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profileedmonton.com

FEBRUARY | 2011

VOLUME 2 ISSUE 6


THUR.FEB.10

THE MANSION

INDUSTRY AFFAIR

FRI.FEB.11

DENIM

F T. D J F A S H E N

SAT.FEB.12

F**K LOVE

A N T I - VA L E N T I N E S D AY

THUR.FEB.17

THE HOOD INTERNET

FRI.FEB.18

ENTOURAGE

F T. S A S H A G R E Y

SAT.FEB.19

SUNGLASSES AT NIGHT

SUN.FEB.20

PINK GLOW PARTY LONG WEEKEND


WE’RE GONNA TURN THIS TOWN

UPSIDE DOWN

WWW.FRE5H.NET - WWW.VINYLRETROLOUNGE.COM - 10740 JASPER AVE


If you had a twin you'd know what you look like in glasses... if not....leave it up to us!�

vision WOMEN

WITH

Opticians & Sunglass Specialists

10515 - 10 9 Street, Edmonton Tel: (780) 423-3937


ENTERPRISE

ENTERPRISE

CULINARY

FASHION

BEN STALEY

NOUR ABRAHAM

NIGHTLIFE

SPORTS

ROB TYNDALE

PUBLISHER

SCOTT FRANCIS WINDER

ART DIRECTOR

MATTHIAS EDWIN SMALE

OPERATIONS

JORDAN MATTHEW WATSON

PHOTOGRAPHY

sticks@andstones.ca PHONE 780 801 0909 FAX 866 634 5344

CRAIG ROY HOBBS BEVAN ALEKSANDER SAUKS

andstones.ca profileedmonton.com

POST-PRODUCTION

PROFILE ME profileedmonton.com/me

MATTHIAS EDWIN SMALE BEVAN ALEKSANDER SAUKS

COORDINATOR

JORDAN DAVID BLOEMEN

DERYK KAUSE

CONTACT STICKS & STONES Suite 5 9908 109 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T5K 1H5

AD INQUIRIES ads@andstones.ca

DISTRIBUTION S A R G E

CHARLI ELBER

CAMPUS

LOGAN McINTOSH

Cert o. nSW -COC-208 3

COMMUNITY

STEPHEN DEUTSCH

STACEY SPERLING

CAMPUS

JEFF SAVAGE


ENTERPRISE

derks.ca


ROB TYNDALE

How did Room 322 get started? While I was attending Grant MacEwan, a bunch of partners and myself decided to start up this store. Starting a company while in school must have presented some pretty unique challenges. It was largely an issue of time management. Basically, we had to manage our time and priorities and really keep things organized, while at the same time maintaining our grades. That was a really hard obstacle to face. Our main goal has always been to sell different lifestyles that people in Edmonton might not really be accustomed to. There are a lot of different styles from all over the world, and one of the things we want to do is bring in different brands that otherwise wouldn’t be in the city, brands that have a really distinct story or lifestyle behind them. Why did you guys decide to start the company then? A lot of students have a rough time balancing school and a job, let alone starting a business. Why not wait? There’s a lot of practical, real world knowledge that comes from running a business that applies back to school. Alternatively, it allowed me to transfer the knowledge that I was getting at school over to the business—sometimes in the same day. I’d learn something in class, and be able to bring it right over to the store afterwards. That practical experience in conjunction with the theories you learn in school has been just priceless. One thing I’ve learned is that some of the theories you hear in an academic setting might work in theory, but don’t really translate into real life. Getting both sides of that while in university was really interesting. And since school, what have you learned running Room 322?

OUR MAIN GOAL HAS ALWAYS BEEN TO SELL DIFFERENT LIFESTYLES

I’ve learned it’s all a process. We’re really not trying to make a quick buck overnight—we get that these things take time. You’ve got to build relationships with customers; you’ve got to build awareness. One of the things we really value is bringing in brands that people just aren’t familiar with, introducing them to new stuff. The one thing that caught us off guard was how important the story behind a brand is.


APPAREL PROVIDED BY DERKS

derks.ca

You’ve got a pretty impressive operation running here. Would you mind cluing us in as to how you got here? I studied mechanical engineering technology at NAIT. I loved everything about it; I’d highly recommend it. Did that education help you out a lot? In the industry, people sometimes think that as soon as you’ve got the word engineering in your title that you’re all book smart but can’t do much in the way of hands on. NAIT actually has time in the shop, time out using all of the different tools. It gives you an idea of how things are actually made; how it has to be possible to actually create whatever you’ve designed. It’s one thing to know the answer to the problem, but it’s another to be able to translate that solution to the welders in the back. I was actually just a guest speaker at the University. I did a talk on effective drawing, actually drafting to get the product you really want. And what is it that you do here? Lexitar is a family business—three brothers and my mom and dad. I’m our general manager, my twin brother is our office manager, and my dad is our operations manager. We’ve got seven or eight guys working in the back. Our primary field is called ‘miscellaneous metals.’ It includes stairs, ladders, and handrails. It’s the stuff bigger steel companies don’t want to do.

ENTERPRISE

Where do you guys think you stand on the line between a more procedural trade and something a little more creative?

DERYK KAUSE WE GET TO SOLVE A LOT OF PROBLEMS

That’s one of the reasons we’ve really enjoyed working with the University of Alberta, we get to solve a lot of problems. “Here’s the issue, make it pass code and fix it.” Is that a common approach? It depends entirely on the customer. Some have an idea, but have no clue as to what needs to happen, and they really just give us an open go ahead. Others like to babysit you through the whole thing. Both work.


profileedmonton.com

You’ve got a tattoo of a pig on your bicep. I’ve got to ask… Pork is my favourite meat. It’s just so versatile—you can do anything with it. It goes with any flavour, fruity or savoury, whatever you want. Plus it looks cool. You’re eighteen and running a catering company— that’s got to present some unique challenges. How did that get started? N53 Degrees catering, it actually started with my sister, she wanted me to do a Christmas party for her and some friends. I realized that Edmonton maybe doesn’t have the best food scene, and I wanted to try to change that. All the other companies only really catered to giant conferences and weddings—big amounts of people, and at that point you can only really hit a certain level of quality. I figured by scaling it down to about twenty people, done at people’s houses, I could keep that quality. So you’re trying for smaller, more intimate kinds of things? Basically you’re in a restaurant in your house. You’re catered to, you get multiple courses—we try to take a really modern approach to cooking. Classic dishes and flavor combinations with a twist. Stuff that people haven’t seen, tasted, or felt before. You can do some amazing things with food.

CULINARY

In addition to the company, I understand you have a book coming out?

BEN STALEY YOU CAN DO SOME AMAZING THINGS WITH FOOD

I went to a cooking competition in Vancouver when I was sixteen. I was the youngest person there, and out of nine people I managed to come in fourth. When I came back I was given a cookbook for Christmas, and my sister said, “Hey, you could do that.” That was just over two years ago. The basis of the first book, The Teenage Chef, is basic recipes with common ingredients that anyone can find. It’s trying to turn these really basic ingredients into something really good. The book comes out this summer. For information on N53 Catering, visit N53catering.com


urbanfashiongroup.com

You’re studying fashion at the University of Alberta? My major is clothing and textiles and my minor is fashion merchandising. Right now the program is really general; it really prepares you for all aspects of the fashion industry. Eventually, I want to see if I can go into fashion journalism.

NOUR ABRAHAM

More traditional fashion journalism? I think fashion is turning towards street wear; people are really looking to that for inspiration now. That being said, the catwalk is still a really important part of fashion. Everyone is looking at how people make outfits more individual. What do you think of Edmonton in terms of fashion? I guess another way of phrasing that is, how do you feel about trucker hats? I think that there’s a lot of room to grow, but saying that, I think we’ve come a long way. If you look back ten years, there wasn’t really any fashion industry, and that’s really just ten years. Now we’ve got Edmonton Fashion Week, which has evolved into Western Canada Fashion Week. We’ve got so many blogs, tons of people writing. There’s a long way to go, but I think the fashion scene is getting there.

FASHION

Do you think those kinds of events are important? Oh for sure, it’s definitely creating more awareness. When people think of Edmonton they don’t necessarily think of fashion, they think of hockey or oil, but there’s a lot of great stuff to find in the city. Oil rig workers and hockey players can get dolled up too. Have you been involved in Fashion Week? Last year I got to model some clothes for local design school graduates, in addition to doing some odd jobs backstage. It was fun, as you get to meet a lot of emerging designers.

THERE’S A LOT OF GREAT STUFF TO FIND IN THE CITY


where you fall in love

8738 109 street 780 433 5382 dacapocaffe.com


unionhall.ca

I think you’ve got to be a very specific kind of person to be able to work in nightlife. What made you want to work at Vinyl? I think I’m pretty good at adapting to people. A lot of different kinds of people come in, and if you can’t talk to them, and really get on their level—regardless of your opinion of them—it’s not the place for you. Everyone’s got a crazy bar story. I imagine working here you must see some things? I’ve seen people stealing disco balls off of the ceiling and playing basketball with them.

NIGHTLIFE

Exactly. I’ve tested that actually, it works surprisingly well.

Other random things… I’ve seen break dancers come in, keep a low profile that they know each other, and just go crazy out on the dance floor. People getting kicked out might be one of my favourite parts of this job. It’s also pretty entertaining for the rest of us. It’s usually someone who is ridiculously drunk and can’t really stand, at which point they get escorted out. That normally looks like a guy clutching onto some big beefy bouncer, getting carried out nicely. That’s actually sort of cute. You’re pretty busy from the sounds of it. In addition to working, you’re in school?

I’m taking economics and political science at the University. I’m not sure exactly what I want to do. I want to finish my degree before I go try to figure out what I want to do. Lastly, I hear you’ve done some modeling abroad? I’ve lived here most of my life, but I’ve spent a lot of time in Denmark as I’m half Danish and half Sudanese. I love it ridiculously. I started modeling when I was living there. We went to New York on a dance trip, and someone approached me in a flea market, asking if I wanted to do a show that night. That’s sort of how I started. Which happens to everyone at one time or another.

CHARLI ELBER I’VE SEEN PEOPLE STEALING DISCO BALLS


profileedmonton.com SPORTS

STACEY SPERLING

YOU HAVE TO TRUST PEOPLE TO PROTECT YOU


How did you get involved in basketball at the University of Alberta? I was at King’s University where I played basketball for three years. When I transferred to the U of A, I took a year off before I tried out for the team here. I already knew the coach and a few of the girls. I ended up being the first walk on they’d ever taken. I know a lot of people fall out of sports as they get older—what made you keep going? I was one of those kids that did everything; gymnastics, tennis, swimming, all of that stuff. In junior high I became more focused on basketball and volleyball. I started playing competitively around then. I think I was just naturally better at basketball than volleyball; I was able to compensate for my lack of height with general grit and hard work. So there’s a history for you in both team and individual sports. What appeals to you about playing on a team? In basketball you have to trust people to protect you, while also protecting them. You’ve got to work together to beat the other team, because you’re certainly not going to do it on your own. Some of my best friends I’ve met through sports—people I’m still really close to. If you’re playing a college or university sport, you’re with these people all of the time, six or seven days a week. Through that you build some incredible friendships just based on the stuff you have to push through—on or off the court. Any advice for people thinking about playing sports at a post-secondary level? In my experience, I didn’t necessarily get to where I was because I was the quickest or the tallest or the biggest. It’s because I always worked hard and because I was a team player. All the work I’ve ever put in has been worth it. I wouldn’t take anything back.


vinylretrolounge.com CAMPUS

WE’RE TRYING TO MAKE SURE THAT THE FUTURE WON’T BE LIMITED BY OUR ACTIONS TODAY

JEFF SAVAGE


You two are the founders of the Deliberation on Campus Sustainability. What exactly is that? LM The goal is to bring together students, faculty, and staff through a series of dialogues discussing campus sustainability, and how we can make a sustainable campus. Really focusing on areas where collaboration is possible and identifying the priorities that need to be addressed. Why did you two feel the need to start this project up? JS Basically we saw that at a University level there was a deficit of students and faculty in sustainability planning. With DoCS we’re trying to bridge that gap between students, staff, faculty, and higher administration. What are some of the issues that come into play when we’re talking about sustainability? JS We’ve talked to some people so far and have come up with sixteen recommendations as to what those areas are. The list included food, water procurement, energy, and transportation. LM Accountability and transparency are big ones, so is social justice. What’s the relationship so far between the University and your organization? LM We established a partnership with the University of Alberta’s Office of Sustainability. The idea originally formed in a class and after we’d thrown around some ideas we ended up making a connection with the University. Eventually we did a project proposal for them. They got excited and the project fit into their strategic planning. We created a partnership where we’re now working for the office of sustainability, bringing in those ideas. Trying to make it a reality. Is sustainability strictly an environmental issue? LM For me sustainability is a three-pronged issue. You’re looking at environmental sustainability, economic sustainability, and social sustainability. What we’ve been really focusing on is expanding that definition, so that people realize when we’re talking about sustainability, it’s not just environmental—it includes the whole community. JS I think what’s really important is to view it as one big working machine. Our world is incredibly complex, which means that environmental issues directly affect social issues. LM I think the other really important part is looking at it as intergenerational. We’re trying to make sure that the future won’t be limited by our actions today. For more information, you can visit www.sustainability.ualberta.ca/docs

LOGAN McINTOSH


profileedmonton.com

I know you’ve done volunteer work all over the city, but before we get into that, I understand you’ve done some work abroad? I lived in Costa Rica a few years ago doing volunteer work with a few different organizations. I did some national park conservation, worked with Habitat for Humanity, and worked a little on sea turtle conservation. Sea turtles? I’m sure there’s a real issue there, but frankly it just sounds adorable. Little baby sea turtles. We’d patrol the beaches, wait for the mothers to lay the eggs, and collect them so poachers and animals couldn’t get to them. We’d then take the eggs to a hatchery, and after they’d hatched, take the little guys back to the ocean to release them. With Habitat for Humanity I helped build a home for a family of five kids. They were living in what could loosely be called a warehouse, sectioned off with curtains. So we teamed up local construction workers to work on that. What kind of work have you been doing in the city?

COMMUNITY

I knew when I got back that I wanted to enroll with the peer support program at Grant MacEwan. It took a couple years to finally do, but last year I decided to go for it. I went through the training and it’s been an excellent experience. This year I was a trainer for new volunteers and, honestly, it’s turning out to be one of the best student services Grant MacEwan has to offer. We’re not counselors, but we’re trained to help students with anything. It’s totally anonymous and we’re here to help with academic issues, personal issues, absolutely anything. We’re an open door and an open ear, and we’re here to listen and help out.

STEPHEN DEUTSCH IT’S BABY STEPS

What kind of advice can you give to people who are thinking about volunteering? I think it can come across as sort of a daunting prospect. When I think about a lot of the volunteer work I’ve done, there are bigger things that I’m extremely involved with, but then there are these other things I’m involved with, but only because a friend needed a helping hand. I think every little thing a person does can really help to change the world. It’s baby steps, and taking all of those baby steps together. I don’t view it as a job. It’s meeting new people, getting out and doing those little things.


profileedmonton.com

DT

WEM

THRS

MON

MON

MON

MON

MON

TUES

MON

$1 Draught $2 Rockstar $3 Highballs

$5 NewCastle $4 Boots

Pints of Rickard’s

Highballs

$3 Highballs $3.50 Margaritas

Pints of Big Rock

$3.75 Highballs $3.75 Dom Bottles $3.75 Jack and Jäger

FRI $4 Highballs $4 Tequila Cazadores

SAT $3 Shots 780 702 2582 6240 99 Street unionhall.ca

TUES

TUES Pints of Big Rock

TUES

Pints of Canadian

$15 Pitchers

Vanilla Whiskey Paralyzers

$1 Draught $3 Highballs $4 Shots $10.25 Ponies

THRS

WED

WED

WED

THRS

$4 Pints

Malibu Pineapple

1/2 Price Pints of Molson

$2 12oz Draft $4 Martinis $7 Bulldogs

SUN

THRS

THRS

WED

Domestic Jugs

Domestic Jugs

$3 Dom Bottles $2 Hiballs

THRS

$3 Highballs $4 Shots

FRI

FRI

THRS

Captain Morgan Pints of Sleeman

Pints of Keith’s

TUES

780 497 7468 10125 109 Street thepint.ca

SAT Jägermeister

SUN Snakebite Pints 780 426 7784 10012 101 Avenue edmontonpubs.com

SAT Pints of Sleeman

SUN All Day Happy Hour 780 444 1752 8882 170 Street edmontonpubs.com

$9 Triples $2 Hiballs

FRI $4 Draught $4 Pints

SUN $7 Spiked Beer Happy Hour Prices 780 437 RACK 10544 Whyte Avenue theoldstrathconarack.com

TUES Jug of Sleeman

Jug Night

FRI Pints of Keith’s

SUN

$1 Draught $3 Highballs

FRI $3 Shots 780 428 0099 10736 Jasper Avenue oilcityroadhouse.com

TUES $2.75 Highballs $3.25 Cocktails

WED $2.75 Dom Draught $3.25 Import Draught $3.25 Highballs

THRS

Double Caesars Happy Hour Prices

$2.75 Bottles of Lucky $3.75 Highballs $3.75 Jack and Jäger

9013 88 Avenue edmontonpubs.com

FRI $3 Pints 3-8pm $24 Dom Table Kegs $4 Shots/ Pints

SAT Happy Hour 2-8pm

SUN $3.75 Dom Pints $3.25 Shots/Highballs $3.50 Cocktails, Imp Bottles, Coolers 780 432 5224 10511 Whyte Avenue filthymcnastys.ca


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Profile Edmonton - February 2011  

February 2011 issue of Profile Magazine - Edmonton.

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