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NFL star Cam Newton for FNV campaign

vative marketing techniques to deeply engage our audiences will result in increased consumption of the good stuff. How can that be a bad thing? It’s not. It’s good for business and good for the health of the nation. At Bolthouse Farms, we’ve been asking the question for years: Why should junk food have all the fun? It shouldn’t, and by ripping a page out of their marketing playbook, we produced a bold and irreverent ad campaign — featuring imagery and a brand voice that could’ve promoted fiery nacho cheesy corn chips — to sell our fresh baby carrots. We implored two test markets, with television commercials, mobile games and an interactive web and social media presence, to “Eat ‘Em Like Junk Food.” And guess what? Consumers did eat ‘em like junk food, to the tune of double-digit growth in fresh carrot sales in those markets. eat brighter!™ and FNV present similar opportunities industry wide. The drill is pretty straightforward — make spinach, grapes

34 fresh  July 2015 Edition

and asparagus relevant to our targeted demographics beyond the tired and — sorry, folks — boring “good for you” mantra that, historically, has been the foundation of produce marketing. These two platforms get us there by transforming the cultural context of healthy foods. Fact: Sesame Street is the most co-watched television program in the world. No doubt, leveraging this asset is HUGE for us, and now that Elmo and Abby Cadabby are encouraging 2- to 6-year-olds (and their parents) to eat brighter!™, the produce drawer becomes a fun and much-anticipated place to get a snack. Toddlers and young kids will want to eat bananas because Cookie Monster loves them too (the sticker on the peel proves it)! Ah, the wonder of engaging families with fun, healthy marketing messages. Changing the eating habits of teens is a more difficult task. FNV gets that motor running in a creative way. Each year, “big food” spends billions on truly creative marketing targeted directly at 12- to 18-year-olds, and the return on investment is undeniable. Fast food, junk food and sugary soft drinks have become deeply rooted in their collective psyche. Let’s face it, teenagers respond to Kate Upton provocatively eating a double cheeseburger. Now we have the likes of Jessica Alba, Colin Kaepernick, Nick Jonas and the other celebrities, athletes and beautiful people on our team. #teamFNV will connect this youthful demographic to avocados, cherries, green beans and melons. Over the long-term, we’re sure to see a swing in how teens perceive eating fruits and vegetables, all because of marketing — with a heavy dose of social media — that’s as innovative as the other guys’. At long last, with #teamFNV we’re joining the fight for our kids’ attention. But wait, don’t eat brighter!™ and FNV compete with one another? That’s the question frequently being posed to PMA, and the answer is a resounding NO. The fundamental target audiences of the two platforms are vastly different. By definition, the marketing mix required to reach 12- to 18-year-olds (read: personality-driven social interaction and out-of-home experiences) is nothing like the methods geared to little ones. We have at our disposal two incredible branded assets that the industry should line up to support. So, what’s the call to action? First, we’ve got to understand that eat brighter!™ and FNV aren’t designed to compete with

Profile for Produce Marketing Association

PMA Fresh Magazine  

The "Issues" issue about facing a global supply chain

PMA Fresh Magazine  

The "Issues" issue about facing a global supply chain

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