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3 THE LEARNED MAN OR THE EDUCATED MAN? Mr. Vice-Chancellor Sir, let me say, for the benefit of people who are here for the first time today, that in this year’s university lectures, we have a simple question to answer— What is man, that we should educate him? In the first lecture, I tried to address the question, “Who needs education anyway?” In the second, I tried to paint a picture of homo sapiens, the knowing man. We saw homo sapiens as a human being with intelligence and potential. When these attributes are developed, homo sapiens becomes a learned man. In this lecture we are asking another question: Is the learned man the same as the educated man? Though I have been raising questions from the beginning of these lectures to now, I am not trying to present a parody of the Ancient Mariner by asking “questions, questions every time and not a single answer given” As pointed out in the first lecture questions give philosophy its resilience and dynamism down the ages. No question is ever finally answered because questions of philosophy are questions of human life. Let us start this last lecture by discussing another interpretation of education which has been deliberately deferred from the first lecture because of its logical relevance here. This is the interpretation of education as personality development. This interpretation is both generally assented to and more presumed than other interpretations. Not only that, development, though a favourable word, is more nebulous than for example, schooling, literacy, knowledge, or certification. When we interpret education as personality development, are we referring to development from a toddler in preschool to a young adult on graduation?

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Professor Oluremi Aina Bamisaiye University Lecture  

University LEcture

Professor Oluremi Aina Bamisaiye University Lecture  

University LEcture

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