Page 12

independently established 127 groups making a total of 171 groups that for 31 units in 8  districts without counting other hundreds dairy goats groups that are not members of MGBA  through farmer to farmer extension. In general the dairy goat groups are strong, autonomous and operational. The majority of over  550,000 user services  of project services  do not belong to groups, but membership  does  confer advantages. Without local goat credit scheme administered by each group, the poorest  households would have been excluded from the project. Access to training and lower fees for  buck and animal health services also eased participation. Group members’ confidence has  risen with their knowledge and control. Group assets and income are jointly owned and members often collaborate in a “merry­go­ round” savings and credit facility to make the most of their personal resources. Chickens,  additional goats and household goods are popular group purchases. Besides cash, members  usually share materials and give each other support, encouragement and pressure to live up to  group standards. 2.3.1 Advantages of being in a group People value things they pay for. This is the development argument around cost sharing­ as a  means of conferring sustainability, in terms of training, breeding and treatment. MGBA acts  as guarantor for breeding material given on loans repayable in kind for the expansion of the  programme,   but   the   individuals   are   obliged   to   put   up   collateral,   which   encourages   a  responsible attitude to business. Most MGBA officials are Community Animal Health Workers who treat members’ animals  at a cost providing animal health services on demand, making it a demand driven services for  quality control. 2.3.2 Gender and the role of women Women in Meru traditionally count goat management among their tasks, and the zero grazing  system causes minimal disruption to their other responsibilities.  However,   the   value   and   income   generation   of   the   improved   goats   attracts   an   increasing  number of men, and their large appetites often involve the whole family in fodder collection.  In many household, husband and wife share management of their dairy goat, and take joint  decisions on the use of goat income and expansion of activities. The project has supported  all­women groups who requested and women believe that their success as goat farmers has  earned   them   new   respect   from   their   husbands   and   empowered   them   within   their   own  households.  The current chair of MGBA is a lady­ citing a powerful example of gender inclusion and  equality.

12

Case 5 Meru Goat Breeders Association  
Case 5 Meru Goat Breeders Association  

Case 5 Meru Goat Breeders Association

Advertisement