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Permit me Mr. Vice-Chancellor, to illustrate the theory of multiple intelligences from my early life and the lives of others around me. My earthly father, late Solomon Olympus Adekanmbi (1900-1983) was able to master two subjects, English language and mathematics through self study during his military service in the Second World War. In his discharge certificate, his superiors described him as having “a good head for figures”. When I was a school girl, it did not take my father long to see that I preferred literary subjects— history, literature in particular, to mathematics. Because he wanted me to learn mathematics, he started writing notes for me as my history and literature teachers used to do. Certainly, my fear of disappointing him helped me to obtain a credit pass in O’ level mathematics. This meant that I had to learn some theorems and formulae by heart in case I needed to use them during examinations. My father applied his linguistic intelligence to help me use my own linguistic intelligence to understand mathematics. Coming home to my department, my former student and now my colleague at the career grade, Dr. Ayotola Aremu is another example. With a B.Sc degree in Electronic/Electrical Engineering, she soon came to terms with the reality that the toys with which she was brought up were now part of her life and that she liked to continue working with them. She came to earn a postgraduate diploma in education before getting admission to do a masters degree in childhood education. For her Ph.D, she worked on using ayo game to teach geometry to young children. At present, she is doing research on using story telling to teach arithmetic. This is an example of application of multiple intelligences to educational practice. Ayotola’ photo slide

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Professor Oluremi Aina Bamisaiye University Lecture  

University LEcture

Professor Oluremi Aina Bamisaiye University Lecture  

University LEcture

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