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cognitive development, affective development, and psychomotor development.

Having established the biological origins of our cognitive i.e. intellectual abilities in the second lecture, we also submitted that our intelligence can grow and can generate new knowledge. This then makes cognitive development a realizable educational objective. But as we asked at the end of the second lecture, is the learned person the educated person? If this were so, knowledge would be a sufficient criterion for education. But on its on, knowledge is a neutral construct. One agrees with R. S. Peters who said that: …the knowledge which a man must possess to qualify as being educated must be built into his way of looking at things. It cannot be merely inert. It is possible for a man to know a lot of history, in the sense that he can give correct answers to questions in classrooms and in examination, without ever developing a historical sense… . We might describe such a man as “knowledgeable” but we would never describe him as “educated”; for education implies that a man’s outlook is transformed by what he knows.33 The psychomotor development as an educational objective also has cognitive origins. Though it is essentially a demonstration of practical skills, such skills need some theoretical knowledge background to actualize their meaningful application. I need to know some principles of the highway code before I can be trusted to drive on the highway. The factory machine operator needs some theoretical knowledge of how the machines function before he can be 33

R. S. Peters (1979) The concept of education, London, Routledge and Kegan Paul, p. 7

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Professor Oluremi Aina Bamisaiye University Lecture  

University LEcture

Professor Oluremi Aina Bamisaiye University Lecture  

University LEcture

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