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profileedmonton.com

JANUARY | 2011

VOLUME 2 ISSUE 5


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ENTERPRISE

PUBLISHER

SCOTT FRANCIS WINDER

ART DIRECTOR

MATTHIAS EDWIN SMALE

OPERATIONS

JORDAN MATTHEW WATSON

PHOTOGRAPHY

CRAIG ROY HOBBS BEVAN ALEKSANDER SAUKS POST-PRODUCTION

MATTHIAS EDWIN SMALE

COORDINATOR

JORDAN DAVID BLOEMEN

CONTACT STICKS & STONES Suite 5 9908 109 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T5K 1H5

ART + DESIGN

RYAN OLAND

ALYSSIA BLENKIN

FASHION

FASHION

sticks@andstones.ca PHONE 780 801 0909 FAX 866 634 5344 andstones.ca profileedmonton.com PROFILE ME profileedmonton.com/me

VICKIE LALIOTIS

LEE EVANS

AD INQUIRIES ads@andstones.ca

MUSIC

NIGHTLIFE

NATACHA HOMERODEAN

MICHAEL NG

PETS

COMMUNITY

DEXTER & JAXON

Cert o. nSW -COC-208 3

CAMPUS

NEIL BLUE

JESS BRADLEY


derks.ca ENTERPRISE

THEY CALL ME MCMEANIE

RYAN OLAND


APPAREL PROVIDED BY DERKS

I hear you have a nickname? Yeah, they call me McMeanie. I think the other two copy-written nicknames were used. Good answer. You received your education at the University of Alberta. How do you think that education transferred into real world experience? I think a lot of the people who graduate University—especially from a professional program, are expected as professionals not only to further the state of knowledge in their field, but also to teach and to take on learners. We’re expected to adhere to a certain code of ethics. I think those three things define a professional. Do you think that being expected to go back and educate people after having been educated is important? I do. I think many physicians don’t. Many go into practice and it’s too onerous to take students and residents. About five years ago I started a medical student satellite program at this hospital. The department of emergency medicine at the University of Alberta is full to the gills with medical students, so we had to find places for them to go to do their emergency rotation, so we combined the two sites. And the University of Alberta medical program? It’s excellent. Top ranked, top rated, there’s lots of great research being done. In particular, the department of emergency medicine, which is new, has really gotten centre stage on the world medical stage. We don’t know why that is, they’ve just got lots of guys who’ve been in it for lots of years. We talked about your nickname earlier, but I still think that there’s this image of a hospital as in inherently stern, serious place. Is that true? It almost has to be. One of the things we say about the emergency room is that it’s a glass house. Everybody sees what’s going on, the discussions you’re having with your patients, their families. If you can’t have fun at work, where can you have fun? But if you’re goofing off too much, people see you texting on your phone, you have to remember that the waiting room is full. People notice that. Do people act differently when you say you’re a doctor? I’m sure med students would be interested to know. It’s true, you have to exercise a certain amount of decorum, which is nice as I’m able to work out in Stony Plain and live in the city. I don’t have to see those same people say, out at a bar. No one wants to see a drunk doctor. It’s a big thing. I still get to hear stories about my days as a resident. Twelve years later, it’s “oh, you’re that guy.” I’ve heard some crazy stories McMeanie.


profileedmonton.com

You spent a year in Germany studying design, how did you end up there? I went there on a scholarship, and I was introduced to service design there. The first project that I did was a living quality design project, which was really interesting because they got in a bunch of different people from a bunch of different disciplines, teachers and social workers, and we were all working together to come up with the idea of what living quality is. I think collaboration is one of the key things I took away from Germany, that designing in collaborative teams is necessary to get sound design. What came after that? From there we went to this little organization called the Tea House, who work with underprivileged children, and that’s where we started testing out our designs for the game we designed. From the sounds of it, that game got some pretty big attention? We entered the national science award while we were there. The game has four different modules, each with a different theme. The first is power—so they learn about how energy associates with them. They learn through the energy character, the energy hero who is an environmental sociologist. They learn what his profession is, and do activities based on that. What kind of activities? The first was to investigate your school, and where you can be more energy efficient. Shutting windows and simple things like that. The game was tested in three different schools. It went over really well, we got some great press, and as a result some big energy companies now want to become a partner in that.

ART + DESIGN

You’ve talked about designing a game, and you used the phrase service design. What exactly is that?

ALYSSIA BLENKIN IT’S TAKING A SOCIAL APPROACH TO DESIGN

It’s taking a social approach to design, designing for the user. There are tons of different instances—online banking is an example. People don’t really consider that a service, but things like that definitely are. IDO is a really famous company, a guy named Tim Brown, people like that have worked on these great projects. They designed a self-testing AIDS kit for Africa. That’s service design. What kind of projects have you been working on lately? One of the cooler ones we did recently involved working with engineers, and we had a client who had us working on a surgical repair station for sub-Saharan Africa. It was really amazing. They basically have to repair these surgical tools for cataract surgeries, and the people straightening them have no idea how to do it. The languages are so mixed up, so we had to design a station and manual with minimal text and lots of info-graphics.


urbanfashiongroup.com

VICKIE LALIOTIS

You run a fashion blog, adventures-in-fashion.blogspot.com. How did that get started? I’m a first year journalism student at Grant MacEwan, and I really want to become a fashion journalist, so naturally I started a fashion blog to that end. I spent so much time looking at other people’s blogs, that I decided I should just start one of my own as well. It was a great way to meat other people and network, and to find other people with the same interests. No one else that I really know is so interested in fashion, I feel like it’s a good way to branch out. After the first year was out of the way, it’s started to really pick up. Do you think that’s where fashion journalism is headed? Away from the catwalk, onto the street? I don’t think anyone is really interested in what’s going on in the big magazines, I think it’s more about what people can do with the trends, and how they can make them their own. I also think blogs have become a working resume for people who want to get into fashion. It shows what you can do, which is helpful as otherwise it can be a really tough field to break into. Your blog is a little different from a lot of the other fashion blogs out there. Why did you decide to document yourself as opposed to others? I guess there are three different ways you can approach a fashion blog. You can do fashion news, personal style, or street style. For me I started with news, which makes it really tough to be original as you’re so dependent on what’s going on around you. Street style would be hard for me too--I’m pretty shy, so going up to people and asking to take their photos would be difficult. I figured it would be easier to focus on my personal style. You’re a journalism student, what’s your ‘dream job’ in that field? I know exactly what that dream job is. I want to work at a magazine called Flare, be an editor there. Didn’t have to think about that for long. I know a lot of people who are interested in journalism, what is it you like about fashion journalism specifically?

IT’S A REALLY POWERFUL WAY TO EXPRESS YOURSELF

PROFILE PROVIDED BY ERIN MONAGHAN

FASHION

I think it’s a really powerful way to express yourself. I love art, and I think that fashion can be living art.


FASHION

urbanfashiongroup.com

LEE EVANS

FREEDOM IS NOT FREE


APPAREL PROVIDED BY GRAVITY POPE

I’ve been told to call you Lee Rex Heavens. Please explain. It’s been a while since someone called me that. At one point in time I was very close to changing my name. It happened because I was put in the customer profile system at Gravity Pope as Lee Heavens. We got drunk on a Saturday and well…I would have done it if it hadn’t been a Saturday. There’s some dead stuff in your house. Talk about killing stuff. I was 14, went out hunting for the first time. I had my rifle— As 14 year olds often do. —No big deal, so we’re waiting outside this truck, it’s getting dark, and I’m impatient. This deer walks through the field and I take a crack at it and it goes down. So we drive up to it and I’m all giddy with nerves and adrenaline. My Dad looks at the deer, hands me the rifle and says, “Finish it son.” I pulled the trigger…point blank. I executed a deer. It’s something you have to do to be accepted in a small town like Athabasca. Shooting a deer in the face? Yup. Bringing it back to fashion, do you think that small town look is where things are going? It’s funny; there’s been a huge push in menswear for very well crafted, well-made goods. Hand made is huge, pieces with history are becoming bigger and bigger in menswear. Where it came from, who made them, how they made them. There’s a big shift to work wear. There’s a lot of U.S. Americana, getting back to the fifties. It’s affected everything, it’s great. If you could do anything in life, what would you do? If I could do one thing in life—other than go to space, cause that’s obvious at this point, build a castle on the moon—I want to buy a decommissioned battle ship, take over a small island with said battleship, and create somewhat of a dictatorship. But, here’s the catch; we create a utopia. We rule from our battleship, constantly with our canon’s pointed at the island. You’ll rule with an iron fist. We’re giving these people everything they’ve ever wanted. It comes with a price people. Freedom is not free.


profileedmonton.com MUSIC

MY BRAIN IS ALWAYS IN FRENCH

NATACHA HOMERODEAN


Tell us a little about yourself I’m a musician; I’m a French and English singersongwriter. I started writing music when I was sixteen, playing guitar when I was fourteen. First shows I played were right after high school. And what kind of music is that? My solo stuff is pretty acoustic, a little jazzy, and a little folky; it’s kind of a mix of everything. You mentioned being bilingual, and you occasionally pronounce words all funny-like. Do you think having the two languages under your belt has influenced your music? Oh for sure. French is my first language, my brain is always in French, which is why sometimes I don’t make sense and you tell me “that’s not a word Natacha.” French is a big part of my life. I write in French, most of my songs are in French. In February I’m going to Montreal to record my first album, it will be bilingual. Is the album going to be solo as well? No, I’ll have a band, but I’m also going to Montreal to play this event Place des arts. Then in September I’m heading over to Granby for the Festival de Granby, which is a kind of competition, so that’s fun. When I went on tour I had this band from Winnipeg, and they were great musicians. Frankly I don’t know if I can afford that. I’ve got a lot of musician friends, so that’s pretty convenient. If you signed a giant record deal and made a billion dollars tomorrow, what would you do? I’d go to Belgium; I’m originally from there. No, I’d buy every instrument. All of them. That’s way too many. While you’re waiting for the album, you can visit myspace.com/natachahomerodean to hold you over.


unionhall.ca

You created ngyoface.com, why don’t you talk to me a little about what that is? Ngyoface.com is a nightlife photography/videography company that I started back in June this summer; I pretty much go around town taking photos and videos for promoters in the city. Nightlife photography? I try and capture all the parties and fun that happen at the DJ parties in the city. What do you think that appeal is for people, to wake up hung-over on a Sunday, and look at photos of how they got that way? You go out, you have a great time with your friends, I’m sort of there to try and capture it, maybe party a little as well. It’s always good to see what happened last night, sometimes we don’t remember. How’s Edmonton’s nightlife looking from behind the lens? Edmonton’s nightlife is growing tremendously. I remember a couple years back it was really hard to find a solid weekend show, but now we’ve got so many promoters and so much competition that you end up saying “hey, do you want to see this one show or this other one?” and it’s become really tricky to pick which you’d rather see. There are so many things to do now, things that weren’t there five years ago. I’ve seen the site; it’s really cool, so I’m curious what your future plans for Ngyoface.com are? Eventually I’d like to branch out to other cities, get other photographers in other cities to send over their pictures from say Calgary, Vancouver or Toronto. I want to create a culture that goes beyond photos.

NIGHTLIFE

What are some of the crazier things you’ve seen?

MICHAEL NG LET’S GET GOONEY

A couple of months ago I captured A.) Two girls making out, and B.) One of the girl’s boyfriends punching the other girl right in the face, because they were making out. That’s definitely not the right response. Any last words? Let’s get gooney.


DEXTER & JAXON

PETS

profileedmonton.com


MTL – 4.5% I hear you guys recently made a pretty big move? Yeah, we came over here from Arizona; it was a pretty crazy transition. Out there we would just suntan and swim all day. Oh, so you’re saying that you can’t sun bathe in Edmonton at this time of year?

Affligem – 6.8%

Honestly, not even a little. It’s freezing. But the city has been a lot of fun for us. We’ve been walking in parks a lot, but we definitely spend some time indoors. It’s a lot warmer, a lot less snowy. Makes sense. So you guys came out here with a certain Oiler?

Achel – 8%

We came out here with Jim and Stefanie Vandermeer, for Jim to play for the Edmonton Oilers. Your owner is an Oiler, does that make the other dogs down at the park jealous? Owner? Is that not the politically correct term?

Edelweiss – 5%

We prefer roommate to ‘owner’. It’s definitely been great. Edmonton is a huge hockey city, so there’s a lot of excitement when you tell people you live with an Oiler. People here have been great. Have you guys ever taken to the ice?

Konings Hoeven – 10%

I’m not the most graceful of dogs, I prefer scampering around on hardwood rather than ice, but we do enjoy watching the games on T.V. There was a rumor last year that Jaxon here was going to be drafted by the team, but it didn’t work out. I’m sorry to hear that. It’s all politics.

Floris Kriek – 3.6%

If not sunbathing and swimming, how have you been spending your leisure time?

THE CITY HAS BEEN A LOT OF FUN FOR US

Jim and Stefanie take us for walks a lot, but otherwise we enjoy lounging around the apartment. We’ve got a great view of the city skyline, so it’s nice to just wander around the apartment, really try and take it all in.

8738 109 street 780 433 5382 dacapocaffe.com


profileedmonton.com COMMUNITY

JESS BRADLEY

WE’VE GOT SUPPORT HERE FOR THAT


Why don’t you start off by telling us exactly what the Pride Centre is? The Pride Centre is an LGBTQ resource centre, and a safe place for anyone in the community who wants to come out. We do lots of programming here, there are arts groups that comes in, trans groups, a seniors group that’s gotten huge, and loads of other groups that come in. We’re here for anyone who really needs that space. We’re trying to be a hub of all of the LGBTQ information, keep people in the loop of all the events that are happening. You work as a youth coordinator. Is reaching out to that group difficult? The group started out as youth aged 14-25, but I decided that the bullying and the belittling and the picking on, all that crap is happening at a much younger age. Youth are finding out that they’re trans at 4 or 5, realizing “oh I don’t really feel right in the same body,” so we’re starting to make our groups open to anyone under the age of 25. We’ve had a much higher demand for outreach. School and agencies have been wanting presentations, which is really, really exciting. So youth are feeling more comfortable and open identifying who they are? Right now there seems to be a trans wave going on, a lot of trans youth are finally coming out, saying “hey, this is what’s going on with my body, I need help, can someone please fill me in on what to do?” We’ve got support here for that. We’ve also realized there’s a lot of support out there for people who are going through these things right now, but that there’s no support for their families, who might not understand. We’re starting a parenting group as well for that reason. Do you think the Pride Centre has helped in creating a certain community in the city? I like to think that in some form or another the Pride Centre has been around for a while. If you look up ‘gay Edmonton’, or anything that has to do with that, the Pride Centre comes up right away. I feel like the Centre has become that main place that if someone is coming out, everyone goes “oh, the centre has resources to help you out.”


vinylretrolounge.com

NEIL BLUE

Business Connex--what exactly is that? It’s a business group here at NAIT. The purpose is to network students to students, students to charitable organizations, and students to industry leaders--the people who are going to be hiring them. We want students to be able to meet each other, give back to the community, and have a leg up when they go out and try to get a job. We want them to know the employers, and have that confidence. That’s a pretty intense goal. How do you guys go about doing that? We put on events throughout the year. They range from beer gardens to an etiquette dinner. There’s a really wide range of events, but the whole point is to build a sense of community within NAIT. We really want to get rid of that stereotype that NAIT is only a school of trade students. Business Connex is trying to build that sense of pride within the program, that we are a degree program now, and that we’re trying to show Edmonton that we’re here to stay. We’ve got some exceptional students that started our group, and it just continues on with more and more awesome people joining. What’s your role in all of that? My role is to approach students; just talk to them about what Business Connex is, because not a lot of people really know what we do. The name isn’t quite so obvious, so it’s great to just approach people in casual conversation, talking to classes about why I love the group and why people would want to get involved. It’s all about building that sense of pride, allowing people to say, “I go to NAIT, I’m getting an exceptional education, and I’m proud of it.”

CAMPUS

I’d imagine approaching people out of the blue would be difficult.

WE’RE TRYING TO SHOW EDMONTON THAT WE’RE HERE TO STAY

I wasn’t always so open. I was a little more shy, but I’ve found that the more open and passionate you are about something, the more likely it is that people are going to respond to you in a positive way. When I go up to someone, I’ve got it in my mind that I’m going to be able to relate to them on some level, and that that’s going to come through.


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Profile Edmonton - Volume 2 January 2011