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Food

GLORIOUS FOOD

and the LGBTQ Restaurateurs Who Dish It Up

Is Ohio Finally Ready to Ban

DISCRIMINATION?

‘Love, Simon’ Hits Theaters

The Fashion of

CINFUL SINCINNATI

TOLEDO HATE CRIME

Victim Speaks Out March | 2018 March 2018 PRIZMnews.com |

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, d o Fo glorious food

Wheat Penny Oven and Bar

Dayton Liz Valenti, chef/owner

Liz Valenti’s first real restaurant job was in San Francisco, about four doors from the corner of 18th and Castro streets, at a little place that the gay owners insisted wasn’t a gay restaurant. “But what else would you call a place that only closed one day a year: the night of the Academy Awards?” Valenti says. “Tourist buses would come through the Castro all the time so the straight tourists could gawk at all the gays. When we would see one coming we would all run outside— customers too—and wave and start kissing each other and undress just to give them a show. Everybody on the sidewalks would do it. So fun!” Valenti had moved to San Francisco with college friend and now-business partner Elizabeth Wiley. She’s from a big Italian

My House Diner

The dish—and the dishes—from some of Ohio's top LGBTQ restaurants and caterers.

family and feels she honors her parents and aunts when she cooks. She honed her skills at the California Culinary Academy and working for chefs Joyce Goldstein and Judy Rodgers, who helped define contemporary American cooking. The Dish Wheat Penny reflects Valenti’s roots with a pizza menu that’s traditional and creative. The Tarte Flambée has bechamel sauce, bacon and long-cooked onions; the White Margherita is a version of the classic without tomato sauce. What caught our eye: The Cauliflower T-Bone, poached in broth, seared and served with a relish of olives, citrus and herbs; Crispy Brick Chicken Thighs, perfectly seasoned, juicy and crispy.

Toledo Tim McCune, owner Tim McCune had us at: “We use real butter.”

build-your-own nachos bar and $1 margaritas as place to go for cheap eats.

At My House Diner and McCune’s Other Side Bistro, the side-by-side establishments he owns on Lewis Road in West Toledo, the burgers are never frozen, the desserts are homemade and the plates are piled high.

It seems the place to go on Tuesday nights for unlimited wings and on Friday nights for male dancers, too. The Other Side, if you haven’t figured out by that list, is also a gay bar.

McCune opened My House in January 2009 and the Other Side a few years later.

The Dish

My House has one of those menus that makes you want to order twice. If you go with the three-egg omelet—breakfast is served all day—you’ll miss the Patty Melt or any of the other great things about a diner lunch. At the Other Side, your money goes far. The Blade newspaper recently recommended the Monday night $2.50

The Reuben at My House is griddled with butter and served with extra Thousand Island. What caught our eye: McCune claims to have the best Coney sauce in Toledo, which is no idle boast given the competition includes hometown legends Rudy’s and Tony Packo’s; the meatloaf sandwich is grilled and topped as you wish. Continued on Page 16 March 2018 PRIZMnews.com |

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Food, Glorious Food

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The dish on the best dishes from some of Ohio’s gay and lesbian caterers and restaurant owners.

Letter From the Editor There’s an Adam Rippon in all of us.

Next Best Things

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Kombucha from Toledo, doughnuts from Columbus and Butler County, and must-haves for the kitchen and bar.

Encouraging Signs

The fight for a statewide nondiscrimination law gains momentum with Ohio businesses; LGBTQ candidates are off and running.

Victims of Hate

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Tommy Wilcox was walking out of a Toledo gay bar in December to meet his husband. “Then everything went black.”

LGBTQ Voices

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A sampling of opinion from around the web.

More Glorious Food One of Us

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A monthly portrait celebrating the diversity of Ohio’s LGBTQ+ community.

Lots to Love

“Love, Simon,” the story of a gay teen trying to come out—and trying to find out the identity of a classmate he’s fallen for—hits Ohio theaters in mid-March.

Cinful

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Reject lazy, stiff stereotypes and throw away the cliches. It’s time to bound over constraints and embrace a new look.

Out in Ohio

It’s last call for The Dock in Cincinnati; it’s premiere night for “Hot & Bothered” in Dayton; and it’s kickoff time for the 2018 HRC Gala in Columbus.

Calendar

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What’s happening this month around Ohio.

Resources 04

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More information about the people and places in this issue.

| March 2018 PRIZMnews.com

Bill Hardy Chief Executive Officer Joel Diaz President Carol Clark Publisher carolzclark@prizmnews.com Bob Vitale Editor bobvitale@prizmnews.com Staley Jophiel Munroe Creative Director staleymunroe@prizmnews.com Patrick Butler Designer patrickbutler@equitashealth.com

PRIZM Contacts: Prizm encourages feedback from our readers. Share your comments at carolzclark@prizmnews.com For news consideration, event listings, letters to the editor and inquiries about freelance writing, email bobvitale@prizmnews.com For photography submissions and inquiries about modeling/styling assignments, email staleymunroe@prizmnews.com

PRIZM @PrizmNews prizmnews

Fair and accurate reporting is critical to our mission. If you discover an error, please contact our editor, Bob Vitale, at bobvitale@prizmnews.com. Address subscription inquiries to Carol Clark, Prizm Magazine 7575 Huntington Park Drive, Columbus, Ohio, 43235 © 2018 Prizm magazine. For permissions and questions contact carolzclark@prizmnews.com.


Reach the LGBTQ+ audience throughout Ohio with one buy

Letter From the Editor Why are LGBTQ people drawn to the restaurant business? Scott Heimlich, the owner of Barcelona, pondered the question for a bit as we spoke at his Columbus restaurant one afternoon in February. He hadn't really thought about it much, even though from his first summer job waiting tables, "I absolutely fell in love with the business." "It was when I was working in restaurants that I finally came out," he told me. "I met my first boyfriend in the restaurant business. I was out to coworkers even before my family." Maybe it's the atmosphere in a restaurant, Heimlich said. "When you walk in the door of a restaurant you just kind of drop all that because we're there to take care of our guests." It could be the entertainment factor, too, he says. "There's a show to it, to a certain extent." This month, we profile five openly gay and lesbian restaurant owners who love their jobs and do them well. They thrive in a field that has a welcoming reputation for LGBTQ people. Chris Trapani, the chef/owner of Urban Cowboy food truck and catering in Austin, Texas, became the first transgender chef to appear on the Food Network when he competed on one of its shows in 2013. He feared coming out would hurt his business, but it helped.

The comfortable-in-your-own-skin feeling of being out and proud was on glittery display last month at the Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, South Korea. Twenty-eight-year-old Adam Rippon was the first openly gay figure skater to compete for the United States. (Right? I know.) His joyous performance, exuberant post-skate reactions and the shade he threw with pinpoint accuracy at Vice President Mike Pence made it apparent just how buttoned up everyone before him was in a sport of sequins, feathers and artistic expression. Not all of us feel comfortable or safe coming out. I don't begrudge anyone—other than anti-LGBTQ public officials, religious leaders or anyone else who works against us while secretly knowing they are us—the decision to keep their sexual orientation or gender identity hidden. I tell people that I came out not as an act of courage but because staying the closet finally became more uncomfortable than the idea of living my life openly. Had I had even the slightest fear that my family would have shunned me, I don’t know that I would have risked losing them. What a gift I have in their love. What a gift any of us have in being able to live our lives openly and authentically. If I was as young and thin as Adam Rippon, I’d be spinning and jumping, too. Believe me, it's what I'm doing on the inside.

Coming out helped him, too, he told We Are Chefs, the blog of the American Culinary Federation. "Before I transitioned, it was harder for me to be taken seriously in the kitchen because I had my own issues," he said.

Prizm magazine and prizmnews.com offers statewide exposure to the community for your branding message. For more information about print and digital advertising, please contact publisher Carol Zimmer Clark at carolzclark@prizmnews.com

Bob Vitale

Tweet of the Month

Let’s Be Social

Follow Us and Join the Conversation Remembering Barbara Havens Closing of The Dock in Cincinnati

Columbus Gay Men’s Chorus Video Cuyahoga Dems Snub Nickie Antonio

Lack of Anti-Bias Law Could Steer Amazon From Ohio

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BOOCHY MAMA’S TOLEDO, SYLVANIA, MAUMEE, PERRYSBURG Kombucha is a fermented tea appreciated more for its health benefits than its taste. Stacy Jurich has managed to marry both with seasonal flavors that include Midnight Moon (juniper, elderberry and rose) and Solstice Chai (chai spices and local apple cider). Jurich also hosts a monthly Kombucha for a Cause event Downtown that recently helped Equality Toledo. boochymama.com

TOM OF FINLAND APRON SIN IN LINEN Get ready to sweat, because the temperature will rise when you’re cooking with Tom of Finland. The website that promises “soft goods with hardcore style” features prints inspired by pinups, tattoo art, rock ‘n’ roll and outlaw culture. $49 sininlinen.com

CRISTEL MUTINE COOKWARE WILLIAMS SONOMA BEACHWOOD, CINCINNATI, COLUMBUS, JEFFERSONVILLE, STRONGSVILLE Popular in the compact kitchens of Paris—and Parma— the Cristel Mutine line boasts space-saving, detachable handles. $600 williams-sonoma.com

EASY COCKTAIL STIRRERS BINK DAVIES EASTON TOWN CENTER, COLUMBUS Instructions on the individual stirrers guide you in creating your favorite cocktails, including Margarita, Tequila Sunrise, Cuba Libre, Pina Colada, Sex on the Beach and White Russian. They won’t be gay-bar strong, of course, so you might need to add extra liquor. $10 binkdavies.com

SALT DETROIT AVENUE, LAKEWOOD An amazing variety of decadent small-plate samplings make dining at Salt social and exciting. Local ingredients and modern recipes permeate the menu; our favorite is the colorful dish of roasted carrots. Saltcleveland.com

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‘THIS IS ME’ (FROM ‘THE GREATEST SHOWMAN’) We all need a little food for the soul, too, and we love this empowering self-love anthem! It’s gorgeous music that reminds us we all have a place in this world: Look out ‘cause here I come/And I’m marching on to the beat I drum/I’m not scared to be seen/I make no apologies, this is me.

DESTINATION DONUTS NORTH MARKET, COLUMBUS Doughnut diva Heather Morris crafts unique, decadent treats using quality ingredients and no preservatives. How unique? Try Mojito or Ginger Peach Wasabi or the good old Ohio standby, the peanut butter/ chocolate Buckeye. $2-$5 destinationdonuts.com

BUTLER COUNTY DONUT TRAIL FAIRFIELD, HAMILTON, MIDDLETOWN, OXFORD, TRENTON, WEST CHESTER Ohio’s only Donut Trail—perhaps it’s more of an only in Ohio thing—is a tour of 12 shops with a combined 372 years of doughnut-making know-how. The “well-rounded adventure,” as the local visitor bureau calls it, also includes encounters with the elusive cronut. gettothebc.com/donut-trail


HEALTH

AND

SEX BELONG TOGETHER

Healthysexuals

DON’T RUSH

You’ve got prevention options. Find what fits. VISIT AND TALK TO A HEALTHCARE PROVIDER

HEALTHYSEXUAL, GILEAD, and the GILEAD Logo are trademarks of Gilead Sciences, Inc. © 2017 Gilead Sciences, Inc. All rights reserved. UNBC3909 01/17

March 2018 PRIZMnews.com |

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A growing list of backers and a hearing at the Statehouse boost prospects for an LGBTQ nondiscrimination law in Ohio. By Bob Vitale It’s not every day that businesses line up asking for government regulation. But 287 Ohio entities, from coffee shops to giants like Procter & Gamble and Abercrombie & Fitch, are putting their collective clout behind efforts to add sexual orientation and gender identity to the state’s nondiscrimination laws. It’s not just a matter of fairness anymore, although the businesses, nonprofits, universities and associations behind Ohio Business Competes do talk about valuing diversity and fostering inclusion. This time around, Ohio lawmakers are taking a $5 billion risk if they ignore advocates’ pleas to join other states that have barred discrimination against LGBTQ people in employment, housing and public accommodations. Columbus is one of 20 cities still under consideration as a location for Amazon’s second North American headquarters, and the retail giant has told suitors that its criteria include “a compatible cultural and community environment,” as well as “the presence and support of a diverse population.” “We believe the absence of statewide antidiscrimination protections puts our region and our state at a disadvantage,” Holly Gross, vice president of government relations for the Columbus Chamber of Commerce, told members of the Ohio House Committee on

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Government Accountability and Oversight at a Jan. 31 legislative hearing on what’s being called the Ohio Fairness Act. Passage of the bill, though, Gross said, would help Ohio compete for “mega economic development projects.” Both the Columbus Chamber and the Ohio Chamber, which represents 8,000 businesses in the state, support the nondiscrimination bill. State Rep. Nickie Antonio, D-Lakewood, who has introduced an LGBTQ-inclusive nondiscrimination bill during every General Assembly session since her first term in 2011, says such support has given the bill momentum. The business case for a statewide law is that employers will suffer in their efforts to hire and retain workers if Ohio is not seen as a welcoming place. Will a bi Procter & Gamble Ohio Business Competes If you’re a business owner or executive with the authority to speak for your business, you can join the Ohio Business Competes coalition at ohiobusinesscompetes.org/join. employee in New York, for instance, want to transfer to Cincinnati if she and her girlfriend could be kicked out of their suburban apartment? Will a queer college professor from California take a job at Ohio State University if they know businesses in much of the state can turn them away? “We’ve talked in the past about the economic impact of nondiscrimination,” Antonio says. “It hasn’t necessarily been picked up and talked about in depth the way it has this time.”

The January hearing on the Ohio Fairness Act marks the furthest such a proposal has advanced at the Statehouse since 2009, when a nondiscrimination bill won passage in the House but was ignored by the Senate. The hearing this year doesn’t guarantee a vote in either chamber. And while recent developments are encouraging to bill backers, there are reasons for pessimism, too. Antonio has 17 cosponsors for her bill, but not one is a Republican, and the GOP controls the Ohio House. And although Gov. John Kasich promised last year to look at the bill because “I don’t want anyone being discriminated against because they happen to be gay,” Antonio says the governor’s office has yet to answer her request to discuss the issue. Stef Goldberg, a campaign consultant for Ohio Business Competes, says businesses have long been out front on nondiscrimination. Indiana and North Carolina learned what happens when states fail to keep up. In 2015, then-Gov. Mike Pence signed into law an Indiana bill that allowed businesses to cite religious beliefs as a reason to refuse service to people they don’t like. In 2016, a new antitransgender law in North Carolina required people to use the public restrooms that match the gender on their birth certificates. Reaction against both states was fierce. Corporations canceled plans to expand in Indiana, and the NBA canceled plans to host its 2017 All-Star Game in Charlotte. “Everything that happened the last few years in North Carolina and Indiana made businesses in Ohio say, ‘Not in our state,’” Goldberg said.


Sweeney, as Cleveland City Council president, faced a sexual harassment complaint from the council’s clerk. The city, using taxpayer money, settled with the woman for $60,000 and paid $27,000 in outside legal fees, according to The Plain Dealer. Sweeney did not respond to Prizm’s requests for comment.

By Bob Vitale Cuyahoga County Democrats—the ones in charge of the party, anyway—have turned their backs on the first openly gay person elected to the Ohio General Assembly in favor of the man who championed a 2009 ordinance that let Cleveland businesses dictate the restrooms used by transgender customers. State Rep. Nickie Antonio is staying in the May 8 primary race, though, for the party’s nomination in Ohio’s 23rd Senate District, which covers Lakewood and areas of Cleveland’s West Side, Parma, Middleburg Heights and other parts of western Cuyahoga County. “You betcha. Absolutely,” Antonio told Prizm in February. “I am not deterred whatsoever. If one can be even more committed the cause, I am.” Antonio is one four openly gay Ohioans—all Democrats—who filed papers in February to run for seats in the Ohio General Assembly: Nonprofit executive Billy L. Sharp is one of eight Democrats running in the state’s 10th House District, which includes Downtown Cleveland, Ohio City, Collinwood, Tremont and other neighborhoods in the city. Mary B. Relotto, a business owner and advocate for women in business, is one of three Democrats running in the 24th District, which includes the Clintonville area of Columbus and the suburbs of Hilliard and Upper Arlington. Second-term Newark City Council member Jeremy Blake is unopposed for the Demoratic nomination to challenge incumbent Republican Scott Ryan in the 71st District, which covers much of Licking County. In addition, openly gay Democrat Rick Neal, a former international aid worker, is challenging four-term Republican Steve Stivers in Ohio’s 15th Congressional District, which

includes a portion of Columbus and stretches from Wilmington to Athens. Although losing the Democrats’ endorsement means Antonio won’t be listed on partyfunded fliers handed out and mailed to voters, a lot of Democratic voters and activists are sticking with her. The former Lakewood City Council member was elected to the Ohio House in 2010 and recently stepped down as minority whip, the third-highest position in her party caucus. “I believe Nickie can and will win the nomination,” said John Farina, a member of the county party’s central committee and a leader of the Cleveland Stonewall Democrats. “She’s everywhere. She works hard. She’s done a lot for the district.” The party machinery, though, put its weight behind state Rep. Martin Sweeney, who served on the Cleveland City Council for 17 years before he was elected to the Legislature in 2014. Cleveland Scene, a local alternative weekly, called the endorsement of Sweeney over Antonio “a dark mark” on the county party. Sweeney is a “good old boy,” Scene political writer Sam Allard opined, while Antonio is a “committed progressive.” Other stark contrasts between the two come on LGBTQ and women’s issues.

Antonio is listed alongside U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin as a “spotlight candidate” of the Victory Fund, which works to boost LGBTQ candidates across the country. The Human Rights Campaign, which rarely weighs in on primary elections, especially those for seats in state legislatures, also endorsed Antonio in her race against Sweeney. Although analysts predict 2018 will be a good year for outsider candidates, Antonio says she can’t help but think she might have been too much of an outsider for the insiders of Cuyahoga County politics. “I am not a heterosexual white male,” she said. “I’m someone who is very representative of someone other than the good old boys.” Farina said the snub by party leaders has women, progressives and LGBTQ activists fired up to help Antonio in her primary race. “If it was Nicholas Antonio and she was a straight man, she almost certainly would have been endorsed,” he said. “But a lot of people who might not have gotten involved are now ready to knock on doors and get active.”

Trans Candidate a First for Ohio Lis Regula, a biology professor at the University of Akron and a mentor at Kent State University's LGBTQ Center, is the first transgender candidate for public office in Ohio.

While Antonio has introduced bills to add gender identity and sexual orientation to Ohio’s nondiscrimination laws in each General Assembly session during her time in office, Sweeney won passage of an amendment to a Cleveland nondiscrimination ordinance in 2009 that excluded restrooms and locker rooms from its guarantee of equality in public accommodations for transgender people.

The Kent resident filed papers in February to run as a Democrat for Portage County auditor. He is challenging incumbent Republican Janet Esposito.

That provision finally was rescinded by the Cleveland City Council in 2016.

As auditor, he plans to improve efficiency of the county government and aims to modernize county processes and systems. Portage County is between Akron and Youngstown in Northeast Ohio.

“He certainly was no champion,” Farina said. Cleveland Scene also pointed out the irony of Sweeney’s endorsement by party bosses on the same weekend in January that women and supporters of women’s rights were turning out for marches in Cleveland and other cities around the country.

“As a teacher, I understand the value of clear communication with the people for whom I'm responsible and the importance of listening to the people I serve," Regula says.

Bob Vitale is the editor of Prizm. He has covered local, state and federal government for newspapers in Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois and Wisconsin. You can reach him a bobvitale@prizmnews.com March 2018 PRIZMnews.com |

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VICTIMs OF

HATE

‘I remember being called a faggot. I remember immense crashing pain in my face.’ By Tommy Wilcox

I made the decision to go when I heard that Bretz was closing. I will question whether that decision was the right one for the rest of my life. On Thursday, Dec. 21, the iconic gay bar in Toledo was opening its doors for the last time. Bretz was the first gay bar I had ever been to. It was where I met my first serious boyfriend, Dennis, who has since passed on. It was where I learned how to DJ, how to play billiards, where I found myself and the freedom to be an open and out gay man without fear of ridicule. I had a few drinks, talked to some friends, watched the drag show and took a bunch of selfies. I had a good time. And by 12:30, I had had enough and left. Alone, I began to walk the four blocks to where my husband was waiting for me. The line to get into Bretz was a block long. It was good to see this beloved place have such an amazing sendoff. There were people everywhere, it seemed, and it was crowded.

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I crossed the street to avoid a majority of the crowd. Continuing down the block, I suddenly had a strange feeling. Something felt wrong. I pulled my phone out to call someone or record my surroundings. I don’t know why I didn’t just call my husband, who was down the street waiting for me. Then everything went black. The next thing I remember is being on my back. I remember kicking and getting someone in the crotch. I remember being called a faggot. I remember immense crashing pain in my face. The next thing I remember is rolling onto my hands and knees and begging anyone for help. I repeated my husband’s phone number, which I only know by heart because of Apple’s security levels. I don’t remember much else very vividly until I woke up the next morning, except I remember talking to police officers and a detective. I don’t remember much about them, but I remember I told them the exact same thing and that I felt like I was the target of a gay-bashing. I spent the next three days in the hospital undergoing multiple CT scans, immense pain, unbelievable dizziness, constant vomiting, desert-like dry mouth and so many different injections of medications that I’m surprised I’m not addicted to something. I suffered multiple fractures: one at the base of my skull that could have killed me, and one in my nose. There were multiple bleeds in my brain: a large one behind my right eye that I still will have for a few months, and a rather bad subdural hematoma. My brain had been knocked out of place by four millimeters. All of this because of what reason? I will be honest: I do not know. Was I was attacked because I’m gay? Was I attacked because of my phone? Or was I an easy, drunk target? I don’t know what my attacker looked like, what race he is, or where he comes from. Yes, it might have just been a random robbery and not about being gay. But I do know that his bias was introduced to the situation, and in my opinion, once you introduce bias into a criminal situation—specifically bias against people who often are targeted simply because of who they are—it’s a hate crime.

All of this because of what reason? I will be honest: I do not know. This is not the case in my situation, though, because Ohio does not have a state hate-crimes law that covers a victim’s sexual orientation or gender identity. Toledo does, but our local law only covers misdemeanor crimes.

can’t breathe out of, and I can’t really taste food at all. I’m constantly in fear about everything and still have to look forward to new issues with post-traumatic stress, in addition to what I already suffer from. For the second time in my life, I survived a gay-bashing. I’m happy that I’m here, because there’s a purpose yet for me. I’m lucky to be alive, because the fracture at the base of my skull was bad enough that one more hit would have severed a major artery. Did I make some mistakes that night? Yeah, it could probably be argued that I did. Maybe I was too drunk or shouldn’t have been walking alone. But as a 46-year-old veteran of the U.S. Navy, I have more than earned my right to do pretty much what I want. There are more than 1,000 reasons—the number of hate crimes against LGBT people that were reported to the FBI in 2016—why we need legal protections at the local, state and federal levels. Actually, there are many more reasons than that, given the number of hate-crime victims who are too frightened or humiliated to tell police. Police also don’t classify many crimes as motivated by the perpetrator’s hate, and a number of jurisdictions simply don’t report statistics to the federal government. It is because of hate that 77 LGBTQ people were murdered in the United States in 2016, the latest year analyzed by the National Coalition of AntiViolence Programs. The total includes victims of the mass shooting at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando. It is because of hate that LGBTQ people of color, transgender and gender-nonconforming people, and trans women of color are by far the most-often targeted among our community. It is because of hate that nine transgender and gender nonconforming Ohioans—Cece Dove, Betty Skinner and Brittany-Nicole Kidd-Stergis of Cleveland (2013); Tiffany Edwards of Cincinnati (2014); Brian Golec of Akron (2015); Skye Mockabee of Cleveland (2016), Rae’Lynn Thomas of Columbus (2016) and Brandi Bledsoe of Cleveland (2016); and JoJoStriker of Toledo (2017)–have been killed in the last five years. Whether or not Toledo police ever classify what happened to me as a hate crime, I am now one more reason that hate-crimes laws need to include sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression. Until police and politicians recognize that LGBT people are targeted simply because of who we are, true equality will continue to elude not only the city of Toledo, but the state of Ohio and the United States as well.

Police departments in Ohio aren’t required to—or fail to—report antiLGBTQ hate-crime statistics to the FBI. It hurts a little knowing that I moved back here from Oregon, where sexual orientation and gender identity are protected classes and where I would have had more legal protection. It feels sort of like being victimized all over again. I went home on Christmas Eve from the hospital and began the long road to recovery and healing. I feel like a prisoner now; I was put in a jail of sorts by someone with a sickness. I haven’t done much since late December except try to not fall down when I’m walking. I still have a long way before I’m back at 100 percent. Headaches are constant. If I move too fast I get dizzy, and I can’t sleep a full night without waking up. I still have an occluded left nasal passage that I

Tommy Wilcox is a Toledo native who has lived around the country and the world. In 2017, he helped raise money for Autism Society and personally organized a food and toy drive to benefit homeless children and families in Toledo. He serves as vice president of the Promise House Project, a charity to benefit homeless youth. Illustration by Christian Cimoroni depicts Tommy Wilcox (top right) and the four transgender Americans who have been killed in 2018: Viccky Gutierrez of Los Angeles; Christa Leigh SteeleKnudslien of North Adams, Mass.; Tonya Harvey of Buffalo, N.Y.; and Celine Walker of Brandon, Fla. March 2018 PRIZMnews.com |

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dayton.columbus.newalbany centerville.oakcreek.university

spring forward 14

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styling:alan leonard & aubra frederick. photo:geekwithalens


Voi

LG

“Wanda Sykes Didn’t Watch the State of the Union” Wanda Sykes “Conan,” Feb. 1

“I did not watch (the State of the Union). My blood pressure’s in a sweet spot right now, and I want to keep it that way. Plus, I’m busy. I’m doing an addition to my home. … I’m building a, uh, what do you call it? Not an entertainment... a break room? No, no... a bomb shelter. That’s what I’m doing.”

“Young Queer People Shouldn’t Be Obligated to Care About LGBT History” Dylan Jones attitude.co.uk

“Should young LGBTQ people care about their history? They’re certainly not obliged to. Why should they? This is just their lives. They’re existing as they should always have been allowed to exist—happily and freely. They shouldn’t be made to feel guilty, or even grateful for that.”

ces

“Loneliness is a contributing factor in a bisexual individual’s poor mental health. … The catch-22, (according to a recent study), bisexuals with post-graduate degrees were less likely to conceal, and therefore more likely to come out, and therefore more likely to experience prejudice and subsequent professional isolation and loneliness.”

A sampling of LGBTQ commentary from around the web

“It is a very, very big thing to get together the courage to transition. … To use the dead name or the wrong pronoun is to tell us that all of this means nothing! It is a denial of our very being, our identity, our sense of self.”

“Instead of bodyshaming Trump, we could focus on substantive issues with the presidency (such as) a new extension of religious freedom to allow medical professionals to object to treating gay and trans patients. … Bodyshaming Trump … makes one no better than the body-shaming bully-in-chief himself.”

B TQ

“Bisexuality and Loneliness”

Lawrence J.W. Cooper bi.org

“Call Me Madam!”

Paula Goodwin paula-paulasplace. blogspot.com

“Body Shaming Trump Perpetuates Harm to All Bodies” Bevin Branlandingham queerfatfemme.com

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Continued from Page 3

Marigold Catering

Cleveland Joan Rosenthal, owner/founder

Cincinnati Jeff Thomas, president/owner

At the same time she talks about efficient operations and executing at the highest level, Joan Rosenthal talks about food like works of art.

Don’t put Jeff Thomas in that category of food people who hate to cook at home.

But if you’re catering events at the Cleveland Museum of Art, Severance Hall, the Museum of Contemporary Art and the Akron Art Museum, you better create something beautiful as well as tasty. Her goal: creating a “fairy-tale-like experience” that people talk about for a long, long time. “We are telling the story of our client,” says Rosenthal, who left a corporate career with places like Hyatt Hotels and Kraft to start her business in 1997. The Cleveland native grew up in a food-loving family and got her start in the food business at age 12—”illegally!”—as a delicatessen busgirl. What keeps her excited after 37 years in the field? “I am surrounded by creativity, art and wonderful clients.”

“I love to throw dinner parties,” he says. “So my job is actually my hobby. It just doesn’t get any better than that.” It was the other way around—hobby became job— when Thomas started Jeff Thomas Catering in 1985. He did the cooking himself for the first six years, which fueled a desire to find new and fresh ideas by traveling the world. “You never stop learning,” Thomas says. “There’s always something new, whether it’s a new product or way to display the product.” It’s a blast from the past, though, that reminds Thoms of how far he’s come. He still has a menu from Johnny Bench’s Homestretch, where he got his first restaurant job in 1978. “The pricing is quite different from today!” He says.

The Dish

The Dish

Marigold Catering’s slow-cooked, beer-braised short ribs with truffle mashed potatoes and fresh garden asparagus are part of the current trend of home-style comfort food.

As a custom caterer, Thomas says, “we prefer to find out what the event is about and learn more about the vision and expectations of our clients. A customer favorite, though is this constructed salad, an architectural dish that gives a much better first impression than the typical banquet salad.

What caught our eye: The Kibbeh Burger, featuring house-made kibbeh and spiced tahini sauce on a pate au choux bun; Lake Erie Walleye Ceviche with mango and lime.

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Jeff Thomas Catering

| March 2018 PRIZMnews.com

What caught our eye: Lobster Corndogs, with a lemon-caper beurre blanc; Goetta Sliders, featuring the only-in-Cincinnati patty of meat, oats and spices.


Columbus Scott Heimlich, owner For Scott Heimlich, the grass is definitely greenest on his own side of the fence. “It can be a lot of hours, long days. It can be very stressful,” says the owner of Barcelona, a Columbus restaurant that regularly makes both customer- and criticgenerated lists of the city’s top dining destinations. “But I look at what other people do for careers and say there’s no way I could do what they’re doing,” he says. “You have to do what you enjoy. That’s first and foremost.”

It’s been Barcelona’s home since the restaurant opened in 1996. In a business where customers crave what’s new and a first bite comes second to posting a photo of one’s meal on social media, Barcelona has incredible staying power. It’s fine dining without airs, a place where couples on date night and big groups of friends dressed up for the theater dine next to neighborhood regulars in jeans and polo shirts, and neither group feels uncomfortable.

“It was really built on chef knows best,” Heimlich says. “I enjoy cooking. I understand it and appreciate it and know when I need to stay out of the way. I learned that a long time ago.” The Dish Paella Barcelona is the most traditional of five versions of the Spanish rice dish on the menu. It comes with chicken, chorizo, shrimp, squid, clams, mussels, piquillo peppers and peas.

The native of Waldo, a Marion County village of 338 whose culinary claim to fame is the fried bologna sandwich at G&R Tavern, thought he’d spend his life on a farm but changed his mind after his first year at Ohio State University and a summer job waiting tables. “Waiting tables to assistant manager to fulltime manager. I spent years bartending, running a couple organizations, and then I had the opportunity to take this place on,” he says of the German Village restaurant he has owned since 2002.

The Barcelona menu has popular mainstays such as paella, cured meats, cheeses and basic tapas, but much of it changes regularly. There are 45 different items on the dinner menu, but a five-course, $60 tasting menu guarantees dishes you’ve not had there before.

“There are restaurants opening left, right and center right now, which is great for our city.” Heimlich says. “We’ve got to stay relevant, stay in the forefront of everybody’s mind.”

What caught our eye: Mejillones en Cidre is sparkling cider-steamed mussels, garlic, drycured chorizo and leeks; Filete y Langosta on the current chef’s tasting menu is grilled Ohio beef filet and lobster tail, with mushroom risotto and red wine shallot herb butter.

“And here we are.” The 110-year-old building at the corner of Whittier and Jaeger streets has always housed a dining establishment.

March 2018 PRIZMnews.com |

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What is TRUVADA for PrEP?

Who should not take TRUVADA for PrEP?

TRUVADA for PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) is a prescription medicine that is used together with safer sex practices to help reduce the risk of getting HIV-1 through sex. This use is only for HIV-negative adults who are at high risk of getting HIV-1. To help determine your risk of getting HIV-1, talk openly with your healthcare provider about your sexual health. Ask your healthcare provider if you have questions about how to prevent getting HIV. Always practice safer sex and use condoms to lower the chance of sexual contact with body fluids. Never reuse or share needles or other items that have body fluids on them.

Do not take TRUVADA for PrEP if you:  Already have HIV-1 infection or if you do not know your HIV-1 status. If you are HIV-1 positive, you need to take other medicines with TRUVADA to treat HIV-1. TRUVADA by itself is not a complete treatment for HIV-1. If you have HIV-1 and take only TRUVADA, your HIV-1 may become harder to treat over time.  Also take certain medicines to treat hepatitis B infection.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION What is the most important information I should know about TRUVADA for PrEP? Before taking TRUVADA for PrEP:  You must be HIV-negative before you start taking TRUVADA for PrEP. You must get tested to make sure that you do not already have HIV-1. Do not take TRUVADA to reduce the risk of getting HIV-1 unless you are confirmed to be HIV-negative.  Many HIV-1 tests can miss HIV-1 infection in a person who has recently become infected. If you have flu-like symptoms, you could have recently become infected with HIV-1. Tell your healthcare provider if you had a flu-like illness within the last month before starting or at any time while taking TRUVADA for PrEP. Symptoms of new HIV-1 infection include tiredness, fever, joint or muscle aches, headache, sore throat, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, night sweats, and/or enlarged lymph nodes in the neck or groin. While taking TRUVADA for PrEP:  You must continue to use safer sex practices. Just taking TRUVADA for PrEP may not keep you from getting HIV-1.  You must stay HIV-negative to keep taking TRUVADA for PrEP:  Get tested for HIV-1 at least every 3 months.  If you think you were exposed to HIV-1, tell your healthcare provider right away.  To further help reduce your risk of getting HIV-1:  Know your HIV status and the HIV status of your partners.  Get tested for other sexually transmitted infections. Other infections make it easier for HIV to infect you.  Get information and support to help reduce risky sexual behavior, such as having fewer sex partners.  Do not miss any doses of TRUVADA. Missing doses may increase your risk of getting HIV-1 infection.  If you do become HIV-1 positive, you need more medicine than TRUVADA alone to treat HIV-1. TRUVADA by itself is not a complete treatment for HIV-1. If you have HIV-1 and take only TRUVADA, your HIV-1 may become harder to treat over time. TRUVADA can cause serious side effects:  Worsening of hepatitis B (HBV) infection. TRUVADA is not approved to treat HBV. If you have HBV and stop taking TRUVADA, your HBV may suddenly get worse. Do not stop taking TRUVADA without first talking to your healthcare provider, as they will need to monitor your health.

What are the other possible side effects of TRUVADA for PrEP? Serious side effects of TRUVADA may also include:  Kidney problems, including kidney failure. Your healthcare provider may do blood tests to check your kidneys before and during treatment with TRUVADA. If you develop kidney problems, your healthcare provider may tell you to stop taking TRUVADA.  Too much lactic acid in your blood (lactic acidosis), which is a serious but rare medical emergency that can lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get these symptoms: weakness or being more tired than usual, unusual muscle pain, being short of breath or fast breathing, stomach pain with nausea and vomiting, cold or blue hands and feet, feel dizzy or lightheaded, or a fast or abnormal heartbeat.  Severe liver problems, which in rare cases can lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get these symptoms: skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow, dark “tea-colored” urine, light-colored stools, loss of appetite for several days or longer, nausea, or stomach-area pain.  Bone problems, including bone pain, softening, or thinning, which may lead to fractures. Your healthcare provider may do tests to check your bones. Common side effects in people taking TRUVADA for PrEP are stomach-area (abdomen) pain, headache, and decreased weight. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effects that bother you or do not go away.

What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking TRUVADA for PrEP?  All your health problems. Be sure to tell your healthcare provider if you have or have had any kidney, bone, or liver problems, including hepatitis.  If you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if TRUVADA can harm your unborn baby. If you become pregnant while taking TRUVADA for PrEP, talk to your healthcare provider to decide if you should keep taking TRUVADA.  If you are breastfeeding (nursing) or plan to breastfeed. Do not breastfeed. If you become HIV-positive, HIV can be passed to the baby in breast milk.  All the medicines you take, including prescription and over-thecounter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. TRUVADA may interact with other medicines. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to your healthcare provider and pharmacist when you get a new medicine.  If you take certain other medicines with TRUVADA, your healthcare provider may need to check you more often or change your dose. These medicines include certain medicines to treat hepatitis C (HCV) infection. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.FDA.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please see Important Facts about TRUVADA for PrEP including important warnings on the following page. 18

| March 2018 PRIZMnews.com


We're open, not unprepared. We know who we are. And we make choices that fit our lives. TRUVADA for PrEP™ is a once-daily prescription medicine that can help reduce the risk of getting HIV-1 when taken every day and used together with safer sex practices.  TRUVADA for PrEP is only for adults who are at high risk of getting HIV through sex.  You must be HIV-negative before you start taking TRUVADA for PrEP.

Ask your doctor about your risk of getting HIV-1 infection and if TRUVADA for PrEP may be right for you. Learn more at truvada.com March 2018 PRIZMnews.com |

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IMPORTANT FACTS

This is only a brief summary of important information about taking TRUVADA for PrEPTM (pre-exposure prophylaxis) to help reduce the risk of getting HIV-1 infection. This does not replace talking to your healthcare provider about your medicine.

(tru-VAH-dah) MOST IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT TRUVADA FOR PrEP Before starting TRUVADA for PrEP: • You must be HIV-1 negative. You must get tested to make sure that you do not already have HIV-1. Do not take TRUVADA for PrEP to reduce the risk of getting HIV-1 unless you are confirmed to be HIV-1 negative. • Many HIV-1 tests can miss HIV-1 infection in a person who has recently become infected. Symptoms of new HIV-1 infection include flu-like symptoms, tiredness, fever, joint or muscle aches, headache, sore throat, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, night sweats, and/or enlarged lymph nodes in the neck or groin. Tell your healthcare provider if you have had a flu-like illness within the last month before starting TRUVADA for PrEP. While taking TRUVADA for PrEP: • You must continue to use safer sex practices. Just taking TRUVADA for PrEP may not keep you from getting HIV-1. • You must stay HIV-negative to keep taking TRUVADA for PrEP. Get tested for HIV-1 at least every 3 months while taking TRUVADA for PrEP. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you think you were exposed to HIV-1 or have a flu-like illness while taking TRUVADA for PrEP. • If you do become HIV-1 positive, you need more medicine than TRUVADA alone to treat HIV-1. If you have HIV-1 and take only TRUVADA, your HIV-1 may become harder to treat over time. • See the “How To Further Reduce Your Risk” section for more information. TRUVADA may cause serious side effects, including: • Worsening of hepatitis B (HBV) infection. TRUVADA is not approved to treat HBV. If you have HBV, your HBV may suddenly get worse if you stop taking TRUVADA. Do not stop taking TRUVADA without first talking to your healthcare provider, as they will need to check your health regularly for several months.

ABOUT TRUVADA FOR PrEP TRUVADA for PrEP is a prescription medicine used together with safer sex practices to help reduce the risk of getting HIV-1 through sex. This use is only for HIV-negative adults who are at high risk of getting HIV-1. • To help determine your risk of getting HIV-1, talk openly with your healthcare provider about your sexual health. Do NOT take TRUVADA for PrEP if you: • Already have HIV-1 infection or if you do not know your HIV-1 status. • Take certain medicines to treat hepatitis B infection.

HOW TO TAKE TRUVADA FOR PrEP • Take 1 tablet once a day, every day, not just when you think you have been exposed to HIV-1. • Do not miss any doses. Missing doses may increase your risk of getting HIV-1 infection. • Use TRUVADA for PrEP together with condoms and safer sex practices. • Get tested for HIV-1 at least every 3 months. You must stay HIV-negative to keep taking TRUVADA for PrEP.

POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS OF TRUVADA FOR PrEP TRUVADA can cause serious side effects, including: • Those in the “Most Important Information About TRUVADA for PrEP” section. • New or worse kidney problems, including kidney failure. • Too much lactic acid in your blood (lactic acidosis), which is a serious but rare medical emergency that can lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get these symptoms: weakness or being more tired than usual, unusual muscle pain, being short of breath or fast breathing, stomach pain with nausea and vomiting, cold or blue hands and feet, feel dizzy or lightheaded, or a fast or abnormal heartbeat. • Severe liver problems, which in rare cases can lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get these symptoms: skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow, dark “tea-colored” urine, light-colored stools, loss of appetite for several days or longer, nausea, or stomach-area pain. • Bone problems. Common side effects in people taking TRUVADA for PrEP include stomach-area (abdomen) pain, headache, and decreased weight. These are not all the possible side effects of TRUVADA. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have any new symptoms while taking TRUVADA for PrEP. Your healthcare provider will need to do tests to monitor your health before and during treatment with TRUVADA for PrEP.

BEFORE TAKING TRUVADA FOR PrEP Tell your healthcare provider if you: • Have or have had any kidney, bone, or liver problems, including hepatitis. • Have any other medical conditions. • Are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. • Are breastfeeding (nursing) or plan to breastfeed. Do not breastfeed. If you become HIV-positive, HIV can pass to the baby in breast milk. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take: • Keep a list that includes all prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements, and show it to your healthcare provider and pharmacist. • Ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist about medicines that should not be taken with TRUVADA for PrEP.

HOW TO FURTHER REDUCE YOUR RISK • Know your HIV status and the HIV status of your partners. • Get tested for other sexually transmitted infections. Other infections make it easier for HIV to infect you. • Get information and support to help reduce risky sexual behavior, such as having fewer sex partners. • Do not share needles or personal items that can have blood or body fluids on them.

GET MORE INFORMATION • This is only a brief summary of important information about TRUVADA for PrEP. Talk to your healthcare provider or pharmacist to learn more, including how to prevent HIV infection. • Go to start.truvada.com or call 1-800-GILEAD-5 • If you need help paying for your medicine, visit start.truvada.com for program information.

TRUVADA FOR PREP, the TRUVADA FOR PREP Logo, the TRUVADA Blue Pill Design, TRUVADA, GILEAD, and the GILEAD Logo are trademarks of Gilead Sciences, Inc., or its related companies. All other marks referenced herein are the property of their respective owners. Version date: April 2017 © 2017 Gilead Sciences, Inc. All rights reserved. TVDC0127 07/17

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| March 2018 PRIZMnews.com


ONE OF Carter Norris

Home: Columbus, by way of New Haven, Conn. Identifies As: Nonbinary. “I don’t have a label on my sexuality.”

US

Pronouns: They/Them/Theirs or He/Him/His Nineteen-year-old Carter Norris loves art, music, writing, painting, fashion and wearing colorful makeup. They want a future full of meeting new people, traveling, making art, and “speaking and fighting for the issues important to me, such as transphobia and racism and destroying capitalism.” They’re a member of Kaleidoscope Youth Center in Columbus, the safe space and LGBTQ youth services agency in Central Ohio. “It’s a family. I never had such a strong sense of ‘I belong here’ in my life,” Norris says. “With a lot of safe spaces sometimes it’s forced, but there’s a genuine sense of family here I hope every LGBT kid can experience.” How has being a part of Kaleidoscope impacted your life? Kaleidoscope has helped me with my anxiety a lot and has helped me voice when I am anxious. The staff and even other youth have pushed me to overcome my fear of public speaking by giving me leadership roles that have helped me in my everyday life even outside of activism. What advice to you have for other LGBTQ youth? To not second guess yourself, to just go for what you want. I often catch myself overthinking and asking myself, “Should I really do that?” Or, “What if it doesn’t go well?” I’ve learned to strive for the life I want and take chances even if I’m not sure of the outcome. I don’t want to be old and have a list of regrets, and I think because of the stigma surrounding LGBT folks— especially younger—and having to hide yourself in fear of the actions of others, we’re always holding back to some degree. There’s so much freedom in being true to yourself, as cheesy as it sounds, and there’s a sort of peace within yourself when you go for what you want.

Photo by Staley Munroe One Of Us is a monthly portrait celebrating the diversity of Ohio’s LGBTQ+ community. March 2018 PRIZMnews.com |

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We Start by Listening. We offer an accepting and welcoming healthcare experience for everyone.

Medical

Pharmacy

Short North Medical Center 1033 N. High St. Columbus, OH 43201 (614) 340-6777

Wellness & Prevention

Behavioral Health

King-Lincoln Medical Center 750 E. Long St., Suite 3000 Columbus, OH 43203 (614) 340-6700

Supportive Services

Dayton Medical Center Wright Health Building 1222 S. Patterson Blvd., Suite 230 Dayton, OH 45402 (937) 853-3650

EquitasHealth.com 22

| March 2018 PRIZMnews.com

Dentistry


Lots to

LOVE By David-Elijah Nahmod

The charming coming-out story ‘Love, Simon’ is a movie we can all relate to.

A best-selling teen novel has become this spring’s most charming gay film. Simon Spier is a typical teenager. He dates girls, hangs out with his friends and enjoys a nice rapport with his family. But Simon is harboring a secret. “I like your boots,” he nervously says to the hunky gardener, who shakes his head and turns away. Yes, Simon is gay, and he’s afraid to tell anyone about it. “Love, Simon,” openly gay director Greg Berlanti’s new film, follows Simon on his journey out of the closet and on a search for love. The film is a hilariously goodnatured but also a quite touching look at the horrors of teen angst in our internet era. It’s based on Becky Albertalli’s novel, “Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda.” One of the first things viewers might notice about “Love, Simon” is the diversity of the cast. Simon’s circle of friends is a close-knit group, and race is a non-issue to the group. It’s an accurate portrayal of the world that many of today’s teens live in. As the story gets under way, Simon’s school is buzzing after one of the students, who

identifies himself only as “Blue”, posts on a message board that he’s gay. Everyone wants to know who Blue is, especially Simon, who begins an e-correspondence with his unidentified classmate.

Newcomer Nick Robinson is wonderful as Simon. He hits all the right notes as Simon stumbles around in the dark trying to find Blue while he hopes that none of his friends will discover his secret.

The two open their hearts to each other, and Simon soon finds himself falling in love with someone he’s neither met nor spoken to. He wants to meet, but Blue declines and continues to keep his identity a secret.

They do.

There are many hilarious moments as Simon wrongly assumes that every male he meets is Blue. At one point he wonders why straight is always the default. This is followed by a collage of sidesplitting fantasy sequences in which Simon’s friends come out to their parents—as straight.

Jennifer Garner and Josh Duhamel also offer fine work as Simon’s loving and accepting parents. The film includes a particularly powerful scene in which Dad apologizes to Simon for not realizing the truth sooner.

“I like men,” one girl tells her mom, who bursts into tears. Mostly, “Love, Simon” is a tender and sweet film about a young man looking to find his place in the world. Simon’s story is a universal tale; being a teenager is never easy. As we see throughout the film, Simon’s straight friends are also looking for love, often just as awkwardly.

“Did you break up with me because I look like a guy?” Simon’s ex-girlfriend asks him. “No, I broke up with you because you don’t look like a guy,” Simon replies.

Although ostensibly a comedy, “Love Simon” is a universal, true-to-life story. Whether gay or straight, we’ve all been Simon at one point in our lives.

At a Theater Near You "Love, Simon" opens on March 16 at movie theaters including the Gateway Film Center in Columbus and Tower City Cinemas in Cleveland.

David-Elijah Nahmod is a San Francisco-based writer whose eclectic career includes work for LGBTQ and Jewish publications as well as monster magazines. You can follow him on Twitter at @DavidElijahN and read his monthly film-review column at PrizmNews.com. March 2018 PRIZMnews.com |

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CINFU

Opening Ceremony Striped Flare Dress (short): $475

We keep the deliciousness going this month with positively sinful Cincinnati style via Hellman Clothiers’ high-end menswear and The Most Beautiful Thing in the World Is boutique’s edgy-posh womenswear. It’s a rare glimpse into two of the Queen City’s new wardrobe jewels for both the rich and powerful and the fashion-forward trendsetter. WASP-turned-rebel chicks can rock the curious yet classic “dare to be different” patterns, cuts and materials used in TMBTITWI’s selections. Big sleeves, ‘80s vibes and large accessories are welcome here! For the luxe, appreciative and masculine-of-center clientele, Hellman Clothiers brings curated touches of Italy, New York and London to upgrade the norm of Downtown Cincinnati. Power can still be playful, featuring floral buttonups, classic cuts and artistic accessories. Jeans on windowpane-plaid or tossing on a silk scarf before jet-setting the world will set you apart for all the right reasons. Forget constraints and fit-in-at-allcost cliques. Be bad and look good.

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Mr. Larkin Miller Dress in Bark: $225 Open House Projects Sister Earrings (silver): $195 Open House Projects Face Bracelet (silver): $225

Creative Director & Photographer: Staley Munroe Host Studio and Lighting: Byron Photography Studio Wardrobe: Hellman Clothiers & The Most Beautiful Thing In the World Is Styling: Nicholas Niederkohr Docherty Models: Christopher Pedroza Richard Stewart Darin Dewey Ramon Fontaine Roc Dabney Trista Bowser Megan McNally Kaye Tchoula Savannah Biss Sophie Rose Hair and Makeup: Square One Salon and Spa

Open House Projects Sister Earrings (brass):$195 Pichulik Necklace: $150


Bonded Poplin Trench: $425 Thistle and Spire Amore Plunge Bodysuit: $75

Miro Dress: $250

Thistle and Spire Amore High-Waisted Brief: $39

Kenneth Jay Lane Black Tassel Earrings: $32

LF Markey

Opening Ceremony: Striped Maxi Dress: $450 Mr. Larkin: Paris Shirt (white bow button up): $225 Deepa Chokers: Elise Choker: $65

March 2018 PRIZMnews.com |

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Eliza Faulkner Sissy Dress: $299 Ropert Graham Sport Coat: $698

Bronwen Choker: $50

Eton Gingham: $295 DL Jeans: $178 Chelsea Pocket Square: $75 Hook & Albert Flower Lapel Pin: $30 Coppley Sport Coat: $895 Robert Graham Shirt: $158 Zanella Dress Pants: $375 Corneliani Scarf: $198 Eton Pocket Square: $75 Hook & Albert Flower Lapel Pin: $30

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100% Silk Velvet Smoke Coat in Gold: $550 Shirred Velvet Bandeau Top in Gold: $125 Boxpleat Velvet Trousers in Gold: $275

March 2018 PRIZMnews.com |

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Ropert Graham Sport Coat: $798 Eton Dress Shirt: $255 DL Jeans: $188 Eton Pocket Square: $75 Eton Silk Scarf: $178

Lana Jumpsuit by Capulet: $150 Pichulik Necklace: $150 (as belt) Deepa Chokers: Elise Choker: $65

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Sanyo 8 Pocket Driving Jacket: $398

Robert Graham Sport Coat: $698

Robert Graham Shirt: $278

RG Shirt: $168

Vince T Shirt: $55

Jacob Cohen Jeans: $398

DL Jeans: $188

Eton Pocket Square. $75 Hook & Albert Flower Lapel Pin: $30

March 2018 PRIZMnews.com |

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34 N 118 W Flatline Silk Jumpsuit: $250 Levens [Porcelain] Earrings: $55

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Jacquard Belt Shirt White Multi (blue): $324 LF Markey: Pleat Front Jeans: $125 Open House Projects Face Bracelet (brass): $185

March 2018 PRIZMnews.com |

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2018

Register with promo code SPRING & Save $5

SAT, APR 14 | COLUMBUS

NEW THIS YEAR: will receive a t-shirt!

Join us for the Robert J. Fass Memorial AIDS Walk Central Ohio! Walk or run to help us raise funds for Equitas Health’s life-saving programs and services offered across Ohio. SPONSORS

BENEFITTING

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REGISTER TODAY AT AIDSWALKOHIO.COM

| March 2018 PRIZMnews.com

MEDIA SPONSOR

2018 Celebrity Chair:

NINA WEST


OUT in OHIO

NEWS FLASH Visit PrizmNews.com for the latest LGBTQ news from across Ohio, and sign up for weekly news and events updates by email. Here are last month's headlines from our website. Black LGBTQ Activists Found Guilty on 6 of 8 Counts A Franklin County jury convicted three queer black activists on six misdemeanor counts stemming from a 2017 Columbus Pride protest of police violence, violence against trans women and marginalization of people of color within the LGBTQ community. Remembering Barbara Havens, Ally Extraordinaire

‘Hot and Bothered’ Premiere

Dayt on

Wright State University film grad Leah Byrd’s web series follows a 20-something stoner lesbian (Byrd herself) and her straight best friend as they create a lesbian dating app. (Read more about it in our January issue.) After getting attention around the country, “Hot & Bothered” finally premiered in Dayton on Feb. 8 at the Neon theater. Visit leahbyrd.com to watch a trailer and learn more.

Last Night at The Dock

Cincinnati

HRC Gala Kickoff

Columbus

When the first Human Rights Campaign Gala took place in Columbus 35 years ago, organizers covered the windows and patrolled the parking lot in case TV crews showed up. Now, not only is the Gala a big deal, but there’s even a party to get the party started. It took place on Jan. 28 at Union Café. The Gala is on Saturday, June 2 at OSU’s Ohio Union. Visit hrccolumbusdinner.com for ticket info.

“The rumors are true,” entertainment director Jessica Dimon announced via Facebook on Feb. 2. Less than two weeks later, The Dock rocked for the last time. Valentine’s Day marked the end for the gay nightclub.

The woman described by more than one person as the Auntie Mame of Columbus’ gay community—bold, brash, generous, adventurous and more than happy to take everyone along for the ride—passed away on Feb. 2. She was 61 years old and had lived with the effects of multiple sclerosis for years. The Dock Is the Latest Ohio Gay Bar Set to Close Say goodbye to another gay bar: The Dock in Cincinnati, home of the city’s first Pride festival and the starting point for many a coming-out story, closes on Feb. 14 and will be torn down later this year. The Ohio Department of Transportation has purchased the bar as it plans improvements to the aging Brent Spence Bridge, which carries I-71 and I-75 over the Ohio River into Kentucky. Anti-Gay Church Buys Former Gay Bar in Toledo A church that lists homosexuality, bisexuality and gender dysphoria as sins comparable to incest and bestiality has bought the building that housed Toledo’s oldest gay bar until late December. In a statement issued on Feb. 2, the Greater Toledo House of Prayer said it had nothing to do with Bretz’s closing, though. ‘We Are Going to Work Very Hard to Get This Bill Passed’ LGBTQ Ohioans who’ve been fired from jobs or kicked out of apartments told lawmakers on Jan. 31 why discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity should be outlawed in the state. But a 9-year-old girl who talked about the anti-transgender bullies in her young life and then reminded lawmakers of all Americans’ inalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness had people in tears and on their feet. Springfield Expands Anti-Bias, Hate-Crime Protections On the eve of a hearing in Columbus on statewide anti-discrimination protections for LGBTQ people, city commissioners in Springfield approved a similar law locally. A proposed ordinance approved, 4-1, on Jan. 30 will bar discrimination in the city of 59,000 based on a person’s sexual orientation, gender identity or gender presentation.

March 2018 PRIZMnews.com |

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Thursday, March 1 Theater ‘Sex Tips for Straight Women From a Gay Man’ A hilarious and wild ride where no topic is taboo and the insider “tips” come straight from the source: a gay man. 7:30 p.m. at the Lincoln Theatre, 769 E. Long St., Columbus, 43215. Tickets are $25-$40. There are four more performances through Sunday, March 4. More info: capa.com Friday, March 2

Saturday, March 3

Thursday, March 15

Fundraiser HRC Cincinnati Dinner This evening of celebration and inspiration features a cocktail reception, auction, elegant dinner, live entertainment, and thoughtprovoking speakers and guests. 7-10 p.m. at the Jack Cincinnati Casino, 1000 Broadway St., Cincinnati, 45202. Tickets are $200$300.

Business Plexus Annual Meeting Northeast Ohio’s LGBTQ networking and business development organization invites you to learn more about the results of its strategic plan and share your input. 5:30 p.m.8:30 p.m. at the Museum of Contemporary Art, 11400 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, 44106.

Tuesday, March 6

Saturday, March 17

Theater ‘Rent’ The Pulitzer Prize- and Tony Award-winning masterpiece returns to the stage in a vibrant 20th anniversary touring production. 7:30 p.m. at the Playhouse Square-Connor Palace, 1615 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, 44115. Tickets are $29-$109. There are 23 more performances scheduled through Sunday, March 25. More info: playhousesquare.org Friday, March 9 Music Celebrating the Music of Judy Garland The Cleveland Jazz Orchestra and vocalist Joan Ellison perform the music of the late, great Judy Garland. 8 p.m. at the Music Box Supper Club, 1148 Main Ave., Cleveland, 44113. Tickets are $25. More info: musicboxcle.com

Theater ‘The Laramie Project’ Members of the Tectonic Theater Project visited Laramie and conducted more than 200 interviews following the killing of college student Matthew Shepard. This collage explores the depths to which humanity can sink and the compassion of which we are capable. 7:30 p.m. at the Beck Center for the Arts, 17801 Detroit Ave., Lakewood, 44107. Tickets are $12, or $10 for students. There are five more performances scheduled through Sunday, March 11. More info: beckcenter.org Dance Alvin Ailey II Dance Magazine calls Ailey II “second to none,” and The New York Times declares, “There’s nothing like an evening spent with Ailey II, the younger version of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater.” 8 p.m. at the Valentine Theatre, 410 Adams St., Toledo, 43604. Tickets are $29-$59. More info: valentinetheatre.com

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Saturday, March 10 Music Blazing River Freedom Band The LGBTQ concert band celebrates 15 years with an exploration of music around the world. 7 p.m. at Pilgrim Congregational Church, 2592 W. 14th St., Cleveland, 44113. Tickets are $5. More info: blazingriverband.org Music Columbus Gay Men’s Chorus: ‘Two Boys Kissing’ Author David Levithan has collaborated with composer Joshua Shank to create a concert based on his 2013 book. Narrated by a Greek Chorus of the generation lost to AIDS, the story follows two 17-year-olds who are about to take part in a marathon of kissing to set a new Guinness World Record. 8 p.m. at the Lincoln Theatre, 769 E. Long St., Columbus, 43215. Tickets are $35. There’s another performance scheduled for Sunday, March 11. More info: columbusgaymenschorus.com

More info: thinkplexus.org

Sports Cincinnati Volleyball Classic Teams from Cincinnati, Cleveland and Columbus are among 36 competing in this North American Gay Volleyball Associationsanctioned tournament. Competition takes place through Sunday, March 18 at Sports Express Volleyball Center, 5280 State Route 741, Mason, 45040. More info: cincyvball.org Wednesday, March 21 Theater ‘Dixie’s Tupperware Party’ Fast-talking Tupperware Lady Dixie Longate (Kris Anderson) throws a good ol’ fashioned Tupperware Parties filled with outrageous tales, free giveaways, audience participation and a fabulous assortment of products. 7:30 p.m. at the Lincoln Theatre, 769 E. Long St., Columbus, 43215. Tickets are $22.50-$45. There are four more performances scheduled through Saturday, March 24. More info: capa.com Thursday, March 22 Theater ‘It Shoulda Been You’ A sweet and wild musical farce with blushing brides, nervous grooms, overbearing moms, unexpected guests and revealed secrets (and you know what that means!). 7:30 p.m. at the Weathervane Playhouse, 1301 Weathervane Lane, Akron, 44313. Tickets are $26. There are 14 more performances scheduled through Sunday, April 15. More info: weathervaneplayhouse.com


Saturday, March 24 Youth Pink Punk Prom GLSEN hosts one prom for kids and another for adults to help support its programming. 7 p.m.-11 p.m. in separate spaces at the Cincinnati Masonic Center, 317 E. 5th St., Cincinnati, 45202. Entry to the youth prom is free; tickets for the adult prom are $35.

CONTEMPORARY COOKING WITH

AN ITALIAN EDGE

More info: glsen.org/chapters/cincinnati Music Capital Pride Band “CapPride on Broadway” is the theme of this concert by Columbus’ LGBTQ concert band. 7:30 p.m. at King Avenue United Methodist Church, 299 King Ave., Columbus, 43201. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door. More info: cappride.org Music North Coast Men’s Chorus With Maureen McGovern The Broadway and recording artist helps Cleveland’s LGBTQ chorus celebrate its 30th anniversary. 8 p.m. at Playhouse Square’s KeyBank State Theatre, 1519 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, 44103. Tickets are $20-$60. More info: ncmchorus.org

515 Wayne Ave. Dayton, OH | Wheatpennydayton.com

Wednesday, March 28 Concert Pink The pop icon, a longtime advocate for LGBTQ people, made news recently when she shared that she’s raising her daughter in a genderneutral fashion. She brings her Beautiful Trauma world tour to Cleveland for her only Ohio show. 7:30 p.m. at Quicken Loans Arena, 1 Center Court, Cleveland, 44115. Tickets are $47-$225. More info: theqarena.com Friday, March 30 Sports NCAA Women’s Basketball Final Four Columbus and Nationwide Arena host two national semifinal games (Friday, March 30 at 7 p.m. and about 9 p.m.), the national championship game (Sunday, April 1 at 6 p.m.) and a full schedule of events to go along with them. Single-session tickets run from $35-135, and all-session passes are $75$250.

PrizmNews.com

More info: columbuswff.com

March 2018 PRIZMnews.com |

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RESOURCES More information about the people and places in this issue... FOOD. GLORIOUS FOOD Dayton's Wheat Penny Oven and Bar, owned by Liz Valenti and Elizabeth Wiley, is known for its California-style cuisine. The restaurant also boasts a bar whose cocktails include handsqueezed juices, fresh herbs and house-made syrups. It’s at 515 Wayne Ave., Dayton, 45410. wheatpennydayton.com 937-496-5268

DEMS SNUB ANTONIO Dems Snub Antonio. There are six LGBTQ There are six LGBTQ candidates running for office in Ohio this year. Party primaries are scheduled for Tuesday, May 8. The general election is Tuesday, Nov. 6. Visit myohiovote.com for information about registering to vote.

Toledo's My House Diner, owned by Tim McCune, serves breakfast all day, burgers, sandwiches, soups, salads and more. (More means homemade desserts.) He also owns the gay bar next door, McCune's Other Side Bistro, which hosts a drag brunch every Sunday. They’re at 5038 and 5042 Lewis Ave., Toledo, 43215. FB: My House Diner 419-478-6525 FB: McCune’s Other Side Bistro Bar 419-476-1577

Rick Neal, who was profiled in the February 2018 issue of Prizm, is a Democrat running for Congress from Ohio's 15th District, which covers parts of Columbus and stretches from Athens to Wilmington. rickneal.com @Rick_Neal

Joan Rosenthal’s Marigold Catering offers eventplanning and catering services for corporate and social occasions. Marigold does everything from breakfasts and buffets to full service coordination of design, catering and logistics. marigoldcatering.com 216-566-5400 Jeff Thomas Catering’s trademark is custom designing events and cutting-edge food. The company designs menus suited to clients’ needs and tastes. jeffthomascatering.com 859-291-0286 ENCOURAGING SIGNS The Ohio Fairness Act, also known as House Bill 160, would add sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression to Ohio's existing nondiscrimination laws. It's sponsored by Rep. Nickie Antonio, D-Lakewood, and cosponsored by 17 other House Democrats. A hearing for opponents to talk about their objections to the bill has yet to be scheduled by the House Committee on Government Accountability and Oversight. Ohio Business Competes is a coalition of about 300 Ohio corporations, small businesses, nonprofits, universities and business associations that say the state's economic climate will suffer unless it takes a stand for equality, inclusion and LGBTQ civil rights. ohiobusinesscompetes.org

Nickie Antonio is a Democrat running for the Ohio Senate from District 23, which covers Lakewood, Parma, areas of Cleveland's West Side and western Cuyahoga County. nickieantonio.com @nickieantonio Jeremy Blake is a Democrat running for the Ohio House in District 71, which covers Newark and much of Licking County. jeremyblakeforohio.com @jeremyblakeOH Mary B. Relotto is a Democrat running for the Ohio House in District 24, which includes Columbus' Clintonville neighborhood, Hilliard, Upper Arlington and areas in western Franklin County. votemaryb.com @VoteMaryB Billy L. Sharp is a Democrat running for the Ohio House in District 10, which includes Downtown Cleveland, Ohio City, Collinwood, Tremont and other neighborhoods. billysharp2018.com @Sharp2018

Visit PrizmNews.com for a full directory of LGBTQ resources in Ohio. To add your organization to the list, email bobvitale@equitashealth.com.

bravo-ohio.org FB: Buckeye Region Anti-Violence Org Twitter: @BRAVOAVP Columbus: 614-294-7867 Cincinnati: 513-453-4001 Cleveland: 216-370-7361 Statewide: 1-866-86-BRAVO (1-866-862-7286) LOVE, SIMON "Love, Simon," which opens March 16 nationwide, stars Nick Robinson, Katherine Langford, Alexandra Shipp, Jorge Lendeborg Jr., Miles Heizer, Keiynan Lonsdale, Logan Miller, Jennifer Garner, Josh Duhamel and Tony Hale. Visit prizmnews.com to see a trailer. foxmovies.com/movies/love-simon

FASHION The Most Beautiful Thing In The World Is themostbeautifulthingintheworldis.com 6 West 12th Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 859-307-357 @tmbtitwi Hellman Clothiers hellmanclothiers.com In the Atrium of the Carew Tower 441 Vine Street Cincinnati, OH 45202 513-579-8255 hellmanclothiers@gmail.com @hellmanclothiers

Lis Regula of Kent is running for Portage County auditor. regulaforportageauditor.com VICTIMS OF HATE BRAVO, the Buckeye Region Anti-Violence Organization, monitors and works to stop violence against LGBTQ people, whether in the form of hate crimes or domestic abuse within our community. The organization compiles reports on harassment, abuse, violence and discrimination. It also offers training to law enforcement and other organizations. March 2018 PRIZMnews.com |

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Is PrEP right for you? PrEP has been shown to be 92-99% effective in preventing HIV infection when taken as prescribed.

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Dayton Medical Center 1222 S. Patterson Ave., Suite 230 Dayton, OH 45402 (937) 853-3650

Photos: Amy Guip

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King-Lincoln Medical Center 750 E. Long St., Suite 3000 Columbus, OH 43203 (614) 340-6700

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Lucky you. Come in to your local Sprint Store and score the newest phones, best plans and biggest deals!

Visit your local Ohio Sprint store today. At Sprint, we believe diversity helps us excel and win. We embrace diversity and inclusion as a company and value our diverse customers and employees.

Cheers. sprint.com/Unlimited March 2018 PRIZMnews.com |

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Dayton Pharmacy Wright Health Building 1222 S. Patterson Blvd., Suite 110 Dayton, OH 45402 (937) 424-1440

EquitasHealthPharmacy.com 40

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