Issuu on Google+

CASE 5: MERU GOAT BREEDERS ASSOCIATION MERU COUNTY, KENYA Cover Photo 

1


2


TABLE OF CONTENTS  1.0 Introduction                                                                                                                            .......................................................................................................................      3 Back ground- origin and history .............................................................................................. 4 1.2 Context – Meru County ...................................................................................................... 4 1.3 Meru Goat Breeders Association- (MGBA) structure, mission and objectives........................... 6  Box 1: Map of Kenya showing Meru County                                                                                    ...............................................................................      6  Box 2: Organization levels at MGBA                                                                                                ...........................................................................................      7 1.4. Partnership Arrangements ................................................................................................ 7  1.4.1 Map of actors                                                                                                                            .......................................................................................................................      7  Box 3:  MGBA’s vision, mission and objectives                                                                               ...........................................................................      8 1.5. Activities of MGBA............................................................................................................. 8

 2.0 The Innovation                                                                                                                       ..................................................................................................................      9 2.1 Technical issuesaround the innovation .............................................................................. 9  2.1.1 MGBA breeding plan                                                                                                                ............................................................................................................      9  2.1.2 .Breeding plan for ¾ Toggernburg dairy goat                                                                           .......................................................................      9  Box 4: Breeding stages                                                                                                                      ..................................................................................................................      9  Box 5: Comparison of attributes                                                                                                      .................................................................................................       10 2.2 Learning points from the experience and innovation.......................................................... 11  Box 6. What do we learn from this case?                                                                                         .....................................................................................       11 2.3 The group system............................................................................................................. 11  2.3.1 Advantages of being in a group                                                                                              ..........................................................................................       12  2.3.2 Gender and the role of women                                                                                                ............................................................................................       12

 3.0 Achievements, challenges and the future                                                                           ......................................................................       13 3.1 Achievements .................................................................................................................. 13 3.2 Challenges....................................................................................................................... 14 3.2 The future........................................................................................................................ 15

 4.0 Additional reading and references                                                                                     ................................................................................       16

1.0 Introduction 

3


This case write up is about Case 5 in the “Learning Route: Innovative Livestock Marketing   from Northern to Eastern Africa” and features the Meru Goat Breeders Association in Meru  County, eastern Kenya. Back ground­ origin and history  The Meru Goat Breeders Association (MGBA) is a poor farmers’  empowerment project of goat breeders in eight (8) districts of the  old Meru district – now Meru County, Eastern province of Kenya.  MGBA was registered in the year 2003. It is currently owned by  171 groups  of farmers  with 4,275 goat farmers  within 31 units.  However,   its   membership   is   still   open   and   is   growing   as   many  farmers   adopt   goat   breeding.   The   farmers   have   to   form   groups  which then register with MGBA A   legal   entity,   MGBA   is   registered   first   as   a  self   help   group,   under   the   Registration   of  Societies Act, Laws of Kenya. It was found in 1998 with support from FARM (Food and  Agricultural Research management) Africa and the Ministry of Livestock Development; as  an exit strategy for the Meru Tharaka Nithi Dairy Goat and Animal Health Project that closed  down in June 2004.The project had been funded by the  British Government  through the  Department for International Development (DFID). MGBA was registered in the year 2003.  It is currently owned by 171 groups of farmers with 4,275 goat farmers within 31 units.  However, its membership is still open and is growing as many farmers adopt goat breeding.  The farmers have to form groups which then register with MGBA.  Members pay registration fees (annual and renewal). Sales commissions are paid at 6% from  members and 10% from non­members). The basic objective of MGBA is to alleviate poverty  and improve the living standards of goat farmers through increased income generation and  improved nutrition. In addition, MGBA is required to continue to genetically upgrade local  goats with the superior Toggenburg, attain self­sustenance and strengthen its management  and technical capacities so as to run its operations commercially. 1.2 Context – Meru County  The Meru County is located in the eastern foothills of Mount Kenya in the country’s Eastern  Province. It consists of eight districts, namely Meru South, Mara, Imenti South, Imenti North,  Meru Central, Buuri, Tigania East and Tigania West. Meru   County is   one   of   the   47 counties   of   Kenya,   and   one   of   the   two  predominantly Meru (community) counties, the other being Tharaka­Nithi. Meru County is  the home of the Imenti, Tigania and Igembe sub­tribes of the Ameru (Meru) tribe, which is  related   to   other   tribes   living   around   the Mount   Kenya region:   the Kikuyu and   the  Embu  people. The Ameru are "Bantu" people who have lived in the Mt. Kenya area for many years,  well before Kenya's colonization by Great Britain in the 19th Century.  The   people   of   Meru   County   are   now  predominantly Christian: Methodist, Presbyterian, Roman Catholic, and other denominations, 

4


reflecting   the   work   of   missionaries.   Meru   County   is   also   home   to   minorities  of Indian descent,   who   are   mainly Hindus,   and   African/Arab   descent,   who   are Muslims.  Meru County is also home to some Europeans, predominantly British in ancestry. The   County   headquarters   is   in Meru  town,   where   MGBA   headquarters   are   located.   The  County has seven constituencies: South Imenti, Central Imenti, North Imenti, Igembe South  Constituency, Constituency,   Tigania, Tigania   West   Constituency and   the   proposed   Buuri  Constituency.

5


Box 1: Map of Kenya showing Meru County 

1.3 Meru Goat Breeders Association­ (MGBA) structure, mission and objectives The structure of the association is constituted through a network spanning from the Groups­ Units­Districts­to Regional Office.  The groups further associate into units. Both units and  groups are run by elected farmers and ultimately answer to the regional office, although their  daily operations are independent. Currently there are 171 groups of about 20 farmers each  making up 314 units. A unit is formed by 4 – 6 groups. 

6


The   MGBA   was   thus   formed   to   coordinate   and   safeguard   all   Toggernburg   dairy   goat  breeding and health delivery activities in a sustainable way. MGBA is managed by farmers  elected to office through free and fair elections.  MGBA  being a community  based farmer led organization  was formed to coordinate and  safeguard all Toggernburg dairy goat breeding and health delivery activities in a sustainable  way. MGBA is managed by farmers elected to office through free and fair election. It has  network   spanning   from   the  Groups­Units­Districts­to­Regional   Office.  The   regional  Chairperson is the head of the organization supported by committees elected to the Region.  The farmers deal with the regional office through elected members from groups. Box 2: Organization levels at MGBA 

The regional office is based at the Meru showground while the unit and groups are based on  the ground. The association took over the entire management of goat breeding from FARM –  Africa on the 15th  April 2003, the Non­Governmental Organization which has successfully  managed the goat project for the last 22 years.  The vision, mission and objectives of MGBA are illustrated in Box 3 in this chapter. 1.4. Partnership Arrangements  As  mentioned  earlier,  MGBA  was  formed  in 1998 with support from  FARM  (Food and  Agricultural   Research   management)   Africa   and   the   Ministry   of   Livestock   Development.  Farm   Africa   was   funded   by   the   British   Government’s   Department   for   International  Development (DFID). Other partners who have worked with the MGBA include:  a) Innovation   Fund   for   Agriculture   and   Agribusiness.   Micro­enterprises   Support  Programme Trust. b) GTZ  1.4.1 Map of actors  The following are the actors who play part in the value chain: c) Public sector MoLD, NGOs (Farm Africa), GTZ, Breeders Association , Kenya Goat  Development Network d) Farmers  e) Local, regional and international customers

7


Box 3:  MGBA’s vision, mission and objectives MGBA   Vision:  To   become   a   leading   goat   breeding   organization   supporting   a   vibrant   national goat industry. Mission   Statement:  To   offer   good   management,   this   will   facilitate   production   of   high   quality dairy goats for the benefit of its members. Basic  objectives : These are:  To   develop,   promote   and   safeguard   identified   Toggernburg   breed   for   food   and  livestock production.  To create a forum for Toggernburg breeders to share ideas, information and to educate  and train each other through farmer to farmer extension method.  To implement and monitor the dairy goat breeding scheme as designed.  To promote and sustain performance and pedigree recording of the members’ herds  and any other herd whose owners value animal recording.  To assist members to market their goats and goat products.  To lobby for goat farmers’ interests as maybe deemed necessary.  To network with other goat breeder’s associations/societies including the Kenya Stud  Book in sharing experiences and also disseminating their lessons learnt. Immediate Objectives: These are:   To   become   financially   self­sustaining   by   undertaking   prudent   investment   in  diversification and value adding of products and services.  To strengthen its technical and managerial capacities so as to run the association on  sound corporate like principles and practices. Long Objectives: These are:   To   alleviate   poverty   and   improve   the   living   standards   of   goat   farmers   in   the  association through increased income generation and improved nutrition.  Genetic up gradation of local goats with superior exotic breed (Toggenburg).  1.5. Activities of MGBA The following are the core activities performed by MGBA: a) Carrying out breeding programmes through rotation of bucks in both districts. This is  an exercise to move or rotate bucks after 1­1 ½ years to avoid inbreeding. b) Carrying out goats’ identification by ear tagging to facilitate proper recording of goats  within the groups. c) Checking the health of entire flock in their groups e.g. hoofing trimming, housing and  other related problems. d) Organizing local shows for dissemination and goat auction. e) Judging and��inspection of breeding animals for quality breeding and judging in major  shows. f) Training farmers on their area of experience. g) Monitoring of groups’ activities and keeping their records for information flow. 8


2.0 The Innovation 

The innovation is aimed at alleviating poverty and improving the living standards of goat  farmers through increased income generation and improved nutrition. In addition, MGBA is  required to continue to genetically upgrade local goats with the superior Toggenburg, attain  self­sustenance   and   strengthen   its   management   and   technical   capacities   so   as   to   run   its  operations commercially. 2.1 Technical issues around the innovation  Apart   from   technical   issues   on   breeding,   housing,   goat   health   (and   general   husbandry),  fodder production and production of organic manure for kitchen gardening; a highlighted  innovation was the introduction and commercialisation of goat milk by a community that had  for ages, relied only on cow milk. Goat milk was found to be more nutritious than cow milk. 2.1.1 MGBA breeding plan MGBA has two breeding plans in one a) Production of pure Toggenburg dairy goats and b)  Production of ¾ Toggenburg dairy goats (Meru Goats). 2.1.2 .Breeding plan for ¾ Toggernburg dairy goat This breeding plan is carried out through community buck stations owned and managed by  the groups. While the pure Toggernburg are produced through community breeding stationed  owned by the Association at the group level as well as the pure Toggernburg bucks. Box 4: Breeding stages

9


The whole idea behind the above plan is based on the attributes of both goats which are as per  the Box 3 below: Box 5: Comparison of attributes  Attributes of a local goats Attributes of pure breed goats   It is used to harsh environment  Produces more milk  Used to fodder that is locally found  Prone to diseases  Disease resistant  Requires high level of management  Used to walking long distances to look  for water.

10


2.2 Learning points from the experience and innovation Box 6. What do we learn from this case? 

When given appropriate technical support, farmers have proved that they can be very  efficient breeders, equitably sharing the limited genetic resources among themselves,  hence strengthening community­based but farmer­led genetic improvement systems  is  a sure way forward that need to be popularized  for small­holder targeted  goat  development programmes. Formation and strengthening if farmer groups, including breeders’ associations at a  village  level,   serve  not only  as   focal  centre’s  for  new  technology   adaptation  and  uptake   (genetic   and   husbandry   improvement),   livestock   marketing,   but   also   as  avenues for   critically addressing the human social factors such as empowerment,  good governance, including advocacy rules for the members The farmer groups and associations offer windows of opportunities for accessing and  managing hitherto unavailable credit facilities (e.g. cash, drugs, feeding stock and  equipment) by the resource poor livestock farmers without demanding collaterals. The community based and farmer led approaches enable partnership building based  on   shared   needs.   This   leads   to   integrated   systems   approach   whereby,   all   aspects  (breeding, feeding, fodder development, housing, marketing, disease control etc) are  addressed by the farmers, extension staff and researchers together. Policy, research and development needs and issues, especially those touching on the  small   ruminant   sector   are   better   highlighted   and   discussed   when   the   farmers  themselves   actively  participate.   Community   based and  farmer   led  initiatives  offer  direct opportunities for farmers’ participation hence ensuring the inclusion of their  view and concerns in the national policy agenda. Farmer   group   approaches   could   enable   value   addition   to   their   animals   (breed  registration   and   inspection)   and   products   through   better   quality   control   and  processing (e.g. cheese and other goat milk products) therefore maximizing returns  from the enterprise.  Farmers have become more enlightened and empowered in social organizations and  development   as   can   be   seen   in   the   number   of   groups   being   formed   and   in   the  successful MGBA annual general meeting and elections. The population of improved goats and pure Toggernburgs that are sold from Meru  has continued to increase.

 

2.3 The group system An overriding here to ask is­  would the farmers have achieved the success noted if they   participated as individuals? FARM­Africa in collaboration with the Ministry of Livestock development helped set up 44  groups   of   around   18­25   farmers   –   women,   men   or   mixed   gender   and   MGBA   has 

11


independently established 127 groups making a total of 171 groups that for 31 units in 8  districts without counting other hundreds dairy goats groups that are not members of MGBA  through farmer to farmer extension. In general the dairy goat groups are strong, autonomous and operational. The majority of over  550,000 user services  of project services  do not belong to groups, but membership  does  confer advantages. Without local goat credit scheme administered by each group, the poorest  households would have been excluded from the project. Access to training and lower fees for  buck and animal health services also eased participation. Group members’ confidence has  risen with their knowledge and control. Group assets and income are jointly owned and members often collaborate in a “merry­go­ round” savings and credit facility to make the most of their personal resources. Chickens,  additional goats and household goods are popular group purchases. Besides cash, members  usually share materials and give each other support, encouragement and pressure to live up to  group standards. 2.3.1 Advantages of being in a group People value things they pay for. This is the development argument around cost sharing­ as a  means of conferring sustainability, in terms of training, breeding and treatment. MGBA acts  as guarantor for breeding material given on loans repayable in kind for the expansion of the  programme,   but   the   individuals   are   obliged   to   put   up   collateral,   which   encourages   a  responsible attitude to business. Most MGBA officials are Community Animal Health Workers who treat members’ animals  at a cost providing animal health services on demand, making it a demand driven services for  quality control. 2.3.2 Gender and the role of women Women in Meru traditionally count goat management among their tasks, and the zero grazing  system causes minimal disruption to their other responsibilities.  However,   the   value   and   income   generation   of   the   improved   goats   attracts   an   increasing  number of men, and their large appetites often involve the whole family in fodder collection.  In many household, husband and wife share management of their dairy goat, and take joint  decisions on the use of goat income and expansion of activities. The project has supported  all­women groups who requested and women believe that their success as goat farmers has  earned   them   new   respect   from   their   husbands   and   empowered   them   within   their   own  households.  The current chair of MGBA is a lady­ citing a powerful example of gender inclusion and  equality.

12


3.0 Achievements, challenges and the future  This project is rated to have highly impacted on the lives  of the beneficiaries  within the  County and beyond.  3.1 Achievements  MGBA through technical support from the Ministry extension staff and other collaborators  has achieved the following:  The   project   has   successfully   coordinated   a   community­based   goat   breeding  programme. Toggernburgs and their crosses have proved through MGBA experience  to be valuable assets, which are growing faster than local goats and with up to five  times the monetary value.  Households are selling dairy goats and milk for cash, for example, to buy food or  settle school fees or medical bills. Demand for dairy goats and goat milk is increasing  day after day as the communities around and the country at large is learning of their  benefits through MGBA exhibitions and farmer to farmer extension system to due to  the fact that the programme is highly profitable.  Crossbred goats have become income generators. Toggernburg female 75% crosses  produce 1 ½ ­ 3 liters of highly nutritious milk per day (3 ­6 times as much as a local  goat) and can usually continue to do so during droughts. A pure Toggernburg goat  male or female is selling for Kshs. 25,000 while female 75% is selling for Kshs. 7,000  – 9,000 per goat, a male selling between Kshs. 8,000 – 10,000.  Household   consumption   and   sales   of   goats’   milk   have   both   increased   due   to   its  nutritional value creating great demand. The growth in dairy goat industry and goat  production has stimulated the development of other markets as goat farmers invest  their profits in a range of enterprises.  MGBA has proved that Toggernburg goats and their crosses are much more resistant  to   drought   that   cattle;   a   living   example   is   the   Kenya   Dairy   Goat   Project   started  through the support of MGBA in terms of experience sharing and supply of breeding  materials in Mwingi and Kitui districts.  MGBA   has   helped   the   start   if   similar   dairy   goat   projects   in   Burundi,  Mbale   and  Sironko in Uganda and in several provinces of this country thorough the supply of  breeding materials and experiential sharing.  MGBA’s method of cut and carry has proven that goat manure is a valuable fertilizer;  particularly   for   good   bananas   and   other   crops   as   plants   reduce   the   need   for  agrochemicals. Manure and fodder cultivation together represent and integration of  livestock and cropping systems.  Through MGBA’s good collaboration with the Ministry of Livestock extension staff.  Besides material benefits, farmers have gained knowledge, skills and confidence from  their goat management experience. Extension staff highlighted better goat housing,  fodder   cultivation,   goat   registration   and   goat   valuation   (farming   as   a   business).  Farmers are particularly proud of the goats they export and visitors they host. Success  in  goat  production   enhances   status   in the  community   and, for  women,   within  the  household. Women can now earn significant incomes from their goats and the respect  and cooperation that come with it.

13


 

  

The Meru Goat Breeders’ Association (MGBA) coordinates the breeding programme  and marketing the sales of improved goats. MGBA also shares information with the  goat   development   community   in   Kenya   and   the   region,   contributes   to   provincial  livestock policy and is part of a consortium lobbying for a national livestock board. MGBA carried out trainings (2010/ 2011) to all its 171 groups making 38 training  sections, where 3320 farmers were trained on clean milk production and handling. MGBA has revised its constitution to match the current one and was approved during  the AGM. MGBA has a dairy goats’ milk processing plant that processes its members’ milk into  Caprino products. i. Fresh pasteurized milk ii. Strawberry Flavor Yoghurt iii. Vanilla Flavor Yoghurt iv. Banana Flavor Yoghurt. MGBA has prepared a Milk Processing Plant Strategic and Business Plan for 2010­ 2015. MGBA has increased milk pay out to its farmers from Kshs. 40 to Kshs. 60 per liter. MGBA through MAHWG (Meru Animal Health Workers’ Group) which is part of  MGBA has started Goat Artificial Insemination.

3.2 Challenges   With the County system of devolved government some groups in the Tharaka Nithi  County would like to sever ties with MGBA, due to the perception that it is “owned”  in Meru County  It is expensive to rotate bucks to new areas­ and this has caused inbreeding  There is less fodder with the private land tenure system and make it difficult to find  enough feed for the goats   Time  factor given to the project  by MGBA  management,  since it is  a farmer  led  project lacking full time business management opportunity.  Resources to carry out capacity building and facilitate proper monitoring of MGBA  activities.  Level of management skills/ knowledge within the MGBA management.  Brokers selling dairy products on behalf of MGBA and thus denying MGBA revenue  to run the association.  Thirst   of   leadership   among   the   MGBA   members,   causing   problems   in   knowing  genuine   members   due   to   lack   of   manpower   within   MGBA   to   carry   out   proper  monitoring of the Association.  Brokers are selling the color of the Toggernburg goat rather than the breed.  Inadequate funds to maintain the association activities.   The group lacks funds to relocate the milk plant from rented premises to the piece of  land allocated to us by the Government.  MGBA is not getting new blood into the genetic pool due to the current importation  conditions. This has led into in breading. 

14


3.2 The future MGBA continues to implement the long term objectives of alleviating poverty and improving  the living standards of goal farmers in the association through increased income generation  and   improved   nutrition   and   genetic   upgrading   of   local   goats   with   superior   exotic   breed  (Toggenburg). The following is the way forward for MGBA:  To settle at the piece of land allocated by the Government for both offices and the  goat milk processing plant.  To develop the plant into a major goat milk processing factory.  To review and put into practice the MGBA business plan.  To import more Toggenburg goats to improve the gene pool.

15


4.0 Additional reading and references  www.slideshare.net/.../the-meru-goat-breeders-association-mgba-a-po kenyadairy.com/mini.../meru-goat-breeders-association/production www.maendeleo-atf.org/Project-Profiles/profs_envAl.html www.ilri.cgiar.org/handle/10568/3101?show=fu http://www.farmafrica.org.uk/

16


Case 5 Meru Goat Breeders Association