Page 1

OLVESTON A M ARKETING P ERSPECTIVE

O lveston serves as an important heritage  gem  and  tourist  attraction  for  the  city  of  Dunedin.  As  one  of  the  few  Edwardian  Houses  in  the  world  available  for  public  display,  it  greatly  enhances  the  cultural  heritage value of Dunedin.     The beautiful home, originally belonging to  the wealthy Theomin family, boasts a wide  array of personalized collections that never  does  fail  to  marvel  the  curious  tourist.  It  represents  the  way  of  life  for  the  wealthy  few  during  New  Zealand’s  prime  development  period  of  the  1800s.  (Appendix A)    The  home  was  built  for  a  family  with  a  myriad  of  interests  however  it  is  a  true  representation  of  their  personalities.  (Borrie, 1993)    

T ABLE

OF

C ONTENTS

LITERATURE REVIEW                    02  HERITAGE SIGNIFICANCE       02  FAMILY PROFILES        03  TIMELINE          05  RESEARCH QUESTION      06  MARKETING ISSUES        06  CURRENT MARKET INFORMATION   07  MAJOR MARKET SEGMENTS    09  CURRENT MARKETING INITIATIVES   10  SWOT ANALYSIS        13  RECOMMENDATIONS      17  CONCLUSION         19  REFERENCES          20  APPENDICES          21   

   

1


LITERATURE REVIEW The literature used to construct this report was from a variety of sources, in order to take full  advantage of the information available on Olveston and its broad marketing context. Primary  sources  included  artifacts  from  the  house  itself,  such  as  the  deed  in  which  Ms.  Theomin  gifted the house to the city of Dunedin. In order to get the fullest, deepest possible insights  about  information  relating  to  Olveston’s  marketing  position  and  marketing  activities,  a  personal depth interview was conducted with the manager of the house, Jeremy Smith.    Secondary  research  included  a  full  range  of  periodicals,  articles,  and  reports,  found  both  online and offline, from the Hocken Collection.        

           

HERITAGE SIGNIFICANCE According to  Hall  and  McArthur,  the    “significance  of  heritage  varies  according  to  the  values    and attribute of different groups and individuals and the nature of the heritage resource itself”  (Simes, 1994). Indeed, Dunedin offers a large gathering of heritage and historical sites of great  value.  Of  these  sites,  tours  of  Olveston  ranks  as  collecting  the  largest  number  of  visitors  (in  terms visits to all attractions, Olveston comes in at 2nd to the Otago Peninsula) (Simes, 1994).  The heritage value that surrounds Olveston stems from the unique lifestyle of the prominent  Dunedin family, the Theomins (Simes, 1994). It has gained a Category 1 rating from the Historic  Places Trust (Appendix A).    An important feature is the portrayal of the Jewish Heritage in the house: this comes through  in artifacts such as the kitchen designed for kosher cooking, and the two sets of dumbwaiters.  Further, the heritage significance of the house can be seen to arise from the intact nature of  the artifacts and the context with which they are displayed. Visitors to the house do not feel  like  they  are  in  a  museum,  but  rather  are  stepping  back  into  time  (J.  Smith,  personal  communication, May 26th, 2013).     

2


FAMILY PROFILES

D AVID E DWARD T HEOMIN ( PREVIOUSLY B ENJAMIN ) Born in Bristol, England in 1852, he was the third son of Jewish Minister Joseph‐Benjamin Theomin  who originated from Eastern Europe (Prussia) to settle in Sherness. England. Once in England, his father  discontinued  the  name  Theomin  having  escaped  the  difficult  climate  arising  from  the  Napoleonic  Wars,  particularly  for  people  of  Jewish  faith.  Establishing  permanent  security  was  difficult  during  that  period  hence  this  heavily  motivated  David  to  gain  permanence  in  a  society  where  he  was  welcomed  and  accepted. Educated in mercantile work in Bristol, he immigrated to Melbourne in 1874 to work with his  half‐brother, Abraham. He met and married his wide Marie Michaelis and the couple settled in Dunedin in  the 1880s due to the gold discovery in Otago. (Borrie, 1993)  He joined the firm of Michaelis, Hallenstein and Farquhar in 1879. Later he established a successful  business (D. Benjamin and company) on Princes Street importing jewellery and general goods to meet the  needs  of  the  growing  settlement.  He  then  formed  the  Dresden  Pianoforte  Manufacturing  Agency  and  Company  (Bristol  Piano  Company).  In  1885  he  changed  his  last  name  from  Benjamin  back  to  his  fathers  original Prussian surname (Theomin). Overtime his accomplishments included; serving for the Chambers of  Commerce and active President of the Hebrew Congregation. However, his passion for private collection is  what  contributes  to  the  grandeur  of  the  Olveston  house.  He  was  an  avid  admirer  and  collector  of  art,  collecting  pieces  found  all  over  the  world,  which  influenced  the  collections  in  the  home.  The  home  has  over 240 artworks, bronze statues; European, American and Asian antique furniture, 18th century Japanese  weaponry etc. Known as a small, gentile, and fashionable man he lived to the ripe old age of eighty‐two.   (Borrie, 1993)  FUN FACT: Olveston is the name of a vacation town near Bristol where Mr. Theomin used to visit  during his childhood years.     

 

3


M ARIE T HEOMIN Born in  1855,  Marie  was  the  daughter  of  Moritz  Michaelis,  an  established  Melbourne  businessman.  She  is  best  remembered  for  her  active interest in the Plunket Society where she served as Treasurer for  a  number  of  years.  She  demonstrated  her  active  support  for  mothers  and their young children. From 1915 onwards, she became a member  of  the  Welfare  Association  until  her  death  in  1926,  at  the  age  of  seventy‐one. (Borrie, 1993)  FUN FACT: A framed picture of her Melbourne childhood home  lies by the front entrance of the Olveston House.  

 

E DWARD M ORITZ T HEOMIN   The  only  son  of  the  Theomins,  Edward  was  born  in  1885  in  Dunedin. He was educated at the Otago Boy’s High School and took up    employment  in  his  fathers  business.  He  entered  WWI  from  1914‐1918,    which  did  interfere  with  his  career.  He  rose  in  ranks  within  the  army    eventually leading up to sergeant level. (Borrie, 1993)    He met his future wife Ethel Mocatta in London in 1919, and the  couple  moved  to  Dunedin  to  build    a  house.  Unfortunately,  the  war 

placed a  heavy  burden  on  his  health  and  he  passed  away  at  the  young  age  of  forty‐four  in  1928,  just  two  years  after  his  mother.  His  marriage    did not result in any children, which explains the eventual inheritance of  the home by the city. (Borrie, 1993)  FUN  FACT:  Edward  worked  as  a  warehouseman  at  his  father’s  importing business.  

 

D OROTHY M ICHAELIS T HEOMIN   Born on Christmas Eve in 1888, she was the only daughter of the  Theomins.  Her  education  began  at    Miss  Miller’s  School,  Braemar,  Dunedin,  and  resumed  in  England  from    1902‐05.  She  later  returned  to  Dunedin  when  the  house  was  completed.  Her  passion  for  children  was    demonstrated during her involvement in the Plunket society. One of her    final requests for the Olveston home was that children would be able to  enjoy  the  house  and  as  a  result  many    school  groups  gain  access  to  the  home  as  a  educational  resource.  She  lived  33  years  more  after  her  father’s  death  and  childless  and  unmarried,  eventually  bequeathing  the    house in 1966 to the city. (Borrie, 1993)  FUN FACT: She was heavily active, enjoyed golf, riding, and tramped the  Southern Alps many times!  (Borrie, 1993)   

 

4


TIMELINE

187918811884-

D AVID

THEOMIN AND M ARIE THEOMIN DUNEDIN SHORTLY AFTER THEIR MARRIAGE

19041906 1966-

MOVE

TO

M OVED

INTO A HOME CALLED “T HE C OTTAGE ” LOCATED ON THE I LLUSTRIOUS A DDRESS OF ROYAL TERRACE . I T IS THE SITE OF THE PRESENT - DAY OLVESTON .

D AVID SETS UP A GENERAL IMPORTING FIRM CALLED D AVID B ENJAMIN AND C O . THEN LATER ESTABLISHES D RESDEN PIANO COMPANY AND SAW YERS BAY TANNERY . H AVING ESTABLISHED HIMSELF HE SETS OUT TO BUILD STATUS .

1902-

A

HOME

SUITING

HIS

NEW

FOUND

D AVID

PURCHASES ADJACENT PROPERTIES AND THE EXISTING VILLA IS DEMOLISHED FOR A NEW HOME . B RITISH ARCHITECT SIR ERNEST GEORGE IS COMIMISSIONED TO BUILD THE JACOBEAN STYLE MANSION . I T WAS HIS ONLY HOUSE DESIGNED IN THE SOUTHERN HEMISHPHERE . L OCATED AT 42 ROYAL TERRACE , DUNEDIN , THE OLVESTON HOME IS BUILT . I T FITS 35 ROOMS AND COVERS MORE THAT 1276 SQUARE METERS . F ITTED W ITH MODERN CONVENIENCES INCLUDING A HEATED TOW EL RAIL , ELEXTRICITY , CENTRAL HEATING AND A TELEPHONE SYSTEM . 

M ISS D OROTHY THEOMIN BEQUEATHS THE HOME TO THE CITY . T HIS WILL W AS MADE 20 YEARS PRIOR HER DEATH . T HE CITY COUNCIL WAS RELUCTANT TO TAKE IT DUE TO COST OF MAINTENANCE , BUT A LOBBY BY THEOMIN ’ S FRIENDS WAS SUCCESSFUL . T HEOMIN

>1967-

G ALLERY M ANAGEMENT C OMMITTEE IS ESTABLISHED TO ADMINISTER THE PROPERTY . I N THE FIRST SIX MONTHS OF OPENING OVER 15,000 PEOPLE VISITIED AND 20 YEARS LATER , IT RECEIVED MORE THAN 1 MILLION VISITORS . (A LL

INFORMATION FROM

B URGESS , 2007)

5


?

RESEARCH QUESTION Olveston is  one  of  Dunedin’s  prominent  tourist  attractions.  However, there seems to be an atmosphere of unfulfilled potential  surrounding the historic site: although Olveston is well recognized  amongst  international  tourists,  it  does  not  maintain  top‐of‐the‐ mind awareness amongst local residents of Dunedin or surrounding  regions  (J.  Smith,  personal  communication,  May  26th,  2013).  Further,  faced  with  infrastructural  challenges  such  as  budget,  resources,  staff,  and  political  agendas,  Olveston  is  essentially  a  valuable resource that is not being taken full advantage of. Through  our research, we attempt to answer the following question: “from  a  thorough  marketing  perspective,  what  can  be  done  to  bolster  Olveston’s status as a crucial historical tourism site in Dunedin?”     

           

MARKETING ISSUES

As Olveston house passes from one era to the next, it has also recently changed hands with  respect to internal management and stewardship. In October 2012, it was relinquished from  the 21‐year management provided by Grant Barron, and shifted hands to Jeremy Smith, the  former general manager of Fortune Theatre (Manins, 2012). In order to determine the main  internal tenets of Olveston’s marketing objectives, issues, and aspects, we conducted an in  depth  interview  with  Mr.  Smith.  The  interview  revolved  around  Olveston’s  context  within  tourism‐marketing  dichotomy:  the  Marketing  practices  that  Olveston  undertakes  are  primarily  constructed  by  Jeremy  himself,  and  key  information  regarding  internal  metrics,  visitor  numbers,  sought  and  historic  target  markets,  and  constraints  were  uncovered  through this form of primary research. 

 

6


Although Olveston has had a positive year in terms of visitors to the house and revenue, Mr.  Smith has stated that there is room for improvement overall: “I feel like we’ve had a great  year,  certainly,  but  that  doesn’t  mean  things  can’t  be  improved.  Compared  to  historical  points in time, you can see that tourism from some sources are down” (J. Smith, personal  communication, May 26th, 2013). The main issues that Olveston house currently faces stem  from  its  internal  weaknesses,  and  external  factors,  which  result  in  Olveston’s  failure  to  thrive. In order to categorize these issues in a systematic fashion, the decision was made to  organize  the  research  conducted  with  Mr.  Smith  around  the  framework  of  the  SWOT  analysis.  However,  before  the  SWOT  analysis  can  be  conducted,  a  detailed  portrait  of  the  current marketing environment that surrounds Olveston must be described.                                  

CURRENT MARKET INFORMATION

TARGET MARK ET

The Target Market represents the ideal set of visitors for Olveston. This section is designed  to categorize these ideal visitors into segments, and to place them within the broader  context of Dunedin and New Zealand tourism.     

7


TOURISM IN DUNEDIN

TOURISM TO OLVESTON

In total,  813,753 guest  nights  were  recorded in the year ending October 2012  in  Dunedin,  down  5.1%  from  2011  (Research & Statistics). This can be divided  up  amongst  domestic  tourists  and  international  tourists,  with  61%  of  this  figure  comprising  domestics,  and  39%  representing  internationals  (Research  &  Statistics).  It  is  important  to  note  that  while  domestic  tourism  was  up  5%,  international  tourism  was  down  17.8%  from  2011  (Research  &  Statistics),  so  the  aforementioned  percentages  may  not  provide an accurate description of past or  future trends. 

In Regards  to  Olveston,  approximately  33,000  people  visit  the  site  each  year  (J.  Smith,  personal  communication,  May  26th, 2013). Numbers of visitor’s fluctuate  depending  on  the  season  (Simes,  1994).  Tourists  can  roughly  be  divided  into  the  following  three  categories:  pre‐packaged  tour  groups,  school  and  special  interest  groups,  and  independent  visitors  (Simes,  1994).  Repeat  visitors  can  be  quite  lucrative,  and  are  a  common  occurrence.  International  travellers,  who  begin  their  tourism  ventures  by  abiding  by  pre‐ packaged  and  planned  itineraries,  will  mature as travellers to revisit destinations  they  have  already  experienced,  but  as  independent travellers (Simes, 1994). 

   

MOTIV ATIONS The motivations of tourists can be difficult to fully  comprehend,  due  to  the  large  diversity  of  the  tourist  mix  (Simes,  1994).  One  commonality  that  was  noted  was  an  appreciation  of  heritage  in  general; this appreciation can  manifest itself  as a  desire  to  learn  more  about  Dunedin  and  New  Zealand  heritage  in  general  (Simes,  1994),  which  would  explain  increased  visits  to  Olveston  from  this  group.  School  tours  may  be  generally  non‐ committal, and may not reflect the interest of the  tourists themselves; rather, they are likely to be a  part of a package for a course, or a feature of the  agenda for the paper (Simes, 1994).     

8


MAJOR MARKET SEGMENTS BUS TOURS Bus markets used to represent a major source of incoming  tourists  to  Olveston,  and  to  an  extent,  still  does.  “Pretty  much  every  bus  company  out  there,  we’ve  dealt  with”  (J.  Smith, personal communication, May 26th, 2013).     

CRUISE SHIPS Currently, Olveston  has  a  marketing  budget  of  about  $15,000 per year, which Mr. Smith expends according to  the marketing strategies he plans out (J. Smith, personal  communication, May 26th, 2013). The cruise ship market  has  largely  replaced  the  bus  market  as  the  dominant  segment.  Mr.  Smith  estimates  that  about  1  in  10  cruise  ship  passengers  eventually  find  their  way  to  Olveston.  “When  you  think  about  it,  that’s  a  great  number”  (J.  Smith, personal communication, May 26th, 2013).   

             

             

RELATIVES OF STUDENTS The relatives of students, who come down  to Dunedin to attend ceremonies such as  graduation, often visit Olveston while they  are not spending time with their children.  Although not a major market currently,  Mr. Smith sees the great opportunity this  segment poses. 

       

9


CURRENT MARKETING INITIATIVES BUDGET

Currently, Olveston has a marketing budget of about $15,000 per year, which Mr. Smith  expends according to the marketing strategies he plans out (J. Smith, personal  communication, May 26th, 2013).     

MARK ET RES EARCH Olveston’s main marketing research strategy utilizes the collection and management of a  large  email  database,  with  which  critical  information  is  gathered  about  main  tourist  segments, and through which promotional material is disseminated. However, the extent  of the marketing research that Olveston does not go far past this point. In the interview  with Mr. Smith, after a prompt about tourist typography, Smith admitted that he had little  idea what the motivations of tourists visiting Olveston were.      

10


BRAND

Olveston’s brand  represents  a  complex  product  offering  to  the  market  in  a  manner  that  encourages  salience,  awareness,  and  communication  of  value  in  a  memorable  fashion. The brand value can be seen to stem from the inherent value of the collection  itself; the Theomins used the collection for purposeful, rather than ornamental value  (Simes,  1994),  and  this  influence  has  dictated  the  way  the  collection  is  used  to  this  day. Performances occur frequently in the house,  often  using the original piano, the  kitchen  is  functional,  and  the  plumbing  is  operational  (J.  Smith,  personal  communication, May 26th, 2013).  This appearance of being frozen in time creates a  uniqueness  that  is  not  found  in  other  museums  or  historical  houses.  As  the  “experience”  of  the  house,  being  an  active,  rather  than  passive  connotation,  is  pertinent  to  the  value  proposition,  the  Olveston  communicates  its  brand  as  the  “Olveston Experience” (Simes, 1994). (Appendix B)       

11


ADVERTISING

The main forms of advertising conducted are through free or paid listings on travel  advisory  agencies.  These  organizations  provide  tourists  with  information  on  top‐ rated  destinations,  and  can  greatly  encourage  or  influence  visitation  to listed  sites.  “If it’s free, I’m there” (J. Smith, personal communication, May 26th, 2013), declares  Smith. Currently, Smith actively pays for the inclusion of Olveston in such sources as  the  Otago  Motel  Association,  the  Yellowpages,  and  New  Zealand  Tourim.  Olveston  also  pays  for  information  to  be  included  at  the  Dunedin  i‐Site  (J.  Smith,  personal  communication, May 26th, 2013).     Advertising  in  the  local  newspaper  is  a  major  source  of  free  publicity  for  Olveston.  Inclusion  of  promotions  in  the  Otago  Daily  Times  is  actively  pursued;  further,  promotional materials are given by Tourism Dunedin, and high quality brochures can  be  found  at  accommodation  establishments,  such  as  hotels,  motels,  and  hostels,  throughout Otago (Simes, 1994).        

12


SWOT ANALYSIS

STRENGTH: UNIQU E PRODUCT OFFERING The strengths section refers to the internal structures, systems, and nodes of value  that  Olveston  either  actively  harnesses,  or  could  potentially  harness  to  imbue  their  marketing  strategy  with  superiority.  According  to  Mr.  Smith,  the  major  strength  that  Olveston  possesses  lies  within  the  highly  differentiated  product  offering,  which  is,  in  his  opinion, unlike anything other historic site. (Appendix C)  The  essence  of  Olveston  House’s  product  is  inherent  to  its  initial  establishment,  which shaped the way it evolved into what it is today. Mr. Smith explains that “intention of  the gift that Ms. Theomin provided to us was to use it in a way which is described by the  deed to the house” (J. Smith, personal communication, May 26th, 2013). In the deed, Ms.  Theomin stipulates a clause that dictates how she foresees the house being put to use in  the future. “The Theomin Gallery is to be used as a public art gallery, museum or premises  for the exhibition of: paintings, drawings, other pictures, sculptures, objects of art, vertu,  other articles or objects of public or historical interest; for literary and musical gatherings;  recitals;  exhibitions...”  (Deed  of  Agreement,  1995).  The  house  requires  payment  of  an  entrance  fee  in  order  to  visit  it,  which  can  be  used  as  an  example  to  attest  to  the  robustness  of  the  product  offering.  In  a  competitive  environment  where  there  are  many  free  attractions,  Olveston  still  manages  to  attract  33,000  people  a  year,  and  as  many  as  40,000 (Burgess, 2007).  According  to  Smith,  the  main  source  of  product  differentiation,  and  thus  uniqueness,  not  only  arises  from  the  collection  itself;  the  maintenance  of  the  collection  gives  the  house  an  atmosphere  of  intimacy  and  liveliness,  and  “gives  the  museum  the  feeling  that  you  could  just  walk  into  one  of  the  rooms  and  start  living  here”  (J.  Smith,  personal  communication,  May  26th,  2013).  This  atmosphere  is  reinforced  by  the  interactive  guided  tours,  which  are  currently  the  only  way  of  seeing  the  interior  of  Olveston.  Olveston  also  includes  a  number  of  specialized  product  offerings  as  part  of  its  appeal, including options for weddings, exhibitions, and performances (J. Smith, personal  communication, May 26th, 2013). 

13


WEA KNESS ES

Capacity “I  would  say  our  main  weakness  is  capacity;  not  ability,  but  capacity”  (J.  Smith,  personal  communication,  May  26th,  2013).  Even  though  Olveston  is  brimming  with  a  talented set of staff, there is still a need for greater numbers of people in order to fulfill the  entire range of product maintenance, and to maximize their product offering. This lack of  size is not only apparent in numbers of staff; the building itself is relatively small to similar  historic  sites  in  Dunedin,  which  can  limit  the  logistics  for  types  of  events  that  can  take  place at Olveston: “We will never do a wedding for more than 200 people, as opposed to  the  [Larnach]  castle”  (J.  Smith,  personal  communication,  May  26th,  2013).  Further  infrastructural  hindrances,  such  as  the  lack  of  a  commercial  kitchen,  similarly  limits  the  kind of events and activities that can occur outside the realm of standard guided tours: “So  many of these [kind of events] require food. We don’t have a commercial kitchen, and it’s  unlikely ever to happen, as a submitting a development proposal would set the wheels in  motion  for  all  kinds  of  expensive  fire  protection,  safety  concerns...”  (J.  Smith,  personal  communication,  May  26th,  2013).  During  peak  times,  the  number  of  visitors  poses  a  serious burden on staff and infrastructure (Simes, 1994).   Physical Location  Within  Dunedin,  Olveston  house  is  noted  as  being  discouraging  to  visit  due  to  its  location  at the top  of a series of steep hills. “People start climbing the hill,  and they just  turn away. I know that from groups that walk up from George St. They’ll say things like ‘oh,  we were ten, but  now there’s  just two of  us,  the  hill was  a  bit much  for  our  friends’”  (J.  Smith, personal communication, May 26th, 2013).   Financial Situation  Olveston  is  largely  constrained  by  the  limits  of  its  financial  budget,  and  the  high  maintenance  costs,  which  have  been  stated  as  being  up  to  $500,000  per  year  (J.  Smith,  personal  communication,  May  26th,  2013).  Further,  Olveston’s  finances  are  agendized,  which can make spontaneous spending expensive: “We don’t have a bank account, so our  financial processing is done through them. Money goes into their bank account, and then  comes  to  us.  We’re  an  agenda,  a  line  item  on  their  ledger”  (J.  Smith,  personal  communication, May 26th, 2013). It can be seen how issues such as this are linked to the  political  economy  of  Dunedin,  and  how  the  production  and  distribution  of  wealth  gets  distributed to sites such as Olveston.  

14


OPPORTUNITIES The opportunities  and  threats  section  refers  to  features  of  the  external  operating  environment. Opportunities are aspects that Olveston could actively take advantage of and  capitalize on, and threats are imposed challenges that can be difficult to overcome.  Word Of Mouth  Currently,  there  is  a  huge  potential  for  positive  word  of  mouth  (WOM)  to  attract  more  visitors  and  tourists.  “I  believe  positive  WOM  is  something  very  achievable,  something we currently lack, and is possibly our greatest opportunity right now” (J. Smith,  personal  communication,  May  26th,  2013).  However,  WOM  marketing  initiatives  are  currently  not  undertaken  to  a  great  degree.  Social  Media,  one  of  the  most  critical  components  of  driving  WOM  (Fanning,  2013),  is  not  pursued  heavily  by  Olveston.  According  to  Smith:  “I’m  not  the  best  guy  for  Social  Media,  and  we  don’t  do  much  of  it  because it would need to be me doing most of it. We did recently set up a Facebook page, I  don’t use Twitter so we don’t do Twitter at all. I can see the value in Social Media, though”  (J. Smith, personal communication, May 26th, 2013).   Local Tourism  If WOM is the instigator to drive tourism, then the market that is most opportunistic  for  this  type  of  affect  is  the  local  tourism  industry.  Although  Olveston  is  internationally  renowned,  and  is  visited  frequently  by  these  international  tourists,  amongst  domestic  tourists  it  is  not  visited  very  frequently  (J.  Smith,  personal  communication,  May  26th,  2013). However, there are many different opportunistic avenues through which increased  domestic tourism could be catalyzed. Recently, economic downturns have occurred in New  Zealand,  affecting  citizens  of  Dunedin  (Gibb,  2008).  However,  these  circumstances  could  actually  bolster  local  visitation  to  Olveston,  as  residents  of  Dunedin  search  for  more  economical  forms  of  tourism  (Gibb,  2008).  Amongst  residents,  novel  market  segments  have  been  prospected  as  lucrative  new  target  markets.  WOM  could  be  used  in  tandem  with  the  targeting  of  these  new  segments,  to  systematically  strengthen  a  marketing  approach. These new segments include the family members of students, who often travel  to  Dunedin  for  school  events  such  as  graduations,  and  possibly,  at  some  point,  the  students themselves: “The student market is very difficult to crack. Maybe one day they’d  be  interesting  to  us,  but  more  immediately,  the  aunts,  uncles,  parents  and  relatives‐  all  those people that come down to Dunedin for graduations and the like‐ would be a great  market  for  us.  They’re  always  looking  for  something  to  do  while  they’re  taking  a  break  from visiting their kid” (J. Smith, personal communication, May 26th, 2013). 

15


THR EA TS The Competitive Environment    Olveston is in competition with a number of tourism sites. While the main direct competition  was noted to be Larnach Castle and the Otago Museum, indirect competition, in the form of  Cadbury’s,  Speights,  and  the  Public  Library  can  be  just  as  detrimental  to  visitor  numbers,  because of the free or inexpensive nature of the specific attraction.     Industry Landscape    Although  the  market  is  growing overall, it  is  being  absorbed  by tourist  destinations  outside  Dunedin  (J.  Smith,  personal  communication,  May  26th,  2013).  “People  are  just  going  other  places, mainly to Queenstown. Australia is a huge market for New Zealand, and this market is  shifting  to  China.  A  lot  of  this  mass  Chinese  visitation  is  going  to  Auckland,  Rotorua...it’s  coming  down  to  Queenstown,  but  not  quite  making  it  to  Dunedin”  (J.  Smith,  personal  communication, May 26th, 2013).      

16


RECOMMENDATIONS The purpose of the above information was provided deep‐seated insight into the issues that  underlie tourism and visitation to Olveston, from a marketing perspective. The following  recommendations consider these pieces of evidence, and help to provide Olveston with the  means to increase the number of visitors to the site.     

INCREA SE SOCIAL MEDIA One  of  the  strongest  opportunities  that  Olveston  possesses  is  the  potential  for  increased  WOM  to  promote,  advertise,  and  inevitably  attract  more  visitors  is  the  Social  Media  presence  that  it  could  install  into  its  regular  promotions.  Social  Media  has  the  power  to  connect  individuals  on  a  personal level, and can inspire emotions that other forms of  advertising cannot. WOM is especially important in this case  because  of  the  need  to  attract  more  local  visitors,  which  should become one of the main target markets. Social media  is  the  perfect  outlet  for  integrating  local  residents  into  the  activities,  events,  and  news that  surrounds  Olveston.  It  has  the  power  to  bind  communities  together,  and  to  instill  feelings  of  kinship;  these  emotions  will  undoubtedly  attach  themselves to the value of the “Olveston Experience” brand,  and will become an important brand attribute in the future.     Potential campaigns can support the overall Olveston  experience  wherein  users  can  share  their  own  experiences  either  through  the  Facebook  page  or  a  Pinterest  account.  Geo‐location tagging can allow the campaigns to be localized  thereby generating WOM. Improvements to the website i.e.  online booking can also update the website to competitors’  current standards.   

17


INCREA SE MARK ET RES EARCH INITIATIV ES

Unfortunately, valuable data that could have been used  to  make  effective  marketing  suggestions  was  not  available to us. Information like Tourist Typography (the  level of cognitive, purposive determination to visit a site,  or  lack thereof) could  have been  used to further assess  gaps  in  the  current  target  market,  flaws  in  current  marketing  activities,  and  potential  opportunities.  In  the  future, it is recommended that Olveston actively pursue  the collection of this type of evidence.     This could be done through surveys, either given on‐site,  or  that  make  use  of  the  large  email  database  that  has  been  collected  under  the  structure  of  presently  instituted  marketing  activities.  Information  on  demographics,  reasons  for  visiting  (which  should  help  understand  tourist  typography  more  accurately,  depending on the type of questions used), and areas of  individual  interest  could  be  collected  and  studied  to  further contextualize Olveston’s marketing environment.                

18


CONCLUSION

Via the thorough marketing  analysis conducted, using  many types  of primary  and  secondary  sources  as  research,  including  in‐depth  personal  interviews  with  the  current  Manager  of  Olveston, a better picture of how Olveston fits in to the tourism environment of Dunedin, and  the even  broader  tourism  industry  of  New  Zealand  can  be  uncovered. Through  this  study,  a  firm grasp of the success and failures of current marketing activities, of major target markets  and potential lucrative markets,  and  of the contextual  strengths, weaknesses,  opportunities,  and  threats  were  entrenched.  From  this  platform,  two  recommendations  in  order  to  help  bolster  future  tourism  to  Olveston  were  summarized:  to  target  the  potentially  prosperous  local visitor market using social media activities to emphasize WOM, and to enhance and add  to market research initiatives.     Dunedin  is  a  jewel  of  a  city,  with  rich  cultural,  social,  political,  and  economic  heritage,  and  Olveston  is  perhaps  the  perfect  setting  for  this  multi‐faceted  gemstone.  The  house  has  a  unique  product  offering,  possibly  unlike  any  other  in  New  Zealand.  It  keeps  the  Theomin’s  alive in this respect, and is truly able to offer a heartily respectable “Olveston Experience”.      

19


REFERENCES Borrie, J. (1976). Olveston. Dunedin: Management Committee, Theomin Gallery.    Burgess, Linda. Historic houses : a visitor's guide to 65 early New Zealand houses.  Auckland, N.Z: Random HOuse, 2007. Print.    Collections,  H.  (2010).  Architects  and  Architecture.  Friends  of  the  Hocken  Collections, 60, 6‐7.     Deed of agreement, Page 2 (1995).    Fanning,  S.  (2013).  The  relationship  between  word  of  mouth  &  social  media.  Retrieved  5/22,  2013,  from  http://www.womma.org/blog/2013/04/the‐ relationship‐between‐word‐of‐mouth‐social‐media    Gibb, J. (2008, ). More kiwi visitors hoped for. Otago Daily Times, pp. 1.  John, B. (1993). The Olveston experience : Dunedin's historic home, New Zealand.  Dunedin: Theomin Gallery Management Committee.    Manins,  R.  (2012,  ).  Olveston's  manager  leaves  property  in  good  shape.  Otago  Daily Times, pp. 1    Simes, D. (1994). Olveston: an assessment of the heritage significance of Olveston  as an historic site and structure. Dunedin: Simes.    Tourism  Dunedin  Statistics.  (n.d.).  Tourism  Dunedin.  Retrieved  May  14,  2013,  from www.dunedinnz.com/visit/corporate/research‐statistics‐reporting 

20


APPENDIX A O LVESTON H OME

21


Source: The Olveston Experience Tour (www.olveston.co.nz) 

22


S C  U  L  L  E  R  Y 

E D  W  A  R  D 

B A  T  H  R  O  O  M 

B U  T  L  E  R  S 

M A  S  T  E  R 

L I  B  R  A  R  Y 

B I  L  L  I  A  R  D  S 

T H  E    H  A  L  L 

23


HISTO RIC PLA CES TRUST: O LVESTO N

“Built with  every  modern  convenience,  Olveston  was  fitted  with  central  heating,  a  shower,  a  heated towel rail, an internal telephone system, a service lift, a food mixer, and even an electric toaster.  The house had 35 rooms (including a vestibule, hall, drawing room, bedrooms, billiard room, card room  (or Persian room), kitchen, scullery, butler’s pantry, library and dining room) with a total floor area of  1276  m².  A  galleried  atrium  rose  through  the  ground  and  upper  floors  and  served  as  a  ball  room.  A  mezzanine balcony was an eyrie from which to watch the dancing.   The London firm of Green & Abbott were responsible for much of the interior design, including  the English oak joinery. The original wallpapers mere manufactured in Buffalo, New York and selected  by the Theomins on one of their trips to America. The house was grandly furnished with expensive art,  textiles, furniture, ornaments and other treasures from all over the world.  The exterior walls of Olveston are constructed of brick and plaster with a Moeraki gravel finish  and faced with Oamaru stone. It has mullioned windows, Dutch gables, and impressive chimneys. There  are crenellations over the bays, and a tower. The roof is Marseilles tiles.  Olveston  became  the  centre  for  arts  and  culture  ‐  business  meetings,  affairs  of  the  Jewish  community, as well as arts and philanthropic gatherings,. In 1907 Marie became deeply involved with  the  Society  for  the  Promotion  of  the  Health  of  Women  and  Children  (later  the  Plunket  Society)  and  Dorothy took over the running of Olveston. A friend, observed that under her supervision Olveston 'ran  on oiled wheels' ‐ and with the help of seven servants.  Olveston’s  architectural  distinction  and  its  collections  record  the  Theomin’s  sumptuous  life  in  Edwardian New Zealand give Olveston special significance. The house reflects the lifestyle enjoyed by  the colonial elite, one of the most outstanding records of this period in New Zealand. It contains over  240 original paintings, Jacobean design styl  This historic place was registered under the Historic  Places  Act  1980. The  following  text is the  original citation considered by the NZHPT Board at the time of registration.   This  grand  residence  built  between  1904  and  1906  for  D  E  Theomin  a  wealthy  Dunedin  businessman,  was  designed  by  Sir  Ernest  George  one  of  the  most  distinguished  British  domestic  architects of the time.                                                                                       .  The house is built in brick, rendered with Moeraki pebble dash finish and has facings in Oamaru  stone.  The  picturesque  composition  and  massing  of  Dutch  gables  and  towers,  derive  from  English  Jacobean houses, notably Holland  House  in  London.  The  house is  also  reminiscent of the  Elizabethan  mansion, Kirby Hall, in Northhamptonshire.                                                                        .  Olveston shows great attention to form, harmony and proportions. The architectural details are  an  eclectic  combination  of  tall  mullioned  bay  windows,  classical  portico,  prominent  chimneys,  crenellations, battlements and turrets.                                    .  The  house  was  modern  for  its  time  and  included  the  latest  domestic  equipment.  Many  fine  possessions, including furniture, china, silverware and paintings are on display in the gracious interior.  The  house  was  bequeathed  to  the  Dunedin  City  Council  in  1966  by  D  E  Theomin's  daughter,  Dorothy. It has been preserved as a house museum” (Historic Places Trust).                       .          Olveston is quite unrelated to the development of New Zealand domestic architecture. It is an  outstanding illustration of Jacobean design and one of New Zealand's grandest urban houses. 

24


APPENDIX B O LVESTON E XPERIENCE

25


APPENDIX C D EEDS

TO THE

H OUSE

26


the course of the ongoing care of the property.

MA INTENAC E A ND CA RE “The  trust  deed  prepared  in  1967  and  revised  in  1996,  is  the  governing  document  which  establishes  the  manner  in  which  Olveston  is  to  be  operated  as  an  historic  house  open  to  the  public.  The  deed  provides,  and  indeed  charges,  the  trustees  to  maintain  the  gift  in  a  sound,  efficient and responsible manner. The ingredients of this role are encompassed in The Theomin  Gallery's statement of purpose prepared in 1992, prior to the commencement of the significant  programmes carried out over the past decade. Some of the programmes are highlighted in this  section.  Mr  David  Theomin's  personal  book  plate  quotes  "Let  things  be  done  shipshape  and  Bristol fashion." This quotation is ever present in the minds of the management committee.  Maintenance  programmes  are  researched  and  carried  out  in  a  manner  that  conforms  and  complements the overall original style, design and way of life that the Theomin family enjoyed  at  Olveston,  while  taking  account  of  the  historical  classification  and  significance  of  the  asset.  The  trust  is  grateful  for  the  detailed  and  invaluable  assistance  it  receives  from  many  sources  through the course of the ongoing care of the property.    The collections are under constant scrutiny and where appropriate rectification work is carried  out. Olveston has over 240 original pictures on display in the house. The works are maintained  with  the  assistance  of  a  professional  conservator.  Some  of  the  background  care  provided  is  painstaking in  its  detail  and this  site  offers a  glimpse  of  the  work  accomplished.  Original rugs  and carpets are cared for either while on display or in storage. Visitors do not walk on original  pieces but  careful replication of some  items has enabled the ambience of the original design,  colour  and  atmosphere  to  be  appreciated  while  original  items  are  preserved.  Visitors  often  remark  that  Olveston  feels  very  much  "lived  in"  and  this  is  a  special  quality  nurtured  by  the  management committee.” (Olveston Experience website, www.olveston.co.nz)             

27

Olveston  

http://www.priyankainth.com/uploads/2/3/0/0/23000270/olveston.pdf

Advertisement