so supportive, and there are so many great people you meet through music. It’s pretty awesome, and there’s a ton of great talent here. I think it’d be hard to leave, there’s a really special crowd here once you get into it. You play solo, which is a pretty distinct decision. What’s your reasoning behind that? There’s a couple reasons. I think a lot of the songs are pretty dynamic, which makes keeping time difficult. I’ll just start and stop, which makes playing with other people tough. When it’s just me, all the control is on me. When I make a mistake, it’s on me. There are just air when you stop. When you play with other people, it’s cool, as you get this different kind of energy, so it goes both ways I guess. Also, it’s tough getting four guys in the same place at the same time. It’s just simpler. What do you focus on in writing a song?

MUSIC

I think a lot of my music is more about my words, the folky lyrical kind of thing. That’s definitely what I focus on while writing a song.

I THINK A LOT OF MY MUSIC IS MORE ABOUT MY WORDS.


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