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TE! HE DncAh of our T E V A S lau iss the sday,

Don’t m issue on Tue on mbour Educati h at Na e. rc a M g 6 n Colle Christia UR

TO O R OVER FO HEAD OK PAGE O ION B T E A C M FA INFOR RE YOUR E R O U M O SEC AND T TICKETS.

editor’s INGRID NELSON, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

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s the great Nelson Mandela once famously said, “Education is the most powerful weapon, which you can use to change the world”. How right he was. This month, Profile turns its focus to those in our community who are doing just that, using their knowledge as a platform to make their mark on the world across a diverse range of sectors. Speaking of which, on our cover this month, we showcase three former students of Nambour Christian College, who are shining examples of the power of a nurturing school environment. All hugely successful in their chosen fields, the trio opens up about their journey to achieve the career of their dreams and the important role the college played in providing a solid foundation to help them reach their goals. Also in this issue, Nicole Fuge chats with budding entrepreneur Renee Coman who is putting her degree in creative industries to good use by working with organisations whose staff regularly travel away from home, talk about innovative!

We introduce you to Tracey Heslop, who is using groundbreaking techniques to help children and adults overcome learning difficulties, and recently retired primary school teacher of 40 years, John Gorman, reflects on how teaching has changed over the years, while imparting some words of wisdom on what makes a great educator. University of the Sunshine Coast student, Caleb Mattiske, shares how his degree has allowed him the opportunity to study and travel abroad and make a real difference in strengthening links between Australia and the Indo-Pacific region – impressive, and at just 21 years old, another USC student, Jak Hardy, is starting his own not-for-profit organisation to encourage future leaders. Told you we have some bright sparks here on the Sunny Coast! We hope you enjoy this special education feature of Profile. Until next time, happy reading.

x Ingrid x

THE EDUCATION COVERSHOOT SHOT ON LOCATION AT NAMBOUR CHRISTIAN COLLEGE. PHOTOGRAPHY BY DUKE AND GYPSY, HAIR AND MAKE-UP BY MELINA DEE. CLOTHING PROVIDED BY WITCHERY, MYER AND JEANSWEST AT SUNSHINE PLAZA. ACCESSORIES BY AJIE.COM.AU

march 2018


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editor’s note let’s chat inspire john gorman people renee coman view jak hardy cover story lachlan smart, emma carlisle, gus peni future tracey heslop homegrown caleb mattiske leading ladies catherine molloy competitions the last word dr chris brown

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LET’S CHAT

back to

school WORDS NICOLE FUGE

Do you remember your first day of school? How about your first day of university or TAFE? While higher education may seem like a lifetime ago for many of us, an increasing number of people are furthering their studies later in life.

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hen I was 15, I decided I wanted to be a journalist and it was a desire which only grew stronger as I entered my university years. Being in an environment catering to my dreams, I flourished and I strove for success. But not everyone is as explicitly certain on their career goals at such a young age – goodness I know some people who, in their adult life, still don’t know what they want to be when they grow up. They say most people will have five careers in their lifetime, which explains why the number of mature-age students attending uni or TAFE increases each year. In the last financial year, 5680 mature-age (over the age of 24) students started TAFE studies at Mooloolaba, Maroochydore, Nambour and Sunshine Coast Health Institute campuses, with mechanical and industrial engineering and technology, general education programs, and human welfare studies and services the most popular fields of study. In the last three years, mature-age students account for just under two thirds of TAFE Queensland’s East Coast Region (Sunshine Coast to Bundaberg) and yearon-year, the Sunshine Coast makes up half of East Coast’s entire mature age student population.

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Meanwhile, at the University of the Sunshine Coast, 5770 mature-age students (aged 21 or over) enrolled in undergraduate degrees in 2017, making up 55 per cent of their total undergraduate enrolment, with the top five degrees being nursing science, primary education, commerce (accounting), paramedic science and social work. As I attended uni immediately after graduating high school, I often wonder what it would be like to study later in life, and so to find out, I called on a good friend of mine, Faye Coleman, who enrolled at USC when she was 30 years old.

I know that I still have 20 to 30 or more years of working to do, so I look FORWARD to completing my study and getting into a NEW CAREER.”

“I had no idea what I wanted to do for a career when I was in high school. All I knew was that I wanted a ‘gap year’ after high school was over, but my parents made

me get a full time traineeship,” she says. “I had no desire to do any more schooling after high school. I then doubted my ability the older I got, so didn’t chase it when I had a fleeting thought about what it would be like to go to university.” In December 2016, Faye enrolled in law and criminology at USC and was required to complete a tertiary preparation program (TPP) through USC. “It was a free program that allowed me to gain the ranking I needed to apply for my double degree and get me back into a ‘study’ headspace,” she says. Faye is completing her five-year course part time, which means it will be 10 years before she is a practicing lawyer. I had to ask – was it a deterrent that you will be in your 40s when you start your career? “No not at all. It actually encouraged me, as I know that I still have 20 to 30 or more years of working to do, so I look forward to completing my study and getting into a new career,” she says, encouraging anyone else contemplating a career change to just go for it. “Take the first step, even if it is a TPP course, give it a go. If you have any kind of feeling you might want to try it, then do it!” What are you waiting for? profilemag.com.au


OLD S CH OOL

VALUES WORDS LAUREN GROUNSELL PHOTOS BLISS PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEAH

When John Gorman started teaching, they had nothing but pens and notepads in the classroom. Fast-forward 40 years and each student has an iPad or laptop. But while technology has advanced, the retiring primary school educator believes the fundamentals of what makes a good teacher remain the same.

“T

he biggest thing that holds a child back is embarrassment, and in my classroom we try to lose that embarrassment so they really don’t care what other people think.” For John Gorman, there is nothing more rewarding than seeing one of his students throw their hand up, unabashed, to answer a question in class. Especially if, at the beginning of the year that student was too shy or embarrassed to have a go. PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

For the past 40 years John has worked as a primary school teacher, and says each year he taught, he aimed to see an improvement in each of his students, not just academically, but emotionally and socially. “Little kids come along to Prep and they can act, they can sing and they can dance,” he explains.

If you have a kid who thinks the right way, is HAPPY with themselves and has that CONFIDENCE, they can do anything they want.”

“Somewhere between then and Grade 12 they lose that. But anyone who makes it in life is going to have to have a go, and for that you need confidence in yourself.” After 40 years in front of the classroom, the past 23 of them spent at St Joseph’s

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JOHN GORMAN

Primary School in Nambour, John retired from teaching at the end of 2017. While he will be sorely missed by the school community, the impact he has made on young lives is lasting. John started his career as a 21-year-old at a school in Darra, in Brisbane’s south-west. Back then, the school was situated next to a migrant centre, and many of the students John taught had English as their second language. “There was a language barrier of course, but we quickly got around that,” he says. “I don’t think we would have had a computer in the whole school, not even the secretaries. “When technology did come in, we had to go to the library for it, whereas in the classroom I just left, we had 15 laptops and 15 iPads for 30 kids. “It’s fantastic, the kids don’t have to go and take out huge quantities of books, all the research they need is right there at their fingertips.” After Darra, John moved to St Paul’s Primary School in Woodridge in Brisbane’s south, before relocating to the Sunshine Coast. profilemag.com.au


INSPIRE

The biggest thing that holds a child back is EMBARRASSMENT, and in my classroom we try to lose that embarrassment so they really don’t care what other people THINK.”

And while technology has obviously advanced, John says there has also been significant changes to the curriculum. When he started teaching, John would look at each child as an individual and focus on their strengths, and says this is something he believes should continue. “I think they need to give the teachers a bit more free rein,” he explains of today. “Now you have to spend so much time on each particular subject, but back then you would look at the kid as a whole and gave them as much as you could.” Outside of the classroom John was known for his involvement in sport, and most recently, for the role he played in putting together school musicals at St Joseph’s. “Each year the musical would top the previous one, to the point where we were unsure how the one to follow could possibly be any better than the current one,” John’s former colleague, St Joseph’s teacher Amanda Norcott, explains. “But they always were, because John would explore a way to build upon what had already been achieved and then take it to the next level.” march 2018

While Amanda says John has ensured countless memorable moments, from performing in staff dance routines to his great sense of humour, what stuck with her most is his parting speech. “He advised parents to simply, ‘Stick with their kids’, no matter the circumstances and to the staff he reminded each of us to remember, ‘We are good people and that we have made a difference in the lives of many’,” she says. “And that is John Gorman in a nutshell – he sticks with people, regardless of who they are or where they come from, and he aspires to make a difference in people’s lives one day at a time, one person at a time.”

While John is ready to settle in to retirement, he says he would like to see more children taking up an instrument, dancing or singing, as overcoming that embarrassment flows on to every aspect of their lives. “If you have a kid who thinks the right way, is happy with themselves and has that confidence, they can do anything they want,” he says. profilemagazine

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PEOPLE

WHEN opportunity CALLS WORDS NICOLE FUGE PHOTOS BLISS PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEAH

Renee Coman is very much living in the now. Thriving in a digital landscape, this budding entrepreneur has an inherent ability to identify pain points and create viable solutions – not only for the betterment of the Sunshine Coast, but on a national and international scale.

T

he word opportunity is defined as a time or set of circumstances that makes it possible to do something, and Renee Coman is testament to that, capitalising on a series of life events culminating in the creation of a program changing the lives of fly-in fly-out families. Having forged a successful career as a photographer at Australia Zoo, Renee’s car was t-boned at 80kms/hr on Steve Irwin Way, seriously damaging her shoulder. But even after surgery and 12 months in recovery, she struggled to carry her commercial camera equipment and decided it was time to put down the tools. In 2013, the mother-of-two enrolled at University of the Sunshine Coast to study primary education. But while undertaking RENEE COMAN

her second practicum at the end of her second year, she found she didn’t agree with the schooling system. “My mentor used a computer twice over a six-week period and we’re teaching digital natives,” she says, explaining she never saw herself as a traditional teacher anyway. “I am very much a digital creative – I wanted to create engaging, meaningful content.” Renee changed to a Bachelor of Creative Industries with a Minor in Entrepreneurship, saying it gave her the direction, structure and clarity she needed. “It was going through those motions which helped me to not only have a business idea but to assess the viability of it and then to create something which allows me to put that in the market and see if that’s something the market will purchase,” she says. In 2016, Renee’s husband was made redundant from the fly-in fly-out job he had been doing for two years, and a week later her dad passed away having been in palliative care for months. “I was there for Dad and he passed, and while doing his Estate, my husband was home for six months to help me. Then he took on another role working away and I thought things would be different this

time – I needed to be surrounded by more like-minded women who were living the fly-in fly-out lifestyle, who truly understand the challenges,” she says. “I started a podcast interviewing and talking to other families, sharing their stories, their tips and tricks. I started hearing the same challenges over and over again; when they started they didn’t know what they were doing, they didn’t know what they were getting into, they felt underprepared, and had they have known what they know now they wouldn’t have done it, and that was because there was nothing to support them.” It was a lightbulb moment, prompting Renee to collaborate with many of those people to create content and case studies. Last year, she launched Distance Assistance, which licenses content to organisations with personnel who regularly travel away from home for extended periods, such as FIFOs, flight attendants, pilots and defence workers. profilemag.com.au


“The aim of Distance Assistance is to provide a range of content, created in collaboration with professionals in areas such as psychology and nutrition, to extend support for staff and help them avoid mental health conditions such as depression and anxiety,” she says. “During the on-boarding process, the employer can provide this platform and enroll both the employee and their family member and it gives them tips on setting up communication routines, how to manage the holiday period when you’re not together as a family unit, tips on physical health, and information on basic financial literacy. Collectively all of these help minimise the risks associated with mental health.” Renee says there have been a range of different studies into the mental health of FIFO workers. A State Inquiry in Western Australia, where Renee’s husband is based, found mental health rates on FIFO sites is double the Australian average. “There’s no one thing that contributes, it’s a combination and that’s where we really hope that with our platform, we can help the family members have context of

march 2018

what it’s like for the partners away and vice versa, and really expand the support network,” she says. “A lot of people make an assumption fly-in fly-out is limited to mining, but every week electricians, chefs, personal trainers and even cleaners are flying to large-scale remote construction sites.” While Distance Assistance is being rolled out across mining and construction sites, the next step is the aviation industry and then onto defence. “I showed it to an air hostess who said if there was a program like this in place when she started 15 years ago, it probably would have saved her marriage. That’s when you know you need to get this out there as soon as possible, if I can have that much impact on one person, let alone thousands…,” she says, trailing off. “The biggest thing I value in this world is my family, my marriage.” Another part of the project is using virtual reality, enabling employees to take a virtual site tour during the selection process and decide if they can live there for such long stints. “It costs anywhere from $5000 to $8000 to get a new recruit on site for day one, and with people staying for one night or one week and quitting, it’s expensive,” says Renee. “Emerging technologies help people ‘visit’ a remote location to not only see if it’s somewhere they can work, but the kids can see where Mum or Dad works. It’s something they normally wouldn’t be able to do and it gives the family at home the context of what it’s like. We’re using

emerging technologies to improve that relationship and combat the distance.” This is not the first innovative idea Renee has had, she was on the winning team for 2016’s Techstars Startup Weekend, pitching a new technology platform for surfers tracking swell. In April, Renee will run Startup Weekend 2018, with a food, health and wellbeing angle, aligning with the region’s economic development plan. “Since completing a Minor in Entrepreneurship, I’ve become excited about pursuing a higher degree by research, focusing on exploring the impact of events such as Startup Weekend and Startup Week on creating a sustainable entrepreneurial ecosystem on the Coast,” she says. “My goal is to support regional entrepreneurial ecosystems, like the Sunshine Coast, grow and thrive through reciprocity and trust.”

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PEOPLE

I showed it to an air hostess who said if there was a program like this in place when she started 15 years ago, it probably would have SAVED HER MARRIAGE.”

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EMPOWERING through education

Brightwater State School is creating global citizens with real world skills through the introduction of two innovative programs. From the principles of permaculture, to peer-topeer behaviour coaching, students are developing knowledge that far exceeds the constraints of the classroom.

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rom the outside, Brightwater State School is your everyday modern primary school. But after a quick peek around the grounds you’ll soon realise there are a lot of special things happening behind the scenes. From the Year 6 students donning fluorescent vests at lunchtime, to kids creating a learning garden, there’s plenty going on within the school that extends much further than reading, writing and arithmetic. Deputy principal, Shelley Butcher says one of the main focuses at Brightwater State School is empowering students through personalised learning. With this in mind, the school has introduced two innovative programs that are helping to create global citizens and leaders. The first is the Brightwater Buddies Peer Mentoring Program developed to support all students and led by Year 6 students who want to demonstrate leadership within the school. Under the guidance of head of student services, Candice Osborne, and teacher Jade Stack, it was launched as a proactive approach

WORDS CAITLYN SPANNER PHOTOS FLETCHER PHOTOGRAPHY

teach students how to get along and display greater independence in solving playground problems. “It’s about kids coaching kids,” says Candice, “What better way for our younger ones to learn problem solving strategies than from their older peers?” Any Year 6 student who wants to demonstrate leadership can put their hand up to be a buddy mentor. They’re provided with training, a snazzy fluoro vest, a clipboard and the confidence to head out into the playground to help their peers feel safe, supported and included. Shelley says the school is seeing great results from explicitly teaching kids strategies for navigating social situations in the playground. The second of the programs that has seen positive results throughout the school is their Apex program. The school has created a suite of programs for academic extension and this year will be highlighting the importance of sustainable practices within our world. “This year’s focus will extend our best and brightest to focus on improving our world rather than focusing on only improving themselves. We are a school that is proud of how we cater for our high achieving children, and we work hard to ensure we’re also creating children with a social conscience,” says Shelley. Spearheading the Apex program is Jo Donlan, a passionate classroom teacher who has embodied strong citizenship values in her classroom for years. “There’s a very strong philosophy of paying it forward in this school and that fits beautifully with the concept of us being global citizens in an interdependent world. Our aim is to encourage and teach children to take personal responsibility with every choice they make,” says Jo.

Through the introduction of a learning garden, the students have the opportunity to develop real-world skills that link with the curriculum. The children planned the complex garden using permaculture principles that will be used as a learning/ living space for multidisciplinary study in the future. “I think that risk-taking is the birthplace of innovation,” says Jo, “I want to encourage children be brave enough to create and trial their ideas because they’re the ones that are going to bring about change in the future.” The program has resulted in empowered students who are discovering new passions and real world skills that they in turn introduce to the wider community. “The positive thing about these programs is that they provide the opportunity for children to have a voice while helping to solve real world problems,” says Candice, “These children have a sense of purpose around what they can bring to their school community. They’re getting a direct feed into how our school moves forward.”

PRINCIPAL – ROBYN TAPLIN

To find out more about Brightwate r State School and how it can give yo ur child a bright be ginning to lifelon g learning, visit brig htwaterss.eq.edu. au, call 5438 3111, or email admin@brightwa terss.eq.edu.au.


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march 2018

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VIEW

LEADING THE

CHANGE WORDS LAUREN GROUNSELL PHOTOS CULLEN COLLECTION

At just 21 years old, Jak Hardy has done more to help others than most people will do in a lifetime. So it seems only fitting the university student is starting his own notfor-profit organisation, aptly named WorldChangers, to encourage future leaders.

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rowing up in a rural town has its benefits, but life isn’t always easy. As a child, Jak Hardy saw his parents struggle with unemployment, but even in the toughest times, they were always giving back to others. "My mum would bend down to pick up weeds and rubbish in the gutter on the walk to school, and my dad would always go out of his way to be generous to people,” Jak, who works at the University of the Sunshine Coast, explains. "They were always going above and beyond to help." It is this generosity of spirit that first encouraged 21-year-old Jak to volunteer, and ultimately led him to start his own not-for-profit organisation, WorldChangers. “I want to see a generation of young people who are equipped to lead, but to lead with a servant heart,” says Jak. “My hope is to challenge the norm of leadership and to empower people. If we had more politicians with that kind of heart and collaborative approach, we would see real social change."

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If we had more politicians with that KIND OF HEART and collaborative approach, we would see real social CHANGE.”

And in many ways, Jak himself is leading the charge. His current focus is on launching WorldChangers, which uses education, engagement, enterprise and real-life experiences to equip today’s youth in becoming future leaders. Jak says the organisation is set to launch this year, and works to connect schools, businesses, and local not-for-profits with those in need. “One of the first programs will see us partner with local business to have a fund of money to help disadvantaged kids get involved in extracurricular activities,” he says. “Through the organisation we’re working with partners to meaningfully recognise students who engage in global affairs and community service, or who demonstrate excellence and resilience in STEM (Science, technology, engineering and mathematics), business, and agriculture. “We’re also working with field workers in a number of different nations across the world to provide exposure trips.” WorldChangers is just one of the many ways Jak has volunteered his time for the benefit of others. He began in school leadership with World Vision, and went on to apply these skills in an active role at the University of the Sunshine Coast (USC). Just three months into his university studies, Jak was elected board director of the student guild, and later went on to hold the title of president. His first project was to work with his team to establish an advocacy and wellbeing program for students in need of accomodation and emergency support. When a devastating earthquake struck march 2018

JAK HARDY

Nepal in 2015, he and his team turned their focus to helping those affected at the university. The aftermath of the earthquake left many of USC’s Nepalese students in need of financial assistance and emotional support. "Banks were destroyed, families were lost and students lost their financial network,” Jak explains.

My hope is to CHALLENGE the norm of leadership and to EMPOWER people.”

As international students are required to pay their university fees as they go, Jak’s team advocated on behalf of the uni to have these payments annulled for the rest of the semester until the students could access their funds back home. Jak studied undergraduate law at USC, before deferring his degree to study postgraduate business at the University of New England. He has also studied human rights law in Europe, and holds a Diploma of Ministry. His community work has seen him represent Australia at the Commonwealth Youth Peace Ambassadors Network, an organisation that focuses on promoting

peace and countering violent extremism. “It’s the biggest youth program in the world,” Jak explains. “I was, for a short time, the pacific coordinator for policy and advocacy. Fiji had a coup only a decade ago and we looked at ways of recovering from these kinds of events. We also looked at Australia’s approach to human rights.” It’s little wonder that Jak’s tireless efforts saw him honoured with the title of Sunshine Coast Youth Citizen of the Year in 2017, an honour he used to inspire other Sunshine Coast youths to help others. And going forward, Jak says he may be interested in policy making. “I always shied away from the idea of going into policy making, but the more I engage in those spheres the more I see the need to advocate for young people and disadvantaged families in our region,” he says. What keeps him going is his desire to see others succeed. “What motivates me are the stories of people not just overcoming disadvantage, but using their own achievements to help others,” he says. “Like young teenage mothers who are starting their own businesses and giving back. Stories like that make me realise that the human spirit is innately designed to do good.” profilemagazine

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Phone Pacific Jaguar on 5458 9786 and book your test drive in the all new Jaguar E-Pace! www.pacificmotorgroup.com.au

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WORDS NICOLE FUGE PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED

Exceeding Academic Expectations At Caloundra City Private School, academic excellence, self-discipline and gracious social manners are cultivated, encouraged and valued. And it’s this fresh and innovative approach, coupled with the school’s flexibility and independence, that ensures every student achieves their potential.

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aloundra City Private School substantiates the research that a student’s academic ability is largely determined by the culture in which they are learning. “A lot of what we do is the character development, and independent schools do that really well, that’s a major point of difference,” says Dr Dirk Wellham, CCPS school principal. “We have a particular program, CROPS (confidence, resilience, organisation, persistence, sociability), which develop these character traits, and that’s one of the key factors in academic outcomes. “That’s evidenced by the quality of people who graduate from our school; they're sought after by employers because of the qualities they have; their control, manners sophistication, they communicate well and are good with relationships.” Dr Wellham says the other factors linked with the research are emotional intelligence and the influence of peers. “There are four adolescent types of emotional intelligence: firstly, your ability to understand your own emotions and be able to communicate them; secondly is awareness, recognition and understanding other people’s emotions, or empathy; the third factor is emotional

If you have a supportive, open environment with high expectations, excellence and integrity, then you’re going to get a better academic result.”

management and control; the fourth factor is how your emotions affect your thinking, called emotions direct cognition,” he says. “People with high emotional intelligence are well above the average in terms of OP results in Queensland, so independent schools like ours are developing emotional intelligence through the interactions between our students.” Interestingly, emotional management and control is developed from Dad; and understanding the emotions of others and understanding your own emotions and expressing them, come from Mum. However at puberty, a child’s friends take over from Mum in terms of expressing their own emotions. “The peers become really important, particularly in high school years as they’ve taken over from Mum, the importance of that is you need to have a really good environment, if you have a supportive, open environment with high expectations, excellence and integrity, then you’re going to get a better academic result.” Not only does Dr Wellham have more than two decades of experience as a private school principal, the past six at CCPS, he completed his PHD on the relationship between the academic achievement (OPs) of students in independent schools and their involvement in co-curricular activities like music, sport, community service, debating and chess.

DR DIRK WELLHAM, CCPS SCHOOL PRINCIPAL

“I measured a number of students with their OP and the amount of hours and what activities they did in their schooling years,” he says. His research found the busiest children were the highest academic achievers and it’s for this reason CCPS encourages their students to partake in co-curricular activities and recently opened their stateof-the-art multi-purpose hall for music, media arts and sports. “We’re small and flexible enough and independent as a non-denominational school, so we can put in place whatever people need for their child,” he says. “We really help our children achieve at a higher level, it’s about expectations and standards, but we’re also able to help the individuals who are not the highest in literacy and numeracy, but are really good people. The end result is when the students graduate Year 12, they are really good people who you’re proud to know, that’s what independent schooling aims to do and what we can help families with.”

Find out how Caloundra City Private School can offer flexible learning options for your child and help them become high achievers. Phone 5437 5800 • Email admin@ccps.qld.edu.au Visit the website ccps.qld.edu.au


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classABOVE

COVER STORY

A

WORDS INGRID NELSON PHOTOS DUKE AND GYPSY

As they say, it takes a village to raise a child and those involved in their most formative years throughout their schooling play a vital role in shaping their future. Profile chats with three past students of Nambour Christian College to discover how the ethos behind this innovative school fostered the unique talents of these remarkable young people.

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o provide a secure and supportive Christ-centred learning community, where a commitment to excellence, creativity and service is encouraged and modelled.” The mission statement at Nambour Christian College speaks volumes about the calibre of young people this school produces, and if the three bright sparks I had the pleasure of chatting to recently are any indication, they are certainly doing something right. Celebrating almost four decades as one of the Sunshine Coast’s leading Christian schools, the college has grown from its first intake of just 36 students in 1980 to a large facility offering private school education from Prep right through to Year 12.

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Currently providing 1150 students with state-of-the-art classrooms, outdoor education and co-curricular activities ranging from music to sports and performing arts, the college recently added an early learning centre supporting the education and spiritual development for children as young as 15 months. A teacher at the college almost from its beginnings, recently appointed principal, Geoff van der Vliet, has worn many hats throughout his 30-year career at the school and is passionate about his new leadership role. “I started teaching mathematics and science at the college in 1988,” says Geoff. “As the college grew in the ‘90s, I was entrusted with a few responsibilities such as

mathematics coordinator and high school coordinator. When the college developed a middle school in 1999, I became head of senior school. Then in 2006, I moved into the role of deputy principal for the college and then head of middle school in 2015 and principal in January this year. “As principal, I start each day feeling excited and somewhat overwhelmed by the responsibility and end each day being very thankful.” Having taught all three of our cover stars, Geoff says he is not surprised by their success since graduating from the college. “Gus, Emma and Lachie were excellent students and it is no surprise to me that they are contributing so much to the community in their adulthood,” says Geoff.

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Gus, Emma and Lachie were EXCELLENT students and it is no surprise to me that they are contributing so much to the COMMUNITY in their adulthood.”

“They each demonstrated inspirational character and high moral integrity. Gus was always a smiling, respectful and kind student who worked very hard. Emma’s work ethic was incredible and always demonstrated commitment to excellence. Lachie was a calm and focused student with an unwavering passion for personal development.” With a vision for the college to continue developing the concept of care, belonging and building community through authentic relationships for each student and staff member, Geoff says the focus is on preparing students to excel in the inevitable challenges of life, regardless of choice of vocation. “It is a privilege to work with the wonderful students and amazingly talented staff at Nambour Christian College. I just hope I can assist them to continue to develop meaningful opportunities for students.”

EMMA WEARS KNIT $119.95 AND DENIM PANTS $129.95 FROM WITCHERY SUNSHINE PLAZA, NECKLACE $140 FROM AJIE.COM.AU. GUS WEARS SHIRT $59.99 AND JEANS $99.95 FROM JEANSWEST SUNSHINE PLAZA. LACHLAN WEARS SHIRT $59.99 AND JEANS $79.99 FROM JEANSWEST, TOMMY HILFIGER TEE $49.95 FROM MYER SUNSHINE PLAZA.

GEOFF VAN DER VLIET, PRINCIPAL OF NAMBOUR CHRISTIAN COLLEGE

LACHLAN SMART

Lachlan Smart has always been one to dream big. Not afraid to take on a challenge, the plucky 20-year-old became a household name two years ago when he achieved his incredibly ambitious dream of becoming the youngest person in the world to circumnavigate the Earth in a single engine aircraft, breaking a Guinness World Record in the process. However, a place in the record books wasn’t the drive behind this young pilot’s motivation, but rather a dream to inspire other young people to follow their dreams. A self-confessed aviation fanatic, Lachlan knew from a very young age he was born to fly. “I always say I bleed av gas,” jokes Lachlan, “I love anything that can get off the ground. I remember being two years old, sitting with a bucket of chips with my mum next to me, watching the planes take off and land for hours. I thought they were the coolest thing in the world, still do.” Chatting with Lachlan over coffee, it’s immediately apparent this young man’s confidence and maturity are well beyond his years and it’s easy to forget that he is just 20 years old, so I am not surprised to learn that it was at the tender age of 15 that he decided to take on this mammoth adventure. “I was sitting on the lounge at home one day thinking about some of the fantastic ideas my friends had to start great projects or take on world issues, but often they

would say, I’ll do it later, or I’ll do it when I’m older,” says Lachlan. “But if you keep saying that, you will never do it, I thought, what’s wrong with now? What can I do to prove that anything is possible at any age if you put your mind to it. “Ironically, at the same time on the television up came a story called Flyin’ Ryan, about a guy who had flown around the world at 19 and I thought, ‘That’s amazing, I can do that’, and so I decided I was going to be the youngest person in the world to fly around the world solo.” So where does this confidence stem from I ask? “I have a great family and I went to an awesome school where the teachers were great mentors to me,” says Lachlan. That college was Nambour Christian College (NCC), where Lachlan was a student from Prep through to Grade 12. “I loved NCC, it was fantastic. It was always somewhere that really fostered people’s desire to go and do things bigger than just the norm, and that was always what I was about,” says Lachlan. “I wanted to be able to step outside my comfort zone and be able to take on new challenges and they really supported that. “I had always been one to say outrageous things and aim for the stars, so my teachers and parents were probably shocked but they weren't really surprised.” But what Lachlan didn’t envisage was just how difficult it would be to turn his dream into reality. “I always look back and think I was a bit naive. I think youthful naivety is incredibly important when you are going to take on a huge challenge because when you are too experienced often that can tend to narrow your vision too much,” he says. “I didn’t know anything about flying around the world, and although I had a lot of flying hours under my belt, I hadn’t even gone solo at this stage. I started building a team, trying to get some profilemag.com.au


I think you make your own LUCK in life. It’s a choice, not something you fall into or are given. I made that choice and I ENCOURAGE other people to make it as well.”

PHOTO BY REBECCA SMITH

sponsorships, but for a full year I didn’t get any support. I had to pull $380,000 together and to be honest after a year I did start to think, maybe I’ll give up, it’s too hard. But then a Brisbane law firm came on board and from there things started to move rapidly and we had sponsors from all over the country.” But that was only the beginning, then came endless hours of intensive training with specialised pilots and a huge team of aviation supporters, so when the big day finally arrived, Lachlan was ready. Taking the controls of a Cirrus SR-22 single engine prop, the nervous 18-year-old took off from Sunshine Coast Airport at 4am on 4 July, 2016 on a 10-week journey that would cover almost 24,000 nautical miles, including 26 stops in 20 countries on five continents. “For the first few flights I was incredibly nervous because I was flying a modified aircraft that was well over its normal maximum weight limits, because I had extra fuel on board, which I had planned for and trained for but it was still scary when you are doing it,” he says. “I still remember the feeling of taking off in the dark in an overweight aircraft, pushing that throttle lever forward and feeling the 310-horsepower engine kick into life and all of a sudden you are moving at 130 kilometres down the runway, you reach speed, pull back on the control column and you are into the sky. “It’s an incredible feeling every time, I still love it. I have done thousands of take offs and landings and I still love every single one I do.” First stop was Fiji and apart from leaving his laptop and lunchbox behind, the ninehour flight went smoothly and Lachlan soon found his stride, but it wasn’t without its challenges. “I thought if something is going to go wrong it will be on the first flight. I was most worried about it coming back on Mum and Dad. I had a lot of money from march 2018

sponsors and if I didn’t fulfil the contract they would want it back. So yes it was a lot of pressure at 18,” he says. “But I survived somehow. The whole thing took 54 days from take off to landing but it felt like two years. There were some horrendous times, I was arrested in Sri Lanka, I thought I was going to get shot down in Egypt, massive storms over the Pacific Ocean and the Mediterranean. So many things could have gone wrong but it came down to that two years of solid training and planning, I had a back up plan for everything.” Completing his mission, an emotional Lachlan arrived home to the cheers of family, friends and teachers at the Sunshine Coast Airport on 26 August, 2016. “Coming back, I had a thousand emotions, but most of all I was just happy to be home. I landed on the same runway I had done my training on, taxied under the massive water jets and shut down the aeroplane,” he says. “There were 450 people there; the stage band from NCC, which I used to play with, were there playing Come Fly With Me, my teachers were there. It was surreal. I gave the crowd a wave and gave Mum one big hug.”

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These days, Lachlan is enthralling audiences with this incredible story of motivation and overcoming obstacles and failure as a keynote speaker, and the irony isn’t lost on him, given that public speaking used to be his biggest fear. “I was petrified of speaking in front of people at high school,” he says. “My palms would sweat and I would be shaking, now I’m quite happy getting up in front of 3500 people and giving a 45-minute keynote presentation because I am passionate about it. It’s my subject, and when you find something you are passionate about it becomes a lot easier.” His message to the youth of today is simple. “I think you make your own luck in life. It’s a choice, not something you fall into or are given. I made that choice and I encourage other people to make it as well.” profilemagazine

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COVER STORY

GUS PENI

Gus Peni has a smile that lights up the room. A popular student at Nambour Christian College, known for his personable and kind demeanour, I’m not surprised to discover his peers voted him Year 12 vice captain, despite having only joined the school in Grade 10. Born in Rabaul, Papua New Guinea, Gus was adopted by an Australian aid worker when he was 10 years old and moved to Australia when he was 17. “I guess my birth parents were hoping for a better life for me if I was adopted, which was a good thing,” says Gus. “We still keep in touch and I get back there to visit them and my siblings.” Although the move to a new country wasn’t without its challenges, Gus says he was lucky to be welcomed with open arms by Nambour Christian College and its students, describing his two-and-a -half years there as some of his most memorable.

“It was tough, everything was hard. At first it was the culture, the humour was different too, I didn’t even know if they were telling jokes, let alone the academic part,” says Gus, reflecting on his first days in the country. “We were learning basic grammar back in Papua New Guinea and they were learning about Shakespeare. I had to have extra tutoring after school and NCC was great with that in terms of getting me up to speed. They were so good at getting me settled into the school and made me feel welcomed by finding the right buddies for me, we are still friends and one of them went to uni with me and helped me through it as well. “It was very welcoming. Everyone knew my name and said hi. I always felt so supported.” Remembered by his teachers as extremely hard working, Gus’s efforts were rewarded in Grade 12 when he graduated and earned a place at university. “Year 12 was one of the best years, I got an OP score, made it to uni and I passed English, which was a major highlight for me,” says Gus. Armed with a Bachelor of Accounting and Financial Planning, Gus was offered a position with Neighbours Aid overseeing their overseas projects – a role that could not be more fitting for this empathetic and kind-hearted young man. “We have two departments, one is domestic and they look after all the charity shops in South-east Queensland and the other is the projects we oversee in six different countries, which is what I do,” says Gus.

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“I look after their finances, all the money sent overseas, the reporting, the regulations we have to deal with and planning for the future.” It’s a big job, but Gus says it is the rewards of seeing the smiles on the faces of the children they help that is his biggest motivation and he loves every minute of it. “We currently have two projects in Africa, in Kenya and Malawi, we just finished building a high school in Malawi and we are working on a high school in Kenya. We also help the kids in the orphanages and in India we are working with women affected by domestic violence to try and give them their dignity back by teaching them new skills.”

When you travel to developing countries, the SMILES on the kids’ faces is the best. It’s the time you spend with them that’s most IMPORTANT.”

Always one to put his hand up when it comes to helping the local community, Gus is also an integral part of a golf project to help break isolation in communities in areas such as disability and indigenous cultures “I love golf. I actually played for my country,” says Gus. “So when a good friend of mine, who is a professional golfer, set up the charity and asked me to help out, I jumped at the chance to come on board as their treasurer.” It’s been quite the journey for Gus, and it’s one that has come full circle. Blessed with the opportunity to reach his full potential, he is now giving back to those who are less fortunate. “When you travel to developing countries, the smiles on the kids’ faces is the best. It’s the time you spend with them that’s most important, it’s even more valuable than money. They are so grateful for your time and coming over. “When I was in school in Papua New Guinea we had people come from overseas to visit. I used to be so excited and now I still see it today when we take teams over. It’s the most rewarding and satisfying thing.”

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EMMA CARLISLE

Tall, elegant and glamorous, on first impressions you would be forgiven for assuming final year medical student Emma Carlisle had stepped straight off the catwalk instead of the hospital ward. Not only has this modest 23-year-old been genetically blessed with good looks, she also has an incredible head on her shoulders, with plans to further her study after graduating as a doctor later this year to eventually qualify as a neurosurgeon. The eldest daughter of two doctors, Emma has had her sights firmly set on following her parents’ footsteps into the medical profession for as long as she can remember, but it was one of her primary school teachers who taught her an important lesson that would stick with her in the years to come. “I remember I had a lot of teachers at Nambour Christian College who were very encouraging, in particular my Year Five teacher, Mr Natoli. I remember him asking me where I wanted to go and I think even back then I said I wanted to be a doctor. He said, ‘Okay, if that is your long term goal, you can’t expect to get there unless you have short term goals along the way’. That really stuck with me, I couldn’t expect to want to be something later on if I didn’t set short term goals. “Throughout high school, I had teachers who were very supportive of me wanting to do better, that was the common thread. I always wanted to do my best and they pushed me to improve. “I was at the college from Grade One to Year 12 and I think my parents were drawn to the college because of the continuation from primary to high school and they were very impressed with the supportive and nurturing environment they offer.” Despite both being general practitioners, Emma says her parents didn’t influence her decision to become a doctor, in fact they encouraged her to keep her options open and consider other career choices as well as medicine. “At one point, I thought maybe I was being swayed that way because I had grown up around that so I did look at a whole range of other things but I kept coming back to it, because I have always been fascinated by the human body and the more I have studied it, the more I enjoyed it,” she says. march 2018

I have always been FASCINATED by the human body and the more I have studied it, the more I ENJOYED it.”

COVER STORY

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Despite being a diligent student who always strived for excellence, Emma is the first to admit that it has taken sheer hard work, commitment and encouragement to get where she is today. “Wanting to do well and to better myself was always my drive. I wouldn’t say that I sailed through, it was a lot of hard work, a lot of study, I was not one of those people who just pulled it out of nowhere. I also had a good group of friends at school who were like-minded and while they didn’t necessarily want to do the same thing, we had healthy competition among us.” Remembering the pivotal moment in her life when she discovered she had earned herself a place at the University of Queensland medical school is one Emma will never forget. “It was a classic case of I didn’t think I would get it. I went to Malawi with Nambour Christian College on a mission trip and a friend and I studied for the UMAP on the plane on the way back. In my mind I thought I will give it a shot and I ended up getting in,” she says. “At the time I was so shocked. I had dreamed about it for so long.” After seven long years at university, Emma will become a doctor when she graduates later this year and although she still has a long way to go in terms of her ultimate career goals, understandably she says it can’t come soon enough. “I am looking forward to not being a student, but I have so much ahead of me still. When you look at people who are consultants, they have so much knowledge and it’s so inspiring to learn from them.” So where does this talented young doctor see herself in 10 years? “If I could choose tomorrow it would be a surgeon 100 per cent,” she says. If Emma’s drive and determination so far is anything to go by, I have no doubt this is a name we will be seeing more of in the future. 25


FUTURE

a new

vision

WORDS LAUREN GROUNSELL PHOTOS BLISS PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEAH

Dealing with dyslexia can not only be frustrating, it can be a significant roadblock in a child’s learning. Tracey Heslop knows only too well of the frustrations, and focuses her work on correcting a little-known physiological condition that can attribute to learning difficulties.

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racey Heslop describes it as similar to thinking through fog. The ability to process letters becomes hindered, leaving the brain scrambling to make sense of words on a page. Living with dyslexia is not only frustrating but can greatly impact a child’s learning, leaving them lacking in confidence and self-esteem. But for some, there is an answer and Tracey hopes by spreading the word, she can help those struggling with the condition. Tracey runs The Alison Lawson Centre Sunshine Coast, which focuses on Remedial Visual Dyslexia Therapy. The centre, based in Nambour, aims to correct a little-known visual processing issue where the eye struggles to focus, which can exacerbate dyslexia. Tracey explains a moving focal point in one of the eyes can result in suppression in the visual cortex part of the brain, leaving it hindered in its ability to process images from that eye. The brain then struggles to make sense of what the eye sees.

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“The suppression acts like a thick fog. It makes it harder for people to stay focused and very hard for them to remember those building blocks of reading and writing,” says Tracey. “Normally their working memory can be quite poor and it’s very hard for them to learn, as all of their energy is going into making sense of the words they are seeing. “It can lead to all sorts of negative belief systems, an emotional response can be anxiety or antisocial behaviour, causing them to give up. They can lose their confidence, self-esteem and joy.” At the centre, they work to improve the unsteady focus through visual training and strengthening, but Tracey says there can be multiple issues that affect one’s learning, and the treatment is only suitable for those who present with the visual processing issue. So how does the treatment work? Tracey explains they stimulate the weak eye by using a special machine and eye strengthening techniques to steady the focal point across 10 one-hour sessions.

Reading difficulties can lead to so much FRUSTRATION, and the ones who are absolutely brilliant and intelligent are the ones most frustrated as they can’t UNDERSTAND why they can’t do what the other children are doing.”

“The machine has a light which shines through and stimulates the neurons in the visual cortex part of the brain, layer by layer, to get them working again,” she says. “There are a number of different orthoptic exercises, techniques and lenses we use that strengthen the internal and external muscles of the eye. “We also have to retrain the brain to take control of the visual to process images the way we want it to.” profilemag.com.au


FUTURE

“ Part of her work includes tutoring, helping dyslexic children who are behind in their reading and writing to get back on track as their focus improves. “We recently had a young boy in Year 4 who was 26th in his class for spelling, and two months after treatment, he is now sixth. “Reading difficulties can lead to so much frustration, and the ones who are absolutely brilliant and intelligent are the ones most frustrated as they can’t understand why they can’t do what the other children are doing.” One woman who knows only too well how frustrating it can be is Sunshine Coast mother Alice Finnerty, whose eight-yearold son Santiago Castellanos Finnerty was diagnosed with dyslexia. “When Santiago was trying to read, the images and words on the page would jump around,” she says. “I can’t even put into words the frustration and daily humiliation he felt.” After her son’s diagnosis, Alice says they tried everything, from speech therapists to art therapy, but nothing improved Santiago’s learning. She called the Alison Lawson Centre as a last resort, and admits she was skeptical when told there could be a way to dramatically improve Santiago’s dyslexia. But after the first four eye treatments, Santiago, who just completed Year 2, read his first words, a street sign on the way home from his appointment. “He has come so far in his reading and writing, it’s miraculous,” says Alice. While Santiago has improved march 2018

The suppression acts like a THICK FOG. It makes it harder for people to stay FOCUSED, and very hard for them to remember those building blocks of reading and writing.”

TRACEY HESLOP

dramatically, he is still behind his peers in literacy, but with twice-weekly tutoring, Alice says he should be on the same level by the end of Year 3. “It’s not a miracle cure, he now has to go back and take all his lessons again, but he’s now taking them in and absorbing them,” she says. The Alison Lawson Centre Sunshine Coast is one of 11 centres around the world. The treatment was formulated off the back of Alison Lawson’s research, an

orthoptist who spent 50 years working with children, particularly those diagnosed with dyslexia. Tracey, a visual therapist trained by Alison Lawson, previously pioneered the Blue Mountains Centre before opening the Nambour branch in 2015. She says the changes it makes to people’s lives is what makes her job worthwhile. “What I would like to say to people with dyslexia is, there is hope of learning becoming easier,” she says. profilemagazine

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COMMUNITY

WORDS CAITLYN SPANNER PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED

Brisbane Catholic Education welcomes a brand new P-12 school to the Sunshine Coast. Set to open in Bli Bli in 2019, Good Samaritan Catholic College will be a school for families looking for a sense of community in a modern setting.

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riony Currell is a vivacious and bubbly mother-of-two, who greets everyone she comes across with a beaming smile. As a proud local of more than 20 years, she’s called Bli Bli home since working at the local newsagency as a teenager. While Briony and her husband spent years abroad, Bli Bli always remained the home base for the couple, who continue to travel as often as they can with their two young children, Zoe and Noah. The Currell family now has a home in the newly developed Parklakes community which is just a stone’s throw away from the new Brisbane Catholic Education (BCE) school site, Good Samaritan Catholic College, that’s set to open in 2019. Having studied a Bachelor of Arts in Japanese, a Graduate Diploma in Education, majoring in religion, and gaining several certificates in theology and ministry, Briony’s other passion is education. As the campus minister at BCE school, St Teresa’s Noosaville, for the last 12 years, Briony has become a respected member

of the Catholic and BCE community. She was deservedly appointed the secretary role of the Good Samaritan Catholic College steering committee and is excited to welcome the new school to her close knit community. Briony says the steering committee has worked together to come up with the school motto Journey with Compassion as well as the school name, the colours and the logo. “It’s been a really amazing experience,” she says, “You don’t really realise how much goes on behind the scenes in starting a new school.”

It’s been a really AMAZING experience. You don’t really realise how much goes on behind the scenes in STARTING a new school.”

With over 140 schools under the umbrella, BCE has been responsible for shaping the lives of tens of thousands of Queensland children for decades. There are already 24 schools in the northern region (Sunshine Coast and beyond), and

Good Samaritan Catholic College will join a community of a number of Sunshine Coast Catholic Schools. Eventually growing to more than 1500 students, the college is planned to open in 2019 with Prep to Year 3 and Year 7 students. The first Year 7 students will graduate from Year 12 in 2024 and the first original Prep students in 2031. Briony is not only on the steering committee, she also plans to send her two children there in 2019. “Zoe will be a foundation Prep student. And Noah will be in the first Year 3 cohort. Noah’s cohort will be the first to graduate the primary school and go into the high school. And Zoe’s cohort will obviously be the foundation that will go all the way from Prep to 12,” Briony says excitedly. She’s thrilled to be part of a thriving community in Parklakes and says that the seamless Prep-12 education available at Good Samaritan Catholic College will be beneficial to families on the Sunshine Coast.

BRIONY CURRELL WITH HER DAUGHTER ZOE. PHOTO BY FLETCHER PHOTOGRAPHY


WHAT’S IN A NAME? Brisbane Catholic Education Executive Director, Pam Betts, says the name, Good Samaritan Catholic College was reflective of the values which the college will represent. “The Good Sams were the first Catholic religious congregation to be founded in Australia in 1857 and they have worked tirelessly, not only in education but to assist the most vulnerable people in our society,” she says. “Inspired by the example of the Samaritan of Luke’s Gospel, these ladies respond with energy and creativity to the challenges of our society. “The college’s motto, Journey with Compassion, beautifully encapsulates these values and I know will inspire the students, staff and families of the entire college community.” Elizabeth Brennan a Sister of the Good Samaritan has had a connection to the Sunshine Coast for years and worked at one of BCE’s schools in the 1970s and ‘80s. Because of this, she’s been enthusiastically watching the progress of the new school and reflects on the parable of the Good Samaritan and how its meaning will translate to Good Samaritan Catholic College.

“The parable is about inclusivity, where the dignity of each person is respected and everyone is recognised as a neighbour,” she says. “There’s a very practical compassionate love in that parable. For me it’s a very tender care and I think that sort of parable offers ongoing relevance for the possibility of love and compassion and peace in today’s world.” Sister Elizabeth believes whether you’re Catholic or not, compassion is a universally significant virtue that translates across all cultures, countries and religions, making it a fitting quality for the college to emphasise.

Stage one of the Good Samaritan Catholic College master plan includes: • Three generously-sized learning areas for prep students • Seven general learning areas for Year 1 to 4 and Year 7 and 8 • Four specialist rooms including food technology, science, visual arts and industrial design • Tuckshop, lunch covered area and uniform shop • Two full-size, covered PE courts, one dedicated for primary students and the other for secondary students • Two-storey administration building incorporating resource centre, student services, and three (temporary) general learning areas • Extensive car parking and pick up and set down zones

Families may register their expression of interest now, enrolments will open soon and information sessions will be held in the coming months.

The Sunshine Coast’s newest Prep to Year 12 college is located at 185 Parklakes Drive, Bli Bli. To find out more, visit www.goodsamaritan.qld.edu.au


HOMEGROWN

cultural experience

WORDS NICOLE FUGE PHOTOS BLISS PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEAH

Having completed part of his degree with the support of the Australian Government’s New Colombo Plan, Sunshine Coast university student Caleb Mattiske has played an important role in strengthening links between Australia and the Indo-Pacific region.

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tudying abroad is high on the list of experiences for university students, dreaming of educational adventures in foreign lands, where they can not only continue learning, but greatly add value to their life skills. With one semester left in his arts/business degree majoring in geography and international business, 22-year-old Caleb Mattiske has taken full advantage of his time at the University of the Sunshine Coast. In 2015, he spent two weeks in Battambang, Cambodia as part of a semester-long sustainable tourism project. Then in 2016, the Suncoast Christian College graduate spent a year abroad, attending a semester at Konkuk University in South Korea, a three-month business internship at the Australian Chamber of Commerce in Korea, in Seoul, and another three-month internship in Suva, Fiji, at the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Oceania regional office.

PHOTO BY DUKE AND GYPSY

“That was unreal because I got to meet a large portion of the Australian ex-pat community in Seoul and hear about what they’re doing and meet a variety of government representatives, from state and federal levels on the ground. That’s the interlinking component of the scholarship – I now have friends and networks from a range of companies and government agencies,” he says. “This process continued in Fiji, it was about developing networks, that I can bring home and use to indirectly strengthen the bilateral relationship between Australia and the Indo-Pacific region, and help connect USC and other students to that.” Caleb worked mostly in communications roles, meeting executives and professionals from the two international organisations, assisting their operations and engaging with their clients. “In Seoul, for instance, I helped facilitate a seminar on the incoming new anti-

CALEB MATTISKE

CALEB IN SOUTH KOREA

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HOMEGROWN

I got to meet a large portion of the Australian ex-pat COMMUNITY in Seoul and hear about what they’re doing and meet a variety of GOVERNMENT representatives, from state and federal levels on the ground. That’s the interlinking component of the SCHOLARSHIP – I now have friends and networks from a range of companies and government agencies.”

bribery legislation. With IUCN, I took part in the organisation’s World Conservation Congress in Hawaii where 10,000 delegates discussed pressing environmental issues,” he says. “I was able to combine my interests in business and geography while getting insights into how important the IndoPacific region is to Australia’s future.” The New Colombo Plan Scholarship is an initiative of the Australian Government, to boost the nation’s relationships throughout the Indo-Pacific by supporting undergraduates to study and undertake internships in the region. “It’s about creating people-to-people links with the Asia-Pacific region, because that’s where Australia’s business is and that’s where our future is,” says Caleb. “That’s at the heart of the program and I’m testimony to that, I had never even thought about studying in Asia, it never crossed my mind. Most people want to study in Europe and America and that’s what I was thinking, I’d love to go to Norway or something, but the opportunity came up and I thought, ‘Why haven’t I thought about that?’ “We identify with Europe and America so much more strongly and those are the destinations we romanticise and dream about, so like for me, it (Asia-Pacific) was off my radar. “But when you look at Australia’s trading partners, where our investment and goods come from, it’s Japan, Korea march 2018

and China, and increasingly south-east Asia, Indonesia, Cambodia. And the Pacific remains an integral strategic partner in many ways, for instance in terms of addressing climate change, where they’re really on the frontlines. “We’re westerners, but we live in Asia and we miss out on engaging with so much of what’s going on in our region. Indonesia, for instance, which is on our doorstep, ranks the next most populated country behind the USA, and we don’t engage and it’s a missed opportunity.” Caleb, who is USC’s alumni ambassador for the national program, says it wasn’t until he returned home that he truly saw the value of his experience. “It’s tough initially, because you have a rollercoaster year of things you never thought would happen, you need to come down a little bit and get back into studying, but it helps give you focus. Sometimes you get so caught up in the study and exams that you forget why you’re doing what you’re doing,” he says.

“For me, my experience has helped clarify the goal of why I’m at uni and what uni is all about. It’s also about being able to share my experiences with other people; I helped a few people apply for their scholarships last year and a few of them got it and they’re excited but they don’t even know how much they will benefit.” Caleb says he is now looking forward to shaping a career around further engagement with Australia’s neighbours. “I wouldn’t mind a stint overseas but I want to be based in Australia,” he says. “Being away made me appreciate home a lot and made me realise how important it is. However, wherever I go, I want to stay connected to the region and be a part of growing that relationship and increasing the consciousness of its importance to Australians.” profilemagazine

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Through my education, I didn’t just develop skills, I didn’t just develop the ability to learn, but I developed confidence.” - MICHELLE OBAMA

LEADING LADIES OF THE SUNSHINE COAST

CATHERINE MOLLOY WORDS CAITLYN SPANNER PHOTOS FLETCHER PHOTOGRAPHY

Educate. Innovate. Succeed. Three simple words that have shaped Catherine Molloy’s life. This leading lady helps others master communication and get ahead both professionally and personally.

E

very night Catherine Molloy goes to sleep with a plan and every morning she starts the day with focus. It might sound cliche, but this type of strategic goal-setting and drive led Catherine to turn over $1 million in her first year of business. “At night, I write down what needs to be done tomorrow,” she says, “And just as I’m waking, I visualise the feeling that I would like for the day.” It’s not just drive that’s led Catherine to success, she’s an expert in communication and delivers courses and keynote speeches all around the globe. Over 25 years she has mastered the secrets of communication and shares the tools she’s learnt along the way with others. But she assures me that while your natural behaviour style determines how effective you are with communicating, people aren’t born with perfect communication skills and it’s something that must be learnt over time. Fortunately, Catherine travelled from a young age and thanks to her inquisitive mind and interest in human nature, she was able to observe others and learn from their communication techniques, specifically their body language. “When we take away verbal communication and our cultural, political and geographical differences, we’re left with the same raw behaviour styles of people. “At the age of 19, while travelling, I found it really interesting observing

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people’s behavior and started to learn how to negotiate and handle ojections as part of daily life. Research indicated most people are not naturally skilled in this area; you have to learn it.” she says. Catherine returned to Australia and put all of these skills into practice in her customer service jobs. “I really like customers and want to provide a great service. If you provide a great service, the sales follow,” she says. Catherine began to win monthly awards for Westpac bank in Queensland, then went on to win national awards. A love of learning and a fascination for people and their communication styles is the cornerstone to her success. The selfdescribed ‘edupreneur’ lives and breathes education and says it’s a lifestyle for her rather than a practice. “I have developed a deep commitment to education. I believe education is the real tool for cultural attitude change and learning to communicate for influence,” she says. “One of my top five strengths is that I’m a learner; I learn from every person I meet and every course I attend and develop. As an educator I then gather the information, trial, test and then share the outcomes. The more we can learn about who we are, the better a person we can be on the planet. And the more value we can add to other’s lives as well as our own.” The educational leader takes her role to inspire, motivate, influence and challenge profilemag.com.au


LEADING LADIES current practices in the education field very seriously. She takes a pedagogy approach when developing her programs and understanding her audience and keeps deep learning competencies at the forefront when contextualising her soft skill training and resources. With a big picture view of the world, Catherine is able to provide these skills and resources to her clients to enable effective communication training for business growth and success. “We develop programs for corporates, entrepreneurs, school-leaver, and universities, all with the same outcomes in mind to self-lead, understand our communication strengths and weaknesses and learn how to create win-win results,” she explains. We last profiled Catherine in July 2017 and since then her business, Auspac Business Advantage, has grown to reach new clients all over the globe. Born out of the need to educate people about communication, Auspac kicked off their Life Skill Wrap Around workshops for MBA and BA degrees with the International Skill Development Corporation, where they’re delivering programs to international colleges. They’ve also worked in China, Hong Kong, Singapore, New Zealand, Australia, UAE and India since July, and they’re now working with the Speakers Institute in Sydney and volunteering on the National Speakers Board. With a lifelong passion for charity work, Catherine is organising an education program for Ugandan villages to bring confidence and courage to teenagers to understand their value and make positive change. And finally, she’s delivering body language boot camps to schools including Immanuel Lutheran College. In the next six months, Catherine will launch her first book, The Million Dollar Handshake, which will also have an exciting digital component, and Auspac will be putting all of their workshops from the last 10 years online. As an intricate member of the Sunshine Coast’s education taskforce, Catherine’s passion and dedication for education march 2018

I believe EDUCATION is the real tool for cultural attitude change and learning to COMMUNICATE for influence.”

Available June 2018 from Hachette and wherever good books are sold.

CAHTERINE MOLLOY PHOTO BY NATHAN SHOOTER FROM THRIVE MEDIA

has inspired hundreds of locals to follow their dreams into the workforce. She has also researched and developed the Future Careers 2025 program for school students with the council and is exporting this knowledge to help local business develop overseas. Over the past four years, The Million Dollar Handshake has been delivered internationally, revolutionising the way you meet and greet and to create influence with win-win results. Join Catherine and the team for the next Sales and Leadership Congress so you can boost your business, learn to deliver your message and develop your million dollar handshake for confidence and influential communication.

Catherine Molloy’s Top Tip:

In a nano second you can lift yourself up and feel great - just pull your shoulders back and straighten yourself. Breathe deeply and smile. When we smile we all speak the same global language and we project positivity. These small actions change our mind and our mind changes our outcomes. I always say, “Be the change you want to see in the world.”

auspacba.com.au catherinemolloy.com.au profilemagazine

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9 NOW OPEN SCHOLARSHIPS

Sunshine Coast Grammar School is pleased to be offering Academic, Music, General Excellence and Principal’s Scholarships. The School welcomes applications from those in Years 7-11 in 2019. Apply online www.scgs.qld.edu.au/scholarships

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 12 MARCH 2018 372 Mons Road, Forest Glen Qld telephone +61 7 5445 4444 | email enquire@scgs.qld.edu.au web www.scgs.qld.edu.au A School of the Presbyterian and Methodist Schools Association


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LITTLE BIG LEARNERS WORDS CAITLYN SPANNER PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED

NCC early learners offers play-based learning to hundreds of children across Queensland. NCC early learners Nambour and Buderim has recently introduced an early swimmers program as part of the curriculum and had the help of What The Fox Creative at each step of the journey.

N

ambour Christian College (NCC) has been a prominent school on the Sunshine Coast since the 1980s. As you can see from this month’s cover story, the college has moulded some brilliant minds in that time, some of which were lucky enough to attend NCC from as early as 6 weeks old through their early learning programs. Marketing and communications manager Nicole Wykes says the early learning programs have been within the school since 2005, but they recently rebranded to NCC early learners in 2015. NCC early learners now encompasses six centres across Queensland that deliver education in a playful, supportive environment under the guidance of experienced early learning educators. “Every centre is unique because we cater for the communities, the families and what they need,” says Nicole, “Our Buderim and Nambour centres are quite unique in that we have added value programs included. We call them early advantages. It’s basically about giving your child an advantage through a variety of experiences

NICOLE WYKES

and learning opportunities.” The children are fortunate enough to be part of the wider school community by participating in activities like the school sports carnival, and going on excursions to the Berakah Farm on the school grounds. The most recent addition to the early learners program is the NCC early swimmers program. “Every child from the age of two-and-ahalf does the Learn to Swim program each week. It’s such an exceptional element to our early years program. And so important being on the Sunshine Coast close to pools, rivers and the beach,” says Nicole. Nicole goes on to explain that any child on the Coast is welcome to join the Learn to Swim program, which is based in Woombye. NCC Buderim early learners also partake in swimming lessons each week as part of their program. The rebranding of NCC early learners and the introduction of NCC early swimmers wouldn’t have happened without the help of What The Fox Creative. During her 14 years at NCC, Nicole has developed a close relationship with the What The Fox team over the past couple of years and has loved working alongside them to create a suite of branding for several programs, including early learners and early swimmers. Nicole says the early swimmers branding was a simple process thanks to the familiarity between the NCC and What The Fox teams. “Because they knew about NCC and having done our NCC website, and helping us with early learners, they knew

us and they knew our product. So it was an easy and fun process. “What I found with What The Fox is they have a team of specialists, and each of the team members took the time to understand the many facets of our business. They give outstanding service, delivering the right mix of creativity with industry knowledge.” From designing the early swimmers logo and website, to sorting out all of their corporate stationery, What The Fox has been by their side at every stage of the process.

WHAT THE FOX LOVES SHARING OUR CLIENTS’ STORIES! NEED HELP WITH YOUR BRANDING AND MARKETING? GET IN TOUCH AT WHATTHEFOX.COM.AU


s p i T g n i A dver tis FOR FACEBOOK AND INSTAGRAM

WHAT THE FOX CREATIVE CAN SHOW YOU A TOTALLY NEW WAY OF DOING BUSINESS!

1. KNOW YOUR CUSTOMER

4. PICK YOUR TIMING

When used effectively, social media is an amazing platform to sell to your audience. But first, you gotta know who your audience is. If you want more customers spending their tasty dollars with you, then you’ve got to understand who they are, what they want and where they hang out. These insights give you the know-how to target the right customers on social media, so that your news hits a relevant audience who are actively interested in what you offer.

Social Media rewards engagement. After posting, there is only a short window to optimise LIKES and engagement. If you get a quick response on social media, your organic reach will spread without you needing to spend a cent! Therefore, think logically about when your audience is most likely to be using social media and post accordingly. There are many tools to schedule social media content in advance, so you can be organised before the mayhem starts, then watch the magic unfold!

2. MAKE AN OFFER THEY CAN’T REFUSE It’s human nature to love a bargain, especially when it involves a business we adore! Post a promotion on social media that offers unbelievably great value and is relevant to your customer’s needs right now. Sure, you may skim a little bit off of your profit margin per sell, BUT… You’ll make up for this many times over by increasing your overall sales.

5. A/B TEST DIFFERENT CREATIVE ON YOUR AUDIENCE Often your audience won’t respond well to one combination of images and words, but go bonkers for an alternative version of the same ad. When running a campaign, make sure you consider a few different options that will resonate with your audience from different angles and test the response!

3. CTA

6. SET YOUR BUDGET

A Call-To-Action is an image or bit of text which prompts your visitors to take action. It’s amazing how many ads are out there that don’t let the audience know what to do to take advantage of an offer. Using specific CTAs like ‘Try it now’ OR ‘Save your spot before it’s too late!’ will do a lot to boost engagement with your offer.

The great thing about social media advertising is that you have a lot of control over the campaign. You are able to test different creative, choose your audience, scheduling and not over spend your budget. A strategic know-how of these elements of a campaign will take your money a lot further, but Facebook does a pretty good job of showing your ad to the people most likely to be interested as many times as the budget allows.

5443 7747 info@whatthefox.com.au | 23 George St Maroochydore Q 4558


“POST A PROMOTION ON SOCIAL MEDIA THAT OFFERS UNBELIEVABLY GREAT VALUE AND IS RELEVANT TO YOUR CUSTOMER’S NEEDS RIGHT NOW.”

7. TEST, MEASURE, REFINE, REPEAT Once you’ve launched your campaign it’s time to let it do its thing – but don’t let it off the leash completely! Keep an eye on what’s happening and check if its bringing in the results that you are working towards. Is it getting in front of your audience? Is it bringing in leads? If not, make tweaks and changes as needed.

The What The Fox team are experts in all things social, branding, websites and all your digital marketing needs. Get in touch today to see how we can help you smash your marketing goals and reach your full potential!

You're invited FACEBOOK

& INSTAGRAM ADVERTISING 9AM – 12PM, FRIDAY 23 MARCH 2018 Learn about how Facebook and Instagram advertising can help you to achieve your marketing goals. Our digital experts will share the latest advice on how to set up a successful campaign, including:

+ Creative artwork ideas, targeting your audience.

+ Setting objectives to develop the rest of your marketing plan.

WHERE? Maroochydore RSL, Memorial Drive, Maroochydore

COST? $25 Early Bird Special (must book by 16 March) $49 Full Price (if booked after 16 March)

TO BOOK Seats are limited so be quick. Head to whatthefox.com.au or call us on 07 5443 7747 to register. See you there!

CALL US NOW ON 5443 7747 TO BOOK YOUR FREE 60-MINUTE STRATEGY SESSION WITH A FOX


YOUR CHILD’S POTENTIAL

www.suncoastcc.qld.edu.au

Keep Learning! Short courses coming up: • Creative Writing • ‘Ahead of the Game’ - specialty training for the sports industry • Website Design • Foreign Languages • Blackout Poetry • Project Management • Wordpress Design and Development • Emotional Intelligence • And more...

For all the dates, bookings and more visit usc.edu.au/keeplearning or phone Julie Hobbins 5430 1127 46

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If your spouse controls the MONEY and you don’t have enough, then seek legal advice, as there may be some OPTIONS available to you.”

PIPPA COLMAN & ASSOCIATES LAW PRACTICE PTY LTD

TOP FIVE THINGS TO DO WHEN SEPARATING PIPPA COLMAN | DIRECTOR OF PIPPA COLMAN & ASSOCIATES

Going through separation can be stressful, upsetting, confusing and scary. While everybody’s experience is different, a lot of people share the feeling of not knowing what to do first. There are a lot of things that will need to be taken care of – some more urgent than others.

H

ere is a ‘top five’ list of things to do when you are separating. Not all may be applicable to you, but the purpose of the list is to give some initial guidance about the things you might prioritise.

1. SAFETY FIRST

If there has been domestic violence, or you fear that there might be, then you need to first take steps to protect yourself and your children. You may feel safe just living apart from your spouse. You may need to apply for a Protection Order to help keep you safe. If you are in this situation, you should contact Scope, seek legal advice, or in an emergency phone 000. Safety includes emotional safety. Don’t be afraid to seek counselling to help you through this difficult time. 2. CHILDREN’S LIVING ARRANGEMENTS

In deciding children’s arrangements, the law says that their “best interests” must be considered. Unless there are domestic violence issues, the best interests of a child is usually best served by the child having a meaningful relationship with both parents. This may not always mean living equally between households. If you cannot agree on a parenting arrangement, then you should seek legal advice and/ or arrange a family dispute resolution conference.

3. YOUR LIVING ARRANGEMENTS

A decision needs to be made as to who stays and who leaves the family home. It is not the case that “possession is nine tenths of the law” in family law. Legal entitlements are recognised regardless of who is living in the house. Often, the best arrangement will be the one that is the least disruptive to the children. 4. GET YOUR FINANCES IN ORDER

Open your own bank account. Ensure that you have enough money to meet the bills, or to move out. If your spouse controls the money and you don’t have enough, then seek legal advice, as there may be some options available to you. 5. CHANGE YOUR WILL AND POWER OF ATTORNEY

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You may want to reconsider whether your partner should still be your nominated executor and beneficiary as well as your Power of Attorney should something happen.

CHILDREN & PARENTING

We can help you with some advice or guide you through what needs to be done. Once these priorities have been taken care of, we can then discuss finalising your property settlement and perhaps longer term arrangements for the children.

WILLS & ESTATES

RELATIONSHIP AGREEMENTS DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

working together P. 07 5458 9000 E. reception@pippacolman.com A. 19 First Avenue, Maroochydore

WE CONDUCT FREE INFORMATION SEMINARS ON FAMILY LAW TOPICS. DETAILS CAN BE FOUND AT PIPPACOLMAN.COM

www.pippacolman.com


Anything is Possible Children learn at their best when their education is enriched by memorable experiences. At Immanuel Lutheran College, we give students the ability to explore and discover not only in the classroom, but also with nature.

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MARKET BENEFITS FROM ECONOMIC DIVERSITY Rockhampton, Central Queensland’s capital, is located slightly inland along the Fitzroy River, about 600kms north of Brisbane. Recently coined “The Gateway to Northern Australia”, Rockhampton is Central Queensland’s largest regional hub and service centre, providing goods and services to communities scattered across the vast central state and reaching out far west. Home to a large jet capable airport, which also accommodates military transport and operations, Rockhampton provides daily flights to and from major centres as well as linking smaller regional locations. A truly diversified economy built on historic foundations, Rockhampton provides employment across several independent sectors, resulting in a solid unwavering population base. In fact the well renowned and respected demographer Bernard Salt recently reported the city is to become one of Australia’s largest cities by 2050, with continued employment and population growth. One of the mainstays of the economy has been beef production, processing and export, which supports thousands of jobs and backs the self-proclaimed title “Beef Capital of Australia”. Other forms of agriculture, including large cropping, are also supported, which expects exponential growth due to the proposed $352 million Rookwood Weir. Education is serious business in the capital, providing a plethora of facilities; boarding schools, a specialised medical university and Central Queensland University, which recently teamed up with TAFE QLD to deliver more than 3000 jobs and provide a unique conduit between formal education, skills and industry. While Rockhampton is not directly reliant on the mining industry to turn the cogs of its economy, any upside certainly rubs off with increased business visits to the area, specialised services provided and companies setting up their base of operations in the affordable township.

All 12 apartments have been afforded a BREATHTAKING RIVER VIEW from a private balcony with an ideal north-easterly aspect.

Defence has been part of the landscape for half a century with Shoalwater Bay Military Training Area, established in the early 1960s, seeing tens of thousands of personnel move through the area every year, including major training exercises with components of the US and Singapore military. A recent announcement of further expansion, including a $2.25 billion pledge from the Singapore Government, will strengthen the sector. Further news in the local defence industry is a sound proposal to locally manufacture and test Australia’s latest amoured vehicle fleet, a $20 billion spend by the Australian Government. Other notable industries are the Stanwell Power Station and the magnesia mine and processing plant. Rockhampton’s impressive economic status, coupled with affordability and strong rental yields (generally exceeding 5.2%) provide the makings of a solid investment.

FOR YOUR FREE INFORMATION PACK CALL 07 5451 1080 www.thinkinvestmentrealty.com.au


THE URBAN CENTRE Rockhampton is a city of thriving energy and activity with breathtaking scenery to match. Boasting an enviably sunny climate and with the beautiful Capricorn Coast right on your doorstep, Rockhampton offers a lifestyle that is unique and unparalleled. Rockhampton prides itself on its economic strength, with industries in tourism, agriculture, retail, mining, administration, construction and manufacturing, which opens up a diverse range of career and investment opportunities. Emerging from a rich history of cattle farming and gold mines, Rockhampton is the urban hub of Central Queensland. Featuring boutique shopping, theatre galleries and a growing cafe culture, the CBD continues to evolve as a vibrant lifestyle destination.

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It’s time to pull out your denim and dust off the bomber jacket. Let’s take a look at the pieces you’ll fall for this season.

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NUDE LUCY, LARSSON CAMI, RRP $49.95. SHOP NOW AT GLUESTORE.COM.AU

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SHORT 90'S SILK SLIP IN TOBACCO, RRP $169. SILKLAUNDRY.COM.AU

NEW-TRALS The neutral colour trend is here to stay. Colour block your outfit or mix neutral tones together. march 2018

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9 FIRST AVENUE, MAROOCHYDORE • 0466 828 144 451 CORONATION DRIVE, AUCHENFLOWER • 0466 828 143 WWW.TRACEYG.COM

STUDY, LIVE, WORK AND PLAY With two highly ranked universities*, over 70 schools, a huge range of training organisations, a high performing economy, exciting career opportunities and an enviable lifestyle… what are you waiting for?

Your future is here! Make an enquiry today! here@studysunshinecoast.com.au www.studysunshinecoast.com.au

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Study Sunshine Coast is supported by foundation partners Education Sunshine Coast and Sunshine Coast Council *Times Higher Education Young University Rankings 2017

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wine not?

throwing shade

FASHION

ZULU AND ZEPHYR BEND ONE PIECE, RRP $180, AVAILABLE AT ZULUANDZEPHYR.COM

SEAFOLLY SHADY LADY, WIDE BRIM HAT, RRP $79.95, AVAILABLE AT SEAFOLLY.COM.AU

make a statement BRAVE AND TRUE MARTINI SKIRT, RRP $99.95, MARTINI TOP, RRP $69.95, AVAILABLE AT HOLIDAYDESIGN.COM.AU

rose coloured glasses SPORTSGIRL NIMROD ROSE GOLD SUNGLASSES, RRP $39.95, AVAILABLE AT SPORTSGIRL

change

OF

Dress as if everyday is a holiday with flirty frills, pops of colour and a rosy outlook.

fruity fun AVENUE TOTE, RRP $49, AVAILABLE AT AVENUETHELABEL.COM

off the cuff MISS CARTER CUFF, RRP $140, AVAILABLE AT AJIE.COM.AU

summer staple wrap it up

SPORTSGIRL HAYDEN BRAIDED SANDAL, RRP $69.95, AVAILABLE AT SPORTSGIRL

SEAFOLLY ST JOSEPHS TOWEL, RRP $89.95, AVAILABLE AT SEAFOLLY.COM.AU

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Dr Jonathan Last

Dr Stephanie Wallace

Dr Last has extended training in skin cancer medicine, child health and pregnancy care. He has a keen interest in child health, chronic disease management, sports medicine and minor procedures.

Dr Wallace enjoys the diversity of general practice, with interests in paediatrics, women’s health and pregnancy, men’s health, chronic disease management and skin checks.

www.cottontreemedical.com.au Opening Hours 8am – 5pm Mon – Fri Saturday Mornings

P: 5443 3768 ONLINE APPOINTMENT AVAILABILITY Cnr King St & Memorial Ave Cotton Tree

Look and feel younger & slimmer without surgery or injections 100% NATURAL ALTERNATIVES TO BOTOX & SURGERY

It’s counting moments, not years.

499 Wrinkle injections for 3 areas*

*T&Cs apply. Ask in-store or visit laserclinics.com.au

VISIT US: Sunshine Plaza (07) 5370 2003 Kawana Shopping World (07) 5306 1904

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before

after

• NON SURGICAL FACE LIFT • REVERSE AGEING TREATMENTS • SKIN RESURFACING • NON SURGICAL BODY TREATMENTS & SKIN TIGHTENING • PRE & POST PREGNANCY TREATMENT • CELLULITE REDUCTION • BODY MASSAGE

laclinique.com.au Ph 07 5373 7576

Brightwater Retail Centre Shop 3B, Attenuata Drive, Mountain Creek profilemag.com.au


nourish and flourish

Glow Gold FOR

It’s safe to say the elements wreak havoc on our hair and skin at the change of seasons. Throw these never-fail beauty buys in your beach bag for a healthy glow now and for the rest of the year.

BEAUTY

LANOLIPS TINTED BALM SPF 30 PERFECT NUDE, RRP $14.95, AVAILABLE AT MECCA MAXIMA

balmy beauty THE GREAT STATE SOOTHING SKIN BALM, RRP $28, AVAILABLE AT ALTERIOR MOTIF

banish beach hair KEUNE CARE MIRACLE ELIXIR SPRAY, RRP $33.95, AVAILABLE AT KEUNE.COM/ANZ

the right kind of oily KORA AGE DEFYING PHYTOX OIL, RRP $59.95, AVAILABLE AT ECO HAIR AND BEAUTY

the best tan is a fake tan BONDI SANDS GRADUAL TANNING MILK 275ML, RRP $17.95, AVAILABLE AT PRICELINE

never leave the house without WE ARE FEEL GOOD INC. SENSITIVE SUNSCREEN LOTION 200ML, RRP $27.95, AVAILABLE AT MOOLOOLABA BEACH PHARMACY

march 2018

pretty in pink SAND AND SKY PINK CLAY MASK, RRP $69.90, AVAILABLE AT SANDANDSKY.COM

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Evolution NOT

REVOLUTION

VITALITY TIPS WITH NIKKI FOGDEN-MOORE

Caring for Women through all stages of their life. Sunshine Coast Obstetrician / Gynaecologist providing birthing services at the Buderim Private Hospital. Providing a caring and respectful environment to discuss your concerns. Suite 18, Building B, Nucleus Medical Suites, 23 Elsa Wilson Drive, Buderim Phone: 5444 4433 Email: info@drkylieisaacs.com.au

www.drkylieisaacs.com.au

T

he art to true success is to constantly be curious and evolve your mental, emotional and spiritual intellect on a regular basis. The power is always in learning. You can achieve this with awareness, intent, replacing fear with curiosity and sharing your time, wisdom and insight with others. Also, actively seek out new ways to grow, learn, be inspired. STEP 1

Think about your three pillars of Ultimate Vitality: • Healthy (fitness, wellbeing, nutrition, me time) • Wealthy (personal and commercial admin, finance, planning) • Wise (experience, education, mindset) • Brainstorm your key areas of focus, growth and achievement in each of those pillars. STEP 2

Review your goals based on the three R’s of goal setting: • Does this goal resonate with you and your core values?

NON-SURGICAL EYELID LIFT

• Is this goal relevant to you. Is this a goal you have chosen for yourself? Make sure you are inspired by others and stay true to what works for you.

WOULD YOU LIKE TO IMPROVE THE APPEARANCE OF TIRED AND HEAVY LOOKING EYES WITHOUT SURGERY?

• Is this a real-time goal? Create a clear road map to get there. This means checking in with realistic timelines to achieve your goal.

A new technology that can treat areas such as:

STEP 3

• upper eyelids • crowfeet • lower eyelid crepy skin • smoker’s lines around the mouth Call us today to book your complimentary consultation & assessment with Melissa

MD COSMETIC AND SKIN CLINIC 87 Mooloolaba Esplanade, Mooloolaba 3-7 Thomas St Noosaville

mdcosmeticandskin.com.au M: 0400 400 982 58

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GIFT VOUCH

We can be so critical of our own success that we begin to make new goals before even recognising all that we’ve achieved. Be proud of who you are, what you have done, and the fact that you’re able to create, change, review and make choices. Harness that energy looking forward and be pragmatic about what or who will no longer serve you. Enjoy the journey and celebrate your personality – it’s what sets you apart from everyone else. Above all, remember that you absolutely need to be clear about what’s important to you and where you want to spend your time and energy. Otherwise you’ll just continue on autopilot.

The crucial aspect is respecting any goal setting period and giving yourself the time and space to think and strategise clearly. This year, consider how you can bring out your best to be healthy, wealthy and wise.

Nikki THEVITALITYCOACH.COM.AU profilemag.com.au


HEALTH

Sclerotherapy involves injecting the VEINS with a sclerosing solution, we use a SALINE solution.”

I take multivitamins daily, but want to give my immune system a boost, is there anything else I can do? IV NUTRITION

ASK OUR

with Melissa Drury

HEALTH

Vitamins and minerals are essential nutrients that reside in our bodies, which are indispensable for maintaining a healthy nutritional balance. Pollution, a change in diet, and various factors such as stress, damage the body, forcing the body’s consumption of these vitamins.

EXPERTS

In the last few years I have developed thin, dark spider veins on my legs, which look awful. Is there a way to get rid of them without surgery? SPIDER VEINS

with Dr Karl Schulze You’re not alone. Lots of women (and men too) develop these unsightly veins as they age and none of us like the thought of the cost, pain and long recovery time that some surgical treatments entail. But there is another option. Spider veins are abnormally-dilated veins that appear as tiny red, purple or blue vessels. They are commonly present on the legs, but can appear anywhere on your body. These veins are not very efficient and aren’t necessary to the circulatory system, so they can be treated without compromising your circulation and without the need for surgery, using a process called sclerotherapy. Sclerotherapy involves injecting the veins with a sclerosing solution, we use a saline solution. This irritates the lining of the vein causing it to become “sticky” and swell. When the procedure is finished a compression stocking is put on. The treated veins will then fade over six weeks, becoming barely visible, or not visible at all. After several march 2018

treatments there is usually up to an 80 per cent improvement in the appearance of the legs, depending on the severity of the problem. The needle we use is very fine, so it causes minimal discomfort. Patients have described the sensation as a bit like an ant bite. Usually one leg is treated per 45-minute session. For subsequent treatments it may be possible to do both legs in one appointment. Sclerotherapy doesn’t really interfere with your daily routine. You will be able to walk immediately after each treatment and walking for 30 minutes a day for the next week is part of the recovery process. You will need to leave the compression stockings on for three days.

Intravenous vitamin therapy involves the administration of vitamins, minerals and other nutrients, such as amino acids, directly into the bloodstream in the form of a drip. The IV method bypasses the digestive system, allowing delivery of greater quantities of nutrients and promoting maximum absorption. Orally administered vitamins can be inactivated in the digestive tract or poorly absorbed in high doses and can cause unwanted side-effects such as abdominal cramps and nausea. IV nutrition therapy is not a panacea replacing an unhealthy lifestyle, but part of a holistic approach to complement and support acute/chronic conditions when the immune system needs a boost. Some common uses for IV vitamin therapy include:

• Correction of deficiency states – for example due to severe illness or following surgery • Reduction of symptoms and severity of cold or flu, and certain other viral infections, such as shingles, glandular fever and others • Reduction of symptoms of the acute stages of illnesses such as cold or virus onset • Anti-inflammatory benefits • Preliminary studies also indicate that IV nutrition therapy may be beneficial for some forms of cancer, may enhance primary cancer treatments, and provide immune system support

While all medical procedures can involve the risk of side effects, these are unlikely and are relatively minor when they do occur.

Before treatment, seek medical assessment by an integrative medical practitioner, this is a GP who has further experience and qualifications in complementary medicine and therapies.

SUNSHINE VASCULAR sunshinevascular.com.au Phone: 5453 4322 118 King St, Buderim

MD COSMETIC AND SKIN CLINIC mdcosmeticandskin.com.au Phone: 0400 400 982 Shop 7, 87 The Esplanade, Mooloolaba profilemagazine

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a SPEC-TACULAR home

WORDS CAITLYN SPANNER PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED

Mid-century inspiration has well and truly made its way back into the limelight in recent years in the interior design and architecture realms. This Peregian Springs spec home has taken the retro movement and given it a modern twist, winning the builders an armful of awards.

W

estern red cedar timber, bright and open spaces, and clean, contemporary lines are the hallmarks of this modern mid-century inspired, awardwinning spec home. Situated on the highly coveted golf course of Peregian Springs, this Balgownie Drive address features a central courtyard complete with swimming pool, plus a second outdoor space providing gorgeous light to the adjacent rooms. The

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overall feel is refreshing and modern with a clear connect to its natural surroundings.

We were SURPRISED (by the awards) as there are a lot of AMAZING homes being built on the Sunshine Coast. We put a lot of THOUGHT and attention to detail into the home so it was nice that it was noticed by the judges.”

The matte black and grey, contrasted with stark white and western red cedar colour palette continues the down-to-earth feeling throughout the home. Notable materials used internally and externally are scyon axon cladding, polished concrete floors with a burnished finish, and herringbone subway carrara tiles.

Feature lighting illuminates each room come evening and is accompanied by glass ceilings, large windows and louvers that brighten each space in the day. The frameless glass window in the ensuite not only lightens the internal space, but draws the eye to the openness of the ceiling and creates a beautiful glass detail at the facade of the house. A striking feature timber wall lies central within this home encasing a seamless hidden door, which is perhaps the most appealing element in the house. Concealed hinges have been strategically placed to create a perfect appearance of clean lines and invisibility. They create a seamless solid timber cube within the house that surprises anyone walking through. The front facade characterises the modern mid-century architectural shapes, which coupled with contemporary

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HOME materials and finishings, provides optimum curb-appeal. The folded flashing that appears on the external facade was done to conceal a thick adjoining beam, while adding diversity to the appearance. Attention to detail was at the forefront in the design and build of this home and is evident from the minute you set eyes on the exterior. The floor to ceiling internal doors, ceiling mounted robe doors and an internal daybed are simple yet effective finishes that make all the difference. This inspired and thoughtfully constructed spec home has been lovingly created by Dayne Lawrie Constructions. It’s no wonder the home received three awards in the 2017 HIA Sunshine Coast Awards and went on to win the Spec House of the Year in the state awards. Dayne and Nadia of Dayne Lawrie Constructions envisaged a small family or older couple making use of this desired address. “We wanted to create a private home but to also maximise the golf course views. The internal courtyard and swimming pool is a very private space that was intentional in its placement for privacy,” says Nadia. “We were surprised (by the awards) as there are a lot of amazing homes being built on the Sunshine Coast. We put a lot of thought and attention to detail into the home so it was nice that it was noticed by the judges.” They’ll now go on to the national awards in Singapore in May, facing other spec homes from all around Australia. We have no doubt that regardless of the outcome, this home is something the team at Dayne Lawrie Constructions will be immensely proud of for years to come.

We wanted to create a private home but to also MAXIMISE the golf course views. The internal courtyard and swimming pool is a very PRIVATE SPACE that was intentional in its placement for privacy.”

NADIA AND DAYNE LAWRIE WITH THEIR DOG KNOX

march 2018

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A bright beginning to lifelong learning Brightwater State School is an independent Public School catering for children from Prep to Year 6, offering: A safe, supportive and caring school community that values high standards, a love of learning, respect, manners and compassion A personalised learning program that is responsive to your child’s needs A strong focus on English, Maths, Science and Technology Access to a vast array of digital technology and programs such as: iPads, laptops, coding and robotics 21st Century teaching methods that include: 1:1 laptop program for Years 4 to 6, dance, robotics and media studies A range of extra-curricular and after-school programs in the Arts and Sports For further information please contact:

P: (07) 5438 3111

www.brightwaterss.eq.edu.au admin@brightwaterss.eq.edu.au 20 Dianella Drive, Mountain Creek

You know you want to. You need to.

IT’S TIME.

start your pool renovation

NOW

M. A . P 62

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SERVICES

fOr

SUMMEr

P. 0400 082 858 www.mapservices.com.au QBCC #15018195

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the outdoor room

HOME

MERCER AND REID RESTING ORBIT TABLES, RRP FROM $349.99, AVAILABLE AT ADAIRS

must have OZ DESIGN FURNITURE ANIKA SQUARE MULTI CUSHION, RRP $69.95, AVAILABLE AT OZ DESIGN FURNITURE

bring the outdoors in TK MAXX GOLD PLATED TERRARIUM, RRP $34.95, AVAILABLE AT TK MAXX

light it up POTTERY BARN MALTA LANTERN, RRP FROM $44, AVAILABLE AT POTTERYBARN.COM.AU

vibes

MEDITERRANEAN

This season it’s all about earthy tones, interesting textures, and that relaxed, Mediterranean feeling that transports you to tropical beaches from the comfort of your own home. affordable accents

earthy tones IN BED X TRIIBE LINEN DUVET SET IN TOBACCO, RRP FROM $340, AVAILABLE AT INBEDSTORE.COM

march 2018

KOH LIVING TEXTURED VASE, RRP $19.95, AVAILABLE AT KOHLIVING.COM.AU

focal point

ED CA US SKY FRAM RNITURE CACT SIGN FURNITURE OZ DESIGN FU DE OZ AT E AILABL RRP $319, AV

NVAS,


right foot forward dear diary SCHOOL MEMORIES JOURNAL, RRP $19.95, SMIGGLE, 5478 4135

STUDENT LEATHER SHOES, RRP $44.99, SPENDLESS SHOES, 5444 2854

stay organised ‘TOMORROW IS GOING TO BE THE BEST DAY EVER’ 2018 DIARY, RRP $20.95, KAWANA NEWS & GIFTS, 5477 7092

school TOO COOL FOR

listen up REVERB HEADPHONES RRP $39.99, SPARKLE BALLPOINT PEN RRP $7.99 AND ALPHA KEYRING “T” RRP $6.99, TYPO, 5444 2824

Get the kids excited about school with these fun and functional classroom essentials.

kawanashoppingworld.com.au healthy & happy BLACKMORES SUPERKIDS MULTI, OMEGA AND IMMUNE GUMMIES RRP $14.99, TERRY WHITE CHEMIST, 5444 2211

sports shoe in disguise THE ONLY SCHOOL SHOE APPROVED BY THE AUSTRALIAN PODIATRY COUNCIL AND HAS A 6 MONTH OUTER SOLE WARRANTY MAKING IT SUPER DURABLE. ASCENT KIDS SCHOLAR, RRP $124.95, THE ATHLETE’S FOOT, 5444 3069

petite picasso MONT MARTE WATERCOLOUR PENCILS, RRP $29.95, DISCOUNTS GALORE, 5478 3544

rainbow bright COLOUR CHANGE MARKERS, RRP $2.50 AND 4 PACK OF A7 TROPICAL NOTEBOOKS, RRP $2.95 CHIOCE VARIETY, 5478 3144


gourmet EDIT NICOLE FUGE PROFILE GOURMET EDITOR

GOURMET

THE

ROCKY ROAD • 400g milk chocolate • 1½ cups marshmallows, quartered • 1 cup peanuts, finely chopped • ¾ cup raspberry lollies, halved Melt the chocolate in the microwave, in 30-second bursts, stirring each time. Once all of the chocolate is melted, stir the marshmallows, peanuts and lollies into the chocolate and pour mixture into a lined square pan. Chill until firm and then slice into squares to serve.

Note: Play around with other delicious flavour combinations, try white chocolate, marshmallows, pistachios and turkish delight, or dark chocolate, marshmallows, macadamia nuts and red glacé cherries. Yum!

No dairy? No worries!

Sunshine Coast business Kokopod is bringing chocolatey joy to all – even those who are dairy and lactose intolerant, or follow a vegan diet. With dark chocolate varieties including ginger-nut, orange and almond, and raspberry fever (pictured), I’ve already placed my order with the Easter bunny.

Secret foodie fun

The next Secret Foodies event has been set – a rooftop party on 10 March at 2pm. Held at a secret location in Brisbane’s CBD, an sms with the address will be sent two hours before. Tickets cost $102 and include flowing Days Of Rosé wine, canapés, a grazing table and entertainment. Visit secretfoodies.com.au

HISTORY HIT

Chocolate Easter bunnies – which do you eat first? 76% BITE OFF THE EARS 5% EAT THE FEET 4% GO FOR TAILS

march 2018

In 1824, John Cadbury opened a grocer's shop in Birmingham, England where he sold cocoa and drinking chocolate, which he made himself using a pestle and mortar. Filled eggs were first made by the Cadbury brothers in 1923 and the Creme Egg, in its current form, was created in 1971. It is now the world’s most popular egg-shaped chocolate and workers at Cadbury in Birmingham produce 1.5 million of these every day.

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brew B OYS WORDS NICOLE FUGE PHOTOS BLISS PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEAH

The foodie industry on the Sunshine Coast is booming, and fostering that growth is GrowCoastal, the region’s first food accelerator supporting the most innovative food and beverage operators on the Coast. Ahead of the launch of this year’s program in April, we catch up with GrowCoastal alumni Matt Hepburn and Christen McGarry of Your Mates Brewing Co.

I

t’s a stinking hot day here on the Sunshine Coast, and Matt Hepburn and Christen McGarry are cooling down the best way they know how – with a crisp, cold beer. They’re unabashedly living every man’s dream, brewing and selling their own craft beer, a business idea the roommates conjured up while knocking back a few one afternoon.

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“I was a project manager in construction and my brother had just bought a bar in Caloundra. I was planning on going back overseas and wanted to learn how to pour beer and shake cocktails, so I quit my job and started working there. At the same time, Christen was a school teacher and he saw I was having these fun times and chilled lifestyle, so he quit his job and we were bar managers,” says Matt. It was 2014, a time when there wasn’t a lot of craft beer on offer here on the Coast, prompting Matt and Christen to introduce craft beer on tap and start a beer club, where local and interstate brewers would come and talk about their beers. “There were no new-age breweries on the Coast, so we started a bar in the garage, like everyone does,” says Matt. “We started renting this shed at Moffat Beach and invested all of our money, which wasn’t a lot, into the 50L pilot batch system. McGarry is the brewer and he would test beers, test recipes. We didn’t know how to brew properly, we were just winging it and it was his job to learn the back end and my job was the legalities.” In mid-2015, they launched Your Mates Brewing Co.

“When we started we were pretty naive, ‘How hard would it be to start a brewery?’ But there was a definite moment we said, ‘If we're going to do this, let's do it properly and as well as we can’. It’s an opportunity to make beer and sell beer for a living. It’s every man’s dream,” says Christen, taking a sip of pale ale. Matt says once they were confident with their first beer, they ran it through the bar, unlabelled, to test the market. Now needing a much larger quantity, they contract brewed out of sites at Baffle Creek, Ipswich and Brisbane, which had the capacity to brew 3000L in the same time their pilot system could brew 50L. By that stage, Matt and Christen were selling just enough beer to cover the cost of its production, without being able to pay themselves. They needed another source of income and opened The Basement bar in Nambour in October, 2016. Then at the beginning of 2017, they started brewing in Maleny and Your Mates became the first new-age brewery on the Coast. “Rather than us paying a premium price to have someone else do all the brewing and take all the risk on, we started to do what’s called gypsy brewing – paying a hire profilemag.com.au


MATT HEPBURN AND CHRISTEN MCGARRY

The Sunshine Coast has a STRONG REPUTATION for quality food innovation and the GrowCoastal program is designed to be a catalyst for the next generation of SUCCESSFUL food and beverage companies.”

fee to the brewery, but I’m the brewer – we do all the work for it,” says Christen. “All the risk is back on us, if we mess up, we pour beer down the drain and that happened in the first six months. But we’d rather pour beer down the drain than sell beer that we didn’t think was up to standard, because that is what craft beer is about – using premium ingredients and creating a product that tastes delicious. “It was quite daunting to have the reins, we’d be brewing 3000L in a day, which would equate to $10,000 of beer.” Last year, Your Mates was selected to be part of the first GrowCoastal program, a 12-week intensive program providing 12 Sunshine Coast food and beverage innovators with the opportunity to accelerate their business growth, engage with industry leaders, secure new customers and build a network of helpful connections. “I went in there really knowing our business and we still live together so we talk about our business every day, we march 2018

drink our beers every day – I went into GrowCoastal thinking, ‘What are these guys going to be able to teach me?’ But the most valuable thing was realising you don’t know everything about your business and taking that constructive criticism on,” says Matt. “If I did that program when we started it would have made our lives so much easier.” This year, GrowCoastal has partnered with the Food Agribusiness Network to manage the program, which launches in April, and will see a new wave of local innovators benefit from the mentorship of food and beverage marketing specialist Jacqui Price, Innovation Centre CEO Mark Paddenburg, and other local experts. The participants will benefit from accelerated learning and exposure in areas including lean startup, target market identification, business planning, financial management, PR and marketing, legal and intellectual property, distribution and fulfilment, market research, exporting, pitching and securing early stage capital. “The Sunshine Coast has a strong reputation for quality food innovation and the GrowCoastal program is designed to be a catalyst for the next generation of successful food and beverage companies,” says Mark. Throughout the program, Matt and Christen launched a crowdfunding campaign to get their pale ale, Larry, in a can. They raised $32,000 in pledges,

GOURMET

exceeding their $30,000 goal, which Matt says is more than any other brewery in Australia has raised through a crowdfunding campaign. In July, they canned their first beer, in December canned their dark ale, Donnie and in January, they introduced their ned ale on tap. “The beers in cans sell themselves, we can’t keep up, we have an empty cold room,” says Christen. “It’s been two-and-a-half years and we’re only now testing the waters of our third beer. Most breweries smash out 12 to 20 beers in that time, but we want to make sure we do things right and do things well.” In recognition of their success last year, Matt was named Young Entrepreneur of the Year at the 2017 Sunshine Coast Business Awards, a title which has only given the boys more motivation. “We don’t have the capacity to get into Brissy yet and that’s the biggest craft beer market in Queensland, we’re just on the Sunny Coast. We need to take the next step, but it’s a million dollar investment,” says Matt. “There are breweries opening daily with no product, no market, no presence and we have all of those things, we have a demand we can’t keep up with, so we’re in a really good position. It’s a really exciting time,” Christen adds. Cheers to that.

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Table talk

EDUCATION WORDS INGRID NELSON PHOTOS FLETCHER PHOTOGRAPHY VENUE NOOSA WATERFRONT RESTAURANT AND BAR

Is a university degree necessary for a successful career? We posed the question to our Table Talk panel over a delicious lunch at Noosa Waterfront Restaurant and Bar.

T

imes have changed dramatically since I graduated from high school. Back then, students had nowhere near the number of options that are available to them today. As a parent of a Grade 11 student this year, I am amazed at the many pathways on offer to graduates. From traineeships to vocational courses and even certificates students can complete during school hours that help them gain employment after school, proves there is no one size that fits all. In fact, often some of the most businessminded people chose a more alternate route to success. We are fortunate to have access to a plethora of quality tertiary institutions here on the Sunshine Coast, offering our young people plenty of choices when it comes to their future. We live in a rapidly changing world and universities have adapted by offering innovative courses that really prepare our students for the real world. And while university might not be for everyone, many employers still place great value on the accountability, responsibility and discipline it takes to complete a

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degree. Hailing from diverse backgrounds, I was keen to hear what our lunching ladies’ thoughts were on the matter. Joining me at Noosa Waterfront Restaurant and Bar was Janice Mastin owner/manager at Blink! the eyelash expert; Coby Sullivan, regional innovation coordinator, Sunshine Coast Regional Innovation Pipeline Team #SCRIPT; Carly Gibbs, owner of Lavish Platters; Kristen Shields, operations manager at Profile Magazine, Teressa Schmidt, associate vice-chancellor (Sunshine Coast Region) CQUniversity Australia; and Kim Baldwin, marketing manager, Study Sunshine Coast (Visit Sunshine Coast).


Everything you do CREATES what you become in the end.” - TERESA

COBY: I learned a lot from

university, generally speaking. It gave me an ability to read a lot of information in a short amount of time, comprehend it and apply it. I also value the discipline around studying and being accountable for exams. There is also the credibility associated with a university degree. But do I use the theory I learned at university? No. Did I ever use it? No. I think in a lot of ways it’s helpful, but it’s not a prerequisite for success. I think times have changed too. You used to need that certification or qualification to open doors. However, with the internet, you have the ability to set up your own domain and test the market and have a minimal viable proposition and see if it’s real and there is demand before you even go through those traditions. There is a hunger for experimenting as opposed to sticking to the trends and being safe in your approach. It will be interesting to see what that effect has over time. CARLY: I don’t think it’s essential, but of course it depends on what avenue you take. You are obviously not going to be able to set up your own doctors practice without a medical degree. I haven’t studied for a degree but I have done things such as diplomas at TAFE. I believe success is more about desire and drive. If you have that you will always find your way. JANICE: I went into teaching quite late and before teaching I was in banking. If I’m honest, before going to university, I thought a degree was so important and something that smart people did. Then I went to university and realised you didn’t need to be smart to be there and I learned more when I was actually on the job, than in the classroom. I found that university hadn’t really prepared me and the theory didn’t mean much. I think success is more about

march 2018

the person and I think vocations such as teaching and nursing should be more focused on learning on the job. Success is about the person, their drive and their attitude and vision for what they are aiming for. I have definitely changed my view point on tertiary education over the years. KRISTEN: I don’t think a university degree is essential either to be honest. I’m really glad schools are now offering alternative pathways for children other than the traditional path they had when I was at school. Having said that, these days there are high expectations from employers, many of whom are asking applicants to only apply if they have a degree, even for entry-level, generalist positions. I advise my daughter to keep that in mind when she is venturing out into the workforce. She may not necessarily need a degree but certainly some type of diploma, certificate or traineeship will get her foot in the door much more than those with no training. KIM: I went to university straight after Year 12. I didn’t really know what I wanted to do so I enrolled in a business degree. I really enjoyed it and I feel that I needed a degree in my field for the positions I was applying for. I agree with Coby about about the accountability and the discipline that university provides and it was a great thing for me to do at that time in my life. Having said that, I don’t think you necessarily need a university degree to be successful. The challenge for me in my job is not only promoting our study options but getting involved in innovation programs and giving students other pathways and internships. I’m currently involved in student focus groups, so I am interested in hearing from the students and their perceptions of tertiary study.

TERESA: I believe there are benefits you get from university that are not just related to the education side of things. You will be in contact with people who think outside the square, you will be involved in coming up with great ideas and learning to process and generate new information. The focus for some is not so much on the formal qualifications but being exposed to great thinkers. It would be a really different world we lived in if we didn’t have those organisations which support the ability to develop and think freely and change our thinking from the last generation. Like many industries, we are in the grip of a new world and of course there are different pathways for different kids. Often we think of a linear pathway when we think of university, but really how many of us have gone that way? Everything you do creates what you become in the end. One thing I would say to young people is to get a part time job as soon as you can. Because if you have those communication and service skills, combined with what you want to learn, you have the mix for success.


GOURMET

On the menu: Table talk review

• Pacific scallops, finger lime dressing, pea sponge • Clean sea kingfish carpaccio, macadamia, seaweed • Acquerello risotto, carrots, ginger, prawns • Lamb shoulder, horseradish gel, radish leaf • 75 per cent tanzanie chocolate with coconut and strawberry

NOOSA WATERFRONT RESTAURANT AND BAR

Italian dishes always sound better when explained to you in an authentic Italian accent don’t you think? This was certainly the case during my first visit to the revered Noosa Waterfront Restaurant and Bar recently. Hailing from Milan, Italy, owner Andrea Ravezzani was born into a rich food culture and you can see his passion for producing simple and delicious dishes that let the produce speak for itself. A highly experienced restaurateur, Andrea took the time to personally explain what was on our plate for each course and the attention to detail that goes into preparing each and every dish is simply astounding. It almost looks too good to eat. The presentation is a standout too, with many of the guests commenting on the unique plates the food is served on – definitely Instagram worthy! Backed by a team of highly skilled chefs, Andrea and wife Kerri have been at the helm of the restaurant for two years and pride themselves on dishing up modern Italian cuisine utilising the abundant variety of fresh local produce. Perfectly positioned on the edge of the Noosa River and surrounded by lush shady trees, the tranquil setting is the perfect spot to enjoy a long, leisurely lunch. Boasting wall-to-wall glass panels that take

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full advantage of the views, they can also be opened to bring the outdoors in. The ladies and I enjoyed a special degustation menu, allowing us to sample some of the innovative flair Andrea is famous for. From the freshest of seafood followed by a delicious creamy risotto and slow cooked lamb shoulder that fell off the fork, each dish was a stand out. Rounding off our delicious lunch was one of the most decadent desserts I have sampled. Perfectly presented, Andrea tells me the chocolate has been sprayed on! The rich chocolate dome breaks open to reveal a delicious strawberry sauce, each mouthful an explosion of flavour. I’m not surprised to discover that Noosa Waterfront rates as one of the top Italian restaurants in Queensland and was awarded a Chef’s Hat in 2017. Make sure you put it on your “must do” list next time you are in Noosa, you won’t be disappointed. Buon appetito!

NOOSA WATERFRONT RESTAURANT AND BAR 142 GYMPIE TERRACE, NOOSAVILLE NOOSAWATERFRONTRESTAURANT.COM.AU PHONE: 5474 4444

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SOME EARLY ADVANTAGES...

With two campuses on the Sunshine Coast, parents have the choice to discover the joy of learning that’s best suited for their child.

WEEKLY SWIMMING LESSONS

With our own pool on site at Nambour, both centres offer swim lessons, teaching early learners essential safety skills and developing water confidence. Our lessons are fun in a warm, nurturing environment.

NAMBOUR CAMPUS FROM 15 MONTHS+

ACTIVE KIDS SPORTS PROGRAM

This super fun program includes a focus on ball skills, dance, balance and fitness and is designed to enhance motor skills in young children giving life-long benefit.

BUDERIM CAMPUS FROM 6 WEEKS+

www.nccearlylearners.com.au 34 McKenzie Road, Woombye p: 5451 3330 | 1-3 Lakeshore Ave, Buderim p: 5476 8333

SHORT AND FULL TIME ACCREDITED COURSES IN PASTRY / BAKING, KITCHEN OPERATIONS AND RESTAURANT SERVICE.

HOSPITALITY COURSES AT NAMBOUR CHRISTIAN COLLEGE FOR STUDENTS & ADULTS

Courses are outside of school hours and open to students from all schools and adults.

At NCC, our new Trade Skills Centre incorporates a State of the Art Commercial Production Kitchen and Pastry Baking Kitchen as well as a 100 seat Restaurant, Bar and Pastry Shop. Providing ‘real life’ learning by industry professionals, students gain the necessary skills and knowledge to become a professional employee in the Hospitality industry.

SIT10216 CERTIFICATE I IN HOSPITALITY SIT20416 CERTIFICATE II IN KITCHEN OPERATIONS SIT20213 CERTIFICATE II IN HOSPITALITY FDF20510 CERTIFICATE II IN RETAIL BAKING ASSISTANCE

NAMBOUR CHRISTIAN COLLEGE

2 McKenzie Road, Woombye QLD 4559 | (07) 5451 3333 | www.ncc.qld.edu.au

Please contact John Shuttleworth for further information info@ncc.qld.edu.au or phone 5451 3333 march 2018

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Growing People

to make e c n e r e ff i d a

Pacific Lutheran College is a supportive learning community, with a strong academic focus and exceptional sporting, cultural and outdoor programs. Our curriculum is designed to support a seamless transition from Kindergarten to Year 12, and then to life beyond school. Fostering thinking skills, curiosity and deep understanding, Pacific helps each child develop their own passion for learning.

K-12 learning community

Core focus on relationships

VISIT US ON ANY WEEK DAY! pacificlutheran.qld.edu.au CONTACT Chris Henschke College Registrar 5436 7321 Woodlands Boulevard Meridan Plains 4551

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Flexible learning spaces

Our iconic dining and events venue is perfectly positioned with coastal views stretching from Noosa to Moreton Island. Join us for lunch or our Famous High Tea 7 days a week; and dinner on Fridays and Saturdays. 313 Flaxton Drive, Flaxton BOOKINGS 07 5445 7450

www.flaxtongardens.com.au profilemag.com.au


elderflower galette

GOURMET

quick raspberry and RECIPE KATRINA MEYNINK

INGREDIENTS PASTRY

• 340g flour (you can also substitute with spelt flour) • 225g cold butter, cubed • 120g crème fraiche EGG WASH

• 1 egg yolk • 1 tbsp milk FILLING

• 500g raspberries • zest of 1 lemon • 40g caster sugar (or less if your berries are nice and sweet) • 2 tbsp elderflower water (rose water is also great) • raw sugar to scatter • icing sugar to dust and edible flowers (optional) Throw all the pastry ingredients in a bowl. Massage with your hands until a rough dough forms. It will feel quite sticky and there will be streaks of butter – this is a good thing. Cover in plastic wrap and allow to rest in the fridge for at least 20 minutes. Preheat oven to 170ºC. Combine the filling ingredients in a bowl, tossing gently to coat, and place in the fridge until you are ready to go. Working quickly, remove pastry from fridge, roll out into a circle,

about 3mm thick and don’t worry about the edges, rough is almost the aim. Transfer to a baking sheet lined with baking paper. Then place the raspberry filling in the centre of your pastry circle, you want about a 5cm border all the way around, then gently fold up the pastry edges to create a rough crust to encase the fruit. Whisk together the egg yolk, milk and a pinch of salt. Brush pastry edges thoroughly with the egg wash and scatter with a generous amount of raw sugar. Bake until the edges look golden, about 40-50 minutes. Serve with icing sugar, flowers (optional), cream or ice cream.

KATRINA MEYNINK IS A FOOD WRITER, COOKBOOK AUTHOR, AND MUM TO TWO GORGEOUS GIRLS. SHE HAS RECENTLY WRITTEN A CHARMING NEW CHILDREN’S BOOK, LULU LE BABY CHEF. THE TALE OF A PRODIGIOUS TODDLER CHEF’S SEARCH FOR THE MISSING INGREDIENT. AVAILABLE IN ALL GOOD BOOKSTORES AND ONLINE AT THELITTLECRUMB.COM.AU

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Poke Bowl Create your own bowl, choosing from ingredients like, salmon, brown rice, carrots, edamame, wakame, avocado, shallots, bean sprouts, coriander, sesame tahini sauce and sesame seeds Born from an obsession and respect for the ocean, fishing and Japanese inspired cuisine, Raw and Rice delivers quality earth to table ingredients to create an alternative takeaway option. Poke bowls are a Japanese/Hawaiian raw marinated fish and rice dish with almost endless possibilities of flavours and ingredients. RAW AND RICE 1A/3 RIVER ESPLANADE, MOOLOOLABA PHONE: 0431 243 631

Yiros Choose your own ingredients including hot chips, feta, halloumi, lettuce, tomato and cabbage Say Opa to the perfect blend of traditional ingredients and modern Greek street food! Yasoo Yiros is taking the Sunshine Coast by storm with their delicious yiros featuring ingredients like hot chips, feta and halloumi. Next time you’re after a quick and easy takeaway meal, ditch the greasy kebab and opt for something fresh, tasty and quintessentially Greek. YASOO YIROS 1 MOOLOOLABA ESPLANADE, MOOLOOLABA PHONE: 0416 449 190

TANTALISE YOUR TASTE BUDS WITH A DELICIOUS DISH OF THE DAY

Pancakes Grilled pear, bacon (optional), roasted pecans, cinnamon, vanilla mascarpone and maple syrup on fluffy pancakes Silverback Cafe is a Buderim local favourite offering quality Tim Adams Specialty Coffee and modern cuisine for breakfast and lunch. While it makes for a lovely little breakfast spot serving smoothie bowls and the generous Gorilla Breakfast, they also offer a delicious range of tapas for those of us who like to sample a bit of everything (who doesn’t?) SILVERBACK CAFE SHOP 4/12-14 KING STREET, BUDERIM PHONE: 5445 4525

Breadless Benedict Sweet corn fritters, bacon, rocket, soft poached free range eggs and housemade hollandaise As the name would suggest, Backstreet Cafe is a hidden gem tucked away from the hustle and bustle. They boast a menu of delicious modern breakfast and brunch options backed by some seriously good burgers, a casual atmosphere and a small and friendly crew. Open seven days from 6.30am for breakfast, lunch and coffee dates. BACKSTREET CAFE 2/40 GLEN KYLE DRIVE, BUDERIM PHONE: 5452 7607 74

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GOURMET

Sicilian Seafood Hot Pot South Australian black mussels, Queensland king prawns, fresh fish, scallops, baby octopus, tomato concasse, Sicilian green olives, capers, fresh herbs and an aromatic stock served with homemade sourdough The fully licensed All’ Antica offers traditional dishes, all created from the best local produce and imported ingredients from Italy. With over 25 years at the forefront of the hospitality industry, this restaurant offers some of the best Italian cuisine on the Sunshine Coast. ALL’ ANTICA ITALIAN RESTAURANT 3/115 POINT CARTWRIGHT DRIVE, BUDDINA PHONE: 5444 0988 ALLANTICA.COM.AU

2018 WINNER OF AUSTRALIA GOOD FOOD GUIDE BEST ITALIAN RESTAURANT SUNSHINE COAST

Strawberry and cream curls Fresh strawberries mixed into Maleny Dairies milk and cream ice cream base IceCream Curls is a uniquely entertaining option for your next event or special occasion. The original mobile ice cream business offers freshly handcrafted ice cream that you can customise for your event. They use local ingredients, including Maleny Dairies milk and cream to create delicious curls of creamy ice cream. ICECREAM CURLS 222 THE AVENUE, PEREGIAN SPRINGS PHONE: 0434 952 498

Jaffa panna cotta Toasted muesli, buckinis, yoghurt, orange blossom syrup and berries Serving speciality coffee by Five Senses, and a delectable range of vegetarian cuisine and cocktails, Two Point Oh is a brand new cafe with a whole lot of hype. They aim to offer the best and freshest produce from local farmers in an eclectic setting ideal for your next dinner date, catch up with friends or family outing. Along with cocktails they also carry an impressive wine and craft beer list. What’s not to love? TWO POINT OH SHOP 1/55 PLAZA PARADE, MAROOCHYDORE PHONE: 0400 794 474 march 2018

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TRAVEL

Travelling opens the mind, casts curve balls, delivers SURPRISES at every turn, and most importantly connects us to new PEOPLE AND CULTURES.”

Jacinta Blundell PROFILE TRAVEL EDITOR

yearn to learn through

TRAVEL

WORDS JACINTA BLUNDELL PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED

Hilaire Belloc’s statement, “We wander for distraction, but we travel for fulfilment”, is the truth of the modern world. Journeying to the heart of other cultures, where rich traditions and passion continue to thrive and life is less impacted by contemporary man, this is where the unlearning begins. It’s also when we comprehend the tiny place we occupy in this world and how great our desire is to see more, know more, and be changed by what we uncover.

A

travel bucket list (or in my case, a wander-list) of iconic sights around the world that beg to be ticked off is the blueprint for most adventures abroad. Standing atop the Eiffel Tower, taking the kids to Disneyland, cruising the Greek Islands or watching the ball drop at Times Square on New Year’s Eve top the wish list for many. But the true allure of travelling isn’t the sights and attractions that draw us, or a behemoth collection of travel snaps and souvenirs to wow friends with – it’s what we discover or unravel along the way that makes journeying (as opposed travelling) the vital spice of life.

TRUFFLE HUNTING PIEDMONT ITALY

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CHOPSTICK-MAKING IN VIETNAM

Writer Henry Miller said, “One’s destination is never a place, but always a new way of seeing things”. Travelling opens the mind, casts curve balls, delivers surprises at every turn, and most importantly connects us to new people and cultures. Enriching the mind and upskilling are all part of great travel adventures, and hands-on encounters are the moments that linger in your memory longer than a great cappuccino in St. Mark’s Square, Venice ever will. Some jaunts are pure or part folly, yet most stem from a yearning for authentic experiences, mixing with the locals, learning their traditions and techniques. Taking a cooking class, chopstick making or rice noodle course in Vietnam, becoming a wine or cheese maker in the rambling hillsides of Tuscany, or joining an en plein air art class in the lavender fields of Provence elevate a holiday to unforgettable. Unassuming travel encounters remind us of our place in the world, and modern day adventure companies connect us to agritourism, volunteer tourism and cultural exchanges, where spending time in a Cambodian school or staying with Buddhist monks in Thien Vien Truc Lam Zen Monastery in Dalat, Vietnam are lifechangers. Agricultural tours are gaining popularity with farm visits and slow tourism through the world’s most fascinating food bowls and rural areas. Tours are designed for both everyday travellers and farmers/agriculturalists, with beautiful itineraries combining ‘must do’ travel sights, education and meeting producers; everything from Texas cattle ranch visits, to UK paddock to plate grazing, and tobacco and classic cars of Cuba are covered. profilemag.com.au


BARREL TASTING IN MENDOZA INFO SESSIONS

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CULINARY EXPERIENCES Join Jacinta Blundell

SATURDAY, 24 MARCH *

in-store at Helloworld Travel Buderim to unlock charming adventures, regional touring and culinary highlights during our expert destination sessions. Presented by tour hosts & specialists Jacinta Blundell & Kristy Hope

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10:30am-11:30am

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12:30pm-2:00pm

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2:30pm-4:00pm

A discovery of hill-tribes & regions beyond the tourist trail. Authentic cuisine, luxury cruising routes & cultural immersion.

Search for the Northern Lights, tour the Arctic Circle, walk ice tunnels & glaciers, fish for King Crab & sail the fjords.

UNESCO sites, Iceberg Alley, lighthouses, abundant seafood & wildlife, fjord cruises, & scenery to take your breath away. 

Max. 14 seats per session

Small Group Journeys is a collection of bespoke worldwide adventures, cruises and tours designed and escorted by Jacinta Blundell. Follow Jacinta in Profile each month as she takes you beyond the tourist trail. MAKE AN APPOINTMENT TO SEE ONE OF HELLOWORLD TRAVEL’S SPECIALISTS TODAY OR VISIT SMALLGROUPJOURNEYS.COM march 2018

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Regional Vietnam touring Cambodia Mekong River cruising

Iceland/Finland/Norway Ultimate winter touring Norwegian coastal cruise

Newfoundland/Labrador Prince Edward Island Niagara wine region Light refreshments served

CRUISE & RAIL

SILK WEAVING IN VIETNAM

Being a fan of winter travel and the far-flung polar regions, my early 2019 travels will deliver me north of the 63rd parallel to the Arctic latitudes of Norway and Finland. The Sami people, who are indigenous Finno-Ugric (Laplanders), call the great white north home and continue to make their living from traditional ways of herding reindeer, fishing, hunting, small scale agricultural operations and livestock farming. All of which outsiders are invited to experience first-hand. In October 2018 the hill tribes and minority villages of central and northern Vietnam are calling, and later in 2019 the foothills of Tibet and the Ancient Tea Horse Route of Yunnan province in southwestern China will place us in the heart of centuries-old traditions, architecture and a hidden world visited by few.

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Cominng soo

SHOWCASE

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Discover the world by train, oceanliner, ferry, yacht or riverboat at our upcoming

CRUISE & RAIL SHOWCASES

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Coming soon, Helloworld Travel Buderim & Caboolture King St will present holiday inspiration and great deals from boutique & major cruiselines, iconic train journeys & rail holidays. ... Standby for dates & locations ... FOLLOW US ON

FOR DETAILS

Contact Helloworld Travel Buderim to reserve your place

(07) 5445 4022 58 Burnett St, Buderim rsvp@smallgroupjourneys.com

*Session times, content & guest presenters subject to change. Please check with HWT Buderim at time of RSVP | Independently owned & operated by Blunbell Pty Ltd, as Trustee for the GSJ Trust trading as Helloworld Travel Buderim and GR & SJ Bell & JH Blundell trading as Helloworld Travel Caboolture King Street

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Beyond the Ordinary

Czech Republic

Canada's Capital Cities

Blue Danube River Cruise

TORONTO to QUEBEC CITY

BUDAPEST to PRAGUE

10 days from AUD$4,990*pp twin share Departures from: 05Jun - 04Oct, 2018

12 days from AUD$6,740*pp twin share Departure date: 25 October, 2018

Immerse yourself in the magic and wonder of Canada's capital cities. Our 10 day Canada’s Capital Cities plus Niagara Falls holiday explores four distinctly different capital cities in eastern Canada – Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal and Quebec City, each with its own unique personality and cultural background.

Experience the true hallmarks of the grand days of Europe on our Blue Danube River Cruise. Get an insider’s view of life along the Danube in Vienna, Salzburg, Bratislava and off the beaten path on our 12-day trip featuring a 7-night riverboat cruise and 2-night stays in Prague and Budapest. Starting from $6,740*pp, join us on a private Imperial evening with dinner and music at a palace in Vienna... a wine tasting in Dürnstein... spend a day in Mozart's Salzburg or medieval Cesky Krumlov... take an exclusive private tour of Baroque monastery libraries in Prague... discuss contemporary issues and historic events in Slovakia with a resident expert... and enjoy evenings of cultural entertainment on and off your riverboat. We’re all about taking you to explore the world’s treasures... discover people and cultures you may not have known even existed... and experience extraordinary, life-changing moments.

Multiple-night stays at landmark Fairmont hotels in the heart of the cities allow you more time to explore what makes each city so special. Enjoy a Tauck-Exclusive private, after-hours docent-led tour of the Royal Ontario Museum followed by a reception and dinner, a luncheon cruise along the St. Lawrence River through the Thousand Islands, views of Niagara Falls, a visit to a Quebecois sugar-shack and more …

Departure date: 25 October, 2018

Austria Terms & Conditions: *Prices are per person twin share in Australian dollars and are correct as at 1 Dec ’17. Prices are based on 25 Oct ’18 departure date for the Blue Danube itinerary and 5 Jun, 10 Jun, 19 Jun, 23 Jun, 2 Jul, 7 Jul, 16 Jul, 20 Jul, 29 Jul, 7 Aug, 18 Aug, 22 Aug, 27 Aug, 31 Aug, 5 Sep, 11 Sep, 20 Sep, 27 Sep & 4 Oct ’18 on the Canada’s Capital Cities itinerary. Prices are subject to availability & seasonal surcharges. International airfares are not included. Change and Cancellation conditions apply and will be advised at the time of booking.

Slovenia

OUR CONSULTANTS JOIN THE 1% Kerri Page, Tegan Ferguson & Jacinta Blundell, of Helloworld Travel Buderim & Caboolture King St are recent graduates of Tauck’s In-depth training program. They join the less than 1% of Tauck’s worldwide network of travel agents qualifying them access to exclusive opportunities for you, their valued clients. Come and chat to them and find out what separates Tauck’s tours and cruises from those of its competitors.

Your Premium Travel Concierge: Jacinta Blundell Mobile consultations Noosa to North Brisbane

(0438) 95 1766 jacinta.buderim@helloworld.com.au


CULTURE

wild

totally

WORDS INGRID NELSON PHOTOS SARAH ASH

Did you know there are around 96 * critically endangered species in Australia? I didn’t, until I met Sarah Ash, a wildlife conservationist and photographer who is on a mission to educate future generations and raise awareness and money to conserve these precious animals through her exciting project, wild_.

“S

adly, we have one of the highest mammal extinction rates in the world, in Australia,” says Sarah, while showing me an image of the most beautiful little critter called the Mountain Pygmy Possum, of which there are only around 2000 left in the wild. Australia’s only hibernating marsupial, they are considered critically endangered. “Their habitat is really delicate and there are many more adorable little creatures just like this one who are in danger,” she says. “I attended the Devil Ark (an animal preservation project) gala dinner in Sydney recently and the first threatened species commissioner spoke. He played a frog call over his phone and said, ‘This is the only way you can hear this species of frog call now because it no longer exists’. It really hit home.”

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MOUNTAIN PYGMY POSSUM

Black and white FACTS often don’t stick as well as they should, so I thought bringing these CREATURES to life would have more of an IMPACT.”

With a background in environmental management, photography and music, Sarah has combined all of her passions to bring these endangered species to the attention of the public through a mix of beautiful imagery, photography, videography and music.

“I was studying photography at TAFE and found a niche in doing portraits of people on a plain black background so the focus was completely on the subject,” says Sarah. “I also worked in environmental management, so when I came across several species I had never heard of before that were threatened and at the risk of extinction, I did a bit more research into it and I was quite gobsmacked at the extent of how bad it was. “It all progressed from there really. I started thinking about how I could combine my love of animals and my creative skills to raise awareness. Black and white facts often don’t stick as well as they should, so I thought bringing these creatures to life would have more of an impact.” Sarah began taking photos of the endangered species she came across using the same striking technique she had developed for her portraits, which progressed to the production of short videos set to music she had composed herself as well as tracks by unsigned Aboriginal artists. Each visual pictorial has detailed information about the status quo of the species to educate the public. “I am always working on it. I go to bed with ideas and I wake up with ideas. I do profilemag.com.au


CULTURE PLAINS MOUSE

PHOTO BY MAX JACKSON

all the editing myself and although I write and compose music myself, when I build my brand, I would like to call on other Aussie musicians to donate music. The ideas have gone mad in my brain now as to what’s possible.” Although Sarah had great feedback from her posts on her own social media network, it wasn’t until she contacted the Foundation for Australia’s Most Endangered Species (FAME) seeking permission to showcase her work on their online network that things started to really gain momentum. “The chief executive of FAME got back to me straight away and said they would love to share my content and suggested I apply for a grant, which I did with the help of my aunty and I was successful,” says Sarah. “I still remember the phone call when they told me the grant was approved, it gives me goosebumps. They have been amazing and now that I have their backing it gives me that accountability and it pushes me that bit harder.” With some great projects in store for 2018, including a trip early this year with Made in the Wild TV, a YouTube wildlife channel, Sarah is well on her way to fulfilling her dream of working on her project full time.

“We will be setting off to look for the most venomous snake in the world, the Inland Taipan! I plan on documenting the trip and learning all the facts about this rare and elusive snake and sharing it with the public,” says Sarah. “I’m so excited. Also, I plan on selling wild_ merchandise and prints of photos to raise money for conservation efforts around Australia. “I feel like this is the generation we need to be focusing on and I truly hope we are still raising awareness and hope to have witnessed some of our current species listed as endangered become delisted.” *Data according to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature

TASMANIAN DEVIL

YOU CAN CHECK OUT SARAH’S BEAUTIFUL WORK ON FACEBOOK FACEBOOK.COM/WILDTHEPROJECT

SARAH ASH. PHOTO BY LACHLAN GILDING

We will be setting off to look for the most VENOMOUS snake in the world, the Inland Taipan! I plan on documenting the trip and learning all the facts about this RARE and ELUSIVE snake and sharing it with the public.”

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CULTURE

FILM: LOVE, SIMON Love, Simon is a feel-good discovery – a universally relatable coming-of-age story about falling in love for the first time and being true to yourself. In cinemas 29 March. Everyone deserves a great love story. But for 17-year-old Simon Spier it’s a little more complicated: he’s yet to tell his family or friends he’s gay and he doesn’t actually know the identity of the anonymous classmate he’s fallen for online. Resolving both issues proves hilarious, terrifying and life-changing. Directed by Greg Berlanti (Dawson’s Creek, Brothers & Sisters), written by Isaac Aptaker and Elizabeth Berger (This is Us), and based on Becky Albertalli’s acclaimed novel, Love, Simon is a funny and heartfelt coming-of-age story about the thrilling ride of finding yourself and falling in love. DIRECTOR: Greg Berlanti CAST: Nick Robinson, Katherine Langford, Jennifer Garner

COMEDY: ROSS NOBLE EL HABLADOR Ross Noble returns to dance around the stage, spinning out all the nonsense in his head into a hilarious standup show, El Hablador. Don’t miss his one-night only performance at The Events Centre Caloundra on 3 April. Following 14 sell-out tours, the king of improvisation comedy is back with another mind-blowing Australian tour. Ross Noble will be showcasing his talent in his brand new show, El Hablador. With a stage presence like no other, his exuberance, spontaneity and cerebral style have established him as one of the world’s bestloved comedians. The master surrealist uses an infinite imagination and plenty of tomfoolery, which is sure to have audiences in fits of laughter. Famed for his fiery freewheeling style, Noble creates comedy gold from tiny particles of random nonsense. Known for improvising vast swathes of his act from night to night depending on what, or more likely, who, sparks his fertile imagination; it gives each performance a special feel, knowing that the material is quite unrepeatable outside this specific moment in time. This is your chance to see one of the world’s most critically acclaimed stand-ups in a hysterical night with El Hablador. WHEN 3 April WHERE The Events Centre Caloundra BOOKINGS theeventscentre.com.au 82

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5 - 11 MARCH INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S WEEK FESTIVAL

In celebration of International Women’s Day and Queensland Women’s week, Women Initiating New Directions Organisation (WINDO Inc.) will host the Sunshine Coast International Women’s Week Festival from 5 to 11 March. Noosa will come alive in celebration of the Coast’s 300,000 women and girls, with events ranging from comedy, to art and everything in between. This is an event for all ages and sexes to explore and advance the diversity, contribution and changing landscape of women in our community.

1 APRIL OCEAN STREET WORLD FESTIVAL

Performers, artisans and chefs from all over the globe will showcase their talents in a celebration of diversity, promising a feast for the senses. Expected to attract 50,000 people, the festival will feature a stellar line-up of performers from Bolivia to Budapest and Jamaica to Japan. The Ocean Street World Festival runs from 10am-9pm on Easter Sunday, 1 April. Entry is free. mra.org.au

windowomen.org

march april WHAT’S ON IN

AND

6 - 8 APRIL WOMEN OF THE WORLD

Women of the World is a global force supporting women and girls, action and change. One hundred local and international speakers will come together at Brisbane Powerhouse to celebrate the achievements of women and girls across the Commonwealth, have frank discussions about the barriers preventing women from reaching their full potential, and identify solutions. wowaustralia.com.au

7 - 8 APRIL AUSTRALIAN BODY ART FESTIVAL

28 - 29 APRIL TREX CROSS TRIATHLON SERIES – RACE 7: TREX CHAMPS

After hosting the 2016 ITU Cross Triathlon World Champs, the TreX series is back and ready to explode into the 2018 triathlon season with an even bigger and more actionpacked season. Events across the country include a new event location, new event formats, the revival of the TreX Duathlon, and new standard and sprint course AquaBike. The TreX series culminates at their rainforest course at Ewen Maddock Dam. trextriathlon.com.au

march 2018

Australia’s premier body art event, the Australian Body Art Festival is free for spectators and attracts great crowds keen to watch artists at work using human bodies as their canvas. Located in the Noosa Hinterland town of Cooroy, the festival will feature brush and sponge, airbrush and special effects full body art as well as some of the most intricate face painting you will ever see. The theme for this year’s competitions is Wild Things which will provide a wealth of inspiration for artists. australianbodyart.com.au

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COMPETITIONS

FULL PRIZE VALUED AT $1365

win

A 60-MINUTE FLYING LESSON WITH GOFLY AVIATION

Win one of seven ‘First Flight Special’ flights (valued at $195 each) and take the controls while soaring over spectacular coastline.

I

nterested in obtaining your recreational or commercial pilot licence? Why not learn to fly at the friendliest and most technologically advanced flying school on the Sunshine Coast. Owned by local pilot, Damien Wills, GoFly Aviation only employs instructors who are passionate about teaching people how to fly. GoFly was the first flight school in Australia to introduce the low-wing sling aircraft for flight training and recently became the first to film online flying lessons. Based at Caloundra Airport, GoFly Aviation offers fixed prices for flying lessons (there are no extra costs for landings, briefs or exams and there is no time wasted waiting for commercial aircraft to use the runway). GoFly also offers free use of its simulator and innovative online lessons for all students and provides free high definition video footage for those taking introductory flights. They also offer an active cadets program for 14 to 18-year-old students and an annual scholarship. If you are interested in learning to fly, or know someone who wants to obtain their pilot certificate, why not enter the competition to win one of seven ‘First Flight Special’ flights?

EACH PRIZE INCLUDES:

• 15-minute pre-flight briefing • Interim student licence • 45-minute flying lesson (where you take the controls under supervision) • Flight can be counted as flying hours towards your recreational pilot licence

GOFLY AVIATION PHONE: 1800 707 433 OR 0426 282 226 GOFLYAVIATION.COM.AU FULL T&CS CAN BE FOUND AT GOFLYAVIATION.COM.AU/PRODUCT/195-FIRST-FLIGHT-SPECIAL/

ENTER NOW AT PROFILEMAG.COM.AU FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN!


WIN ONE SIZE FITS ALL FASHION With summer as the major source of inspiration, Bijou (bijouthelabel.com) offers the perfect blend of comfort and style in their one size fits all fashion. Featuring glorious cuts and colours, their kimonos, skirts and wraps are just what your wardrobe needs for a boost of vibrancy and effortless style. This prize is for all the bohemian fashion lovers out there – two clothing prize packs to the value of $150 each.

WIN PERSONALISED MEMENTOS Oh My Giddy Aunt (ohmygiddyaunt.com.au) creates beautiful jewellery and personalised keepsakes to tell the stories about your life. They offer original jewellery designs made in Australia and traditional ready-made charms, lockets, bangles and treasures. You can win a size M solid 9ct yellow gold traditional princess heart signet ring, set with an emerald birthstone and finished with hand-engraved swirls, PLUS a size N sterling silver large round classic signet ring, handmonogrammed in a block font with the letters LYA (Love You Always). Full prize is valued at $350.

WIN! FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN, GO TO PROFILEMAG.COM.AU/WIN

WIN THE ULTIMATE IN SKIN REJUVENATION The latest breakthrough technology to lighten and rejuvenate the skin, D’Lumiere Esthetique (drlanzer.com.au) is a skincare range designed and developed by renowned Australian dermatologist and cosmetic surgeon, Dr Daniel Lanzer. The range is Australian made, highly potent and includes active ingredients, containing liposomes for increased absorption and plant derived (candle tree) DNA extract to protect and heal the skin. Enter to win an incredible prize pack valued at $349.

WIN A FOOD-LOVER’S DREAM The Noosa Food and Wine Festival (noosafoodandwine.com.au) is one of the most hyped events on the Sunshine Coast calendar in 2018. Profile readers have the chance to win tickets to two exciting events at the festival; two tickets to The Local Seafood Flair event with Miguel Maestre ($165 each) and two tickets to The Festival Village (from $30). Bon appetit!

WRITE TO US AND WIN! Tell us what you love about this issue of Profile Magazine for your chance to win an eight pack of eco-friendly Sienna Byron Bay Nail Polish. Send your letter, along with your name and address, to editorial@profilemag.com.au, for the opportunity to win! SHOW US YOUR PROFILE AND WIN! Show us how you enjoy your copy of Profile Magazine by tagging @profilemagazine and #profilemagazine on Instagram, for your chance to win a Skinny Tan prize pack featuring pre-tan primer, body mousse, tanning mitt, and mini mitt.

march 2018

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THE

LAST WORD

Dr Chris Brown

Three years after graduating as a vet, Chris was talent-spotted while telling stories over a few beers in a pub. A fortnight later, he was the new vet on Harry’s Practice. Since 2009, Chris has been TEN’s Bondi Vet, a co-host on The Living Room and a regular guest and panellist on The Project. Chris is currently filming the fourth season of I’m A Celebrity…Get Me Out Of Here! which broadcasts live, five nights a week from South Africa, on TEN and WIN Network. MY FAVOURITE CONTESTANT ON I’M A CELEBRITY HAS BEEN …

I really enjoyed Pricey (Steve Price) last year, for the simple fact his viewpoints were so extreme going in, for him to go about that transformation of his morals and outlook on the world was quite profound. To see him now since he’s come back, he’s a different person; he’s happier, he’s healthier – he seems like a better version of himself and that’s a really nice thing. I talk to him quite often and he says it’s the greatest thing he’s ever done. THE COMFORT FROM HOME I ALWAYS TRAVEL WITH IS …

My camera gear. I love to be able to capture the extreme environments we find ourselves in. I always have the camera out and take a lot of photos and try to share them on social media to first of all prove we are in South Africa, but also to show people how amazing this location is. IN PHOTOGRAPHY THEY SAY ‘NEVER WORK WITH ANIMALS OR CHILDREN’ … I have a pair of boots I wear on every single shoot and

you sometimes forget how good the sense of smell of pets really is. I was working with a tiger one day and then flew back into Australia and went home and I must have had the urine or something (you get covered in all sorts of bodily fluids), and my dog and cat both sniffed my shoes and ran. For the rest of the night they kept patrol, one at either end of the house, if they weren’t standing guard at the doors they were doing a patrol around the house – they were convinced there was a tiger around because they’d smelt it on me! They didn’t relax for a couple of days. MY FAVOURITE ANIMAL IS … In terms of my favourite to work on, probably giraffes, just the way they work is quite fascinating. I was in Uganda midway through last year for a couple of weeks working on a program to relocate giraffes across the Nile River. Understanding the intricate way their circulation works to keep them from passing out and working with that to make sure when you sedated them and when they go down they don’t injure themselves, and then waking them up in safe ways. They’re quite gentle unless they’re absolutely pushed and then they can kick and the kick can kill you, it’s working with what is a fairly gentle nature to not push them over the edge.

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Profile Magazine March 2018  

March 2018: Education. Featuring Nambour Christian College, Catherine Molloy, Caleb Mattiske and Jak Hardy

Profile Magazine March 2018  

March 2018: Education. Featuring Nambour Christian College, Catherine Molloy, Caleb Mattiske and Jak Hardy