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EXPRESS

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NEW RELEASES!!!

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CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH CASS CONVERSATIONAL GERMAN CASS KINGS SIZE (50 GAMES) CASS FIRST STEPS WITH THE MR.M...............EN CASS MICKEY IN THE GREAT OUTDOORS......... DISK MOUNTAIN KING CART MINER 2049ER CART BASIC (400/800) CART ROSENS BRIGADE.............................. CASS & DISK CLOWNS AND BALLOONS.............. CASS & DISK SEA BANDITS CASS & DISK POOYAN CASS & DISK ONLY £5.00 EACH 11!

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News

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Fun With maths

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More amazing exploits with our resident Atari adventurer.

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All the latest from the ever-changing world of 8 bit Atari.

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An easy-to-use routine to help the kids With mental arithmetic.

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?UTILtTIEsm‘Cagw Vol. 3 No.9 January 1988 Managing Editor: Derek Meakin

Group Editor

Re views

Good old games

Features Editor: . Peter Davtdson

.

.

MicroLmk

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18 ears

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one b y

.

News .

More about Britain .

,

20 .

3

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nationWide online database for micros. .

.

Production Editor: Peter Glover Editorial Assistant: Neil Fawcett

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News Editor: Mike Cowley Technical Editor: André Willey Advertisement Manager: John Snowdon

Advertising

look at the latest software releases.

t earn takes a

We reminisce with classic cartrid g e software from

-

Alan McLachlan

.

13

Our evaluation

Mouse

21 th e

f or

.

w h o e f ami 'l y in l

t h'is

.

ad

aptation of Yahtzee.

Driver

26

routine to make your joystick Simulate

A useful

Games System

a

rodent.

28

Now the dust has settled: An in-depth reView of Atari’s XE. _

_

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Sales:

Nora Lawton

M“°°'es"°'d' Chasm” SK",

File Converter

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Solve the problem of pictures saved under different formats.

Tel: 0625 878888 (Editorial) 0625 878888 (Advertising) 0625 879940 (Subscriptions) Telex: 26571 MONREF G Qu°ting Raf- 723MAGOO‘ Telecom Gold: 721MAGOO1 Prestel Mailbox: 614568383 Fax: 0625 879966 Published by: Database Publications Ltd, Europa House, Adlington Park, London Road, Adlington,

Survive the enemy submarines in this fast-action arcade game. .

Communlca Need

SNP‘

modem?

a

37

trons To help you choose,

we answer

all the questions.

39

Easy Programming

The start of

a

_

new series to help you get to grips with Atari Basic.

33,573 January-June, 1986

£15 £18 £33

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A

43

Printer

Poster

rates for Subscription 12 “sues' 90“ free:

superb utility to create double-size

screen dumps.

UK

Europe (incl. Eire) Overseas (Airmail)

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Five Liners Prize-winning mini programs

ISSN 0266-545X

“Atari User" welcomes program listings and articles for publication. Material should and pref— be typed or computer-printed, erably double—spaced. Program listings should be accommpanied by cassette tape or disc. Please enclose stamped, selfaddressed envelope, otherwise the return of material cannot be guaranteed. Contributions accepted for publication by Database Publications Ltd will be on an all-rights

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sent in by our clever readers.

47

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un 0mpf 0 games g’nts et morea?d

W'th hel p from other users

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Gadgets

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Menu control the easy way Wlth this ultra-sonic SWItCh. .

basis.

1988 Database Publications Ltd. No material may be reproduced in whole or in part without writen permission.While every care is taken, the publishers cannot be held legally responsible for any errors in articles, or advertisements. listings, Am” Us?" ’5 3” mdependem ”Uh/mat!” and Alan Corp {UK} Ltd are not responsrb/e for any ofthe articles they contain or for any of the opinions expressed. News trade distribution: Europress Sales and Distribution Limited, Unit 1, Burgess Road, lvyhouse Lane, Hastings, East Sussex TN35 ANR. Tel: 0424 430422.

©

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Software

53

solutions

Our reS|dent expert h 6 ps to .

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computers

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your prOQVamm'ng

pro bl ems-

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55

Action

This routine will add more than punch to your drinks cabinet. -

Mallbag

57 ,

_

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The chance to get your news, Views and name in print.

January 1988 Atari User 3


BRITISH

A

BROADCASTING

CORl’ORATlON

MICROCOMPUTER

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British

MicrocomputingAt-ardi.

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exploiting the computer’s outstanding power, graphics

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The huge potential of Archimedes doesn’t stop there. The 310.“ with its built-in PC emulator can run Lotus 1.2.31“ D BASE IIIZ“ ITS-WORD?“and other popular business programs available under MS-DOS?‘

>

With prices starting at £749 exc.VAT for the 305 with mono monitor and rising to £1035 exc. VAT for the 31034 with colour monitor, the Archimedes 300 series represents

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Already Archimedes* has won the British Microcomputer of the Year award,a clear winner against the other two ?nalists. the Amstrad 1512 * and the Amlga DOO’."

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Acorn !

Acorn Computers Ltd 4335, BSI 3YX

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finance deal

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available through participating dealers.

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At an operating speed of 4 million instructions per second 7' t b t eve rything you d h msmn?y W 1th thlS 0. 0 Flt at a?ens e power your ?ngertips advantages are enormous. '

Name' .

310 with colour

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PRIORITY REQUEST

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computer system of such capability.

Please send me an information pack on Archimedes a list of dealers.

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In addition to BBC Basic V, high level languages such as ‘C’ and ‘Pascal’ can be used for specialist applications fully and speed.

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The choice of

l—FREEPOST OR PHONE 0800100100 _

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FINANCE FOR LIMITED PERIOD

lnterest free credit is availableon all Archimedes systems during the period l.l0.87 to 3l.12,87. “aximum period oft-rt'dit 12 months. Subject to Written quotation availableon request from panicipating dealerswho an- Iirem'ed credit brokers.

mm

‘Arrhimedes

is a

trade

mark

olAcorn

Computers

Ltd.

‘Lotus 1.2.3

is

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trade

mark

of Lotus Corporation.

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BASE

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a

trade mark ofAshton~Tate.

“Amiga

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Record turnover ATARI has achieved record results in the third quarter of its financial year.

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Sales were $80.4 million — a 34 per cent increase over last year‘s third quar-

.

Atari seems to have been in breach ofstates:”ChiIdren's

SALES of Atari’s VCS 2600 and XE games/computer systems have been high despite a TV advertising

promote

ability

to distinguish between fact and fantasy will vary according to their age and individual personality. ”With this in mind no

campaign setback. The problem arose when the independent Broadcasting Authority objected to an advert scheduled to be shown during prime children's watching time. One reason given by an

unreasonable expectations

of performance of toys and games must be simulated

bythe

lBA spokesman is that the advert put forward by Atari did not comply with its code of practice. The section that

excess use

machines for

its

the Christmas market all remaining slots had been sold, leaving the company well and truly out in the cold. Atari spokesman Peter Walker refused to comment about the ad content or problems with the TV campaign. But he did say that

“sales of the games/ computer systems are high

ofimagin-

ary backgrounds or special effects". By the time Atari had produced another advert to

and do not appear to have been affected by the lack of

advertising”.

35-5!

The very deV|I to

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pay over games HUBBLE bubble toil and trouble for Red Rat Software games Little Devil and

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complaint”.

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games

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Nadler told Atari User: ”I can’t understand it, Little Devil is nothing more than a harmless arcade game with

enticing children to start dabbling with ouija boards or something like that then there could be a justified

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evil intent at all. “Nightmares contains all the ingredients of a classic fairy tale with no harmful additives or colouring for people to worry about.

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"In fact the opposite situation exists, with the little devil doing good by trying to free lost souls and break out of hell himself”. Silica Distribution had originally banned both games, but has relented in the case of Nightmares. Their spokesman John

_

over last year. Sales for the

m“ nine months stand at $2153?" Iion,30 per‘centuponlast year's ”65 million. Income has "se";7_6 P" cent m'"'°“ to frornQ$25.8 $454 million. ‘

weather outlook b ht THE serV|ce which offers Atari USers an opportunity

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France and "Italy because they are considered to have

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refused to handle the games in this country for similar reasons. Red Rat director Harry

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Hambley told Atari User: “We are now handling Nightmares— but Little Devil

remains on our banned list. ”We consider the title unsuitable for general distribution and refuse to stock

it for the same reasons as we do not stock Lucifer’s Realm, Leather Godesses of Phobos or Strip Poker". Says Nadier: ”The French and Italians and Silica Distribution are all judging the book by its cover—I doubt if

any of them have played the games at all”.

-

to become weatherforecasters IS being upgraded to a professional standard. to all AThanks tari owners WeatQtlierLink, wi soon be able to pick up the same satellite pictures as the Met Office experts. To achieve this, WeatherLink which operates on the MicroLink system _ has switched satellites from the older NOAA 9 to the more advanced Meteosat. —

This means that the weather maps transmitted from outer space have been dramatically improved in quality offering perfect —

clarity and true colour. “The problem with NOAA 9 was that it relied on infra red images”, said Derek Meakin, head of MicroLink, “and this, at times, resulted in weather maps that lacked clarity and true colour. “The far more sophisticated Meteosat satellite totally eliminates the probIem, enabling Atari owners to download pictures of a

completely professional standard".

January 1988 Atari User 5


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AN in-depth survey of visitthis had been slashed to ors attending the Atari £8.50. Christmas Show has ”The visitors have had a revealed it was a smash hit bonanza”, said one major with the public. disc supplier. One hundred per cent That’s why more than 40 indicated not only they felt per cent of visitors questheir attendance had been tioned that reported well worthwhile, but also bargains were the highlight that they plan to attend the of the show. next in the series. Other major reasons The reason for the mass given for describing the endorsement stemmed in event as a success were the the main from the vast mix of exhibitors, the range number of special offers to of products, the venue and be found, with a conserva- the overall presentation. tive estimate of total disThe survey also revealed counts available being the spending pattern of visexcess of itors to the show. Some 40 placed in £100,000. per cent spent up to £25, 26 And such was the per cent up to £50, a further between 12 per cent up to a £100, competition exhibitors at the show that with 22 per cent paying out some prices fell dramaticmore than £100. ”it was fantastic", said ally during the course of the event. Atari user Donald Peterson. When the doors opened “I've travelled down from on the Friday, boxes of Sin Bradford for the day and discs were selling for reckon l’ve saved not only £14.95. my fare but also more than By the end of the first day, £150 in special offers”.

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WITH the winter Olympics p0ised to grace our tele— vision screens, Tynesoft has released Winter Olympiad 88 for the Atari XL and XE. As well as being able to take part in the simulated action which sporting includes downhill racing, bobsleigh, slalom, ski jump and biathlon, Tynesoft (091-414 4611) is

competition with

running a a trip for

two to the winter Olympics in Calgary as the star prize.

announced ”0”

by Agamem-

(0273 417370)-

Print Marshal f

Whi_Ch

feqU'feS 64k ram, d|S_C df'Ve a dOt matrix printer allows the user to produce flow charts, circuit diaand

6 Atari User January 1988

.

ON CUE

Mastertronic SOCCER

Alternative SlLENT SERVICE

A

Microprose

I

FOUR GREAT GAMES

A

Micro Value TALLADEGA Top Ten

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MILKt as eRACE romc

V

STORM Master-tromc

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LEADERBOARD

v

Access/US Gold

v

GAUNTLET us Gold

v

skiing star. Leading TV Winter sports

D'ZZY DICE Players

A

FOUR GREAT GAMESZ Micro Value

BMX SIMULATOR Code Masters

.

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.

contribute toa 2am?) commentgtor ree VLne et .00 which is included With the Price £9.95 _on game.

BOULDER DASH ll

V

First Star/Prism

cassette and £14.95 on disc.

Schematlcs to complement word processing software has been

HOUSE

PANTHER

KNOCKOUT Midas

designed

,

Mastertronic

.

,

m

Mastertronlc

The competition, closes on January Vélgich ls open to all purchasers of Winter Olympiad 88 30d requires you tO place '” order the eight most important qualities which are needed by a top alpine

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A PACKAGE

FEUD

180

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Olympic competition

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MaStertromc

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(Software House)

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DECATHLON

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Fireblrd

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software grams,

club

sheet music

magazines, and anything of

schematic nature. The program also mixes graphics With text 30d turns the computer ”110.3 40 column by 20 fOW WindOW Of an 80 00mm” by 80 VOW document page which can be scrolled around.

m

GUN LAW

Mastertromc _

Compiled by Gallup/Microscope

a

m

There are four new entries this month, all in the Top Ten. While three games re-enter lower down the chart. Mastertronic’s budget range is well represented with four in the Top Five the first place still eluding them, as Decathlon from Firebird seems unmoveab|e_ —


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Electronic mail — The cheapest and fastest form of communication D°SSib'e- 't was the same to send a message to one mailbox as to 500!

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million worldwide. You can even send and receive telexes after office hours or while travelling,

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Telemessages - Type in your message before 8pm and delivery is guaranteed by first post the next day (except Sunday), anywhere in the UK and USA.

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games and utilities.

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Two recommended packages you have an 850 interface: Pace Nightingale manual modem + cable (£116.15) PLUS Mini Office II (£19.95).

If

_Total price: E 136.

Company searches —_0btain facts about anv_Britlsh limited company In seconds, and fU||Y analysed financial information on over 100,000 major companies.

the biggest .

Access

and (“PSt Up-tq-qate multi—Iingual dictionary in the world, with over 380,000 words.

-

-

-

.

10.

don’t have an interface: Miracle wszooo v21, v23 modem + Datatari interface + cable + Datatari software. Total price: £149.95. W'th e''th er com b'man“ you also log on to other databases and bulletin boards all round the world. If you

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apart from your Atari is a modem, which plugs into your telephone wall socket, plus suitable communications software. We have provided two possible t' th e e ft olellzqshon ever eqUipment "5 VP“ [J‘se' you Will be able to call MicroLink, open your mailbox, save to disc any messages waiting for you, and disconnect In as little as tWO m anteS

All you need

4-1

.

_

.

Tele-booking — Reserve train and theatre tickets, check flight details worldwide,or order from a vast range of products — from flowers to floppy discs.

Telesoftware — Download directly into your Atari any program from the ever-growinglibrary now available on MicroLink — both

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“if“ su scri-bunk ersintuphquKse,ogo1t§iex e an

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With...

When you jom MicroLink _you ve got the world of communications at your I fingertips 24 hours a day. You II have immediate to access ALL the faC|||t|es Offered by Telecom G0|d and a great deal more beSldeS. I

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world

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News - Use the powerful search commands to pinpoint vital business information from the world’s leading news services,

newspapersandperiodicals. —

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you also have

r———————————————-————————~ Please send me full about MicroLink, and

Radiopaging pocket radiopager you,“ be alerted each time an urgent message arrives in your mailbox. So you re always in touch. a

Gateways — Get thl'OUgh to New York in just five seconds or key into the EEC computer in Luxembourg. which links you to 600 databases throughout Europe. —

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EVERY month Iwonder if I’m going to have enough time to write this column. What with freeing kingdoms held in tyranny’s thrall by powercrazed sorcerers, rescuing damsels trapped in high towers and hacking my way through deep jungles to bring back the lost blue pearl of the Pimpopo tribe, I reckon l have my work cut out. And that was only yes-

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Next up was Brimstone, an unusual text adventure in the Electronic Novel series from Broderbund, courtesy of US Gold. Although the screen layout on this adventure was a shade uninspiring, the contents more than made up for it. These Electronic Novels have perhaps been a bit neglected by most adventurers and they certainly have not been given the publicity by their distributors that the products deserve. That is a pity, because these games The parser '3 impressare very good. ively sophisticated, 9” a par W'th Infocom’s and Magnetic Scrolls', and there are many innovations in the adventures. The text is fulsome and the plots gripping and atmospheric. ” a“ .

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Turn to Page 10> January 1988 Atari User 9


——_————

Adventuring 4 From Page 9 featured the return of Floyd, that lovable little robot you first encountered in Planetfall. Stationfall contained superb puzzles, many very funny incidents the Windy Arcturian balloon creature immediately springs to mind a teasmg plot and qwte the best ending I’ve come across. Talk about bringing tears to the eyes , — WI 7, there wasn t a handkerchief in our house that wasn’t sopping! Stationfall wins my vote as one of the best adventures ever written. Running a close second was the eagerly awaited Magnetic Scrolls Guild of Thieves from Rainbird, the dazzling follow-up to The Pawn. In

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first part there are three sections in the game was sprawling, over— populated and somewhat unsatisfying. Even so, both adventures fully earned their place in any dedicated adventurer’s collection. You’ll note that many adventures these days are for disc owners only. That’s hard luck on those who only have cassette decks but I’m afraid that’s the trend with adventures. Scrimp and save every penny to get a disc drive is my advice - you’re missing out on a lot of pleasure without

Thieves has won several awards already including PCW Adventure Of The Year and looks like remaining a steady seller for a long time to come. To conclude my review of some of the highlights of ‘87, there was Lurking Horror (lnfocom) and Knight Orc (Rainbird/Level9). Both started off promisingly but turned out to be a little disappointing. Lurking Horror had one or two illogicalities and was somewhat overrated as a horror story it turned out to be rather tame. Knight Orc was a major step forward for Level 9 but the '

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.

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And so lastly to a few of the letters received. My belated thanks to Simon Cantrill (aged 12) of Stourport for his superb map of Mercenary, The Second City. Not in the traditional mould of adventures, know, but a splendid game for all that. Martin Tee would like some help with Golden Baton. He can’t find a lamp and cannot defeat the knight on the battlements. It's a long time sincel played this one and I’ve lost my solution documents. think the lamp is inside the castle somewhere perhaps you can find it after overcoming the knight?lseem to remember that you also have to make yourself invisible maybe that’s how you get past the knight. Can anyone say for certain? For Andrew Tonge of Leeds and other readers still troubled by The I

I

70 Atari User January 7988

Payoff, let me advise you to beg, buy or borrow the April 1987 issue ofAtari User, where a complete solution appeared. Andrew would also like some assistance with Earthquake. He has got to the fire blocking the path and has been down the drain but can’t make any further progress. Who can help this adventurer in distress? From Cwmbran, A.M. Norris and party have reached level 8 in Ultima lV but can’t find the mandrake. Another problem is in entering the codex (after the abyss sanctum) they are unable to get the symbols of the word of passage in order. Advice is required from other Ultima lV players, please. And so until next month, bid you all a fond farewell. Have a happy new year and may all your treasures be

agree with but if not, why not write in and tell me what your own favourites are? |’|| publish such lists from time to time —there’s nothing like airing your own

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——-———————-—Educotion‘ NOT enough emphasis is placed on basic numerical skills in schools today — youngsters should know their multiplication tables and be reasonably competent at addition and subtraction. This easy-to—use program can be fun and educational for kids of any age, and even adults may wish to test their knowledge of rudimentary

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When the routine is first run you are asked for your name, followed by a menu screen offering different types or you can of arithmetic problems have a random selection of each. After this you are asked for the difficulty level to 12 —which can be changed

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When you press the Start key 10 questions will appear one at a time, and the timer is started. You are allowed three attempts at each and if the last answer you give is incorrect you will be given the correct one. Although the test is timed, there is no time limit and your final score depends on the attempts taken at a FUN

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at the first for a correct answer attempt, six forthe second and two f0r the third. At the end your score, the time taken and the fastesttime is displayed. If you score more than 89 the level of difficulty is increased by one if you

HITH MATHS

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January 1988 Atari User

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Some of the enemy aircraft take a bit of killing and the large bomber simply refuses to exlode. If you get into trouble then simply loop the loop and escape the danger. The graphics are acceptable—except forthe aircraft which are rather uninspiringly designed. Play is quite addictive despite the niggles and the one feature that really saves the day is the smooth and efficient screen scrolling. Screaming Wings is the best on the compilation and should give you hours of fun. In Crumble’s Crisis you are Crumble, and work in the intergalactic zoo. Last night when you were locking up you didn’t setthe time locks on the Fuzzies’ cages properly and they have now escaped—all 30 of them. 80 away you go with your

Supplier: Red Hat software, 17 Fennel Street, Manchester M4 JDU. Tel: 067-335 7055

see

I

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a

ation |.am always a little dubious about the quality of the software but with this package two of the four are good. Let’s look at them

individually:

you ever play arcade games you will recognise Screaming Wings as a clone of 1942. Basically you take on the role of a lone pilot and single-handedly take on an entire Japanese airforce. If

YouraircraftisaLockheed Lightning and you take off

from the carrier where you are based at the beginning of each level. If you survive you must return there to land.

certain By ShOOtihg aircraft you can gain extra 7

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there are Other nasties: Gh05t5, QOhlihS and

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evil weevils. if you start to get low on energy, lUSt |00k for the knives and forks that will replace it bUt be careful hOt to tOUCh the walls as they are made Of anti-matter and make a bit Of a mess it touched. The graphics are well is it“? to

dloneand'fthe gafme 50 D ay,. yeu ancy gorng Fu22|e hunting th's ‘5 for

youhave read some strange mtrOdUCt'OhS for games m the past, hUt the one for Disc Hopper IS superb: “ZlOtZl has been stranded by the i

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strange

away Planetary system Of Bright Antares, HIS on|y .hope of survrval _'5 .to D'50 .HPP home. Th's involves ”ding the sub-etheric discs across the intergalactic spatial interstices” Did you get all that? Your ObleCt ‘5 to advance as

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(disc)

WHENEVER

...

Obtained by h0pping on to a diamond shape — but only on certain screens and then hopping off quickly. The game has a few curious features which include cheat pods—diamonds with a circle around them. If you —

stand on one of these and press fire you will go to the

next level.

Though original, this game did not have much else going for it. The concept of The Search is to retrievea magic ring hidden somewhere in the frozen wastes. You have to return it to the blue castle from where you set out. Control is by joystick and in the process of playing you will encounter different When this characters. occurs you are offered four of action: Flee, courses attack, greet or bribe. There are various objects that you can?nd to help you in your quest. The game also has a save feature that will allow you to store your programs on tape or disc. Y et as far as graphic adventures go this one suffrom both fers poor graphics and sound. Few compilations contain games of equal value and no this is exception. However, for the price this Four Star Compilation does give you your money’s worth. Neil Fawcett 6 Sound.................................. Graphies.........................,....

7

Clalyab'lllty...........................g Ozzillormoney................. 7 January 1988 Atari User

73


m

What

battle in the American Civil

Grant’s Program: Shiloh Trial in the West Price:£79.99 supp/fer;ss//Us Gold, Units 2/3 Ho/ford Way, Ho/ford, Birmingham 85 7AX. Tel: 027-355-3338 _

war.

Taking command ofeither army against the computer or a human opponent, you have the choice of playing at of three levels: any Introductory, intermediate or advanced. There are 15turns in each

UNTIL April 1862, General Grant's ascendancy in the American Union army had been relatively uneventful. But then came

battle

great

a

game, each

representing 90

minutes of realtime.Aturn is made up of a number of phases which are played out

that fateful

dawn when he and his 45,000-strong force was caught in a surprise attack by Confederate General Johnston and his army of

over a two-level, 30 x 30 square-gridded, scrolling map of the battleground. The terrain includes light and heavy woods, clearings, roads, ridges, creeks,

the Mississippi. So began the Battle of Shiloh—two days that were to prove Grant’s first real trial by fire. In this latest wargame

ravines, swamps,

streams,

orchards,

ford, river,

a

a

sunken road and Shiloh Church. The map can be viewed from long range giving a strategic view of the whole battlefield — or you can zoom in to have a tactical

from experts Strategic Simulations, you have the chance to determine the outcome of this historic

.

|t was enlarged smaller

look at an area.

There are four types of unit used: Infantry, cavalry, gun boats and artillery. Each of these is rated for manpower including guns if —

artillery— efficiency, morale, weapon type, ammunition, and other factors. The units are dis— tinguished on screen by specific shapes and colours. At the intermediate and advanced Ievels,the phases, in order of play, consist of command control, recovery

fatigue,

rally, reinforcement,

or

followed by two sets of Confederate and Union operations and combat phases, with a mid-point recovery phase intervening and

culminating

in

victory

a

determination phases. On the eighth turn only, an end-of-day phase also comes into play. Each phase offers

a

wide

variety of options and the game is extremely flexible in play.

not possible in a short review to do justice to the range of options, parameters and commands available and to the depth

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This

is

particularly

recommended if you want to realistically portray the fog of war. Within any of the three overall complexity levels, you may pick from any of five difficulty levels. Level three is historical and makes no modification to either

~‘

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fla-

to have certain units hidden from view, only becoming visible when moved adja— cent to during an operation

,

1

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vour of the intricacies, let rne list a few of the options open to you: You can elect

'

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.

complexity—and hence

.

.

the arrival

of Union reinbe varied and can choose you between a one- or the full two-day campaign.

forcements may

In

addition, a comprehen-

sive range of commands allows the player to, among other things, display help menus, save and load games, toggle between tac— tical and strategic maps, remove units to view the underlying terrain, centre the map aroundaunit, build a level of fortification, and view all squares that the designated unit can fire into the list goes on and on. The game’s algorithms are many and complex too.

For has

example,

each

leader

rating that is modified randomly each turn.The effectthis has is to make that command confused, indecisive, cautious or confident and this in turn affects the units. Fortunately, the accoma

bonus

panying documentation,

the form of page

a

in

glossy 60-plus

booklet, clearly

sets

out the instructions, back-

ground, complexities and ramifications. The game is supplied in

'

s

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It is

.

other levels affect the casualties inflicted in

“an

one

levels. This is one that you can turn to again and again and

represents excellent value

for money.

A

must

for all

afficionados.

side. The

gr

box and comes complete with a stiff map of the battlefield on the reverse of which is a handy reference guide. Shiloh is sure to be greeted with delight by all wargaming fans. It is flexible enough for beginners to play at a fairly basic level but true sophistication and challenge really becomes apparent at the higher

combat avour the player, four

?ve the

U n O n. i

Ammunition supply, the efficiency of the units and -

~

Chappell

and two

Confederate and

Bob

Documentation...................9

Graphics..............................7 Playability...........................9 Value for mane 9 overall

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determination—eveniftheir

(disc)

Supplier: Tynesoft, Addison Industrial Estate, B/aydon, Tyneand WearN5274TET9/5097'474 46”

“ALERT...AIert,

Delta

Base

to Star Ouest Priority DesCode Red..Code patch Red....”. Thus begins Mirax Force one of the best games to appear for a long time. Your mission is to fly Star Quest, your super star fighter, over the gigantic alien demothership, stroying as much of the —

superstructure as

pos-

Your goal is to annihilate the ship's main reactor. This sounds straightforward, but isnt and it beat me. As you attempt to destroy the mothership you are constantly buzzed by the defence fighters. These small craft attempt to eliminate you with monotonous .

,

.

.

mISSIlesmlssthe enemy WI” ram you. As well as avoiding the fighters you must negotiate tall pylons, buildings and shadowed objects. This addition makes the game extremely taxing. The inlay card outlines one of the features as very smooth bi~directional scrolling, but to the common mortal this means that the screen scrolls from left to right in a fashion very similarto Defender. The graphics are superb, the colours expertly used and together they make a stunning display. Intricate design work adds to the overall quality and style and a nice feature is that every time you lose a life the colours change. The sound effects are adequate but are lifted above the average by the digitised speech: On loading you are greeted With the message, “The battle begins”. .

Blast'ng _

.

_

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M'ss’"9““0"e .

P’grgcfizm'

Pricej£2,99 Supplier: Bug-Byte, Victory House, Leicester Place, London wczH 7NB. Tel: 014390666

RUSTY

is

a

rather young

droid, whose manufacture .

date wasn't that long ago, and he is more than a bit impetuous. You see, Rusty likes to explore. But one day, he got separ— ated from his companions, so he went for a look around, When he stuck his a hands into topodimensional converter and promptly disappeared, the main computer wasn’t all that surprised. ” Oh, well, another day, another droid," it muttered,

be

can

*

pearance. But Rusty wasn’t dead. In fact he was very much alive, but in a void, alone, except for surreal enemies whose only intent was his utter

annihilation.

His

only

chance was to run. What little he knew about dimensional converters —

which certainlywasn’tmuch —told himthatinaconstruct universe such as this, if he kept fighting and moving, it should stress the fabric of

the universe. in theory this should ensure that he would be thrown back into the real

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The credit for the quality of sound goes to 2-bit Systems’ Replay add-on (which was reviewed in the June 1987 issue of Atari User). More speech can be heard as you play, and it is always as crisp and clear as the

artwork. The sound, graphics and superb scrolling complement each other superbly. My only reservation is that, at times, movement was so fast had difficulty in telling what

opening message.

Even though the gameplay is difficult it is addictive. Billed as the ultimate shootA'em-up, with numerous levels featuring the very best of the Atari's graphic

The game has a oneplayer mode and usesajoystick plugged into port one. It’s response is very sharp, and this is necessary because at times you have to turn sharply to avoid the buildings or defence craft. Beware of too much acceleration or you’ll soon find yourself in deep trouble. Mirax Force is well pack— aged and the inlay card carries some very nice .

I

killed me.

capabilities

can

— l

only

agree. N eilFawcett .

,

Sounds

7”

G’aph’F?-~------~--~-----"""-"'-

Playablllty.........................10 Valueformoney.........,.......9 9

Overall

boring demde...

report detailing sudden disap-

-

_

,

“Faulty droid terminated”. Well, it saved a lot of time, and was far eaSier than a

$2

,

world. But how long will that take? Only you can

Rusty’s

.

.

_

and logged Rusty down in banks as, his memory

filing

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Product: MiraxForce Price: £7.95 (cassette) £395

B

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main sible.

i‘

That actual story covers

up for what basrcally is a strange kind of shoot—’em-

up. You control a small droid in the centre of the screen, and have to shoot anything that moves. The enemies float around you in an attempt to collide with you, thereby draining your power. To increase your life energy you have to make contact with the floating heart logos. These help, but not much and you have to collect a lot to make any gain at all.

The evil sprites you encounter come in various forms and colours you need to destroy them all to progress to the next level.

You may recogniseacouple ofthe sprites too. This is a weird of kind. anu it a little game, does get boring afterawhile. Though original, it soon becomes rather than annoying amusing. Overall, there's not really much there. it’s basic blast-

everything-in-sight and this is made simple by holding down the fire button

and in

waggling the joystick slow circles.

The sound are

and

gameplay

both very basic. Robert Swan

SoundG Graphics..............................y56

Clayablllty...........................:4 alue forMoney.................6 Overall.................................6 January 7988 Atari User 75


__ Good, but ~,i:

Four Great Games Przgram: Price: £3.99 (cassette) Supplier: Tynesoft, Addison Industrial Estate, Blaydon “upon Tyne, Tyne and Wear NEZ14TE. Telephone: 091-414 4611

not

great nd

de

Sa 2333L3:23: (12:22:22: you °°.me Natural'Y

millions of the little

II is

the

latest budget compilation from Tynesoft. wouldn’t necessarily agree that the l

Great. The four included are a but pretty mixed bunch there ShOU'd be something on offer here to entertain or amuse a 9°°d many' Mousetrap is a traditional platform game. You must guide Marvin the ravenous accolade

mouse

through

22 screens

to sniff out his favourite nibble, cheese. Naturally, it isn't going to be made easyfor you and all sorts of hazards and obstacles must be overcome

including dragons, flying

fried eggs, toilet rolls and

Christmas puddings. In each screen you must collect what appear to be flasks in order to gain access to the next one. The final one holds the giant wedge of golden cheese. Mice and cheese are a

slight departure from the more usual explorers and gems, but Mousetrap is hardly original. Despite being described in the packaging blurb as incredible graphic animation, the graphics are

only average and the sound a continuous wailing discordant tune is poor. It is nonetheless playable and pretty tricky too. Space Hawk is a well put

together vertically scrolling space shoot-’em-up.There’s not much plot, just pure unadultered mass murder. Flying the gunship Zebra you have to earn your stripes by exploring the planets in the neighbouring Solar System. The Star Council has given you licence to kill any hostile aliens, should you

76 Atari User January 1988

“My “a; 2

I

You have the ability to fly both up and down, and can also adjust your speed which can make for some pretty tricky manoeuvring. Despite the ostensibly peaceful nature of your —

FOUR Great Games

,

across devnls and of coursethey are all hostile well certainly never met a friendly one.

the actuality means that you must shoot anything that moves and just about anything that doesn’t. Captain Kirk would not have approved ”it sureYou start with a shield strength of 25 points which is gradually eroded by collisions with the kamikazi enemy space ships, each hit knocking off one point. To get to the next level the grounded space fleet must be destroyed, together with a substantial proportion of ground installations. The graphics are up to standard and the sound adequate, if not

exactly

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making Space Hawk

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good

and pleasing

game. played Who Dares Wins II last May and playing it again now, my opinion of it I

hasn’t improved. Armed with a rifle and a dozen hand grenades you have to single-handedly defeat the enemy. Working your way through a rather dismal landscape you must dodge lollipop trees, ponds and bullets on your way to the first enemy garrison. If you beat off its defences you will gain access to the next level for a bit more of the same. An extra life is awarded for each 10,000 points scored, but Who Dares didn’t hold my interest long enough to get that far. The pace is rather too slow, graphics poor and sound irritating in the extreme. Killa Cycle is altogether differentzThe visual presentation is simplistic to say the leastand the plot absolutely

minimal -just stay alive. It’s for one or two players, with

optional computer

con-

trolled opposition making the numbers up to four. Pressing Start clears the screen and four coloured lines appear, each moving at a steady pace. The computer-controlled lines move by their own volition and you control the direction and speed ofyour own, leaving a solid coloured trail in your wake. Neither you nor your

opponents can

move across

any trail and the objective is to keep moving without crashing hitting a trail means instant oblivion. With four players this soon becomes pretty tricky and careful coordination is necessary to keep going in the tightest corners. Players who crash disapthe screen, pear from together with their trail making more space available to the survivors. The —

last survivor is awarded maximum points and the others get points on a decreasing scale. This game continues until a pre-set total is reached. There are seven different screen layouts, rotated in turn with all but the first having blocks or small mazes to make life even more difficult. Although it’s a simple game in concept and presentation, found it surprisingly enjoyable,competitive and addictive — although quite where cycles come into it don’t know. At the price, Four Great I

I

Games

II

has to be

value for money.

good

Niels Reynolds

Sound

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Now with full Happy compatibility. Improved drive speeds up to TWICE normal loading speed. Reduction of drive WEAR and TEAR: whole tracks can be stored in the PLATE’s 16K of RAM. Supports Double, Dual and Single densities. Sector SKEW is no longer required to obtain HI-speed. Will run all available disk operating systems, (DOS), including: SPARTADOS, HAPPY WARP SPEED DOS AND OTHER HIGH SPEED SYSTEMS. The PLATE drive can also emulate other drives via its massive on board RAM including: IS/US DOUBLER, STANDARD 1050, ARCHIVER, HAPPY, LA ZER AND WA RP DRIVE. HI-SPEED reading and writing with special SIO gives an increase in speed by a factor of SIX!! Many special commands have been added to the SIG table.

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Instead of the old fashioned joystick, 'ACTION BUTTONS' control direction & fire BUT—this is neat - Star Trak has a second set of buttons which combine direction AND fire into one! STAR-TRAK'S fingertipcontrol enables even the 'learner’ to reach scores old fashioned joysticks can't reach.

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BOUGHT my first cartridge game an Atari system a long time ago VCS. At this time the company was relatively unknown in Britain, but the VCS was nonetheless a huge success.

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NEIL FAWCE Tl- IOOkS at SOf-tware that has stood the test of t|me

Soon after came the Atari home comwhen the games puters th.'s lavas age realalnd y arrived. some super b so it ' Ata" produce comto complement ‘ts

Wm

0nfew

gala"? puters.d\l_asth number: Zigzag; “xi: gopflrzrigy $2; rectilnd

to none despite their cost, a hefty £30 or so. Then suddenly the ca rtri dgebased games I°St the" appeal, the discs of_ W mainLybecause‘of were 0 eaper adiaent an eaSIer to

i:

pr; 1?“

t

d

h

.

I“

w:..z.;z'1¢",:;:,z.3"zzwe; ware had to change 1:02) Why settle

for

cartridge'game when a superb 64k game disc and produce it more cheaply? Marys” ?rst major success was in the ?eld Of arcade games' WhICh a

good

16k

you could write .

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,

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meant

of

the

cartridge-based packs Coin-op conversions.

that

were

many

smoothly. Most home micros offer

early Atari

versions of this game, but none is as spectacular as the Atari one. Stunning graphics, fabulous sound effects and its awesome speed make this one a winner.

The best of these have become leg-

endary and entertained millions of Atari users world-wide. Not all the conversions met w'th acclaim, m“ stories far outnumber the

GAL AX' AN

tgiileusuccess

No? with

the release of the new XE Games Console, Atari is attempting to bring the cartridges back into the limelight — at an attrac-

The ultimate sequel to the early Space Invaders shoot-'em-u‘p. Galaxnan first appeared in arcades m 1979 and met

,

The

This means that

people new to the world of Atari will get a chance to play the classics that made these computers popular |n the o|d days and kept me up until late in the morning. So let's take a look at some of the old favourites that may again become blockbusters.

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Aliens have invaded your home planet and you have to fly around destroying them and rescuing the stranded humans before the aliens mutate them... The object of the game is simple: Fly around in your super sleek space fighter blasting the aliens with your laser cannon or obliterating the entire screen with your smart bomb. The screen scrolls from left to right very .

.

CENTlpEDE In 1981 Atari Coin-Op introduced game in arcades. it was converted for the Atari 8 bit range was very popular indeed. You are in a garden with a

original

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bug

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M you haven’t played Pacman you haven't lived it’s the ultimate in maze games and the inspiration of If

countless clones. When released in the arcades it caused total paranoia as addicts flocked to play it. had many a late night scurrying round the maze eating the pellets and attempting to avoid the hungry ghosts. But when late the power-pill it was my turn to do the eating!

78 Atari User January 7988

and

and you have to kill the centipedes as they come down the screen, but you are hindered by the

JOU ST

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this later

sprayer,

f

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all the

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Atall conversion retained

characteristic qualities and charm of the original, and superb graphics and animation enhanced the playability. after years of playing the game IEve_n It 3 Still a pleasure to watch wave after wave Of alien nasties majestically gliding down the screen in an attempt to destroy you. Even if you don't rate shoot’-em-ups it’s impossible not to like this one.

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mounted. You are treated to stunning graphics and sound: The noise and animation of the birds are beautifully done and the playing field constantly changes. Playing the computer is fun, but the game comes into its own when you have a live opponent.

b“

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In this novel arcade conversion you are mounted on a giant bird. You have a jousting lance hence the title and you must do battle with other knights who are similarly

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of the most peculiar

is one

ever played on the Atari

not the most exciting, but certainly the most enjoyable.Originally written as an arcade funny, the conversion has kept all the humour. The game play is simple — you have to earn points by tunnelling your way through the earth.

-

_

quickly to inflate them until they explode a little bit gruesome per—

H

,

Appearing on screen are bonus vegetables, and if you eat them before they disappear you can

E

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score up to 8,000 points. Living in small caves are monsters like Pooka the intelligent tomato that can kill you with a single touch. You can kill the monsters by dropping boulders on their heads or by pumping the fire button

haps—but different.

All in all this is a very amusing game and great for the kids.

-

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are can spray up and

move your bug screen as well as left to

down the

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MISSILE COMMAND ‘

right

—thiswasanew conceptin shoot-’emups when the game was released. This version hasn't quite got the style of the arcade original but it is

In this game one of the most challenging have ever played you need lightning reactions as you attempt to save six cities from destruction by in-coming nuclear mis—

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.

certainly entertaining and challenging.

Here is one of the simplest games you could ever play and one of the most addictive. All you have to do is colour in 75 per cent of the screen simple. However’ you are hindered as you do this Qix that

As yet another arcade conversion this only differs from the original in

Li‘yetii’ifv’;Esa'ii??ifi'i?jé‘fé‘lgé‘g122 you draw. If these or the Qix touch you you lose a life. lines

STAR RAIDERS I

first bought

a

You take the role of a starship commander who has the simple task

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of saving the universe from total destruction and all before breakfast. The game is joystick controlled, but you also have a range of single-key

been said that the early of Atari computers can be attributed to this game after all}; a computer is only as good as theseft ware written for it. It has success

16k Atari 400 got a joystick and this game. There has never been a challengequite like it and never one that fits quite as snugeg into an 8k rom.

When

_

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——

commands,

Several years and numerous joy— sticks have not even dented my pas— sion for this one. Many games have attempted to match it but none have succeeded.

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DONKEY KONG

micro. You play the part of Mario, the maintenanceman, and you have to rescue your girlfriend from the gigantic gorilla Donkey Kong. This is made

difficult

because he is con-

stantly throwing barrels at you as you climb up each screen. You can jump over them or splat them using

one

_

a

?

ft,

~

at -—

H

of the sledgehammers positioned around the levels. Due to the tremendous success of this game a follow-up Donkey

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This is one of the first and, for me, one of the best platform games ever to be converted to a home

ha.“

missile

ygu fontrol rnstea 0 three and use a J°y§twk instead ofa trak-ball. versrons Later to use Ata” allow'you Trak-ball by pressing Control+T to put you into the right mode. It’sa game that every Atari owner new xe tems come With it bU|lt m.

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.

bouncesaround

one

that

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£552 Miss 7

15,

was released and this Kong Jr also appeared on cartridge. In this version you play the son of Donkey Kong and you are out to rescue your dad who has been locked in a cage by Mario. The game play is similar and as much fun as the first. These are two very classy games. —

'

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January 7988 Atari User

,~

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microlinlt in association with

-

7,4_*,,,

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_

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lTELECOMGOLDlff-EfféJE— 7——

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A NEW users grom: has been set up on MicroLink to help UK farmers make better use of their computers. The British Farm Computer Users’ C”it'OUP is being organised by Andrew COOleYi who is PI’OiGCt CO'OI'dthO" for on-farm

systems With the Milk Marketing Board.

“My experience is that many farmers are already exploring the potential of micros beyond their use in

.

f

MOVIng W’th the t'mes .

l

ONE of Britain's largest' removals specialists has joined MicroLink in order to improve communications between its wide— spread offices. a subsidiary Scotpac of P810 International Removals ships by —

day-to-day management", he said, “but they suffer, perhaps more than managers in any other business, from the isolation inherent in farming itself. The pri-

—g

E-

mary aim of BFCUG is to overcome this isolation. We want farm computer to be able to share their ideas and experiences and get the maximum value from these immensely powerful management tools". MicroLink is At first providing a farming section on its bulletin board, but eventually BFCUG will become a closed user group on the system. Support for the new users

V_

think of,

can

,

“1 Of a fzom ouseafsmgle 'ftem_[59 ”(3:2 $75; an h s 15 t thpBYt' e "d eposm ”is 363 plus branches "7 Austra/la, New Zealand, and k

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eEast. tevanZ/(lj'z'dfourhAfnca are now a bl e to to each se’nd mes/$43,935 at icroblnk telex mal an der VIE; e ectronlc '

ill,

serwces.

_

Scotpac has Installedat

least one mm"? “3" modem at each 0f_ "3 depots, and (73? eight microsystemsmitsGlas90W headquarters. if all adds UP .t° some very busy M'CfOLmk last year mailboxes Scotpac handled more than 20,000 ln_le_Idua/ shipments W?’9hm9 a total 0f21 inf/”0” lbs. _

Sum-It. Special terms are being

arranged for farmers subscribing to MicroLink and and a reduced BFCUG subscription will also apply for existing MicroLink users who join BFCUG before the end of this year. -—

The

0 o m m s boom l” the heavens

In

.

AMATEUR astronomers are at the rate The reason is that nothing

beats means

mail

as

a

electronic Of getting to know about the latest happenings in the heavens.

A constant stream of astral activity means he also

needs to produce twiceweekly newsletters detailing all the fresh sightings reported by the Smith-

Institute in America. “When it is processed and distributed by conventional means, this information is often quite dated by the sonian

reaches our said GUY HUfSt”MicroLink has,

YOUR chance

speeded up the transmission of news from America. A paging device alerts me each time a telex message arrives from the Smithand

i

don’t waste

a

relaying it via

moment Email.

the behind Initiative booming interest in MicroLink comes from GUY HUFSt, editor of The Astronomer, a monthly magazine With an international readership.

time it

'

sonian

readers", however,

a

f IaSh SHROPSHIRE

joining MicroLink of ten a month.

f ax

-

fgghtszifxzearg$215,581“

world ou everything

organisation has come from Dr John Craven, head of the Milk Marketing Board’s farm management services, and from leading farm software suppliers Farmplan and

“Those of our members

entrepreneur

has come_up Duncan Baker With a novel idea for getting more mileage out of his

MicroLink subscription.

He is using the system to help him operate a faximile service from his office in

Lydbury.

“Basicallywe need thefax machine for our own pur-

with MicroLink facilities can often accessinformation the

poses", said Duncan, pro-

day it reaches me -but others have to wait until one of my newsletters arrives by post. That’s why so many astronomers are keen to join MicroLink.

English Centre, “but we have a fair amount of spare

same

“People

in places

as

far

away as Sweden, West Germany, Australia and New

Zealand

are now

receiving the Email version of my newsletters. This means they are often able to study new phenomena within hours of a first sighting something not possible before we joined MicroLink".

to 10m MICI‘OLInk

--

prietor of the Lydbury capacity.

“Seeking to help cover our costs we’ve started a fax service priced at roughly half that of other local agencies". The service Duncan offers includes receiving text via

MicroLink electronic mail

or

telex, printing it out on plain paper or letterhead and distributing it by fax. And of course this procedure also operates in reverse when

required.

Page 8

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ANYONE who has played Yahtzee will know just how addictive it is. In this computerised version of the original dice game, points are gained by rolling five dice and holding those that seem the most useful. After a total of three full throws — irrespectiveofthe number of dice held you choose the category into which you want to enter the dice combination. The available categories are shown in Figure and your final score is displayed once all these are all ?lled, If the dice fall well after the first or second throw of a turn, just hold them all and select Throw again. After each set of three throws your score must be even if it entered into a category means you get no points. This program has been written with brevity in mind, and is fully controlled by the joystick using Fire to select or de-select dice held or to choose the category. Various prompts indicate what to do, and the program scores itself. Even if you have never played the game before you will soon get the idea—and then have problemstearing yourself away from it. The challenge is simple: Score the maximum 346. With

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which character to print Validate selected category and total

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number of ones number of twos number of threes number of fours number of fives number of sixes

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Available categories

Total of ones Total of twos

,

Total of threes

Total of fours Total of sixes Totai of all dice

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50

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Total of two Total of dice Total of dice Total of dice

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24 15 18

20

Turn to Page 22 P January 7988 Atari User 21


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MOST programs require input from you at some stage, even if it's only to select a game level, or supply 3 yes/no answer. Complex software often has a wide range of options to choose from, and in these circumstances a mouse-controlled menu offers significant advantages over standard keyboard input. The mouse moves a cursor around the screen, without affecting anything that's already printed there— usually a menu of available options. You position the cursor over the option you want, then pressa button to select it— there’s no keyboard entry whatsoever, so you can’t accidentally type something which will crash the program. A mouse can be used where keyboard input is difficult — for example on graphics screens without text windows so many people will find it much less daunting than an array of

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In

The

ST series 3” contain an operating system which is specifically designed for mouse control. No such luck with the 8 bit range, unfortunately' but it is possible to emulate _

many mouse features using an ordinary Joystick- Atarl's artist pro— gram Paint employs this technique to select colours and textures.

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Basrc program IS The runningeursor's horizontal and vertical coordinates are returned in two addresses at the top of page 6, so there's no problem keeping track of a

position,and you can defineawindow anywhere on screen to confine it.

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make letter-matching, word-finding, counting or other educational games 26 Atari User January 7988

|n

fwd—

-

-

cursor

routines

for small children who cannot yet read or write. It's also valuable for applications involving the general public, such as fund-raising events or shop demonstrations, where the computer console can be locked well away from

marauding fingers. contains the main Program routine. It’s mainly machine code, so take great care typing the data stateI

and be sure to save a copy run it for the first time. Line 10 reserves eight pages above screen memory to hold all the data. The first four act as a buffer to protect the machine code from those commands which erase data above RAMTOP. Clear screen and Graphics commands will erase the first 64 bytes ments,

before you

man MOUSE

1

omen aourws

SIMON

2

REM

BY

3

REM

(c)ATARI

MILLER USER

10 S=PEEK(106)‘4:POKE l“6,s-4:GRAPHICS

B:SZ=S*256 23

X=B

FOR

T0

348:READ

D:POKE $2+X,D:N

EXTX DATA 104,154,104,141,7,212,141,245, 6,26,”5,2,l33,284,133,206,169,B,133,2

SB

03 49

in the reserved area, while scrolling a text window will erase a total of 800 bytes. If there is no risk from these commands in your Basic program you can change the second statement in line 10 to POKE 106,S and this saves you 1k of memory. The next four pages hold the playermissile table but, as always, the first 384 bytes are not used for player or missile data, so we can store all the machine code there. The routine wedges itself into the vertical blank interval and is therefore executed automatically every fiftieth of a second. This means that the routine does not steal any of Basic’s processing time, so program speed is not affected and the program will run happily no matter what Basic is doing.

4,ll9,253,6,2ll5,249,6,144,3,173,249 14A DATA 6,141,255,6,173,12D,2,41,4,ZD 8,20,173,254,6,56,237,253,6,2E5,248 15” Milk 6,176,3,l73,248,6,l4l,254,6,2 08,25,173,120,2,41,8,298,18,173,254 160 DATA 6,24,189,253,6,2E5,247,6,144, 3,173,2L7,6,141,254,6,172,255,6,169 170 DATA 32,145,205,2M,145,205,2M,16v 9,248,155,2ll5,2lil,169,32,165,205,2M,1

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DATA

130 um 245,6,2D8,5,141,D,2as,m,6,1 73,254,6,141,?,268,162,15,189,0,208 196 DATA 2D8,1D,202,16,248,169,D,1Ll,2 51,6,240,11,138,1B,1?,1?,1?,29,?,208 DATA 141,251,6,m,3D,208,76,98,22

[117A,255,6,169,3,141,29,208,169,46,141,gala 6253A2A1zélgggl?7?41,249,6,169,17,141 , , , , , 41,247,6,169,49,141,24

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am 6,169,14,141,192,2,169,2,161,2 53,6,165,1D2,174,245,6,169,7,32,92 8D DATA 228,96,173,254,6,208,6,141,D,2 70

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Listing

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Main mouse program

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9 DATA llg,76,98,228,173,25266§§?§éz,;69,2 141,245,612“ I I I 46, , 17 6

'15r169,9'1“r2‘6'61173'245'6'73'1

The cursor can flash atarate ofyour choice, or remain unblinking, and it’s easy to switch the entire mouse system on Or Off at different pornts In your Basic prOQram. You could also use this routine to _

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2,208

The routine described here will move a p|aye,_missi|e cursor, under mode, even while

SIMON MILLER has a handy line

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Line 210 starts everything off. The first number in brackets is the address of our machine code. The second is — of the the address high byte only player-missile table, and the final two parameters specify where the cursor will initially appear on screen, horizontal followed by the vertical position. The values shown will place it centrally. You will normally want to tailor the .. mouse parameters for your spelelc the 11 at top application, so addresses of page 6 are used as registers, and you can change the values in nine of these to suit yourself. Table shows the function of each address. 1781 and 1782 are used, along with page zero addresses 205 and 206, as counters and pomters. —

I

minimise this problem, keep the value below 4, and use the centre of the cross, not its arms, to indicate your target. Address 1788 controls the cursor flashing routine. Its default value is 0, which keepsthe cursor unblinking,but any other number will start it flashing at the rate specified by that number. Values between 2 and 8 should prove suitable. Theflash rate is also affected so address 1789 by cursor speed you will usually need to set these two

you’re on target. Rememberthatallthe initialisation for

two-line resolution PM graphics has to 3 been done for you, and players are available. 1

“51mg "3 _Add't'0n_a|_ program to add men“ Opt'ons to I-'5"‘9' _

.

parameterstogether.

Address 1789 controls the speed of the cursor movement, and it is initially set to 2. It governs the number of times the cursor moves during each vertical blanking interval, and you can

Counter (do not " ?tter) Counter (do not alter} Cursor window right border . lftb or d d C or er ursor Cursorwindowten w!" ow ° om 5rd Cursor Window top border Colour overlap detector Flash rate Cursor speed Current horizontal position Current vertical po sition

Table

H

V‘

259

if

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-

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-

4

.

.

.

.

|

page 6registers

Don’t alter any of these, or the program will crash. The default values in 1783 to 1786 allow the cursor to move anywhere on-screen, but you can use these registers to define a restricted window. For example, POKE 1783,91 will stop the cursor descending into the text window at the bottom of a

graphics screen.

Address 1787 lets you use colour, rather than cursor position, to detect which menu ltem has been chosen. When the cursor overlaps one of the four possible playfield colours—either a text mode letter or a map mode plxel — the number shown in Table H is

returned. This value is updated only once

menu item has been chosen. The values refer to positions on the player-missilegrid, and do not correspond to row or column numbers in any Graphlcs mode. Your BaSIC pro-

gram

can

them

translate

enough into

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COLORO

65 66

(708) (7°91

comm

Default colour Orange

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311 POSITION 32l1 POSITION 33” POSITION 341 POSITION 351 POSITION

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Table

//;

Cursor/Playf/e/d overlap

during each vertical blank period, though the cursor may move several times. You might therefore get an apparently false reading when the cursor is close to, but not actually

touching,

a

playfield colour.

.

.

To

Slnce you can use any. Graphlcs mod-e, the chonces may be Indlcated by plctures, or icons, rather than words.

Although the program

primarily

mouse, the fast, cross would make gunsight in arcade-type

intended to drive

smoothly moving an ideal

is

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current

vertical position429

IF VP<21

AND

IF

VP<37

AND

,12,4:GOTO 510 1,59 IF vp<45 AND

nates, if necessary. 1790 is also used asaswitch. Poke it with 0 to turn the mouse routine off and remove the cursor from the To switch it back on, do screen. line another US_R call like the one in. 210, With dlfferent values for horizonif tal and vertical position you wish. The additional Ilnes of Baslc in Proshow a simple application gram using the mouse system to select a colourfor the text window. Plug ajoystick into port and use it to position the cross anywhere along the menu line you want, then press the trigger. 3 410 onwards check Lines

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361 POSITION 371 POSITION 38“ POSITION

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1731 1782 1783 1784 1785 1786 1787 1788 1789 1790 1791

__

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1 t“ ‘° ”gm 22” “5” Add ”“5 set up a demonstration lllenu. 23“ GRAPHICS 2:POKE 559 46:REH must re -set DHACTL after ever/GRAPHICS comma nd. 241 REM Set up window for cursor moved

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_________________—__.—___——January 7988 Atari User 27


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recorded games.

the console ANDRE WILLEY takes an m-depth look at the Atarl XE systems

f

FOLLOWING last month's overview of the new Atari XE games console and keyboard, let's take a more detailed look at how it performs and what you can expect if you decide to buy one. As you probably know by now the XE system is supplied in two versions The first is the straightforward games console with joystick and built-in Missile Command. In this configuration you could, in fact, add both a tape deck and a disc drive, but you'd Only be able to use them to load pre-

ettl ng |nS|de

'

most of the peripherals available for 8 bit range— but more ofthat later. Let’s start by looking at the console

the

from the outside. Most of the standard I/O connections are present, including the now obligatory two, rather than four, joystick sockets, the 13-pin serial l/O port and the 7-pin Din power socket which, incidentally, uses the same power supply module as the rest of the XL and XE range. Also present are the TV output — phono socket with detachable RF cable and two new sockets, composite video and audio out. These always used to be part of a 5-pin Din socket which also included chromiance and luminance (colour and brightness) signals but neither are all that likely to be missed. —

That said, the difference in my

between cassette and cartridge based software would quickly offsetthe price

of an XC12 tape deck. The second package comes with joystick, light gun, plug-in keyboard and the Bug Hunt cartridge game making a 64k 8 bit computer which, in practical terms, is almost identical to the old 800XL. In addition, you also

get the cartridge version of Flight Simulator ll a very well respected —

aircraft emulator game which uses both joystick and keyboard. Those interested in the games angle might like to note that Missile Command will run very effectively with a Track-Ball. What you don’t get, however, is a find a little tape deck, which surprising as this pack is being sold as a programmer-oriented item. But you do now have the basis of a complete computer system and you can add I

Convenient The cartridge socket is on the top of the machine as with the XL series, and is much more convenient than the awkward rear-mounted system used on the 130XE. it should take all XL/XE cartridges, including the sophisticated bank selecting ones such as Actionl, Mac/65 and Basic/XE. The final socket, which has never been featured on an Atari 8 bit machine before, is a 15-way D socket tp allow connection of the removable keyboard. Unfortunately for any serious com>

Current Atari Computer/ConsolePackages

m—m

XES 3001 XES 4001

”mm-Light

Price ,

.

579-99 Console,

keyboard, joystick, Flight Simulator //

Keyboard, X6 12 data recorder, 10 games on two tapes . gun and Bug Hunt cartridge 728k computer, XC12 data recorder, 130XE joystick and 10 games on two tapes 65XE 64k computer, XC12 data recorder,joystick and 10 games on two tapes

£59.99

(Dixons/Currysspecial offer)

28 Atari User January 1988

discs.

find this to be an unacceptable cost-cutting exercise. After all, how much would it have cost to leave a I

or even the edge connector PCB itself protruding from the rear ofthe casing? In orderto save a few pence Atari has eliminated the possibility of using the XE console as a serious computer system. Other than this one little niggle found the new unit, with it’s elegant detachable keyboard, to be a marked over the older improvement machines. Certainlythe quality of both the television and composite video simple edge

of the

l

outputs show

a marked improvement the rather faint and slightly blurred 130XE display. The sculptured keyboard has an excellent feel with a light but very positive action. The layout is the same as that of the 130XE, with the exception of the function keys which are now

over

round, pastel-shaded buttons along

the top of the unit. It would, however, have been nice if Atari had marked the keys with both the control key graphics and the international character set rather than just the graphic set. NOW let’s see what's under the [16W b°””e‘ ‘ s“"’”3i”9'y "me i” fa“ '” essence the only difference you're likely to notice at first is the fact that Missile Command is now built into the the operating system the self-test and a

ggttines rom

.

4!-

puter users Atari has not allowed any expansion of the machine by rather short-sightedly omitting the parallel bus which has been present on all Atari 8 bit for the last six years. This means you can't add any of the now very common memory boards, fast I/O modifications or even such mainstream computer products as hard

cage |p

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Reset

2

_

Composite Video out

Command, Self-test

chip

s"

,

Rom: OS, Basic, Missile

{is

,

Colour sub-carrier crystal

Antic

(CPU)

XE games console internal layout

the default is to run Missile Command. Hold down Option and you’ll get the self-test mode, Select gives you Basic (for all the good it will do you without a keyboard) and Start givesa cassette boot. .

The Operating SYStem

show the correct XE layout, rather than that of the old 1200XL. This probably explains the major modifications to the OS which exist at $CA54 to $C855. However, the Break key still doesn’t show up correctly on the test. The power-up and system reset routines have some extra code patched in at $C865 to take note of the

if

h

detects the

resence

of

the defauitppower-up kebbeoaoril

a

is

Option gives YOU self-test mode. Select gives Missile Command, Start requests a tape |oad and, as with previous Atari machines, the buttons may be used in combination —such as Start and Option to override Basic when you load a machine code game. The first thing did when received my console was to check which revision of the operating system was being used. Dated May 7, 1987 it has the same internal code as the 13ox|5 (BB/001), but is entitled Revision 4,o_| don't know what happened to Revision 3_ The differences between Revision 4_o and the XL/XE 03 are purely cosmetic - most of them being in the self-test routine. The latter's initialise locations at $5003 and $5000 have been moved to $5000 and $5006 respectively, and the keyboard template has been altered to Basic and

i

i

new

configurations such as booting with Missile Command. I’m not sure why Atari bothered, since the modified handler doesn’t seem to be able to cope correctly With the game in possible

par-

to interface with the XL/XE parallel bus is still present. All that seems to have been altered are some vectors at $E49E

in

other words, there’s a

large

chunk of totally wasted rom inside the XE console—besides the self—test, that is.

any case. For example, if you boot the system with Missile Command and then press Reset you will be dropped back into self-test, and the next time you try you'll be returned to either Missile Command or Basic depending upon Whether YOU have a keyboard attached. Fortunately, when you’re working in Basic the Reset handler seems pretty reliable. The only thing worth mentioning is the patch at $C890 which enables the cassette handler to look for the Start key as well as Return to start cassette I/O. This was added at the last moment after a frantic plea from Atari UK saying that users without the keyboard add-on wouldn’t be able to boot

commercial games

Strangely enough, most of the driver code designed

aIIel device

tapes.

The hght gun The only new item in the packageis the llght gun and this comes Wlth His — own Bug Hunt game cartridge the available. The game only currently firing range Will depend on your TV set, but managed to get a ‘comfort10feet away from my 27m screen able .

.

.

I

With

no problems. V we re to believe Atafl S adverts, It the appear gun would that fires_an InVISIble the teIeViSion beam oflight‘at — screen. This is not strictly true what the happens actually i_s_that TV_set fires a completely VISIble beam of light at the gun. .

|f

As you will know if yo‘U’ve followed in some of the more technical articles Atari User, a TV set works by scanning 6 pinpoint of light across the screen, .

Turn to Page 30 > January 1988 Atari User 29


-————————R2VIGW few ideas for using the light gun in your own games programs. So much forthe hardware, but what does the Atari computer enthusiast who wants to keep up with the Joneses get for his or her money?

you have pulled the trigger or not.The trigger status shows up very simply as

4 From Pa g e29

movement on one of the joystick lines. The switch used is of the normally closed variety, so the trigger pressed condition will register a value of 15 at STICK(0), with the default result being 14 exactly the opposite a

it up as it goes along. This beam starts at the top left and moves across the screen until it reaches the end—at which point it goes backto the left hand edge and starts again one line lower down. Some fiftieth of a second later this process has reached the bottom and the whole things starts again. Because our eyes don’t react fast enough, we see it as one solid image

lighting

to what you’d except from

—-

A GOLD

C

a“

.

Cruse,

2235 1195 2295 25.95 25.95 25.95 25.95 22.95 15.95 25,99 25.99 95.00 17.00 17.00

Warship

Conquest ..

Kamigruppe

Printshop Graphics Disc Graphics Disc II Platform Perfection 895 Beer + Dropzone + Caverns I

“3“ “95 895 Shoot 'sm up 895

Raid

Moscow Head ||

01,3.-

1195 11,95 1195 11.95 11.95 1195 11.95

795

Remy "

Phantasy Gettysburg Panza Grenadier War

in

Cm

PUISUI'1295

ELECTRIC

Russia

ENGLISH SOFTWARE Smash Hits Vol. 5 995 Smash Hits Vol. 6895

‘Phone for availability

30 Atari User January 1988

Cass.

03“-

DREAMS

Cass.

895

Pilot

Tomahawk.....................u.u.......8.95 NOVAGEN Cass. Mercenary 795 Second City 535 Comp.

Pack------------12-95

"75° An

Aztec795

Dept

Green Beret795 INFOCOM Station Fall Hitchhikers Guide to the

Disc 1295 12.95

Gaiaxy.,...,..

Honor

Lurklng

MASTERTRONIC

5.99 6.99 25.95

Clss.

On Cue

_

Storm 130

Clss....2.99 1.99

299

Amaurote 299

grim """"“""211115113-..m---2,99 ml? Hem

Last

V8

Ninja

SWAT Molecule Man1.99 Crystal Raiders 199 Gun Law 199

Fransis1.99

1

”111,299 1,99

895 oi

Jewels Disc 1295 Disc 1295 Dlsc 10.95 12.95 Dlsc 1095 8-95 1495 Disc 125° 19-00

SpyVSpy I895 Boulder Dash Construction Klt..8.95 Cass. IMAGINE/OCEAN Arkanoid 795

‘6-95 16.95 25-95 2295 ég-gg

Cass.

Havver Bower199 RAINBIRDIFIREBIRD Druid

16-95

Spindizzy 895 DIGITAL INTEGRATION Fighter

Disc

1.99

DaylighIsu-~-----v----------------3-95

LIYing TIIVIa'

‘1'95

Set

Ggrrntgeaxnsu'ucbon Leaderboard Toumament....,,,,...4.99 Gauntlet Deeper Dungeon ..-.....4.99 War

DOMARK

Graphics

10.95

01

“em“

Cass

SPY V,SPY

Fire Vietnam Gaun?etags Field

OODE MASTERS BMX Simulation Red Max1_gg

Mercenary

Leaderboard 795 Super Huey 895

Cass.

ACTIVISION Ghostbusters 895

DATABYTE

......6.00

Summer Games Arcade Classics 795 Temple 01 Apshai Trilogy Beach

DI

223;

2218 Baker Street Bmadsides U.S.A.A.F. Computer Ambush Carrier Force Colonial Wizards Crown Battle of Antitam

If, on the other hand, you are more of a computer novice who is looking for a cheap but very sophisticated games playing console with an amazing range of superb software and the possibility of upgrading to a full computer at a later stage you've definitely got the right machine. —

A

221 Cannock Road, Chadsmoor, Cannock, Staffs W811 200. Tel: (05435) 79099

Rebel Charge game

1295 12.95 12.95 Disc 11.95 msc 22.95 22-95 2295 Disc

Cass

DISC

1295

1295

Darkness

and

light gun

a

£29.99.

very attractively

a

package with

Missile Command built in, but no possibility for expansion of the 64k memory, or of adding any high-speed peripherals. Neither do you get any form of storage medium such as tape or disc with the package. Alternatively you could pop down to your local branch of Dixons or Currys and buy a 65XE computer (including an XC12 tape deck, joystick, 10 games and that all important expansion connector) for £99.99. Then, if you really want one, you can pick up the light gun and the Bug Hunt game for

joystick.

a

you’ll get

designed

The horizontal position of the gun is always available by PEEKing location 564 ($234), and the vertical position is at 565 ($235). The vertical location is easiest to use it registers 6 at the top of the screen and 123 at the bottom. Horizontally, the gun will register between 85 and 95 at the left of the screen. This value will then increase to about 227 two-thirds ofthe way across at which point it will drop back to zero and start counting up again to between 20 and 30. It’s always best to work out the correct values for your own television but you must remember to use a formula to calculate the true horizontal value. Next month I’ll show you a

rather than a fast moving dot of light. The Atari, on the other hand, is quite fast enough to see the momentary flash of light. When the dot reaches the area of the screen you are currently pointing the gun at a small photodiode in the gun registers the pulse back to the Antic chip in the computer. Antic then does some pretty rapid calculations to work out where the dot is at that precise moment and you have your light gun location. Light pens work in exactly the same way. This calculation happens whenever the gun is pointed at the TV set it is the software which deCides whether

US

Well,

1282

1295 1295 geld raIDThteves 15'95 Th?awfam Disc GREMLIN "é'?xia'i'l'ié'é'mwwcase.

Sprong 695 Gumbies Crisis..,.....,...................695 Screaming Wings...............,,,.,,.6.95 SUBLQGIC Flight simulator Ii

8.95 8.95 9.95 Disc 39.95

Jsjgarf'am'sw

2182

'

the Mouse Detective..........8.95 Blazer 795 Footballer oi the Year ........,..,.....a.95 Cass. SYSTEM 3 International Karate 550 Basil Trail

SEGA Zaxxon

“NEW”

Pooyan 995

CHS-

ca’s-

.

Dams

W‘"SF:'C5M""""""“'"'5'95 “2° °n'y"'""”é'§5 ?hzgfneedway DATABASECHSS Of?ce II MICROPROSE Service 995 Silent F-15 Strike Eagle 395 Mini

Solo

Flight Con?ict in C._D.S.

5m"

Cass.

895 Vietnam II

12.95 Cass. SOFTWARE FWM" -~--~-----~‘2-95

C'WSIhs Coiiosus Chess

IV

895

gumdeaI Ugma I" urtima

SOFTWARE Millepede Defender Donkey Kong Jnr—

Cass. _______— —

m

Cass. RED RAT SOFTWARE Devils 695 Littie Night Mares 695 ~~-~~-----~----6-95

Compilation

1

2

232 695

imp-131192 Space Lobster

2's;

War Hawk Football Manager Master Chess Micro Rhythm

8'95 395 18.50

Disc

299 1

99

1.99

Nifggnzosg‘ggmmggm A,” 52054 FM £295

Disc

Disc 16-95

,

Cass. 1.99 1.99 199

HARDWARE

Disc

10.95 10.95 10.95 16.95

TITLES

Soccer Colony

LXBOO £24900 Epson Femuson CMeos Manhunt, £209.00 X012 mane unit * green hem £34.00 130XE Computer pack incl. Computer XC12 software a joystick £13530 cx77 Touch Tablet 1:49.00

PHONE

Disc

LATEST PRICES

FOR

ST F

,

1.

.,

.

1

ST

Software lee OI." udvert the Atari ST User

In

Disc

1295 9.95

3.95 Disc

8.95 8.95 895

price I! comet n time 01 going to Access or ya“ me" welcome.

Al

13.82

cmriages

Joust

9.95

'

BUDGET

1232 16.95 16.95

IV

ATARI

DISC

12.95 Cass.

ORIGIN

1295 11.95 12.95 Disc 10.95

P

”?rst:«new ”My” ?x“"rev-“egg °

{mm MILES Phone

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orwrite ior comprehensive stock Atari and ST software 5 hardware

2...

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8.95

press.

°"""

A

$432.55 LAST

list

(or

.


U t i Ii ty

——————————————

"t'm'es W.°"‘ MPST scree" dump With 62-sector uncompressed files, and this program converts other types of picture files into this form. It’s an ideal companion to the poster printer in this issue. Once converted, files will also load into the AtariArtist art package. Type in the program and use Get it Right! to correct any typing errors. When it is first run you will be presented with a menu of the different picture formats the program can use see Figure |. You select option four if you want to see the disc directory. Once you have chosen a suitable format for your picture, you will be asked to enter the source filename the one you want to convert and the destination filename the one you’re creating—ofthe picture. It is important to note that if they are both the same, the original will be overwritten. After the filename has been given, the picture will be loaded and you press 8 to save it as a 62-sector file.

DANBY

GRANVILLE

_

_

to convert

f|les

plcture

pROGRAM

BREAKDO

picture form?“ ?lenames géztszaurce and

120'210

220280 290-450 470-510 521)‘600 510‘650

55°

Get source

destinationture

dispiav the ap‘gmecmr me Read in and as 091 SaVe the picture routine t Disc directory for a keV routine the LOOP to wait data for mpusave Machine code _

,,

VARIABLE

DUM

Dummy bytes to "1 beT‘Ore picture irsead

Graphic Art Department

10

REM

20 30 40

REM

tttttttmrrtmtttttt

REM REM

50 REM 60 DIM 70 FOR

POKE

*

2910

REM

**********************

300

OPEN

FN$(20),DA$(20),FN2$(20) X=1536 T0 1567:READ Y:POKE X,Y:

310 320

IF

4,9,2:SETCOLOR

80 GRAPHICS 0:3ETCOLOR

2,0,0:POKE 752,i 90 POKE 82,0 100 POSITION

11,3:1

"

1110

POSITION ,

130

1.

:?

7

11,41?

"""““'""“"

GRAPHICS

DEPARTMENT.

ART

, ,.

140

PAINT.

71,2.

170

TRRP 7

530:?

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SELECT

THE

PACKAGE

ART

THAT

TH

E" _,

7

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=?

tkHr

PICTURE

HAS

CREATED

BEEN

=P°51T1°N 1r16=INPUT 3“ OR A>4 THEN

WITH.

A

1801FA<1

190 IF A=1 THEN 200 IF A12 THEN 210 IF “3 THEN THEN 215 IF 0:10 220 7 :? 'PLEASE

8-9-

DUN=5 DUN=16

“UM GOTO

FILENA‘HE

OF

sou

1:1

T0

DUH:GET#1,A:NEXT

INPUKFNS 250 7 :? PLEASE ENTER FILENAHME T. PICTURE e.g. D:SPACE.HIC FN2$ 260 INPUT

Y=0

FOR

T0

DES

640

CLOSE

65!

RETURN

$1 _

DATA

.

Getbt ’

39

rig”,

SOUND

430

FOR

1,50,10,1|

T=1

T0

4002NEXT

REA

48“

OPEN

T

01“

IF K<>83 THEN

460 470

m

450

RUN

520 530

REM

5411

TRAP

?

***

DISK DIRECTORY

*l**

#1,6,0,'D:*.*i

.

56”

INPUT DA$,:GOT0 550 $1,DR§2? SPACE PRESS 560? ;? :'3 ;?

GOSUB

610

REM

***

GET

A

(y) (3)

M

CF;

00

40

EPA

5@

CPS

(A) (y)

m

11>)

130 C38 140v111 159 501 155 LTX 160 X6H 17g FMN 175 8“ 180 723

580 KEY

“it

22g 793 230 PT6 240 m 250 019 260 RYH

(a) (1)

215

DHD

(G)

AXX

(N)

(0) (K)

(S)

f

(R) (H)

47g W 1.80 50K (4) 49g RKV (1)

8SD

Am

PUR

(D)

3901151

CCN

PMI"!

1.60

43g

DYT

300 ZNJ 310 6A8 32g 41L

(Y) (R)

CJN

45g

w NKN

330 N03 340 R27

200 21g

(G)

(F)

(E) 510 DGN (1) (4) 5m D30 (A) (K) 53. MP (9) (s) 51.0 RF9 (E) (1) 55g PRH (Q) (6) 560 TAT (X) (5) 570 MT!) (F) (y) 580 RON (V) (7) 590 5” (R) (K) 600 i>CP (8) (2) 610 CYX (1) (K) 6200118 (c) (H) 630 (1111 (T) (K) 640 MFE (8) 10) 650 RTA (5) (U) 660 J3G (F)

280 290

(K) (V) (5) (8) (9) (c)

190 MA (0)

62“

590 IF K<>32 THEN 600 RUN

CPZ

100 JPX (9) 110 1119 (M)

#1,8,I,FN2$

CHR$(125)20PEN

CP1

20

9g

490 Q=USR(1536) 509 CLOSE ti

51“

1g

61 70 JVP (G) 80 8er (R)

our PICTURE m

SAVE

,

x

NEXT

42”

zi,4,0,“K:”

21:0PEN

GET

410

58" OF

T

#1,BYTE POKE SCR+Y+(x*40),BYTE 390 POKE SCR+Y+(X*40)+40,BYTE 4” NEXTY

370 380

# 1301021112051

24“

GET

169,11,162,‘I6,157,66,3,165,88 ,157,68,3,165,89,157,69,3,169,0,157,72 ,3,169,30,157,73,3,32,86,228,104,96

DUH:? 111511330

FOR

“SPACE-PIC

255 $12,105

i‘ilenaemory me

tLK

6315

660

ENTER

DeStina?on

520 CLOSE

710,0:

IN PICTURE mi

READ

550

5310

filename

Start of screen m

FN2 $

621,503“

2:232310

'

'

160

712,15

,,

12131.- 11110100301".

screen

330 SCR=PEEK(88)+256*PEEK(89) 1.20 31.0 TRAP 2 350 FOR x=0 T0 191 STEP 360

“PICTURE CONVERTER

SOUrce

SC:

Figural: Picture formats that the utility can convert

*

X

NEXT

_

Graphic 7

loaded

FN

P amt

270 GRAPHICS 31 280 POKE 708,10zPOKE 709,6:POKE

*

PICTURE CONVERTER * BY GRANVILLE DANBY * (C) ATARI USER *

WN

xt

.

62-sector

mto

form

uncompressed 10410

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——

35a 7NR 360 1-13 370 T82 380 MAC 400 161 410 (164 420 052

January 1988 Atari User 37


_—-_———

By N|CK PEARCE

SUBHARINE uumn N-PEARCE

REM

1

2

sis- z=412:Gosu0 PEN:? 599 REii READ CONSOLE

BY

REM

reSt-

Your ship is armed with the latest depth-charges,which you can use to destroy either enemy submarines or their projectiles—the choice is yours. At the beginning of the game you °h°°se one Of fou'.m'ss'°“5: Nov'ce' Commander,Captain or Admiral—the ha'd95t- PM“ are scored for de' stroying enemy vessels and a bonus number of depth-charges is also given. The subs lurk at four different depths, and the points and bonus -

.

322 ?liff§s°?f?de§3r 1312011423

5h°a's °f “5h t° h'de “hm?" and !f of your depth-charges hits one‘ it one W'“ explode and the enemy W'” escape. Each mission

lasts five minutes and if you survive you are awarded bonus points depending upon the number of depth-chargesyou’ve got left. If at any “me you are N by an enemy m'ss'le your depth-chargecount is reduced by it drops below _25 your ship and if_ 25_ w1|| begin to glow until the count reaches zero when ith“ eXplodeand your mission ends. You control the ship using a joystick .

.

.

.

h-hreis a g

'

C

The g ame features the smooth 20 o b'Jects an d movement of up to at one °."e' S'the".°°'°urs°n.S°'ee" time. This is accomplished by the clever use of player-missile graphics, Vertical Blank Interrupts and Display List Interrupts.

Extra

"

l

Sub

lJL/

m

1

bombs

i

699

2002003320020},

013

110 CLOCK=CLOCK+1:GOSUB SHOllle PEEK(C THEN 400 120 IF CLOCK/PIP=INT<CLOCK/PIP) THEN G

750 POKE XTRA=0

POKE

01150007

oro 1~r<CLocK/p1p)*10+300 300 100 IF PEEK(HIT) THEN

8

110

THEN

220

11>185 280

FOR 1:0 T0 I:GOT0 28g

230 pop

2“

PW“

OR

PEEK(XSPD

NOT

7:11 PEEK(HS+I)

THEN

NE

501m 3,1,z,5

1

4

;

1

300 souno 3,20,I,15:M=PEEK(COL+4):N=PE EK(BACK):GOSUB $1100 320 FOR I=0 TO S:POKE COL+4,RND(0)*ZSS NOT PEEK(BOHS) THEN POKE 330 IF TIME, 55

6 8

1

. .

\

,~

355 FREQ:7;G0‘|'0 11g 860 O=2-GOTO 110

m 3(3)=4;50r0

11g 880 S(6)=4:GOTO 11.

5(4)=4:50m 11.

COL+li,ll:POKE BACK,N:SOUND 3,0

3000P0KE , , 393 399 400

FOR

1:0

REM

GAME OVER

To

THEN

POKE

HIT,0:GOT0

200:NEXT I

HIT,1:POKE SHAP,0:GOSUB BUZZ: J=PEEK(PTSH)*256+PEEK(PTSL)+EXTRA POKE

ggg5353133010 965 mpmom 110 970 0010 110 980 1; "or our THEN 9911 FREQ=2:GOT0 110

110 FREQ=1:GOTO 110 IF DIFF=1 THEN 1110

132ggéi?igm

HI=J:GOSUB 51100111 IF J>HI THEN 43“ IF NOT EXTRA THEN Z=199=GOSUB 0VER":FOR I=0 T0 90I:NEXT :? "GAME

1999

I:

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ACCOMPL

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BONUS

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450 Z=219:GOSUB

P

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FOR

I=0

TO

1:30000

3,45,10,4:FOR

36:80UND

2

FOR

J

=0

To

35

5

NEXT

3,000

REM

suomosua

3110011

,

H

7115111]:

311011

111511

J

SCORE

N$=STR$(HI):M$="0000I":M$(6-LEN(N 5))=N$:POSITION 17,9;7 mmuuan 2000

21.99

REM

250!

FOR

2900

Z=552

ERASE

2:41. .? B$:NEXT Z 2899 REM 0010

T0

1.20 STEP 20:00300

PEN

2999 REM pg" 3000 I=SCR+Z:J=INT(I/256):POKE88,1-25 6*J:POKE 89 JzPOSITION 0 ' 0:RETURN 1.199 REii

DISPLAY OPTIONS

,

g

EXTRA=PEEK(BOMS)*15*(DIFF+1)£0101]

11:33

500 440 Z=170=GOSUB

11g

1059 Goro 110 1110 1060 IF DIFF=2 THEN 1070 Sm?HGOTO 110 1080 6010 110 1090 s(6)=5;Go'|'o 110 1100 S(4)=S:GOT0 11g

PTSL,J-256*I:POK

0010

1110

com

élgTéalliliégg?gégaggKE " PEN

v

111

1010 1020

SHOW

110 110

1000

BACK,RND(0)*255:NEXT 1:00308

PEEK(BOMS)

,

;,

FREQ=1100TO gig GOTO

LEOEL

OF

GAiiE

4200 Z=204:GOSUB PEN:IF DIFF THEN ? ”n ovice":GOT0 1,225 4210 'NOVICE":POKE BOHS,120:PIP=80:C '.’

510 POKE SHAPAGE,HYTOP+17 530 Z=52=GOSUB PEN=?

LOCK=0:POKE BEAT,1 1,220 z=251:sosua PEN:IF

_

01rr<>1

THEN

?

"

191

l

'

: Zi?si’géfwmtgasngngogtg?pTH)iPOKE , , , , ammo m ggg gggug?ggw”

+

500 GOSUB ERASE:GOSUB

63 127

PTSH,0:FREQ=999:E

PTSL,0:POKE

900 FREQ=6zGOTO 910 GOTO 110

380 IF 190

111

740 GOSUB snomosua SHOHHI:GOTO 1004553: ;: 799 REM DIFFICUUY LEVEL 81g 0=6:FOR 1:2 10 3 STEP 2:5(1)=3;N5xggi ' T I:FREO=10:GOTO 100 820 D=4:GOTO 110

gqg

POKE

POKE

XPOS,124:POKE

gig iggg?éfgig 1113

.

1

SHAP,56:POKE

HX+I,PEEK(XPOS+DEPTH)+(PEEK(S HAP+DEPTH)=208)*15 "5

340

mm

2=M=PEEK<XP°

STEP

SggEg$z)DEPTH=D OR

THEN

,.

190 COUNT=COUNT'1=IF COUNT FIRE MISSILE 199 RE“ SUBS T0

mm,

THEN 600 RE" BEGIN THE GAME 700 505113 ERASE:POKE SHAPAGE,MYTOP

HS

J:NEXT 699 REM

1

2

1

4

'

_

$52,525; 655 mmmimp

70 N$=STR$(PEEK(BOMS)):H$="I00“:l‘l$(4-L EN(N$))=N$:POSITION 11,0:? M$:RETURN

XT

600

660 eosua LEVEL 680 IF K<>START

3

1

1

2 3

H$="00000”:H$(6-LEN(NS))=N$:POSITION

132gguzgnggg I 10I 4 I

,

.

50 N$=STR$(PEEKlPTSH)*256+PEEK(PTSL)):

210 IF H<60 +D£PTH) THEN

game"

77'“'G°S”B BUZZ'” “05m”

420

rglegcsgdcbryepfensii:g??gt

SCORE TABLE

2 25110233511“ 1,9 m DISPLAY ,0:?

K=7 THEN

600 K=PEEK(CONSOL):IF

USER

BATTLE stations!...Battle stations! Enemy submarine detected on sonar, all hands on deck...! You are on a mission in hostile waters in command of one of Her Majesty’s finest battleships _ the Royal Oak. The enemy submarines are a constant threat and as you go about yourtask, you never have a moments

"mar for KEYS

fintsh _

540 Z=124:GOSUB

255

PEN:?

"RESET

to

.

" ,

550 Z=196:GOSUB EVEL

PENz? "SELECT":GOSUB

”commander":GOT0

421.0

423g 7 ”COHHANDER”:POKE BOHS,100:PIP=5 3:0LOCK=1I:POKE BEAT,3

l.

Turn to Page 35 > January 1988 Atari User 33


5.25"BULKPACKED-TOPQUALITY

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Game

———————————

4 From Page 33 4240 Z=300zGOSUB PEN:IF DIFF<>2 THEN ’taptainHGOTD 4260 4250 ?'TAPTAINHPOKE BOMS,80:PIP=36:C LOCK=20:POKE BEAT,7 4260 Z=348:GOSUB PEN:IF DIFF<>3 THEN "admiral?GOTO 4280 "ADMIRAL”:POKE BOMS,60:PIP=26:C 4270 LOCK=25:POKE BEAT,15 4280 GOSUB ORIG:GOT0 $1100

?

REM

5000

SOUND

7760

T=0

T0

9:NEX

T:SOUND 3,0,0,0:RETURN 6999 REM SETUP ROUTINE T

7000 MYTOP=PEEK(106)-24:POKE 106,MYTOP 7010 SDMCTL=559:PCOLR=704:COL=708:SIZE P=53256zSIZEM=S3260 7020

GRACTL=53277:CONSOL=53279:AUDCTL=

53768:SKCTL=53775:PMBAS=54279 SHAPAGE=206:ML00=207:MHIGH=208:PC =1559 7040 PX=1562:MX=1565:PY=1573:MY=1576:P S=1584:MS=1587 7030

7050

COLR=1600=XPOS=1610:YPOS=1620:SHA

P=1630zXSPD=1640 7060 BACK=1650:TIME=1670:HIT=1661:XX=1 690:YY=1695 7070 BOMS=1669:BEAT=1737:PTSL=1738:PTS H=1739:SELECT=5:START=6 7090 SHOH=50:SHOHHI=2000:ERASE=2500:0R IG=2900:PEN=3000:LEVEL=4200zBUZZ=5000

7399

d

if

7780 7790

TIMER

COUNTDOWN

REM

INSTRUCTIONS

4,9,2 :?

7

"

4

=

8

5

minutes

an

you"

?‘survive

?

you

get bonus points!" to move your

Joystick

8699

b

7999 REM MACHINE CODE ROUTINE 8000 DIM FILL$(17),COPY$(23),VBION$(10 ),VBIOFF$(10),DLION$(4S) 8020 FOR I=1 T0 17:READ J:FILL$(I)=CHR $(J):NEXT I 8030 DATA 104,104,104,133,208,160,0,13

2,207,104,104,145,207,200,208,251,96 8040

FOR

$(J):NEXT 8050 DATA

1=1 I

T0

23:READ

J:COPY$(I)=CHR

8060 FOR I=1 T0 10:READ J:VBION$(1)=CH R$(J):NEXT I:VBION$(3,3)=CHR$(MYTOP+4) 8070 DATA 104,162,0,160,0,169,7,76,92, 228 I=1

7

protected

”Enemy subs

10:READ

?

"

underwater

"firing

?'You

at

4

a

warship

J:VBIOFF$(I)=C

differen

armed

wi

'.’

1

T0

45:READ

J:DLION$(I)=CH

49,169,0,141,47,2,141,124,6 DATA 169,164,141,48,2,169,204,141 ,0,2,169,6,141,49,2,141 8130 WA 1,2,169,63,141,47,2,169,192, 8120

REM

PAGE

6

1,

FOR

I

FOR

I

POKE

1705,MYTOP+12:SCR=(MYTOP+12)

DATA

112,240,112,198,0,0,6,6,6,6,

*256 61134161134161134161134/6I134161134I61

134,6,6,134,6,6,65,164,6 REM

91-1

FOR

I=1740

T0

1788:READ

J:POKE

I,

JiNEXT I 8510

DATA

72,138,72,152,72,174,124,6,1

831741611891114,6169f79137,731141,10,2 12 3520

I=K+8

TO

I=K+208

I,J:NEXT

I

8800

DATA

K+127:READ T0

I,

J:POKE

K#223:READ

J:POKE

0,0,0,0,0,8,64,2,0,0,0,0,8,6

5,20,2 8810

DATA 32,0,18,72,33,20,2,72,0,8,82 ,1,108,150,9,80 8820 DATA 136,82,59,46,220,59,74,17,13,i_ 6,219,127,62,255,254,91,17 f}kk~ M; 8830 DATA 20,54,28,60,255,255,126,60,0f” ,0,40,56,16,0,0,0 8840 DATA 0,32,132,0,16,66,8,0,0,128,2 24,248,252,252,254,255 8850 DATA 0,1,3,31,63,127,255,255,0,0, 131,207,255,255,255,255 8860 DATA 62,255,255,255,255,255,255,2 55,0,0,225,241,251,255,255,255 8870 DATA 6,143,223,255,255,255,255,25 5,8,24,24,24,255,125,255,126 8880 DATA 16,24,24,24,255,190,255,126 '

r

VBI

8899

REM

8900 8920

K=K+1024 FOR

I=K

T0

K+1100zREAD

J:POKE

I,J

9020

POKE

MLDH,0:POKE

MHIGH,MYTOP+19:P

SDMCTL,0:POKE GRACTL,3 9030 POKE 756,MYTOP:POKE SHAPAGE,MYTOP +17:POKE AUDCTL,0:POKE SKCTL,3 9050 FOR 1=SCR T0 SCR+4:POKE I,INT(RND (0)*4)+76:NEXT I:POKE SCR+5,74 OKE

9060 FOR I=SCR+20 TO sca+23zrm<e 1,1NT (RND(0)*4)+76:NEXT IzPOKE sca+19,75 9070 FOR I=SCR9504 T0 SCR+527:POKELI)I“D " NT(RND(0)*4)+140:NEXT I 0 Bones 9080 z=532:oosua PEN:? "PNTS ~

IGHh

3,12,48,192,252,243,207,63 I=0 TO 32POKE 1544+1,MYTOP*20

DATA

J:NEXT

3499 8500

FOR

JzNEXT I 8730 FOR

'

J:POKE

I=0 T0 4:READ J,K:POKE XX+1,J :POKE YY+I,K:NEXT I 8370 DATA 14,7,13,2,10,254,7,252,2,255 8399 REM DISPLAY LIST 8400 FOR I=1700 TO 1731:READ J:POKE I, 8410

K=MYTOP*256

I

leNEXT 8360

8710

8720

a,

X=U3R(ADR(F1LL$),610) 8320 FOR I=1536 T0 1543:READ JiNEXT I 8330 8340

SET

8950 X=USR(ADR(VBIOFF$)) 8999 REM START 9000 POKE COL,26:POKE COL+1,166:POKE c 0L92,20:P0KE COL+3,122:POKE COL+4,56 9010 POKE PMBAS,MYTOP+16:POKE SIZEP+3, 1:POKE SIZEM,0:POKE 623,17

o

R$(J>:NEXT I 8110 DATA 104,173,11,212,201,122,208,2

8420

bombs.’

"There are 4 missions:Novice,Co mmander," 7690 ”Captain 8 Admiral (hardest). B ombs are" 7700 ? deducted and points gained a t a rate“ Ga on the mission. 7710 ? "depending in extra” 7720 ?'bombs and points by destroying subs:-" " = 80088 2 + POINTS DEPTH 773g 7 ?

T=1

FOR

CHARACTER

:NEXT I

92,228

8299 8300

th bombs“ 7640 ? Nosed for both attack and defe nce). 25" 7650 7 "bombs are lost every time your ship is" are destroyed if you 8 you 7660 ?'hit run out”

7'0f

meta,“

by shoals

missiles to the surface

command

0

141,14,212,96

fish”

7610 ?’pass t depths"

T0

Thisis one of hundred. of program: now availablo FREE for downloading on

8100

REM

'

104,104,104,133,206,104,104, 133,208,160,0,132,205,132,207,177,205, 145,207,200,208,249,96

FOR

2,208,20 8599 REM TOP OF MEMORY 8600 FOR I=12 T0 23:X=USR(ADR(FILL$),M YTOP+I,0):NEXT I 8700 FOR I=0 TO 1:X=USR(ADR(COPY$),224 +I,MYTOP+I):NEXT I

1

-‘;:X=USR(TIMER,32)

by N.Pear

ce,(c)1988‘&?

7670 7680

deepest

the trigger to release ombs."; ” 7900 GOSUB BUZZ:POSITION 24,0:?

DIM

7540

7630

124,114,140,114,156,112,172,112,188,11

?"

REM

TCOLOR

7620

6

8080

7500 GRAPHICS g;p0KE 82,1:POKE 752,1 7520 SETCOLOR 1,0,10:SETCOLOR 2,9,2:SE

of

=

FOR I=0 T0 9:READ J,K:POKE YPOS+I ,J:POKE BACKTI,K:NEXT I 8550 DATA 32,58,76,116,90,114,108,114,

8540

HRSlJ):NEXT I 8090 DATA 104,162,228,160,98,169,7,76,

TIMER=K943:I=INT(K/256):TM$(61,61 )=CHR$(I):TM$(63,63)=CHRS(K-I*256) 7440 DATA 198,203,208,36,165,204,133,2 03,160,32,177,88,201,144,240,7,170 7450 DATA 202,138,145,88,48,17,136,177 ,88,201,144,240,10,170,202,138,145 7460 DATA 88,200,169,153,145,88,76,98, 228,104,104,104,133,204,133,203,160 7470 DATA 32,169,153,145,88,136,145,88 ,162,6,160,0,169,7,76,92,228

7600

3

?

"Use Ship and“ 7800 ? "press

7410

7499

4

7770 ?’A mission Lasts

TM$(68):FOR I=1 TO 68:READ J: TM$(I)=CHR$(J):NEXT I:K=ADR(TM$)

7400

=

DIM

M$(5),N$(5),S(8),B$(40):B$(1) ="":B$(20)="”:B$(2)=B$ 7300

2

255"

7

BUZZ

3,100,10,8:FOR

" '?

7750 191“

'.’

4999

24,6,104,168,104,170,104,64

63" 7740 127'

DATA

141126,208,140131208,189,64,

6,141,21,208 8530 DATA 232,224,10,208,2,162,0,142,1

9090 X=USR<ADR<VBION$>>:X=USR(ADR(DL10 N$)):GOT0 500 9199 REM VBI DATA DATA 216,173,84,6,24,105,8,133,20 4,162,3,188,8,208,152,41 9210 DATA 4,208,10,152,41,2,208,5,152, 41,1,240,54,74,168,185 9220 DATA 59,6,208,47,185,37,6,197,204 ,144,40,169,27,153,59,6 9230 DATA 152,10,168,169,8,153,0,210,1 53,1,210,165,20,41,1,208 9240 DATA 10,169,0,157,44,6,157,55,6,2 40,8,169,0,157,40,6 9250 DATA 157,51,6,202,16,181,173,74,6 ,24,105,3,133,209,105,9 9260 DATA 133,203,162,7,189,40,6,205,8 4,6,144,39,197,204,176,43 9270 DATA 189,29,6,197,209,144,36,197, 203,176,32,173,125,6,208,19 9280 DATA 238,125,6,173,133,6,56,233,2 5,141,133,6,176,5,169,0

9200

Turn to Page 36) January 7988 Atari User 35


4 From Page 35 ,

9290

DATA 141,133,6,169,0,157,40,6,157 ,51,6,202,16,198,162,8 9300 DATA 189,94,6,240,11,189,74,6,201 ,14,144,4,201,238,144,56 9310 DATA 173,10,210,41,15,133,209,173

116121E/1617/21’11‘111r105 9320 DATA 1,208,2,9,254,157,104,6,48,6 '

,160,14,169,208,208,4 DATA 160,222,169,216,157,94,6,152 ,24,101,209,157,74,6,173,10 9340 DATA 210,41,240,105,8,157,144,6,2 102,208,2,208,179,189,94,6 9350 DATA 240,11,189,74,6,201,18,144,4 ,201,234,144,61,173,10,210 9360 DATA 41,15,133,209,173,10,210,41, 7,201,7,240,8,201,3,208 9370 DATA 6,169,0,208,2,169,6,24,105,2 53,157,104,6,48,4,169 9380 DATA 18,208,2,169,218,24,101,209, 157,74,0,189,72,157,94,8 9390 DATA 173,10,210,41,240,105,6,157, 144,6,202,208,174,173,133,6 9400 DATA 201,26,176,9,238,144,6,238,1 44,6,24,144,5,169,48,141 9410 DATA 144,6,169,0,141,104,6,173,13 3,6,208,5,169,1,141,125 9420 DATA 6,173,125,6,240,9,173,10,210 ,141,144,6,24,144,79,165 9430 DATA 20,45,201,6,240,11,238,202,6 ,208,6,238,203,6,206,133 9440 DATA 6,172,120,2,192,15,240,44,16 9407133,77,152,41,8,208 9450 DATA 15,173,74,6,201,180,176,8,23 8,104,6,169,0,141,131,6 9460 DATA 152,41,4,208,15,173,74,6,201 ,68,144,8,206,104,6,169 9470 DATA 11,141,131,6,173,126,6,208,9 2,173,132,2,240,3,24,144 9480 DATA 79,162,2,189,23,6,208,67,189 ,59,6,208,62,173,131,6 9490 DATA 141,132,6,24,109,?4,6,141,12 8,6,173,84,6,141,129,6 9330

4

, ‘

95,00 DATA

'

,

"

3

"'

169,647,3157,23,6,169,0,157,48

,6;133,77,169,48,157,192 9510 DATA 2,142,130,6,206,133,6,138,10 7168716956215)?,21|,169 9520 DATA 3,153,0,210,169,19,141,126,6 ,208,10,202,16,181,48,78 9530 DATA 173,126~,6,240,73,174,130,6,1 73;126,6,74,74,168,185,154 9540 DATA 6,133,209,173,132,6,208,7,56 ,169,0,229,209,133,209,24 9550 DATA 165,209,109,128,6,1S7,26,6,2 4,185,159,6,109,129,6,157 9560 DATA 37,6,206,126,6,208,23,169,64 ,15?;23,6,169,140,157,192 9570 DATA 2,169,1,157,48,6,138,10,168, 169716321531112192173711 9580 DATA 6,133,204,162,8,189,84,6,133

1253,189,94,6,133,205,160 9590 DATA 7,177,205,145,203,136,16,249 ,189,134,63240717,222,134,6 96” DATA 189,134,6174774,74,10,1l,10,

:: ,,

157294262163271892144 9610 DATA 6,157.64,6,165,20,41,1,208,1

,

f;‘ 1

0,24,189,74,6,125,104 9620 DATA 6,157,74,6,202,16,190,169,0, 133,204,16222?é975?33 9630 DATA 203,189,59,6,208,7,189,4,208 141,4,208,65,139,12,208 9640 DATA 41,8,240,81,24,189,37,6,105, 4,133,209,16l,8,185,84 9650 DATA 6,197,209,176,61,185,134,6,2 08719424,185,144,6,105,6 9660 DATA 153,64,6,189,23,6,201,64,208 443,152,41,1,208,10,132 9670 DATA 204,169,14,133,203,169,55,20

36 Atari User January 7988

8,2,169,39,153,134,6,169,27 9680 DATA 157,59,6,138,10,168,169,34,1 53,0,210,165,203,153,1,210 9690 DATA 208,3,136,208,185,202,16,149 ,173,125,6,208,35,165,204,240 9700 DATA 31,24,109,133,6,144,2,169,25 5,141,133,6,164,204,152,10 971” DATA 10,10,10,1U,168,136,152,24,1 09,202,6,144,3,238,203,6 9720 DATA 162,2,189,8,6,133,204,189,12 ,6,133,203,160,7,169,0 9730 DATA 145,203,136,16,251,189,37,6, 157,12,6,133,203,189,23,6 9740 DATA 133,205,160,7,177,205,145,20 3,136,16,249,138,10,168,189,26 9750 DATA 6,157,0,208,189,59,6,240,35, 222,59,6,208,10,169,0 9760 DATA 153,1,210,157,23,6,240,34,18 9,59,6,74,74,10,10,10 9770 DATA 157,23,6,173,10,210,157,192, 2,24,144,14,24,189,37,6 9780 DATA 125,48,6,157,37,6,74,153,0,2

10,202,16,149,165,20,41 DATA 1,208,75,162,3,134,203,189,4 ,6,133,209,188,19,6,162 9300 DATA 2,165,209,49,207,145,207,200 ,202,16,246,166,203,189,44,6 9810 DATA 157,19,6,189,0,6,133,209,188 ,15,6,162,2,165,209,17 9829 DATA 2”7,145,207,2?0,252,16,246,1 66,203,139,29,0,157,4,208,56 9830 DATA 189,40,6,253,51,6,157,40,6,2 02,16,185,48,73,162,3 9840 DATA 134,203,189,4,6,133,209,188, 15,6,162,2,165,209,49,207 9850 DATA 145,207,200,202,16,246,166,2 03,189,40,6,157,15,6,189,0 9860 DATA 6,133,209,188,19,6,162,2,165 ,209,17,207,145,207,200,202 9870 DATA 16,246,166,203,189,33,6,157, 4,208,56,189,44,6,253,55 9880 DATA 6,157,44,6,202,16,185,141,30 ,208,76,98,228

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— WHEN I bought my first modem — way back in 1983 — my choice was fairly limited, mostly in terms of price. In 1983 the modem market for Atari computers was split into the sub-£100 bracket for acoustic 300/300 and 1200/75 baud modems, while you had to look at spending £300 or more even for a simple direct-connect no frills

.

.

ChOlL‘E’ .

Today the situation is very different. Modems are even being given away by some online services in a bid to get subscribers to sign on the dotted line

'

Steve Gold explains what to_ look for when buy|ng your ?rst quahty modem

forayearormora

So what criteria shouldthe beginner apply when he sets out to choose a

modem? To my mind (and would stress this is a personal opinion only— based on several year’s usage), the key factors to be borne in mind when choosing 3 modem are — in no particular order — price, Hayes compatibility, ease of use, and reliability of construction. I

As with most things, price isa major factor in the modem market. Ignoring the freebie modems (which are generally costed in with your first year’s subscription to the service offering it), the cheapest modems on the market today start at around the £20 mark, For your money you usually get a direct-connect unit (a modem that plugs straight into a telephone socket) that has a simple switch taking it on or A

0

Answer call

Carrier control CO=OFF, C1=ON Modem dialing pref/XOFF ’ Echo commands E0: E1=ON .

_

D E

F H

,

F1=OFF Echo data F0=ON,

off line

as required. Most of the modems in this price bracket work at

tion)

are list of the basic commands in the Hayes command Ianguage set is given in Figure l.

1200/75. For the beginner, such modems are ideal for the first few months, but automated Iogons — so necessary for

the smooth operation of communications programs save a lot of time and effort for the ex-novice. The route to automated Iogons is good -—

communications software compatibility.

subsequent commands

and

mnemonic.

A

Unlike several other proprietary modem control systems of its genre, the Hayes command set was placed into the public domain by Hayes, so that other modem manufacturers might adopt the standard thereby making it universal. The idea caught on and by 1983 the majority of medium to high-priced modems on sale in the US had some form of Hayes command language built into them. At that time modems were only just beginning to penetrate the home and small business user market in the UK. As with most American originated ideas (good or bad) it took a few years for the idea of Hayes compatibility to —-

and Hayes

The Hayes standard — sometimes called the Hayes protocol—is a simple modern control languagefirst used by the Hayes modem corporation in the US. Developed by Dennis Hayes, the

modem company's owner, it first appeared in Hayes modems in the early part of this decade. As with all good ideas, the Hayes command language is fairly simple by design. All commands to the modem (while in an off-line state) are prefixed by the command AT (short for ATten-

run, to page 38 >

UP Take modem offline (hang W’th used in con/“not’o'l — prefix see

ll") L(n)

+++ command below) Display identity

.

(n=0_,_7;22) , 3) Speaker loudness (n—

'

v

21)

store N Display/set number online Go a P Pulse dialing pref/X after R Reverse to answer ,

Tone

ia lng P

,

tone Virl Wait for secondary dial resets Madam z Instructs modem to Interpret Zeircommand string locally anddng transmit the string., usually “57, H usmg take modem off Ime t+e++ command above. For example Va r Y may set command ATH. This from modem to modern)Figure l: The basic Hayes command set

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The Pace Linnet January 7988 Atari User 37


—_————————Review 4 From Page 37 percolate through to the UK modem By 1985, the Hayes command Ianguage was beginning to appear in several high-end (£300 DIUS) modems and _ at last— people were beginning to realise what a useful facility the Hayes command set is. Today, most modems priced above the budget market (£20 to £50) are Hayes compatible, or have a low-cost option forthe facility to be fitted by the modem manufacturer. Ease of use is another important criteria that is often overlooked by many modem buyers and, amazingly, modem designers themselves. Hayes

towards modems

compatibility iS a major step ease of use, but some

shall remain (Which have a front-panel control system that defies all logical explan— ation. Because the Hayes command Ianguage iS 30 comprehensive, most Of the modems on sale today only need one control switch on the unit itself— the on/off switch — the remainder of the modem controls can easily be handled by a series of Hayes commands piped down the modem's serial port. Like a good car, the quality of a nameIeSSl

modem’s construction—its pedigree if

can usually be spotted by you like careful examination of the case. Tell-tale signs such as slippage marks at the point where screws or retaining clips are fitted, along with a bad finish generally, tend to indicate a modem is not professionally produced. If it is relatively new on the market, the casing’s lack of finish may be due to the modem being hand— built, but you should question your dealer thoroughly as to the number sold and the number of satisfied customers. If the modem looks badly finished and has been on the market for some time, it is best to reject the unit in favour of a better one. The BABT modem approval regulations—aswell as your guarantee rights forbid you to open up the modem box, so the internal construction can only be easily assessed by its outward appearance. For illustrative purposes only I’ve chosen the Pace Linnet Hayes compatible modem to look _at and explain how the theory‘ behlnd thls artlcle comes lnto practice. The Linnet comes in a small beige box about half the height of a modern Atari disc drive, and with about the same footprint. On the front ofthe unit is a grey-green display panel along —

38 Atari User January 7988

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MODEM “Kink“!

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The Miracle Modem Maximiser

with Six red status lights, which indicate the current state of the modem. As well as using the Hayes command set, the Linnet is capable of useful for pulse and tone dialing speed-dialing on more modern telephone exchanges and office PABXs. Limited speed—buffering is available so that, if you wish to communicate at 1200 baud full duplex constantly —

-

only be assessed by can

tw ar d

appearance

The software

which occupies

a

single 16k eprom on the modem’s PCB —functions in a similar fashion to your Atari’s Basic interpreter, translating

the Hayes commands into direct instructions to the modem components. Modems are changing all the time and recently another manufacturer Miracle Technology unveiled an add-on, the Modem Maximiser. Designed to complement any modem, the Hayes-compatible Maximiser costs £225-00 (ESQ—00 extra for the data encryption option), and adds a range of features to even the most basic of Hayes-compatible —

,

0”

mands.

6 The Internal can st rue t lo”

it s

the Pace Linnet is controlled. Commands sent via its serial port are interpreted by an onboard eprom and translated into specific modem comation of modems,

entirely software

(possibly dueto a software limitation), the modem will buffer data down to its three speeds 300 baud full duplex, —

1200/75 baud and 75/1200 baud. The Linnet also features call moni— toring. Via an internal loudspeaker and semi-intelligent line sensing, the modern can recognise dial, engaged and number unobtainabletones found on the telephone network. By returning special result codes via its serial port, the modem can signal to your Atari micro the current state of the call. This option is used on some communications software packages

for unattended auto—diallng. As With many modems in the £139 to £195 price bracket, the Linnet is auto-answer and can thus be used in a bulletin board computer-based system. Also like several of the latest gener-

modems. Features

of the Maximiser include: Error~correction to Mpad, Epad and Xmodem protocols, data compression and encryption, data storage a 16k serial buffer comes as standard, 9600 baud speed buffering, and a centronics printer port for connection to a printer in the absence of your computer being switched on. Although the Maximiser is a rather pricey add-on for many modern owners, it does indicate the way that the modem market is going. It seems more than likely that at least some of the facilities found on the Maximiser will be incorporated in future generations of modems, in much the same way that the Hayes command set is a|mOSt universal in today’s quality —

modems. Further details are available from: Pace Micro Technology, Allerton Road, Bradford 3075 MG. Tel: 0274-4882”. Modern Maximiser: ‘Miracla Tech; "0/0914 St Peters Streét, [psi/”Ch, ”37 Pace Linnet:

,

7X3Tel:0473—216141.

.


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lN this new series we’ll be exploring the wonders of Atari Basic from square one, and showing how even an absolute beginner can quickly learn to produce interesting and worthwhile programs. We’ll start by explaining some of the fundamental things they don't bother to tell in the manuals, then progress to you sound, colour, graphics and some advanced programming techniques. First let's assume that all you’ve read are the booklets which came with your computer so you know how to plug all the various bits and pieces together, can find your way around the keyboard and maybe you've tried typing in one or two of the sample programs. 80 now what? Where do you go from here? The Basic referencebook gives you a list of words that the computer can understand, but it doesn’t try very hard to make these comprehensibleto humans. Terms like variable, string, function, register, channel and lOCB are liberally sprinkled around, and there’s little attempt to explain what they are, “it alone hOW to use them.

. .

. .

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.

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example, try reading the

OPEN LET

COW" puter can understand,and arranged in carefully worked-out order.

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Every program consrsts of at least one program line, which may contain

So far Program I

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Don’t worry if this still looks like a foreign language we’ll explain it all —

'

shortly.

.

Every command has its own rules

which tell you what extra bits and pieces have to be tagged on, and the order in which they must appear. These are known as the collectively rules ofSYNTAx, and if you get them wrong the computer will not accept your program line when you hit the

Return key. Let’s pause for breath and look at an example:

an

.

PRINT

-—

or

REM

Fortunately, programming isn't nearly as difficult as it looks. Basically excuse the DU“ its all about StfiCt fOiiOWihQ rules: Once YOU'VE learned the rules and can apply them

'

as

i

.

Every programline must start witha number, and the computer auto~ matically shuffles the lines around in its memory so that they are always arranged in numerical order, with the lowest first. This will happen regardless of the order in which you typed the lines. Every line number must be followed by at least one command, which might be a single word such as PRINT, LIST, REM or END, but will have extra letters or numbers usually tagged on to it. Some examples are:

.

journey Basnc

line

i

correctly, your computer will turn into obedient servant, instead of an uncooperative little monster. SO i?“ a at the by definingstar} ew terms. ve'X beginning, program '3 nothing more than a set of instructrons, phrased '" a way that the

many

I

.

100 characters letters, symbols so it could easily occupy up to three lines on your TV screen.

SEC-

on COLOR and SETCOLOR VOU'“ 300" see what mean.

a

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of Atari

numbers

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0

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m PRINT “HELLO

This is a valid program line which your computer will understand and obey. It starts with a line number — 10 then it has a command PRINT followed by an extra group of charac-

‘ . .

.

_

ters ”HELLO". The rules of syntax for the PRINT rm" to Page 47 >

. . January 7988 Atari User 39


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WORD PROCESSOR Compose a letter, set the printout options using embedded commands or menus, use the mail merge facmty to pmduce personalised circulars and more! —

DA'I‘ABASE

Build up a versatile card index, use the ?exible print-out routine, do powerful multi-field sorting’ perform 3“ arithmetic functions, link with the word processor

and more!

SPREADSH EFT Prepare budgets or tables, total columns 01“ rows With ease, copy formulae absolutely or relatively, use a wide selection of mathematical and scientific functions, recalculate automatically—and more!

(‘().\l\1$ \I()Dl'l,l-I Using a modem you can access services such as MicroLink and order a wide range of goods from ?owers to software, send electronic mail, telex and telemessages inaflash—and more!

GRAPHICS Enter data directly or load data from the spreadsheet, produce pie charts, display bar charts side by side or stacked, overlay line graphs and more!

LABEL PRINTER Design the layout of a label with the easy-to-use editor, select label size and sheet format, read in database files, print out in any quantity and more!

DATABASE SOFTWARE

Europa House, 68 Chester Road, Hazel Grove, Stockport SK7 SNY

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M‘ Off" II f th ?'faf‘rsii??go?ia/SEE (4tzlgerequiiled)? on 51411 disc for £19.95 ,

I enclose cheque made payable to I IDatabase. debit my Software, card: I CECE] CED] CECE] [EEC] Exp. date E I or

ACCCSS/V 153

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Europa House, Adlington Park. Adlington. Maccles?eld SKlo SNP.

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0 4 From page 39 command state that If you want It to print a group of characters as they appear on the programexactly line, you must enclose those characters in inverted commas. If you leave the “2mm“ OUt’ the computer W'” misunderstand your |ntention_and print the number 0‘ Why does n do .

.

th'S? Read on. There are two

. .

. . . . .

. .

other terms you need to understand before you can write any worthwhile programs: Numeric variable and string. Let’s look at numeric variables first. Every numeric variable has a SUCh as

0'003', ‘256 or 56000000' Remember “OW '” a'gebfa YOU 03" write Let X = 50? Well, to your computer the letter X would be a variable name, and the number 50 would be its

value. The

5'

name

_

remains constant throughout your ”5 program,‘but value_can change as many times as you like. So whenever you tell the computer to print the value of X, it will give you the number that X represents at that particular moment. _A variable name need not P3 a 8!"qu letter, bUt 't must begin W'th a capital letter, and can contain only capital letters or numbers — symbols we" as % or # are "Ot allowed. 'f we 9° to back OUT, prevrous example PM!“ HELLO ' V0“ W'” we saw that recall leavmg out the inverted commas WOUId make the computer give you the number zero. can you see why? NOVj’ H S because the computer W'” _

.

. . ' . . ‘ .

assume

— commas thatHELLOTwrthoutmverted IS a variable name, so It starts promptly t? search for the

gggserifc?l?invghé?z gslit‘gssrjggs

that the answer must be zero. You therefore get 0 printed on the screen, much to your annoyance. See how a small change can produce major differences in the computer’s behaviour? We'll return to variables next time, but now let's turn to the related subject of strings. A string is 3 sequence Of characters grouped together in any way YOU fancy. This month we’ll look at the two main types, literal strings and string vari-

ables. A literal string is a group of characters enclosed by inverted commas — like "HELLO", or “So far so good", or

“Useless". When told to print string, the computer will

a

literal

print

everything inside

the

inverted

commas, exactly as it appears in the program line. You can put almost anything in a literal string, apart from the double-quote character (”l itself. Experiment with a few and see. String variables are a bit trickier to understand,but like numeric variables they have names made up from tal letters and numbers, but all capistring names must end with a dollar sign $. For example:

‘ -

5

.

l

. .

A3

3

5

MONTHS

t

MESSAGE$

. characters. Lets say, for example, that you have a variable called A$ which contains the characters: ”READY FOR ACTION”. If you now tellthe computer to PRINT A$, it will respond by printing READY FOR ACTION, just as though you’d told it to print the characters themselves. The variable name and its contents are interchangeable, so as far as the computer is concerned. Suppose though you had told it to PRINT ”A$”’ What 30 you think you’d get, and why? As with numericvariables, the name which identifies a particular will remain constant, though itsstring value —

the characters

1

. l I

. l

I

'

.

.

.

the string can change. So at the beginning of your program, a string variable called LlVES$ could contain the words “ALL LlVESINTACT”,while atthe end ofthe program it could contain “NO LIVES in

_

.

LEFT".

.

The awkward thing about variables is that you can’t just string write them straight into a program. This is because your computer needs to know how much memory it must set aside to hold the string’s characters. If you had a program “he hke this. 1|

A$="so

far

. '

so good"

You would need to reserve space for at least 14 characters — 11 letters and three spaces. This process ofreserving memoryis called dimensioning—for obvious reasons—and there isaspecialcommand — DIM — for doing it. To reserve space for up to 20 characters in a variable called A$, you would type: 10 DIM

.

. . .

A$(2?)

For up to 50 characters in

a

variable

Turn ta Page 42 ’

' . January 7988 Atari User 47


one string varistrings and an you identify them? Line 30 e.litgral tavtigp — INPUT. a new command contains ‘0 W3“ until .

4 From P age 41 called MESSAGE$ you would type:

iii

.

DIM

.

Th's,

. . .

it

DIM

M$(2ll)

2l2l

LET

M$=”NELL

30

mm

so

DONE

program.

direct link between you and have the computer, and Whatever you the for NAME$ be called typed Will the ' d°“'t 3° Of program duration type Bananaface unless you're happy to be stuck with it! Numeric and string variables are to among the most difficult things at Out Whe” you’re Staf?ng them g‘aSte' "St: bUt you must understand before you can progress very far. So article why not read through this

FAR‘

-

go at own? fave our 0 rograms y pg

0": NAME$<4Nl PRINT ”Please 3b INPUT NAMES w PRINT HELLO“ DIM

tell

me

T he second

month

we

a

much

it

does

1

.

few i ;

.

and Show how

Stftsmen? e 96 0 Variables your kn OW use. an entertaining to put

of these pregrams “593

1

.

,

gig/ext soda/53W

How

-

writing

1,

ll look at a few more commands, mc’Udfng the

your name”

50 PRINT NAME$

.

a

ain , and h

1

.

It adds a

ms

lg

'

ms something and pressed type the Return, then it proceeds with

a

.

C°mpmef

te'ls

YOU V6

MESSAGES<50)

The number in brackets is the number of character count. You don’t but need to use all the reservedspace, it or you will lose t exceed mustn you the excess Characters. variable has been a Once, string can specify its conyou dimenSioned, Here are of number ways. a tents m two Simple examples:

.

.

-

'

.

can be

cost

Telex?

cheapest will Telex machine. The need a and buy a dedicated also will way You conventional Cheetah). You could go the a total outlay dearest £2,892 (the That's the Whisper), £404 a year rental. cost you £1,604 (the 01 to install, plus El line, costing include VAT.) separate telephone of £2,l09. (All prices double as a of a minimum use your micro to first the year are doing over users Atari more and more Or you could do what use your ordinary telephone! And just machine. Telex

to

go

on

,

tr“

77,

1h

How into

I turn

do

Telex

my

Atari

machine?

(see the communications software and appropriate MicroLink. to modem and a subscription All you need is on in this issue), a telephone, available to Atari users teleshopping, advertisements services of number go a of as it happens, growing Telex is just one round also read the news electronic mail right you can MicroLink. With MicroLink telemessages and and much more. send micro user group, closed into your directly create your own free telesoftware programs the world, download

a

a

.

0u

But

why

use

Telex?

between

.

.

businesses. Today

instant communication 2 million — and more than Because it’s a standard machines in use in Britain —just as Telex communications of there are l50,000 up business speed a hard copy dramatically have to used because you worldwide. It's far more ef?cient, but the phone quick as using for your records. that the "conversation" MicroLink for Telex every when you use get bonus you But there's a big doesn't offer. or receive Telex conventional way office to send HAVE to be in your even a portable). don’t home (or at With MicroLink you use your computer for you — as easily waiting can just are any Telex messages messages. You there can check whether business efficiency? So now you How's that for your anytime. anywhere, means of

See Page a


HAVE you ever wished that you could a poster out of a picture that you have drawn using your AtariArtist cartridge? Well here is a utility that will take a 62-sector, uncom. . pressed ?le and create one usmg an Atari 1029 dot matrix printer. The program will print out a poster approximately 38 by 43 centimetres — that’s larger than a sheet of A3 in four shades of grey that the computer automatically assigns to each of the colour registers for that particular picture. When the program is run you are prompted for the filename, which must be entered like this:

/

make

/ /

/ , 0

,

(Ill

7/7!”

/

Q

//

J

@

/

.

l)

'

,/

W

sJ/ /

»

'

,

(a,

/

g//

/// ,

/

,

'.

_,

,

'

,/ ,

,

0

.

(H I”.

f//

/

2

_

.

7/7,

.

(“1(”JR'

f/‘1“‘x,-‘J"

/

lty

|

, ~

.

/

'

/

/§//

D:FILENAME.PIC

GRANV,LLE

DANBY °nvertA ?’ tanArt-

,

.,

C

Al“

,~ Return, to be . ”mmonwm'm'ff“— 9 ofthe disc. \lu es Z ISt presented with a directory /_/; / Pressing the spacebar will return you ”Z Z/ W / ft to the load file option. / / Z f Once a picture has been loaded 22, r/}'/‘f//,/ x Z/ / M4 }l\ g // ’ , ,, press Pto send ittothe printer, and let (h ’ the program do the rest. T /// / ,— //Q P The printout routine is wrltten in // ' Z / machine code and will only take about 10~ PRO //’Z .’y(ll,\ 740 // GRA M B 15 minutes to dump the poster in two 4/ Dis 150 D/ayt ext — // l\\ REA halves the bottom half first. and get Reads m 160.250 // Y theKDOWN Re?d t //’ a“Thine 26036 pi CtUI’e _‘ {7 % data 370.4600 Print thhepleturecaode filena ///' BLES l“ .

or you can just press

'

lnto

A\ /,

.

\

‘Z/f

//

.

//

postErs

//

,

/%/

,

,

//

/

57

,

x

.

,

.

.

,

/

/

VANA

{

‘ f‘\er\ame Picture director)! for (“Sc Butter ressed DAs Value 01 keydpnates Coor ‘ X'“(7 Picture

\

'

c

_

"

u/’/

/y// Z/ ///

FN$

10 20

REM

30 40

REM

'

)

.

.

Q}:

ununuuunnnnn

159

THEN

320 330

IF

2,0,0:POKE 82,0:POKE 752,1

OKE

85,0

80 DIM FN$(20),DA$(20) 90 POSITION 12,2:7 ”POSTER ”--------------" SITION

340

LPRINT

REM

50 REM ************************ 70 GRAPHICS 0:SETCOLOR 4,9,2:SETCOLOR

PRINTER”:PO

12,3:7

100 7 :? D:PICTURE” 110

1”

ENTER

OR

PRESS

PICTURE FILENAME,eg, RETURN

DISK DIR

FOR

ECTORY”

120 TRAP 100 130 1 :INPUT FN$ 140 IF FN$="” THEN 150 FOR X=1536 TD

480 1708:READ

Y:POKE X,Y

:NEXT X IN PICTURE it“ READ 160 REM Hi 170 GRAPHICS 15+16 180 CLOSE #1:OPEN #1,4,0,FN$ 190

708,10:POKE 709,61POKE 712,13

POKE

POKE

200 Q=USR(1677) 210 GOSUB 570 22I IF K<>80 THEN 210 230 FOR S=20 TO 100 STEP 250 260 270 Kg

280 290

NEXT REM

710,0:

0.5

2,S,S/20,S/20+5

240 SOUND 5

Ht

PRINT

POSTER

***

84,192:POKE 85,0:POKE 86,0:P0 1655,0:DY=192:X=0 POKE

CLOSE ?

#1:OPEN

k

Mach' ep/ctwe nd Wait {he Code Dis data Subc direCtOry ’°uri,,e to routine Wait fo

#1,8,0,"P:"

#1;CHR$(27);CHR$(57);CHR$(27);CH

280 DY=96 THEN

DY=96:POKE

REM

***

ke

me

VDress

X<

END

84,DY:POKE

:LPRINT

CONTINUE"

:LPRINT

165S,0:X=0:P :LPRINT

350 POKE 1542,255 360 GOTO 280 370 380

for a

I(6)/Dress

RS(65);CHR$(1);CHR$(224); 3I0 Z=USR(1536) 310 X=X+1:POKE 1655,X:POKE 84,DY:IF

GIANT POSTER PRINTER * * * BY GRANVILLE DANBY * * (c) ATARI USER *

REM

,,

470,55 0 560.6 00

Z"

l

MACHINE

530 CLOSE #1:GOSUB 570 540 IF K<>32 THEN 570 SSI RUN 560 REM *** GET A 570 CLOSE #1:OPEN 580 GET #1,K 590 CLOSE #1 600 RETURN

KEY

***

#1,4,0,"K:”

'

.

cope

DATA

m:

164,84,136,132,84,192,95,208, 2,104,96,32,118,6,162,16,201,0,208,13 390 DATA 169,98,157,68,3,169,6,157,69, 3,76,77,6,201,1,208,13,169,103,157 1.00 DATA 68,3,169,6,157,69,3,76,77,6,2 01,2,208,13,169,108,1S7,68,3,169 410 um 6,157,69,3,76,77,6,169,113,15 7,68,3,169,6,157,69,3,169,11,157 420 DATA 66,3,169,5,157,72,3,169,0,157 ,73,3,32,86,228,76,0,6,0,0 430 DATA 0,0,0,34,72,34,72,20,108,87,5 7,87,90,127,127,127,127,127,169,7 440 DATA 133,85,162,96,169,7,157,66,3, 169,0,157,72,3,157,73,3,32,86,228 450 DATA 96,162,16,169,7,157,66,3,165, 88,157,68,3,165,89,157,69,3,169,0 46I DATA l57,72,3,169,30,157,73,3,32,8 6,228,104,96

f‘

DATA

1,70 REM 1m DISK DIRECTORY MM 520:OPEN #1,6,0,"D:*.*” 480 TRAP 490 INPUT #1,DA$ 500 7 DAS, 510 GOTO 490 " SPACE PRESS 520 ? :? :?

Get (t .

lét/ ,

10 CP1 20 cpz 30 CP3 40 CP4

(Y)

(3) (X) (4)

50 CPS (Y) 70 PV6 (C) 80 YVL (F) 90 12W (4)

(3) (1) (1) (J) 140 SVH (3) 150 PSC (A) 160 DLS (7) 170 510 (L) 180 FUM (9)

100 KRC 110 RY7 120 OAS 130 YFS

190 NPK 200 QKZ 210 WK

(R) (Q)

(6)

220 43V (2) 230 JCP (r) 240 45 250 rm 260 DLT 270 FO9 280 CQN 290 AV9

(E) (3) (E) (2) (G) (G)

(S) (K) (S) (7) 340 CDL (1) 350 SJ8 (X) 360 R99 (F) 370 DQU (1)

300 QLC 310 HZA 320 6llD 330 KS3

380 R57 (Y) 390 HYD (9) 400 F93 (K) 410 E“ (4)

420 ozu (Y) 430 D38 (5) 1.40 ice (0) 450 GV8 460 HY3 470 DQV 480 GFO 490 PDX

(2)

540 550

(N)

(N)

(ll)

(A) (0) 500 J6U (P) 510 (ch (0) 520 760 (F) 530 3“ (P) 4GY DYN

560 DLH 570 CSR 580 R60 590 NZD 600 R64)

(4) (E) (6) (J) (6) (9)

T0

January 1988 Atari User 43


GRA PH'CS DUMP fr cm I. SUtcliffe

.

.

the DIOtten §_ Initialises the obtained

lo; US?!)

chilues

Mini Office Cant “mp screens f r0m the Graphic modul d'"30th to a _

~

1

.

1;

'

ter HoeWeVe", OU 1020 Printer plotS' selecting thé Diggnsasjeleica 0” Scfree”

'

'

-

'

rorn menu. Th 8 screen can then be printed using this five-line 8

-

.

,

program.

Load it and Ch ange the re to in the first line to thgerzznce of gRAfH you wish to prim Make"; re thee D i'iet 0 ter is swit and that you have fitted a gzid or? t 9" run the prOQram Th f' ile Will load _e and the p 0 t ter Wiii b egln to work taking abom an hourto complete a dump Th e e.xaCt time dept-Ends on the Cb .

mm

10

uniwnms p”an ' 4 ' . ' J. ‘

~ ,

umzsszom

'

E::“‘°'"”“‘3‘ "Wm I:o°‘{;; 5601.0“th x “32.51-am| mum-nun mm; ' \ ..,5' m.". W‘mui 1:10

to

I. ".,

I

s

.

mums

was: to ur c:o m. s. u ? sup-Mm

.

,

so

screen, becaUSe it mplexny of the repmduces each pixel.

,

'

30 FM!

-

7

n 26: Stir - LLOMIE my“; -

?”

..

_

“i"i?.l":?'a1-ux:..2 Jinn

-’

"35.°3":? m;--x--.é,,, '

disc

19 9U8 (6)

.

2“

'

'

)

you entered followed by the day. 50 — Clears the screen, prints the title and holds the data statements.

from S O 'H a nr a han

.

.

.

HAVE you ever wondered what day a particular date fell on? This useful little program will tell you the answer. It prompts you for a specific date, which you must enter in the form of day, month, and year with each separated either by a comma or Return. Note that the day should be a number from 0 to 31, the month from to 12 and the year should be four digits such as 1988. The day corresponding to that date Will then be -

1

.

.

output.

10

.

.

“55m“.

“5“

_

GUS

ztz'3'“?'°“_'” ""‘" W"

m'ig’e'zsi??'zt' '

..

.

/

. L“? 2. "” ”Emmi", zcmosxtm mm ( I 15 newnwuuwt D.N.\’:V1-V _ _ . _ . x:x|t(|.5u/m.o-v-x.P.-mulu.c-wx u m: (sue/4) outrun (e) :Z=Ilt (cu) zuzln ' ’ In“; . (9 ' ”I sx-rimt-?ltns

:

"-";V1;"

“5

a

,

/

— Sets the string that up DAY$ holds the answer. 20 — Gets the variables D, M and Y from the user. These correspond to day, month and year. It also places the

10

value of Yinto

Y1.

— Calculates the value of R minus number from one to seven.

30

44 Atari User January 1988

a

,

4

/’ ,/4”, ,, z,

z

"wasp-439m? "WWI!

4”? 33], 41/

14“

, 1,

0 D

so 7

PROGRAM BREAKDOWN

'

,

/

_

“s"znsn‘nl s,1=‘.' “MFFIIDEI by mu amines S.l.0'llanralnl“:l?lll

,‘

,

"n? :. I“;"."; t'b:::-:::lz‘ng;:rrlri =

/

/

_

_

7“ “0

35 38Y (H) All 904 (v) 50 CCF (X)

Reads the data statements and 40 chooses day R. Prints the original date

DAY’F|NDER

7}? 3mm

1:

PROGRAM BREAKDowN the graphlcs mOde and pokes the data dir ectly on to the screen from 1— Sets

-

.

UNF ORTUNATELY

d

Option

'

'

'

31V e Screen

from th

a pixe' 0” the3 sergesn ltatlf‘er)1/lt WOl‘ lOEates S o 't 'S a 30“ “t.” block— ——or if the pixelisablank—o 4—8 en d 5 the correct printer COdes to the 1020 and plots them — 5 Mo position 0” the paper Xtefh?etsg onfext a screen colu mn it m OVGS the paper “9 to the star tOf the next column,

'

-*‘M5'““"5a?‘i-5“"v5“ .

10 loll} (S) 20 “n (H) 30 ZUR (4) All “T (T) 50 PM (3) .

f


you've written any useful or interesting five line programs why not send them to us to grace

Simply send a copy of the program on disc or tape together with the — documentation preferably as a word processed file — to: Atari User, Europa

IF

————-—

I

Wln £25

our

pages? We pay £25 for each one

are relevant. And remem-

her if you want your material returning please enclose a suitably stamped package.

published. a full You should give description of the routine _

and any other details that

1~

E sco

tt —

BOMBS are falling from the sky and is to catch Your only hope of survival them in your bucket of water. Each successive missile descends faster than the last and if you miss one .

.

it W1” eXP'Ode and the. 96m? '3 °V.er' For each caught you W'!‘ 93m 3 att e Will be displayed pOIEt, and oft e gameend youLscore You can move the bucket from left a ''0 y stick p Iugged in

sound Channe' 4 — Checks for

5

SP

x5 80 X

.

Captain of a subm?f,'ne I??? age thge Pole. A.CO||ISIOn withtgn iertt) Nhorth as resiilted in severe dam C?o era t e steering gear and en izge the sonar is no _

Ionzereerogz‘gmand _”9' .

power left and the Situggonaye 00ILmiLed opeless but you can still mov e goutsh or blow the tanks to 90 up. You also know there is an exit h

.

somewhere m the SUbtherged cavexperienced skipper could submarine but can you?

GOTO

G.

INPUT

I.

PRlNT

7

USE KEY3

SOUTH UP

S U

0

:

0.0.0.15uizin

s our»

,

25

'

x coordinate Score. ‘ X coordinate of the Y coordinate Of the

5 22:

k

cm gt. guc

m

3

PM (y)

4

985

5

T” “0

'

(V)

.

6 game Tgeééfeifyyone Ding In Vrsv

from Robert Crew and Andrew Homer

ABBREVIATIONS

Y

Giff“;

iniiiiii

PSOGiATtZATAnfb-Es pee of the bomb. e

“m“:

all»

s-sczscuzspzsv-uvzlm?lt“Sill“i

minsoiiiio 0.15.1..mcou z -"=MSU 5.1:2 ?rm s rostrum p. tn to: 6.5” “rmqsm?m

to find out. you must enter-POKE 82,0 to alter the screen margin. Leave out all unnecessary

SUB ZERO ESCAPE

_

Avolluaox an “(Mm o

s

0

"

0

a

21:13:03?"

Game over rounne'

_

PROGRAM BREAKDOWN Draws the screen assigns the rela1 tive values to the variables, reads the

erns. An save the

.

bomb and gets another random number for the bomb.

Sorft'g?‘efs'w

Y

COlllSlOn, updates the increases the S p ee d 0 f th e .

.

‘ ‘° 5" Hill“! 0 _ . . XML? 1 P0511!“ “in“ -?-V*1-':§:¥.z:.;gi;.a 0 “ 0 some ' ' (I) ' ’."r.~;ri'; -ii

0“

a

'

score,

'

'

SKlO 5NP.

a random 1 l:):SP=§l=GIMICS maul-tumult joystick fire button and gets oiuniiosxrmii 5,2:7 mm?s me“: number for the bomb. cutouts mfzsrucmzoii F=t are, 2 — Reads the Joystick movements, an nun-(5:1: sets and z s:srxum:x:xus:7 moves the bomb up ahdelahyest e m m, wosnxou trams? “rut-welt): 3 —-Moves the bucket and SWitc

THE CATCH from Roy

House, Adlington Park, Adlington, Macclesfield

comn S 82d zpngs S Own or useftheGaObbreviated T0, INPUT and PRINT to allow four screen lines to be entered for each program line. However, once you have typed them in like this they Cannot be edited in the conventional way so if you make a mistake the whole line must be entered again. The lines will fit, so just take care as you type them in. The program is writt n B to avoid spoilin the eamInhas“; and g‘ 'e _y gl'vmg clues no detailed d escription is iven. However 't is wort h noting that9,lines 10 40 an ai 50 are used to set the game up, 20 'Lines and 30 control its oper,

_

-

.

-_

ation, including sorting inputs, monitoring the position of the sub, the score and incrementing determining whether the game has

been finished Lines 40 and 50 check for lack of — power ending a game, or if another input can be accepted at line 20. Now you have the basic design of an adventure game you should have

no

problems expanding

your own usin It is

it or

th

writing '

possibletogesczssggecgegtgmqyfjé

sub Wisely, Watch out for red and good luck.

u u"

herrings

I‘m'Fs“.""$“”"?n’ossu' W"? 5? "muff

.""$u."“s“”’?

='~'

1.10escapeiuzcztzozomuipuzszo:tasty?! 4mm 4. zsur I$:usu rlt?i 1 ssmzcrbzgi 23!!!" Jr ”1. m“ '=“‘="°=““':I"“* “5:73:15 it“ WEI ? rs .

?f?llll)flz?

hirij‘zs I It“ tutti -

?

"Setzt-ltbzulzlf

n)” an “rpm “D m an “N tun “nah” n“ on c” “E. 2 Es” .? vs 4 “I" a rszusiu snunctmtu. telnet-ems“ -

m 1

“ES “9 1m

"no ”in

:En

tn: ICE":IF 1:0 run

LEFTALL mes

tun-i?

is

50 l5="l sun or lIGllll“:H$:"‘ w ums TIE Eii:r~:ss:"seilril mom on “5 “ml-"i”z'm" 7“ CH ”57W? W" u

=

-

ii iiii9 (H) 20 NR (T) 30 X“? (H) 45 “0 (A) 50 "47

(4)

January 1988 Atari User 45


AMR '] USER M A

01mm

0171711115

USEQ

»

_______—_____________—_________________

dd‘wmmmed

aid 7“

I

Ten of the Be"

?e mefpopala?

'

.,..,,°

_

uw

&

MW

.

Utilities

~

sf

'

5

m e rs

-

MOG’G’ those

Dlscview o

Make

-

Utility

J

I

'

MAM

*

-

hidden

SECtors

. ’

-’

l

»

., .

r

by

with this superb

Tak e a

at all the your useful Djf??ign‘Mak diScS’OOk informer, e Prints Epsom Of of YOUr Atari

/

0

.

Art

029 ,

1

fav

.

'

Ourite p , Ctures -

Load youf/gz; OMS/233W mgr

0” y0ur

4

D’Cfoes and a"Show ‘\¢ltrol>ii2:,-a¢snC creat EYOur cryGain Without goi h instant acc 635 to to msc ~ [1305 directories e ”Umber you, Full/Sew!AUtobom Basic Ii pro a Sf'ngs With Print our 22am this an’l’E?nt y fESidem DSOn r“ Character set in fun to Dagasdnoflnijr disc, data With cassette or ZWPUIate 8 ea se _ whether on Gene ramtemO'y ZColumn a “Play on your Ve’y impressive 80 screen6 column text Pl\u_g the latest G 6 t, .

.

.

.

_

These two

.

exclting compilations bring together some of the very best listings

_

DinnenuMbi

.

from the pages of Atari User. Whether you like games or prefer more serious pursuits there’s something here for you and you can also learn a great deal from examining and modifying the Basic listings.

.

_

_

.

COIT

my

,

.

'

O ‘

_

tR[Q h [I

type ’”

es Best Gam the of Ten

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Bounder was the game you liked best of all. Now, in BOUNDEI? PLUS, we We made it even better with SIX exciting new screens to test your dexterity. Bounce up and down on the springy trampoline to hit the many targets while avoiding the balloons. [XL and XE only. /

.

.

eaCh

°

.

.

.

or

just £1.95 each when a new subscription

you take out to Atari

User

or if

you renew

your existing subscription.

ATM/87


_

The Prlce Of

Jump in the air and the jewel will automatically be placed in the first case for you. What appears ‘0 be a 9h05‘.d°°r W'” appear nearby 9° throth 't and you M“ be transported to the next are.

_

Maglk

WHEN you die enter RESTORE, then when the Lenslok screen appears get it wrong three times. The game will restart at the point where you died and you will have 251 stamina points and all your equipment. You can do this every time you die, giving you infinite lives to allow you to complete most of the game easily. — Welch, Rowley Regls, West “D"?me' ldlands.

_

,

level.

Michael Cain, Beeston, NOt'

“ngham'

m WHEN you are just starting and the computer asks you if you have a bank -

account following code without a name: 31222646. This Wi|| give you £999,900inyour account and enter the

to one side and ou should be able to avoid it WithOYJt having to move around too much‘ Dorothy Bean, Middlesbrou9 h, Cleveland.

Bounty BOb

-

Strlkes

836k

'

When you have collected the flower pot on the first level, press number one on the keyboard. Now press Start and you will move to level four. On level five if you collect the coffee pot and press eight fo||owed by Start you will jump to level eight. - William Donald, Turriff, Aberdeenshire.

SELECT track one, the eight-lap race and at the beginning Of the game DOS' ition your car in the centre of the track. This way no cars can hit YOU and you can Sit back With the minimum Of effort and watch the points accumulate Uhtii all the laps have been

m AS soon

you hear or see a missile flying towards you put your tank into full reverse and start firing. This is the best manoeuvre when trying to dodge as

AFTER getting the cheese—the fastest ship on Targ — go to the colony craft, then enter the kitchen and take the sink. It will allow you to pick up almost

any object you findYou can now pick up the spider’s web which will act as a skeleton key and you will be able to open any door. Because of this you can drop the rest of your keys as you don’t need them. On the edge of the city you should see

another ship flying around

go up

to it and take it to get a lot more speed. If you wish to fly it you must go to a hangar, drop it, and board it. If you drop it anywhere else it will just fly away. To be able to tell when you are near

Michael Hoar, Corsham,

Quasimodo

it.

After completing a screen you have to go through the black hole. Look between the sights and, when you see an asteroid appear, move the joystick

'

HERE'S a cheat that will allow you to miss all the archers climbing the ladders. After getting the first jewel on the second level run to the opposite end of the screen where the jewel cases

a mechanoid installation you must collect the metal detector at location 09-05:This willcause Benson’s screen to change to blue when you are near an installation. The metal detector will also let you know when you are over a Palyar building by glowing green — if it glows red, the building is not owned by anybody. To avoid having your craft blown up when you are attacked on the ground, press L to leave it. You are shot but your craft is left intact. Finally, your escape craftis at location 3-15and you have to use the elevators at location 9-05 to get to it — Ruth James, Heaton

Moor, Stockport.

Beeston Rylands, Nottingham.

'

POIe P05|t|on

completed. Wilts.

Will be able tO kit yourself OUt Wlth J- Speed, all the best equipment.

YOU

Beer

Belly Burt’s .

Brew BIZ ON certain screens look for walls next to the platforms: You can jump over them and out of the exits skipping several screens. — Daniel Welch, Rowley Regis' West Midlands_

The Pay-Off HERE is a cheat for the adventure game that came free with most Atari disc systems. Once the main program has loaded remove the disc from the drive. |f you are killed during play you will be asked if you want to try again. Entering Y will make the computer attempt to access the disc without success. Half the title screen will appear with the prompt What Now? and you have been returned to Luigi's betting shop. To refresh the screen and remove the title, type E to move east. All the

other

game elements

will

remain

unchanged; Objects will be in the same locations and condition they were |eft in from the previous game. R, Clarke, Solihull, West Midlands. _

one

one

on

ON the inlay card for the tape version there is a mistake. It says that you or O for a time-out. It should press should read: Press B for Bird or J for Dr.J. to obtain the time-out. — Christopher Smith, Welling, Kent. 1

January 7988 Atari User 47


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with a stick, the subject of remote control has fascinated the human mind. You can switch on your television or video, open your garage doors, lock your car, pilot model aircraft and do a host of other clever things without stirring from the spot. But this armchair revolution seems to have bypassed the computer world. start you on the here 5 a So gadget to right road — its a Simple remote control device which lets you send messages to your computer from a distance of up to six metres. It can add an extra dimension to audio-visual displays in schools or staff-training centres, by allowing you to step through a preset sequence of

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stills or computer-animated drawings at the touch of a button, without any

trailing wires.

It can also be used to trigger any of the power-control gadgets described in previous issues, so you could switch mains or battery-powered appliances on or off without going near them. it can even be made to operate as a stand-alone unit, to

e

In

switch appliances on or off without the help of your computer. We’ve chosen an ultrasonic system, for various reasons: It’s cheaper and simpler than radio control, and beats infra-red on range, cost of operation and susceptibility to extraneous fac-

5

easy

tors from the outside world. There’s also no risk that it will accidentally change channels on your IRcontrolled television or activate your video. It uses a single on/off channel, but this is adequate for many purposes, as we’ll explain later. Figure shows the transmitter. It’s a which can be simple oscillator adjusted by VRi to generate any frequency from around 35Khz to 45KHz, so it can be tuned precisely to the ultrasonic emitter’s optimum frequency. Figure II shows the receiver, I

—. 3

9V

0

1

which

|R1 4

TD1

3

|R2 '

more

complex

in

low whenever a signal of the correct frequency is received. It serves three purposes: First as an audio-to-digital converter, second as a current amplifier and third as a filter which rejects any spurious incoming

2 ,

frequencies. Construction of both

,

C1

48 Atari User January 7988

little

goes

‘VR1

Figure l: Circuit for transmitter

a

TR2 form a simple but powerful amplifier, which converts the tiny output from the ultrasonic transducer into a respectable voltage swing at the input of IC2. This IC is a phaseIocked loop device, whose output

8

lC1

is

design. TR‘l and

OV

.

boards is easy,

especially if you use the ready-made PCBs available from RH Design. Alternatively you may prefer to etch your own from the patterns at Figures IIIa and ”Ib' The transmitter board layout IS _

_

-


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Circuit for receiver

in Figure IV. lt's designed to fit small case supplied by Maplin Electronics, but could easily be adapted to suit other boxes if

given into

a

necessary. The switch is a high-quality pushbutton type, which is sturdy enough to hold the entire board firmly in place, but we’ve included four mounting holes in case you want to use a different switch or box. Make sure that lCl is inserted with in the correct position, but all the pin other transmitter components can go either way round. TD1 is the ultrasonic transmitter, and is marked with a T. You can attach it directly to a 2—way PCB terminal block as shown in Figure IV, by bending its leads slightly. Alternatively, solder on longer leads allowing enough space to allow for adjustment of its position in the handheld box. The battery leads must be

H

0

0

DBP12a

0 0

8

1

soldered

to

veropins,

or

directly

to

their pads. The receiver board layout is shown in Figure V. The only polarised

components are TR1, TR2, lC2 and C2. The transistors will only fit one way round: lC2 has a small notch in one end, as shown in Figure V, and C2 has black chevrons to mark the Ov side. All other components can go either way round. As with the transmitter board, the ultrasonic transducer TD2 can be wired to a two-way terminal block, or Turn to Page 50 >

Figure The

0

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Figure lllb.‘ The PCB receiver pattern January 7988 Atari User 49


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directly to the

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PCB pads Via extenston

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.

leads.

2 V

u

When everything has been correctly soldered, the two units must be tuned to work together. This can be a bit fiddly if you don’t possess an oscilloscope, but it’s worth the effort to achieve maximum reliability and

m

6 8

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® Figure /V.' Component

range_

Start by plugging the receiver into port 1, and then run Program I. You at centre should see the number screen. If you get 0, adjust VR2 until the number changes and holds there reliably. If you can’t get a to appear, there’s a mistake in assembly

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somewhere. Attach a 9v battery to the transmitter board and adjust VR1 to somewhere nearits centre point. Hold it pointing at the receiver about half a metre away, press the button and adjust VR2 on the receiver board until the number on screen changes from to O, and thetext window disappears. This adjustment is fairly critical. Now stand about two metres away and pressthetransmit button again. If does not the number onscreen change, adjust VR1 on the transmitter until it does. Repeat this dualadjustment procedure at about six metres distance, to get the best pos-

a TDZ

Programming could hardly be simpler. Your computer thinks the switch is a lOYStiCk trigger bUttOhi 30 the

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50 Atari User January 7988

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constructional articles for each device. If you would prefer to use the

standalone module, independent of your computer, attach a 6v or 9v batteryin place of joystick leads 7 and 8 positive to the pin 7 point—and replace R9 with a 1N4148 signal diode, wired with its towards cathode Coloured band switch

remote

as

a

5

~

(9

|Cz

)

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described in earlier issues, to control models or mains appliances. The power controller could plug into port 1, leaving port 2 for the ultrasonic switch. In this case the address controlled by the switch will be 645. Software to drive the power controllers themselves is described in the

~ ~

particular option has been triggered, but you can insert extra code at line useful! 110 to make it do something For example, it could trigger one of the power-control devices we’ve

,

q;

Figure

t

1

number in address 644 changes from to 0 whenever the unit is activated. You can use this to initiate a single action, or bUIld a step counter into IC2. your program which selects options in lS when the Choose a GV I,e|ay whose CO“ is 80 in Ui seq?ence ea to pgeslsded, lht iS case it’s a 900bciiittgn es ohms or more, such as Ma lint some kind of delay as well, to avoid Fxggv, FM91Y, FM89W or F223Aly§nd connect it between the pin 7 and pin 6 triggering unwanted options 0” the terminals.The relay contacts will close way through the sequence. when the transmit button is pressed Program || gives YOU a demonstration Of hOW different options can and open again when it is released. be chosen quickly and easily. Hold down the Transmit button to step through the various options WithOUI Program /: Program to help set up the switch triggering any of them, and release it when you get to the one you want. As it stands, it simply notifies you that a REM PROGRAM 1.‘ Settin th e " lt ras 1

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PARTS REQUIRED FOR ULTRASONIC SWITCH TRANSMITTER 1k

R2

12k (brown/red/orange) 4K? horizontal preset

Code

M1K M12K

(brown/black/red)

R1

VR1 C1

Code

Maplin

UH02C

Sl

mfd Mylar (marked 102k) Push-to-make switch

IC1

TLC555C

TD1

Ultrasonic transmitter PP3 battery lead

WW15R YR67X

.001

*

HF28F FKSZS BL17T FT31J

(optional)

*

1M 47k

The

QH69A ‘

RK72P FT38R '

'~ ~

_

,

a

pair, order code HY72N. A A]

,

y “

y ‘

. , 3

Printed circuit boards (order code DBP12a and DBP12b) Price £2.38 per pair. Joystick extension lead (order code AT111) Price £2.99 Available

from:

UH03D FF10L

3n3 ceramic 22n ceramic 1n0 ceramic 0.1mfd disc ceramic

OB33L

All components are available from: Maplin Electronic Supplies, PO. Box 3, Rayleigh, Essex $86 8LR. Tel: 0702 552911

B1M M47K M1K M10K M18K M4K7

(brown/black/green) (yellow/violet/orange) 1k (brown/black/red) 10k (brown/black/orange) 18k (brown/grey/orange) 4K? (yellow/violet/red) 10k horizontal preset 100mfd 10V single-ended

WW83E, WW18U

,

Ultrasonic receiver * 3-way PCB terminal 2-way PCB terminal (optional) ultrasonic transducers are

sold as

.

RECEIVER

Note:

224k) 103k)

Maplin

BC109C NE567 tone decoder

RA76H

PP3S battery 8-pin DIL socket Small narrow box

R3, R6 R4 R5 R7 R8 R9 VR2 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6

0.22mfd Mylar (marked 0.01mfd Mylar (marked

C7 C8 TR1,TR2 ICZ TDZ

, '

R.H. Design, 37 Stonefall Avenue, Harrogate, North Yorkshire, HG2 7NS. Tel: 0423 508359

WX74R WX78K WX68Y

, :

, A

Prices include VATand

YR7SS

postage

33 Ormskirk Road

JIK ATARI

ADBROKE OMPUTING

The leading North West SpecialistATARI Dealer

INTERNATIONAL

Preston, Lancs. Tel: (0772) 21474

JIK

_(1 line) Itnes)

ATARI

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This Company has given years of full support to ATARI users Countrywide from their retail shop premises at Ormskirk Road, Preston. Now from their NEW Mail Order Depot they can offer the same Excellent service to all Mail Order Customers. All Software and Hardware is fully tested prior to setting. This ensures Customers receive working items so that returned goods,_ and all the attendant tmstration are a thing of the past. All Hardware is supported by our own '_ON SITE' engineers, therefore qurck turn round on all repairs is Guaranteed. All prices quoted are fully VAT inc. and there are no hidden extras“, what you see is what y ou 9 et. Delive W included in p rice. Please ring for latest prices, new releases, etc. _

<

F;b .t

a

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1:2.

_

.

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_:§

1.5}-

per Disk...................£1.99 10

Disks.................£16.00

10 Disks+Plastic £17 50 library case 100 Disks ...........£150.00 50° Dis“ ------------£65°-0°

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Computers£399

Monitors...........................................£4.99

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PRINTERS 51/ D/S

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Our ATARI trained engineers will repair all Hardware in minimum time at competitive rates. Please ring for a quotation. All repairs carry a 90 day warranty.

h

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DUST covens

5,

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130XE Computer........................£119.00 Disk Drive TBA XC12 Recorder.............................£32.00

Dot Matrix Star NL10...........................................£240.00

Disk Dnves£299 Printers £799

%

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S°?ware

m W‘Zthaxe 0c anadcglr'rplete 931 rgdnge Y -

NL10 Sheetteeder................................£55.00

Panas°m°

$825 MP135 ngrég

a???

||= IT'S AVAILABLE we have Send SAE for full catalogue.

it!

332 2321125323.:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::£5500 AW ”were a "n9 we “5“ V9 Y gue??? ggswfr _._—. k D' as etc su lied All Dedicated books and mags In stock 35 NOleDDEN EpQTRAS

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FOR MORE INFO CALL ON THE NUMBERS OR SEND SAE ABODVE AN STATE FULL REQUIREMENTS

January 7988 Atari User 57


______________________—____

0

O

__—_______________________

Has upgradmg your computer glven you hardware you no longer “00d? Or left you have changing "Item“ fN'th unwanted software? Then THIS is the place to advertise your surplus items. Atari User readers are always on the lookout for a bargain and this is the first p lace the y look!

Classi?ed advertisements will be accepted under the following condi?ons: o This service is EXCLUSIVELY for the use of private readers. No trade ads will be allowed. 0 To avoid encouraging software piracy, all ads will be carefully vetted before they are accepted' 0 Ads can only be accepted on this form (orra photocopy of it). 0 There is no maximum to the number of words you include in your ad. If there is insufficient room on the form, continue on a separate sheet of paper. . The cost is 209 per word, with a minimum of 10 words. ° We GUARANTEE in the ad Wm 27) January February ‘7596 (on'sale provrding it IS received by December 20. .

An added bonus,

2553265353532212";fii’élfé?i‘i??‘é?’l?

enthusiasts who '

-

.

can

send an instant response.

O 130xe disc drive, data 0 Atari 800 16k ram, 10k recorder, joystick, soft- rom,48k ram expansion ware, books £225. Tel: boards also keyboard 0268 773898. and connector strap for 0 Atari 800x| 1050 disc Atari 800 £50. Tel: 0272 drive, cassette player, 661842 after 6pm. joystick, £1000+ worth 0 Citizen 120D NLO of games all latest titles Epson compatible prin£250. Tel: 01 328 2246. ter £130. Atari assembler 0 Atari 800xl, 1050 disc editor cartridge £12. drive with hyperdrive Atari macro assembler enhancement and 30+ disc £10. All with mansoftware titles £200. Tel: uals. Tel: 0268 743725. Beaconsfield 04946 0 1050 disc drive, XC12 6561. cassette, various soft0 Cassette software for ware, (all new) offers? sale, s.a.e. for list to Tel: Northwood Middx Sean Billings, 91 Peter- 25671. house Close, Mildenhall, 0 Atari 130xe computer Suffolk. 1029 printer, 1050 disc 0 Atari 130xe 130k com— drive, XC12 recorder and puter, disc drive, joy- joystick. Also Mini Office all in stick, XCII cassette deck, and The Pawn over £250 worth of soft- brand new condition and ware, books, mags, very boxed £350. No offers. good condition, all the Tel: 01 302 0589. Iot for £280 o.n.o. Tel: 0 130xe + disc drive + Daniel 0924 828166. XC11, mags, games,

~

atari

artist touch tablet, O 130xe,

Fl“

-

m

for the next now .

lssue 52 Atari User January 7988

| I I

lzj

I I

1010, 1050 £15. Excellent condition.

62596. sticks, blank discs worth Q 1050 drive E100, 1027 over £800 will sell for printer £80, 1020 plotter £220. Tel: 0608 737332. + T.tab|et + extra pens, 0 Atari touch tablet and £20. Plus paper, software £100. software disc and Atari XMM801 Epson original

disc drive. Tel: Portsmouth (0705) 812536. 1050 discdrive

0

plus software £90. Atari assembler editor rom £16. Atari microsoft compatible dot-matrix cassette software from basic ll rom £16. Mini printer £160. Gauntlet, 75p to £9.50. Tel: 0702 Office II £10, cut and -

Ballyhoo,MiniOffice £10 each. Tel: Bristol 0272 623637. 0 For sale Atari 130xe, 1010 recorder, 1050 disc drive, 1027 printer, joysticks all boxed, magazines and atari-writer, Mini Office H + software £299. Tel: Ross 01 642 1352. 0 Atari 130xe, 1050 disc drive with ”Iazer# enhancement. Some software £120. Buyer collects. Tel: Brentwood 216112.

Z]

SESSSWw

E S | i: | E:

E: l: E: l:

510487.

0 Atari Tel:

1027

paste w/processor printer £80. Atari touch tablet

078086

671 Tel: 0992 32697.

usual free software. As new £200. Tel: 0703 255782. OAtari 1029 printer £70, Atari 800 computer £40, Atari 1010 data recorder

Cl

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drive,

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Chm“ ”cm“

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Address—___—_

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| I |

| l I


LET’S start with an easy query from Mr K.L. Edwards from Warden Hill, Cheltenham, who writes:

,

,'

l’m in the middle of

designing a large database program on my 730XE, but I’ve found a problem:

osmium = ”m

DIM

‘H

D5 59,43? §°

;

”5“

1

,

"

-

When someone runs the program he can enter almost unlimited informat/on because the text is stored in a very long string. This is initialised by the following code: 1M

fl;

, '

I‘

_

.

/

I

' ,

I

,

-

Your programming problems salved by ANDRE WILLEY

I

But line 770 takes about two minutes to execute, so please could you give me an alternative method possibly by programming it in machine code for me. —

,

machine code in this case like using a sledgehammer to crack a nut. In fact, Basic’s own string handling functions have a rather convenient little side effect which will solve your problem much more easily. We have touched briefly on this technique before, but it's so that it could do With more useful Using

would

be rather

explanation.

.

.

When copying between tWO strings statement like lLET A$=B$, usmg a BaSic Simply takes the first character and places it in the first pOSB$ from men of A$, and then repeats the process for the second, third, fourth and so on until the whole string is copied. Alternatively, it is quite possible to copy the new string anywhere inside the original using the normal substring notation. For example, to copy B$ in at position two of A$ you would use A$(2)=B$._ ”you pause to_ think What’s happening here‘you WiII see

string is filled with the first character— rather like toppling a line of dominoes. So, in your example, try the

following: 1M DIHD$(13MB) 1m osmf " 123 DS(13B50)=" 130 D$(2)=DS 4

Type—in troub|e

uer

is

There is no fault in the game, and it should run quite happily on a 64K 800XL. Also, there are not more than 128 variables in the program so why does the error occur? The answer lies in the way in which Atari Basic functions, using a system known as tokenisation. All this means ‘S that after YOU ve typed 'h each line, converts all that long-Winded Baa"? text into a much shorter set of symboIs. For example,_when you type__REM, BaSIC will store it as a Single Asmi byte zero. Similarly, DATA would give a

value of one, INPUT two, COLOR three, and so on. Another way in which it packs your program in into a smaller space is by

usingasimilartechniquewithvariable

Now a letter from Steven Taylor from Essex who seems to be having some difficulty with one of our longer programs:

ust aroun tchehanswerto e corner. éharacbtertbnelfrom B$ is copied in to [have a” 800)“ mm a 7,050 disc andhave b_een.buy/ng Ate” drive, two of then is B$(2) A$, position User from. the ve'ry'f/rst ’53Ue- lqu1te copied to A$(3), B${3) to A$l4l and so on until all B$ has been copied. often key ’h the listings, bf” / ve been havmg a “me d’ff’eU/ty W’th Chopper The sneaky trick comes when you Rescue from the September 7987 try copying a string into itself in this issue. manner using A$(2)=A$. Firstly cha— lhad been typing forsome time and racter one from A$ is copied to poshad almost t’h’Shed when / got an — ition two. Next character two which Error4 as / tf’ed to enter “he 6720- My we havejust transferred from position book says that th’s means TOO many is copied to position three. This one variables (greater than 128), bUt I’ve new character at position three is counted and there seem to be far less. copied to four, and so on until the end is th’s due to a fault ”7 my machine, of the string. more the” or does the game one The end effect is that character needs. that it does work 64k to is copied to position two, then three, run?./ assume correct/y mm the 800XLthen four and so on until the whole our

Although the solution to your probis straightforward, the cause is rather more complex. First of all let’s discount some of the possibilities. lem

Don't forget to set up the length of the string by writing to the very last character as shown in line 120, oth— erwise the string copy will stop as soon as it thinks there’s no more text giving only a copy of a single character. So there you have it— a very simple and rather elegant method of ?ning a string with anything you want instantly.

,

,

,

,

,

”a;

V

.

names. You may find variables with names such as MYDISPLAYLIST and

CUSTOMERSTOCKCODE useful, but they waste an enormous amount of think, if you used

eac merrngayidust imes in our ro ram theirs ou have just wastedy halfpa Ei<ilobytte of ram. It is obviously far more convenient and compact for Basic to store the name just once, and use another one-byte token whenever it needs to refer to it. Each time you type in a new variable name as you key a program in, the computer will set up an entry in a special table called the variable name table and the tokenised line will just —

contain

reference number. This is always stored with the program when you save it and, in fact, there are only two ways to remove it— a

whole table

Turn to Page 54 > January 1988 Atari User 53


Programming

$®FT ‘IVA?F /

4 From Page 53 load

a new program or type NEW. assume you must have been working on another listing before you started typing in Chopper Rescue, so leaving all the variable references from that preVious program were

h

I

_

left memory. When you startedworking on Chopper Rescue you simply added your new variables to the end of the table, and eventually filled it up to the .

141),andfinallylocations142 and 143 point to Basic’s internal stack which

,

’D:TEMPF1LE

keeps track of GOSUBs and FOR NEXT loops.

Then type NEW to erase both the program and the variable name table from memory, leaving a clean slate

1g

ready to accept the correct table. Now all you need do is use:

.

VER=pEEK(43234) VER=162 men

20 IF

=42979:REN REV SI IF VER=234

‘DzTEMPFILE

The program will be read back in line by line, and a new table created just as though you were typing the lines in from the ke y board.Thistoken's'"9 Process 's “S“.a'W VeryfeSt?'o“ certainly WQU'd” t. notice n when typing m a Single “We from the keyboard — but you Will find that ENTER is very much slower than LQAD due to the extraitimetaken by this routine. You might we to take a the [00k at token table for written yourself 39 ve a small program Wh'eh Will-display the .

A OR

...

sumauzwmopue

BASIC VER=96 THEN

STATTAB=4 B/C BASIC

2143:OPTA8=42974:REH

REV

40 IF

~ERROR:

0PTAB=U THEN

'.’

NOT

REV

A

iug ggAlglieéglg:END

,

210 ADDR=STATTAB

22”

“53510535“?

23g aosug 1995 ? :? z? :?

ZOO

OPERATOR

TOKEN

TABLE":

510 ADOR'OPTAB 329 BASE216'0FFSET=O 335 GOSUB

I

lli?li mill

tab'es- '” case You want t° de'Ve the ram'based Tab'es start straight after Dos and there are a set of zero page pomters to keep track

fume"

Of

1m

.

ADDR=ADDR+OFFSET

1050

IF

PEEK(ADOR)>127

_

54 Atari User January 7988

1073

-

PRINT CHRS(PEEK(ADDR)-128):ADDR=A DDR+1:GOT‘0 um

-

-

Speedier SOI‘t .

all the followmg entries. Then you just fill the gap with Smith. You will already be familiar with the commands used to modify portions of strings and to compare them, so all you need to know is how to make that extras p ace Onceag ain Basic’s strin g handler comes to the rescueTake as an example TXT$, which contains a number of 50 character sub-strings which make up your entries. If you want to make space for an extra one at position 201 you would use“ '

1070

.

array). Locations 136 and 137 point to the statement table — the tokenised version of the program itself. Locations

THEN

,

.

variable value table. This contains eight-byte values for each variable defined in the name table, and it is these entries which determine the type of variable (numeric, string or

RETURN

_ .. 1.60 PRINT CHR$(PEEK(ADDR)),ARBOR-ADM? +l:GOT0 195“

.

.

NUH=BASE:? "TOKEN","CONTENTS”:?

1; pEEK(A_boR):g THEN 124! PRINT NUM,:NUM=NUH+1

.

-

<awor> t09ether With

TABLE CONTENTS

193g

them.

The vanable name table we have been discussing is pointed to by locations130 and131 (in home, 6502 ,OW_ by high'format). The end '3 locations 132 and 133 but,indicated since there '3 normally a null byte at the end’ the program doesn Ilzero) t test for the end address. Locations 134 and 135 point to the

PRINT

REM

_a

Willey you would select the next entry

’ .

,

,

Davidson, Jones, Morgan, Taylor and

1d”

fu'm'on

_

This IS another problem where machine code is not the best solution, and a little bit oflateral thinking will let you do thejob much more elegantly What you really need to do in '5 Bas'c; redefine the problem.You have sorted list of names and addresses, '” surname 9'def- When adding a new entry to this you meet present adding it to the end of the list and then re—sorting the whole thing to get It back IMO order. But wait a moment there’s 00W one entry OUT of lsn't lt father a here, sequence 39 waste oftime re-sorting the whole i0t7 Instead, why not simply put the new entry in the correct position in the first place? If you do this every time a new record is added, the “St Wi” always you H never Err/1:1; lgosjzgftngga?:d Each time 0 u wan tit 0 a dd a Y new item to your list, search through until you find the entry Just after the pos— ition you want to place your new entry. Then move the rest of the text up in memory to make room for it and just drop it in to place. For example, if you wanted to add the name Smith to a list such as —

110 ? “VARIABLE NAME TABLE":? 120 ADDR=PEEK(13E)+PEEK(131”256 13“ BASE=128=°FFSET=9 149 GOSUB WOO 2M ? z? :? :? ”STATEMENT TOKEN TABLE" :?

.

and

ages/ Is there

138 and 139 indicate the last entry in this table and it is here that your immediate mode commands are stored until Basic has finished processing them. After the program space comes an area reserved for the contents of str— ings and arrays (pointed to by 140 and

maXimum °.f 12.8 e’th'eSThe solution 'S Simple: Firstly _you ShOU|d “St the program to disc USInQI

ENTER

I

,

AA

a machine code routine for string sorting that/cou/d use to speed things up?

in

LIST

A

mentsor additions to the information wr/l initiate a sorting of the surnames, and here lies the problem it takes

_

.

.

Finally this month a letter from Yearwood of Lincoln who writes:

G.

-

'

TXT$(ZOT+SO)-TXT$(201) '

had my Atari 730XE fora

"Having few months,

/have progressed to the stage where I’m trying to write

programs ofmy own. / have written a database program of names and address of just about everyone/knowand it seems to work fine apart from one snag:Any amend-

That’s it for this month, but don't forget that solving problems with a computer is often a lot easier if you

can step back a couple of paces and think of an alternative way of asking the question. You might find that the answer is a lot simpler than it first looked,

-


-——-—-'~

COMPMTlNO

I

‘l‘N —----

'

COCKTAILS are always popular, especially at this time of year, so here is a program to. help you create new and exciting drinks. Well, to be perfectly honest, some of the creations sound awful, but then, you never know until you try. ln the world of the cocktail bar, the rule is that almost anything goes, so this program is not terribly reticent about what it mixes. Every cocktail must have its own name, so lines 1000 to 1160 design one on a modified random basis. The so it can process is open—ended generate extremely long names on occasmns. However, they should all at least before be pronounceable trying the drink. And endless party fun can be had attempting to say the name after having imbibed. The program classifies drinks —

l

'

RUTH JAMES [Jr-"193 eye to the fest|V|t|es .

.

_

according to type, for example spirits, liqueurs, fortified wines and soft drinks. The recipe for the cocktail is generated by choosing a random number of items maybe zero from each category. Some drinks should never be mixed and these are separated into groups in the spirit and liqueur sections. The program will only match group A and B spirits and liqueurs, never drinks from the same group. Basically group A spirits are grain-based and group B grape-based. Similarly group A liqueurs are generally fruit-based with group B herb-based. The data statements defining the available ingredients can be modified to remove anything you disapprove —

-

_

I

bleary

a

of, or to add your own particular favourites. All sections begin with a

number which tells the program how many items are in the group. Therefore all you need to do is add or remove items from the data statements in the appropriate section and change the number at the start of the block.

That's mixing. 1

REM

THE

REM

BY

3 5

under the 1876. Home Compu(hic)ter WARNING: It ish an offensh, Act, . . to operate a compu(hlc)ter while under the influensh of this prog...

PAN-GALACTIC RUIH

COCKTAIL

USER . ‘

10 ? CHRSHZS) 15 POSITION S,0:? CKTAIL

"THE

”Slim"

PAN-GALACTIC """""“

S,2:? "By Ruth James"

”W ‘0 ”a“

516”

=5000zGOSUB 300 70 LIN=6000:GOSUB

i

Measuna

1

Of

Kits“ State

H°Wf0mak 3

Gin

7

;; '

1

2Measures

399 and some

\e

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Measure of Apricot 1Measure°° fpepsi

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andSOm e f and Some rresh P'neap De l and Cubes Some dime pee, rieda .

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of Kirsh 2MeasSl-lres 2 Measures of Madeira Ures of 1 Mea SW? of PineappIeJ “We 3 Lem 0" ,.~ Jurce and s’ome' and some fa's'“ and som e Ece CUbes 'eSh pineapple Cub es -

“a iSchnaP°?a

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H 952

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320 N=INT(RNO(0)*N)+1 330 roa 1:1 TO N INGS 340 READ

.

.

300:LIN

.

”0

.

measwe ofs h‘Sky Measures Of 53’th Vermomh ofA eff Wine 1Measure e?swe of Juice Pew?“ ps'

OffSweet Sheth JU‘ce

Q 300:LIN=

LIN=2000:GOSU8

:LIN=9000:GOSUB 300 POSITION 4,20:? "PRESS ANOTHER DRINK" 120 OPEN $1,4,0,"K:" 4.30 GET 21,KEY:IF KEY<>0

100

eaKemeiu Measures

?

80 LIN=7I00:GOSUB 300 90 LIN=8000:GOSUB 300

a g ozade

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a

1000

4000:GOSUB 300 60 IF V<>l THEN

.

CO

5,1=?

BAR":POSITION

40 V=INT(RND(0)*2)=l 50 IF V=1 THEN LIN=3000:GOSUB

Howtomakeaou

BARF;

JAMES

REM (c)ATARI 60508 500

30 GOSUB 35 7 z?

,

{ii

theory, happy

enough

2

2”

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i;

Milli} Maia

,

17 POSITION

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and

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";T;" Measure";

400 IF r>1 THEN 7 s ' " of "; 405 PRINT 410 7 was 020 IF INT(RND(0)*100)<10 430 RETURN 500 REM INNIALISE

.

,

THEN

305 ~

Turn to Page 56 P

January 1988 Atari User 55


4 From Pag955

Armagnac

“500 4010

505 POKE 752,7:557c0700 2,0,0 510 0177 V00$(5),CONST$(21),ING$(20) 520 V00$="AEIOU“ 53! CONST$=”BCDFGHJKLMPQRSTWXYZ" 540 RETURN 1000 REM SELECT NAME 1020 793g 7040 HEN

R=TZ

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PAGE 6 has been supporting Atari computers for 5 years coverage now includes both 8-bit and ST. Get the latest copy from your local newsagent or by —

‘ .

31703

”$010“ Wapuwfs not“

// .

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56 Atari User January 7988

.

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cxa

120 4x0

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REM

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REM SPIRITS GROUP A 2010 DATA 8,67’n,Nhisky,Vodka,K7‘rsh,Sak i,wh7‘te rum,Tequ7’La,Schnapps 3000 REM SPIRITS GROUP 8 3010 DATA 4,Brandy,Dark rum,uh7'te rum,

360423 (L)

601MF

FIZZYARINKS, 8,CoKe,Pep57,7 Up,Lemonade,B itter Lemon,To-'17'c water,G7’nger ale,Sod a water

INT(RND(0)*10)=T

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R=INT(RND(0)*5)+T

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LIAUEURS GROUP

REM

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'

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21,0776“

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A

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(E) (7) (E) (2) (T) 2 ‘


Moi

.

WHILE playing around with Dos 2.5 the other day I got

Of M I n I a?’ce II ,

takes

line _

Will work Wlth-a cassette a file is saved deck. _When

if

you type processor, Return but not a marked show whhh u asabentarrowcharacter -pthen backspace with the cursor and type Control+inverse video ke , the Esca e (27th) character willappegr. This is very useful for printer codes, espeCially if you have run out of macros. _

are

long inter-record gaps used and this this unfor-

character [sags without havin to resort to usin macrogs which is ve “gaff, for anybody who 3:7an to .

k ~ .

|S

° SWOV

WIN 4

seei w. e

S

perfectly

is

pressed

TENNER,’

spacebar

e 5 5:1 willie i?:e'f4lé ‘Zigioeii/ P _P

into

SOftWGI'e _

_

compatabl'lty hhvh months and I U'ser'for five find it excellent. But I have some questions: Is 8 bit With

n l ggmzaglzle fhoftyvgaft e

EACH month We { award.£1o prizes forvzilig most interesting letters sent to us. -

loop

a

computer for the spacebar to Evading pressed. Line 50 Simply e_

now

_

I

bag pages n

Get Your

-

waltlng for

.

DOS 2-5 and YOU. WlSh usmg to View a text file WithOUt

having to go into the word processor, select option C from DOS and WIDE! FILENAME.EX7',E:t0 display the file to screen, or:

FILENAME.EXT,P: to print the file out. If the text is scrolling too fast use Contra/+1 to step or start it. When printed out format, the ?le is Of a POfOf so its only use isi you want to quicklychecka document

before creating a final COPY~ _Jonathon Burg, London.

-

Simon London.

3

-

d "V3

0 No the software written for the 8 bit Atari micros is not compatible with the ST. The latter uses a Motorola 68000 CPU while the 8 bit Atari uses a 6502C microprocessor. The way to get the Atari to takea number from the keyboard without having to press Return is to use the OPEN and GET commands. to The simplest _way explain this |S to give you a

example program:

50 ?”YOU

RECENTLY ordered a 7050 ' disc drive from Com p umart , but I received a letter saying thatAtari have Withdrawnit. They also said that a new

/

.

processors available for use W’th a data recorder. 7 Marcus McCollum, BalvCO. Antnm' money, N.Ire|and. 0 The AtariWriter cartridge “

THE

drive made byAtari will be released around Sept-

disc

.

Line

10tells the computerto

look for an input from the . keyboard. The K- m the the tells command OPEN computer to look at the keyboard, and the 4 indicates an |NPUT operation. ~

The GET#1,KEY

com-

MallPag Editor

User Hous e A dlin 9 t °" Park

! Europa l

{Adl'

eSl‘le'd I M acc'"i9t°!"

SK10 5NP

ember.

Could you please tell me the differences between it and the old 1050 and will software be compatible? Also, when exactly will it appear? A Pyrski, Slough, —

.

i

_

,

_

_

software.

22V; zalht‘feéharwgtgzgactvs: can

be

replaced with the

XF-551 drive. This was expected to be released before Christmas, but At-al'l

‘ '

_

Help

“1

_

bu8|ness

THREE years ago I bought an Atari 800XL with Atari d?'ifflcumtisi 1050 disc drive but never

aafor’rid

ganuaiiy

difference between the two drives is 1050 the that where reqUired a modification to give double density and faster loading speed, the XF-551 has true double density and high-speed load built in. Atari guaranteesthe main

.

.

:

~

*

.

.

.

;f_

fU” df'Y? W‘” retain8” compete ability With eXistine .

Berks.

sfogaiife ”if: SPACEBAR"

out,

Ate"

_

The

'

COULD you pease ’" f orm me ’f the“? 5”? any word

PRESSED

e

l

exhpe'f'e'ilcm

50 §g iiTKZiSSYTHEN 40 GM 20

mail-

-

'3

recorder -

Lee,

LeWis,

19 OPEN #1,10,?,~K:"

-

WP Mb

e um. giro“; [855658351 9nit/amber y press

Ve Y

Start Writingpansd °°U|d be one rbf y1,51): J

to do so in the macro menu. On a different topic, when .

there’s more

reasso

ah Pgstisiftifressageijndica?ng

Y

"e“

.

Wm

m

20 mend thisuinput and asSigns the KEY which to Ascn value name and can justavariable

“dramatic“ estimatedtweet the well. key "

.

new

on

.

,

you wish to load. Also when using the word

.

.

.

.

-

8 mo

l"

a

the directory of my Mini Office II disc on screen. I found that any of the mod— ules can be loaded using the binary load feature of Dos that is option L, followed by the filename of the module

.

o

.

.

212: thizfgaéafédzeigazfei startgd my own taxiandprivate hire business which

has

proved

successful.

lnow wonder if it is p osth f orme t SI bi ecvo/rhh , abuse usmess In te er my pu _

Turn to Page 58> January 7988 Atari User 57


‘ '

4 From Page 57

W?rg9§/'}detsif;r‘if such pro

r

.

grams are.ava/labl_e I WOUId and also reqUIre a printer be your '

gppLeCIate L Cagn?zzgl' fondifct for V ou t ° b _uy t o h_e lppyou W'.'th your busmess IS Mlm Office II. It is disc based and gives you word processor,

.

Is

Park

Macclesfield SK1O 5NP

prin-

ter, graphics. package 30d program

gommlurgfgtégns or on y It is designed to work with an Atari 1029 or Epsoncompatible printer. The 1029 will plug straight into the serial port on your '800XL, but other printers .

need an Atari 850 interface box or some other suitable

printer interface before you

can use them.

There is a review of the Panasonic KX-P1081 an Epson compatible printer in the October 1987 issue of Atari user. —

In tead it SseIfTest gmoeesfigzigh?o?he routine. R

-

Bootlng .

_

w'th Baslc

there

a

,

utility available

.

that will allow me to convert Dos 3 files to a Dos 2.5 format? - James Harvey, Hammersmith, London.

spread—

sheet, database, label

.

Adlington Adlington

'

.

8 wnChlng DOS formats

Mailbag Editor Atari User Europa House

a as, suggest/onsGwo-lul?

a

Maubog —

'

,

1

WE welcome letters from readers about your experiences using the Atari micros, about tips you would like to ass on to other users. and about what you would mg to see in future issues. The address to write to is:

_

0

users

regard to my personal taxation, business accounts andbusiness writing usinga

loading it.won't be able to, will go into self test. You only have to hold the Start key down to boot with so it

d

,

~

Mg",573? Recaagyyonlfleesgggg

> '

0 The Dos 2.5 master disc contains a file called COPY32.COM which will allow you to do this. You’ll an re am ensi y avai a e enganced 3Iso_thave'ltl:)e

full compatibility with Dos

2.

-

_

OWN an Atari 800XL and have an annual subscription forAtari User. ltyped in Get It Right II! from the November issue, checked it with the old Get It Right! and saved it on cassette as instructed in the magazine. When loaded into memory/get on screen the message Get It Right II (in a box} and Loaded OK (not in a box) but I do not get the I

??ygenggy?zszeily'p shire ' Scotland.

0 You will find your probIem lies with the procedure to load the file into memory. If you hold the Option and the Start keys when booting the program, you will switch off Basic. When the GIR program attempts to go to Basic after

you are using

autoboot

new

-

Auto “He .

. , A

numberlng [HAVE recently bought‘an 800)“ and/am Sf’” learning how to use ”; It seems to autolacks the facility of mat/c h"? numbering and

renumbermg.

I,

,

Have these subjects ever been featured in Ata r| User? D.M. Hill, Stranraer.

0 .

.

G 9 H lng I.t q", I

,

VE

_

typed

just

,

in

your

excellent new Get—It—Rightll checksum program, and I think it’s really good. I especially like being able to call it up instantly rather than having to LIST and

ENTER

everything. However, [can’t seem to make it checksum itself correct/y either with the 0/0' or new versions. Both give me the same error/ines —

-—

730 and 3010. On GIR II I

get the wrong cumulat/ve check digit from line 130

also

onwards.

S/nce these

are

only

PRINT lines and the pro— gram seems to work fine, I wasn't too worried — but I have checked the spacing of each line very carefully and I 58 Atari User January 1988

,

,

.

6

Still can’t get It to give the right checksum. I’m wondering — is it me, are the checksums or printed correct or not? — ,

,

Michael Hayston, Aston, Birmingham. 0 Andre Willey replies:

Some of you have noticed that the two checksums printed alongside the Basic version Of my GGt It Right ” program didn't quite match the listing. This was rather embarrassing and caused by a printing error which meant that two lines of the program containing inverse video text were inadvertently printed as normal characters. On line 130 the text inside

r’g the quotes should have been shown as inverse video, including one extra inverse space on either side of the wording, Similarly line 3010 should also have had the whole of its PRlNT text string in inverse video. The program will still

work quite correctly without either of these changes, of course, but it did mean that

the checksum values for these lines didn’t match. Both checksu ms were printed out from my original program listing before the printers omitted the inverse

text.

So in fact the checksums are both correct it‘s the list— ing that’s wrong. I'm sorry for any confusion caused.

in the

August 1987 issue we published a utility to renumber Basic programs. It creates an autoboot disc or cassette file that loads into memory

and

remains

resident until the power is turned off We hope to cover auto ?ne numbering in a future issue. ~

_

Ba3|c facts in Basics ,

, '

a new Atari owner and borrowed a book on Basic from a friend who owns another make of computer. When I type in some of the programs I get error messages, though I'm certain I have made no mistakes when typing them in. Could you please explain to me what is going on? Is there some secret to typing

IAM

I

'

'


/———Moilbog programs out ofbooks?— Richard Lawson, Heaton in

written in the most common style Of Basic available.

Unfortunatly, Atari Basic differs from most of these, 3° V°U Wi" have t° m°dify the program listings to a style that Atari Basic will accept.

D’?er’ng TvsyStems

comparlso“ '

the CAN you please explain the d'?erence batween 800XL and the new 65XE computer. Is the 65XE as reliable and can it do all the things the 800XL can do? At [99 it sounds a very good buy and [fit can do all the things the goox1_ can do it will be a good starter pack. J_

L.

and was intereted when it started making comments

about the PAL and NTSC

television systems. cou/ol you please explain the differences between the two and why would this effect the Atari computers? ‘ Pame'a 3°“iami“' W3"-

ington, Cheshire. 'Th e PAL system is one o f the European teleVlSlon standardsthatwe use. it has .

a

_

._

THE other day/was reading an American magazine for the Atari 8 bit computers

50Hz frame rate and uses 312 lines per frame to build a picture on the screen. The NTSC system is the

computer

White ' Hawarden'

Clwyd.

American equivalent to PAL.

-

-|

ferences occur

.

-

ln

the phy5l-_

cal design and layout of the micro. On the 300XLthe 03’— tridge socket is 0" the top, but on the 65XE it is positioned at the rear. The parallel bus that featured on the 800XL is not on the 65XE, nor does it have

expansion bus that appeared on the 130 x_E

the

_

Serlous searc h es IRECENTLYstarted writing adatabase program to store and my friends’ names addresses [on my Atari 800XL. The main program proved no problem, but when it came to writing a routine to search through the names individual to find one

However, it only

uses 252

the program almost slowed down to snall’s pace. Could you give me any help on this matter? — Alexander Cheadle Brook, . Hulme, Cheshire.

surname,

. When searchlng th‘.’°“9h

the surnames there ls, as a 5|°W way and _a “5143" q Ule wa Y The slow we V is the most obVlous—you start and at th? f'rSt entry number until you ?nd the contlnue one YO? re |°°km9 for. Th's '5 an ObY'OUS way, YOU bUt rather ted'IOUS. that t wouldn W_°'k certailnly way lfvou were tookmg _up a the dlteC' phone"U‘fgbef you.l?“ ory,wou A much faster method is to open the book in the middle and decide whether you’ve got to go fonivard or .

.

back. By looking at just one name you’ve already elimi-

nated half the directory. If you then turn to the middle of the section you now know the entry's in, and again decide whether it’s above or below the one you've selected, you will have quartered the book and so on until you find the name you’re after. Using this method the —

i070];found, ou epme. youp ease gelcorregt. —

Michael Davies, Braintree, Essex.

lines

.

This means that although the screen is up-datedfaster on the American television, the picture quality is not as good as that achieved by

CheCk

per frame to build a picture and uses a faster frame rate of 60Hz.

PAL.

Atari com uters were initiall desi needaround the NTSCysV stgem but when a t h ey were so Id" 'l'n E _urope hardware modlflcatlon was made so they would be compatible with the PAL system. So, the difference in the way the two systems work will not directly affect your own micro.

.

OThe 65XE computer and the 800XLare ver YSlm' arto each other. The major dif-

After checking line it to

.

.

Merse y , Stock p ort.

0 All Basics are different, although most are based on a dialect of the language developed by the Microsoft Corporation. Nearly all PUb‘ those Iications outsidefor your dedicated purely computer feature programs

3070.

.

computer could find any one itemin an_orderedlistof at Just 10 1000 by looking

entries. This system is known as a binary chop, because each successive test chops the remainder of the list in half. Followmg this method you should have no prob— Iem m speedlng up the search routine, and the coding for it is relatively simple. .

error that-the. proThe? gram '5 encountering '3_“9t actually at “he 3010. bUtts I" fact located between lines Wlll prob3696 to 3890. You ably find that you have entered one or more of the data statements !"C°"e°?Y-

these carefully and

»

-

very

ShOUld

?nd y°ur em"

'

x -

.

g

Pln'OIItS l“ the 800XL '

,

FOR a while now / have had an interest in the ?eld of

electronics and computers. have built many of the gadgets that have appeamd i" Atari User, but/now wish to design and build my own hardware modi?cations for my 800XL. Mostpin-outs for the connectors on my Atari have been readily available, but! to have found it impossible . the for details the any get serial l/O connector on the 1

rear.

.

lwould apprecrate It very .

.

.

"He‘s

YOU

h -f you cou Id he!p me muc'i Philip Marsh, Hammer

"

-

smith, L ondon. _

Here is a diagram of the pin—outs for the serialf?llO.

0

,

connector:

g

.

‘ ' ,

,

~

.

.

nght Ilnes for fault THANK you for a great magazine, and thanks also for my copy of Sprong by Red Rat software that I won in your birthday competi— tion. lwas verypleased with

2

4

6

8

10

12

.

.

.

.

.

.

'

°

'

-

'

-

-

1

3

5

7

9

H

13

8 erla ll/O' Jac k _

input output input Ground Data output Ground Command Motor control

Clock Clock 3, Data 1.

2.

4.

it.

5.

In the November 1987 issue ofAtari User you pubIished the listing for Greedy Gunther. After I had completed the firstscreen theprogram was in the process of drawing the second when it came up with an ERROR 8 at line

6. 7. 8. 9. Proceed 10. +5/ready 11. Audio input 12. +12 volts 13, Interrupt

January 1988 Atari User 59


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This fascinating adventure features the most

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“MM“

W—mmm?mm TO ORDER PLEASE USE THE FORM ON PAGE 61 12/816


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Profile for Paul Rixon

Atari User Magazine Vol 3 Issue 09  

Atari User Magazine Vol 3 Issue 09 - magazine for Atari home computer users, published by Database Publications.

Atari User Magazine Vol 3 Issue 09  

Atari User Magazine Vol 3 Issue 09 - magazine for Atari home computer users, published by Database Publications.

Profile for prixon
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