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NORDIC MAN

NORDIC 6 MAN 8£ 75DKK AUTUMN / WINTER 2013

2013 ISSUE 6


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NORDIC MAN

nordicman.com


LE BOOK PRESENTS

THE CUSTOM MADE TRADESHOW FOR THE CREATIVE COMMUNITY

© KEITH HARING FOUNDATION. LICENSED BY ARTESTAR NEW YORK

COUNTY HALL, RIVERSIDE BUILDING, LONDON, SE1 7PB

CHICAGO


DESIGN GALLERY R E P R E S E N TAT I O N EXHIBITIONS SEMINARS ART SHOP

ETAGE PROJECTS DESIGN & ART GALLERY

ETAGE PROJECTS - BORGERGADE 15E - DK1300 COPENHAGEN K


W W W. E TAG E P ROJ EC TS .O RG

ETAGE PROJECTS DESIGN & ART GALLERY

ETAGE PROJECTS - BORGERGADE 15E - DK1300 COPENHAGEN K


ConTENT FASHION ART CULTURE LIFE STYLE DESIGN MUSIC NORDIC MAN

FIGURE IT OUT


THE BROOKLYN SALSA COMPANY. A new generation of salsa makers inspiring global flavor with local, sustainable ingredients. Meet the rest of the BKLUXÈ crew at GANT.com/GANTRUGGER @GANTRUGGER #BKLUXÈ


INTRO

P O S T MOD E RN I S T I C E D G E The term Postmodernism seem to be more relevant than ever in our development of creativity and innovation. We see the dissolution of distinctions, the merging of subject and object, self and other. This is a sarcastic playful parody of western modernity and the “Clint Eastwood” individual and a radical, anarchist rejection of all attempts to define, reify or re-present the human subject. Creativity is a process of generating ideas, expressions and forms, either when looking for new ways of tackling existing problems, of re-interpreting reality or searching for new opportunities. Creativity is in essence a process that can amplify knowledge and lead to new ways of using it. In turn, creativity lies at the origin of innovation – understood as a successful exploitation of new ideas, expressions and forms and as a process that develops new products, new services and new ways of running businesses or new ways of responding to social needs. Creativity is therefore of great importance for the innovative capacity of citizens, as well as organizations, businesses and societies and are all the more important in times of rapid changes and serious challenges. Clear examples of creativity and innovation is often found i disciplines and such as art, fashion, design and literature. This issue wishes to explore creativity and innovation with an edge of postmodernistic thinking to enhance the liberating energy and vitality found within much art, fashion, design and literature. I hope you will enjoy the following pages and that the content will inspire you. Jacob Petersen / Editor in Chief

ADDRESS NORDIC MAN BORGERGADE 15 E 1300 COPENHAGEN K DENMARK PHONE DENMARK +45 42 70 99 27 NEW YORK +1 (646) 937 8563 EDITORIAL CONTACT INFO@NORDICMAN.COM SUBSCRIPTIonS FACEBOOK/NORDICMANMAG

CULTURE EDITOR MORTEN VAMMEN CONTRIBUTING EDITORS ADRIAN MADLENER CHRISTINA HØST PERNILLE SANDBERG

DISTRIBUTION PINEAPPLE MEDIA INTERPRESS BLADKOMPAGNIET

art courtesy of ETAGE PROJECTS V1 NILS STÆRK MARTIN ASBÆK CAN GALLERY AND THE ARTISTS

FASHION EDITORS JESPER HENTZE EDITOR IN CHIEF Jacob PETERSEN

ART DIRECTION SØREN P. LARSEN DAN BJÆVERTOFT

ADVERTISING LAURA R. PETERSEN ADS@NORDICMAN. COM

NORDICMAN.COM SUBSCRIPTIONS WEBSHOP


Glenmorangie Single Highland Malt Scotch Whisky, 43% Alc./Vol. ©2010 Imported by Moët Hennessy USA, Inc., New York, NY. Please Drink Responsibly


PHOTOGRAPHY HENRIK BÜLOW ASSISTANT KAZUMA TAKIGAWA LOWEL TAUTCHIN / SCOOP MODELS STYLIST JESPER HENTZE ASSISTANT ELISABETH BYE MARTINSEN GROOMER / JEANETTE GJERDE / SCOOP ARTISTS

S TRI N G E N T 10


Cap Marc Jacobs / Shirt Adidas by Jermy Scott


Jes Brinch: Hate 2013

Shirt Givenchy

Roskilde Morning Glory


3


Turtle Neck Marc Jacobs / Jacket Gucci


Mads Nørgaard


Shirt Diesel

Roskilde Morning Glory


Coat Lanvin


Shirt Saint Laurant


Trousers Adidas


Dolce & Gabanna

Jacket Dolce & Gabanna Scarf Marc Jacobs


T H E STAT E O F N O R D I C

A RT CURATED BY MORTEN VAMMEN

Everybody started collecting art in the shiny happy 2000s. The excessive boom in real estate prices made people buy enormous TVs and kitchens they could live in, but they needed something color-coordinated to talk about to hang over their designer sofas, to set them apart from the culture-less masses. A lot of bad oil paintings and pastiches where shifted by greedy gallerists, who turned into bankers, inspired by Anselm Reyle´s 60s-inspired stripe paintings 800% price raise - in one year. Then came the crash in 2007, and everybody overflowed the online auctions with boats, fur and art. Some artists took note, and turned away from couch-friendly kitsch oils to the more stable, clever and well funded institutional market, making more conceptual or formalist film, installations and performances - unfortunately beyond the average collectors reach. A newfound non-commercial and playful fragmentation in a multitude of styles appeared with no fear of the past or of the future. A lot of new art reclaimed the role as a visionary source beyond the market forces, emitting personal or metaphysical experiences and stories beyond traditional mainstream medias oversized mouse wheel.. So enjoy a pause from a visionless world, increasingly obsessed with the financial bottom line and depressed from stressing around the hollow golden cow. Enjoy a dance of ideas from a broad selection of artists, spanning from a 20 year old untamed talent, to internationally acclaimed artist-brands, in all their glory. Feel free to cut out their works and frame them on your wall, for that special clever Scandinavian 2013 ambience.

22


C H A R T A R T FA I R JEPPE HEIN_itsnotyouitsme.jpg / Exhibited at the Chart Fair Cph 2013 Jeppe Hein / It’s not you it’s me 2012 Powder coated aluminium, neon tubes, two-way mirror, powder coated steel, transformers 100 x 100 x 11 cm / Edition of 3 + 2 AP Photo: Anders Sune Berg Image courtesy Nicolai Wallner, Copenhagen


Cul-de-sac 2012 Missasssnatch


Elmgreen & Draset Shepherd Boy


Elmgreen & Draset Jason


Gardar Eide Einarsson Untitled


Superflex If you don’t like Denmark...


The walls were shaking with the young couple’s laughter. Rover sighed and left. The Nepali soldier looked at him and then followed. These Western people are all crazy, he thought. 51 Suddenly they could all hear dogs frantically howling and barking nearby. It startled everybody, and the Nepali soldiers used flashlights so they could find and perhaps shoot a few wild dogs. But very soon, they had other things on their minds. The ground started to tremble and people immediately clutched each other’s arms in fear and desperation. There was a low monotonous sound and everyone looked at Osho Gosh, who screamed it wasn’t him. And then a soft red light lit up the entire area. They looked up. The sky was red, glowing orange-red like fire, pulsating in flashes that could be seen, heard and felt. There was heat, strong heat. No one moved. People were completely stuck: the students, the locals, the Nepali soldiers, the agents, the American official and Victor Ritterstadt. They all just looked up at the throbbing red sky, not knowing what to do. Everyone seemed to be sweating and praying they wouldn’t die. Victor slowly went over to Mary and Lucy to comfort them. They said they were feeling dizzy. “Don’t be afraid”, Victor whispered. “It’s just a UFO.” Everyone was completely awestruck by the experience, including Ilse Grokmann. They would never believe this in Berlin! She suddenly felt a hand on her shoulder. It was Victor. He whispered something in her ear and she looked at him and nodded. He smiled at her and urged her on. Then she walked straight out towards the center of the red light. No one said anything. There was an increase of light and energy in the center and suddenly Ilse Grokmann was gone. Disappeared, just like that. Then slowly the light grew dimmer. The sound receded. As if nothing had happened, the dark night sky was filled with stars again and the crickets could be heard, with occasional affirmative dog barks. Rover looked around in panic and tried using his mobile phone, in vain. People hugged each other and started smiling again. Noone really knew what to say. “You have a phone here?”, Rover asked and Rama went with him to the office building. “It’s OK”, Victor shouted. “It’s OK. Everyone’s friends now.”

Excerpt from Mother, Have A Safe Trip © by Carl Abrahamsson. Published by Edda Publishing, October 2013. www.edda.se


Ziggie Bruhn the unknown


PAC/CAN rave


Vibeke & Sofie Roed


Svend Sømod Loop Remix


Canon_G9_photographed_with_Canon_EOS_1D_MarkII

Canon_G9_photographed_with_Canon_PowerShot_G9


Jens Haaning G9 & G10


Helene Nymann Helene Nymann aka Ima


Søren Martinsen The Voice of the Day


Sebastian Schiorring Framegrabs from Twozerotwoone


Marie Erdinger Plum What´s mine is yours

What´s mine is yours

Marie Edinger Plum What´s mine is yours Tekst and Screenshot from video : May I die before What´s mine is yours 2013


Frida Sabina Ibsen No Name Area


Line Gry Neivelt Space attack mornings


Hannah Heilmann Having no soul


Jon Stahn untitled


Niels Bonde the_angels_tap_and_train_us


Jacob Holdt Untitled (From American Pictures)


Jes Brinch Hate


Thierry Geoffroy / Colonel: “ IS CLIMATE CHANGE STILL AN EMERGENCY ?”/ “ CAN EMERGENCIES BE RA


BE RANKED “


ROSKILD PHOTOGRAPHY BO LENNERT MODELS ANDREAS SIDENIUS / 2PM & STREET CASTING WORDS MORTEN VAMMEN

INTRODUCTION

Forget to eat (no Michelin stars), to go to the toilet (virus alert), to sleep (too noisy and high), to network (as if...), to make new biz (leave the bosses alone), to score (you have to que up first), to take a bath (why bother), to pose (relax), to have (clean) sex - even forget to hear (museum) music. The legendary Roskilde festival is about something completely different: just being there in the moment, like a zen monkey, hugging your fellow man beyond all the trappings and hallucinations of everyday life. Let it all go, maybe it looks like a Darfur camp but you will end up laughing.

56


DE 2013


Jacket SAND


Mads Nørgaard Sennheiser


Soaked in Luxury


Jes Brinch: Hate 2013


Jes Brinch: Hate 2013

Jes Brinch: Hate 2013


Mads Nørgaard


Orange Scene


Kraftwerk


InWear


Jes Brinch: Hate 2013

Roskilde Morning Glory


Felipe

Oliveira Baptista WORDS PERNILLE SANDBERG

Lacoste is a brand of traditions. Founded on a mind-set of freedom and wholesomeness in 1933 the spirit is still ongoing and relevant for today. The man responsible for everything in the creative process, runs his own label in his own name as well, showing his collections during the haute couture fashion week, even though it’s ready-to-wear. As he describes it himself: a real luxury brand. This man has the honor to be the creative director while Lacoste celebrates their 80th anniversary, the anniversary of a groundbreaking invention of the polo shirt and the creation of an unforgettable symbol of passion and identity: the crocodile. Indisputably linked to the business founder, René Lacoste chose this as the leading logo back in 1923 as he was named “The Crocodile” through his tennis career. He made a bet with the captain of the French Davis Cup Team, and if he won he would win a suitcase made by crocodile skin. In 1933 the industrial production of Lacoste began. The world of Lacoste is so much more than the polo shirt and the crocodile logo – it is now an empire. Every season Lacoste presents five different collections LACOSTE Sportswear Men and Women, LACOSTE Fashion Show Men and Women, LACOSTE L!VE Men and Women, LACOSTE Kids and LACOSTE Leather Goods collections. This history obviously brings a lot of varied and unseen challenges, needing to be balanced as a father and a husband. We caught the busy man behind it all, Felipe Oliveira Baptista, born 1975, creative director of Lacoste since 2010.

72


PS: Monsieur Felipe. FOB: Hello! PS: How are you? FOB: I feel good; I’m working on the new collection. PS: Do you feel calm? FOB: Well. It is not that hectic. Right now is not the hectic part of the process. This is an exciting moment creatively. PS: But isn’t it stressful to start a new collection? FOB: No, I think the stress comes when we are about to run out of time in the end. The beginning is the best part. Now everything is open and possible. It is an interesting journey. You create work and you make it workable. Ideas start to materialise. PS: So what do you do to get new ideas? FOB: We kind of hit an arcade and study the design, the architecture and photography… It is all about finding images that tell a story. PS: What do you look for in photography? FOB: Not necessarily fashion photography. Sometimes a photographer with a good sense of colour inspires me. It is a batch of things that we are trying to put together. We can find inspiration in people on the street as well as finding inspiration in the texture of a certain fabric. What is interesting is to find inspiration in a lot of external things. PS: What is the biggest challenge when reinventing a brand of such powerful traditions? FOB: This is what is exciting about it - you have to put something completely new into it and still stick to the true DNA of the brand. When designing and working we have to invent something new and people should get surprised but still be sure of the fact that it is Lacoste. It is about knowing what the brand stands for. PS: How does your own story influence the brand? FOB: On a personal note I have always been interested in clothing, I have always been interested in sports, I have always thought that clothes should have a function, a meaning, a purpose and that is very important for Lacoste. It is more about design than about fashion in a way. There is no rational value in what I can bring or what I cannot bring. I always want to keep things upbeat and what I bring in depends on what interests me. My mood can be darker. It is always the same spirit but with different initiations. PS: Is it hard to do that when you run your own label as well? FOB: It’s hard to find the time to be dedicated to both. The hardest part is to find the time. Some things come quite naturally. PS: So you don’t have that much time – and you have a wife and two kids. Is it hard to find time for them?


FOB: Yes, it is. I have to find a lot of discipline in myself. PS: What makes you different than the previous creative directors of Lacoste? For example – what do you bring to the label that Christophe Lemaire (previous creative director of Lacoste) was not able to? FOB: This is tricky for me to answer cause it makes the previous directors sound negative. I suppose we’re inspired by different periods of time. When I arrived I really wanted to focus on womenswear and to really push it, which is a big change. I wanted to be more urban and focus on putting Lacoste into daily life and not just focus on the weekends – that’s the main thing we are working on - and still stay true to the DNA. That is an important aspect. PS: Does sport plays an important role when you design? FOB: Of course, it is the essence of where we come from; even when we are designing casual wear. There is always a technical element in the clothes that makes it into Lacoste. PS: I am from Scandinavia, I am young, and I am curious – why should young people in Scandinavia wear Lacoste? FOB: We are trying to create a crossover between ages. We’re not thinking about age of country or market. Lacoste is sold worldwide in 1200 different shops so we’re trying to stay open and not think of a particular woman or age or a lifestyle, we are thinking more general. It is interesting how one piece can be worn by a woman on 25 or 45 and still feel cool with it. The philosophy behind Lacoste is that it should be quite easy to wear and you should never need any instructions. It’s always about comfort and utility. When designing colours and construction we are always thinking about comfort and how people can mix it into their personal style even though they are 30 or 50. PS: So you are trying to design on an international level – then what about the production of Lacoste? Is it still produced in France? FOB: There is still a lot of production in France and then we have platforms in Asia and South America. PS: Does the way the production is made matter to you? FOB: I am happy there are still factories in France. Lacoste produces in Europe, Peru and a small part of it is in Asia, Morocco and Tunesia. All of our factories, the conditions and the way people work are very controlled. All of the Lacoste production takes place in company owned factories. PS: What are your future plans and ideas? FOB: I think it is pretty much to develop this aesthetic. That is my main goal: making people wear Lacoste seven days a week and making the brand more and more desirable and relevant for today. PS: What about your own label and your own future? FOB: I would definitely like to involve and develop that too. Right now it is developing well so it is good.


PS: When designing, does Lacoste brings something to your own label? FOB: I need attention for my own label and I need attention for me and I think it is exciting to work on so many different creative projects at the same time. It all stimulates me creatively. You have all these ideas coming from one place to another and I am trying not to put up too many barriers for myself cause it always goes in a different direction. PS: You are the creative director of Lacoste and this year is the year of the 80th anniversary. Is that a big challenge? FOB: It is a huge challenge but it is fun. It is not like I have already forgotten but right now we are working on the collections for the next years. But this is a very interesting time for us. You have to think about many things. PS: How has your life changed since you became the creative director of Lacoste? FOB: I think it relates to a sense of organisation, creative processes and the timing of them. I have to follow all the work and I have to manage bigger teams and a lot of new projects so I think this have been a very exciting and insightful process. It is always hard to find the time to balance all of that with a private life. PS: You talk a lot about timing. Do you have time for social arrangements? FOB: Work hard, play hard. PS: Is that your mantra? FOB: One of them - one fits the other. You have to forget about the problems and get into another state of mind and meet people. It is a part of the game and it just has to be normal to you. I do less of that but I still do it. PS: Would you like to maintain that lifestyle for the rest of your life? FOB: Obviously you evolve as you grow older but it is important to have a job in life. It is very important that you have that whole spectrum in life. It is very important to have success and happiness in your life. I could never imagine doing something else than what I do now. I do have moments that are private but I think creative people need to travel, see other places and meet a lot of people. PS: So how do you get the energy for all that? FOB: Good question! I travel a lot and do a lot of sports. I think that is very important. This lifestyle suits me. PS: Does your Portuguese roots influence your lifestyle? FOB: I suppose so. I don’t know if you can say it like that but it is a part of me. I grew up in Lisbon but it has been eighteen years, so most of my culture comes from London and Italy. I think that is a part of being European. I have been to Denmark a few times and I don’t think the Danes are different. I don’t really think nationality defines who you are. I am really against that. I am proud of my roots and there are beautiful things about my culture but again, it is not something that ever comes on the étop of the list.


BOOKS MIND FOOD CHOSEN BY MORTEN VAMMEN

Inca sex rituals, electronic magic, green eyed redheads, the control machine, its all here in this manual for psychic youth, beatniks

The acid guru of the 1960s break

down

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tribalists.

Tibetan

Book of the death into pure essence, a mind expanding This complex coffetable

read even without tabs.

classic shows that you are a clever bastard, forecasting digi-modernism decades ago. A psychoanalyst and a philosopher take a mindboiling flight over capitalism and Schitzophrenia, the only real freedom left today?

Bright sial

but

controver-

Yugoslavian

turns

Freud invented the science of psychology thru research

everything around: this

on a handful of hysteric

time about

madams in the 1890s - using

Hollywood as

a lot of cocaine in the

psychological

procces. No wonder

propaganda, on a quest

psychologists

for a post communist/

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liberalist system and a

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new, free consciousness. Utopic.

hide

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113 Reynolds debut, Energy Flash, was the first serious rave analysis, a Lacan on E listening to cheesy happy hardcore. Next up was a return to his post-punk roots, cool analysis of Joy Division, Throbbing Gristle, The Cramps, Suicide and all the new romantic electro pop of the 1980s.

Chief curator and DJ from the post-dubstep label Hyperdub dive into the bass continuum, linking military sound weapons, dub tactics, mindworm jingles, Detroit techo rebels and highbrow philosophy composing a love letter to the bottom end.


PHOTOGRAPHY MATTIAS EDWALL ASSISTANT NICHOLAS LOFF CHRISTIAN BRYLLE / SCOOP MODELS STYLIST JESPER HENTZE ASSISTANT ELISABETH BYE MARTINSEN GROOMER / SIDSEL MARIE BØG / TOMORROW MANAGEMENT

G I G O L O


Jes Brinch: Hate 2013

Dries Van Noten

Roskilde Morning Glory


Jacket Balenciaga T-shirt Miu Miu Jeans Diesel

J S J B


Jacket Dries Van Noten Shirt Balenciaga Jeans Diesel Belt Dior

Roskilde Morning Glory


Bottega Veneta


Saint Laurant

Roskilde Morning Glory


Prada


Jacket Junya Watanabe Jeans Diesel

Roskilde Morning Glory


Louis Vuitton


Burberry Prosum


PHOTOGRAPHY EMIL MONTY FREDDIE

A CCe s s 90


Jes Brinch: Hate 2013

Roskilde Morning HugoGlory Boss


Bag Louis Vuitton, Dior, Shamballa, Dior Rays, Nokia phone, Tommy Hilfigar Watch, Maya Water Facial Mist


Rolex Submariner


Seiko


Tommy Hilfiger


Masion Martin Margiela


Sennheiser Momentum Closed


Kris van Assche


Nicholas Eades – Bien Cache – Men’s Shoes Nicholas Eades has a background as a professional skater earning a lot of respect from fellow skaters and friends. His passion and expertise has over the years grown for men’s shoe wear. Besides working as a consultant for international brand owners, most of the time you will find Nicholas at his unique and high end shoe store in the center of Copenhagen. At the Bien-­Cache shoe store you will find collections from Maison Martin Margiela, Magnanni, Kris Van Assche, Emperio Armani, The last conspiracy, Grenson, ShoeShiBar, Swims and many more. So when in Copenhagen don’t forget to pass by Nicholas’s store and have chat with the kind mr. Nicholas and be prepared to be inspired by his carefully selected range of shoes.


www.bien-cache.com Gammelmønt 35 Dk 1117 Copenhagen +45 33 93 98 93


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PHOTOGRAPHY NICKY DE SILVA BENJAMIN S / SCOOP MODELS STYLIST DENIS BJERREGAARD / AGENTUR CPH GROOMER / GITTE GULDHAMMER / AGENTUR CPH GROOMER ASSISTANT STINE RAMUSSEN

D E RAN G ED Scent by PRADA


3 Piece Suit Boss Shirt Sand Scarf Hermès Bowtie Brooks Brothers


Blazer Sand Shirt Sand Scarf Vintage Ysl Collar, White Vintage Gucci


Blazer Filippa K Knit Hugo Collar, Knit Armoire D’homme Scarf Hermès Pocketsquare Atlas Design Pocketsquare Hermès Flower Lanvin Briefs Libertine-Libertine Socks American Apparel Shoes Showpiece Peter Jensen


S S S T F P

Shirt Burberry Prorsum Collar, Fur Vintage Ysl Scarf Hermès Tie Sand Flower Lanvin Pants Burberry Prorsum Boots Burberry Prorsum


Suit Gucci Shirt Gucci Scarf Hermès Tscarf, Bow Hermès Flower Lanvin Pocketsquare Atlas Design

Roskilde Morning Glory


MASTER WORDS MORTEN VAMMEN

PUBLIC ENEMY FEAR OF A BLACK PLANET Listen to this breakdancing, burning cop cars in Jordans and urban camoflage spaying qoutes from Malcom X biography as a clever fucking wigger. In the 80s, rap became a recorded product, as cutups of the hole history of music flashed by with a cornucopia of slang on top. The Bomb Squad production crew took that game to the next level, and peaked on the third album, Fear of a black planet. Music history was hacked and atmospheric layers of atonal noise pulled from funk classics, quotes from Black Panther speeches, heavy 808 sub-bas kicks, off-center beats, militant drum rolls and horn blasts made a overload of sonic information and builded a monumental soap box for Chuck D to unfold his wordplay sounding like a triumphant basketball anchorman stiving to raise the consciousness of the masses. As the sugar on the often bitter pill, Flaver Flav was his crackhead clownish antidote. Topics include Hollywood, drugs, police violence and race/class - but in a new humorous funky arty format. The sound was dense and raw, made of samples from scratched 70s vinyl thru 8 bit Emu and 12 bit Akai samplers mixed on a broken analoge Neve mixer by hand, no computer - with absolutely no dead air - making a cinematic experience unmatched even today. Even stoner Spike Lee used Public Enemy as soundtrack to “Do the rigth thing� final riot scenes. The album is the peak of the sampladelic era, and as the lawyers smelled money and stopped this creative metod spurred on by a oversampled James Brown, unwillingly provider clones and spare parts for the hiphop industry. Its estimated that today this album would cost Public Enemy double the shelf price pr. album just in sample and publishing clearances. Fear of a black planet was the crossroad where hiphop turned into adult danceable retro-futuristic avant-garde noise, hail the prophets of rage!.


R PIECES


JON HASSEL DREAM THEORY IN MALAYA FOURTH WORLD VOLUME TWO Listen to this naked in a silky waterbed, stoned in the twilight, trying to read Kilton Stewart´s book on the Senoi tribe. After his highly lucrative work building sound cathedrals for the awful Jesus-freak Bono, producer Brian Eno is seen as a pretentious sellout villain coasting in posh galleries. But in the 70s he was the godfather of hip, and after his glamourous work with Roxy Music, he sort of invented ambient music, our generations answer to classical, or muzak? Ambient is music with beats, vocals, solos and even ego removed, long floating abstract, often soothing tape-loop soundscapes to tint reality playing in the background, made using vast amounts of synthetic reverb and echo, like a very white dub with no soul or body. Eno explored this anti-rock concept for a couple of albums, but he needed a lead voice to foreground his vinyl landscapes: enter Canadian trumpet magician Jon Hassel, who already crafted a sonic fiction on albums evoking a unreal ethnic futuristic “fourth world” headspace. A couple of sensual masterpieces, Possible musics 1-2 was the de facto soundtrack in the 80s to play stoned and naked making your bed a space capsule floating downstream in a uncharted area. Eno then reversed-engineered these tactics and used them on nerdy and the clubfooted post-punk Talking Heads kidnapping them to the same Compass Point studios in Nassau Grace Jones used, crafting their only masterpiece, Remain in light - adding a more african trance rhythm approach and the hallmark spacious treatments, to their arty-farty cut-up ramblings, with cameos from Hassel, who continued to churn out high quality maps for nonexistent exotic futures in a unreal ahistorical place like a reverb soaked white Miles Davis. Later in the 1980s, The Orb and the chill-out generation reinvented ambient using turntables and samplers as a meta-pastiche on every vinyl collectors beetles stoner gems, and now, even in the extremely conservative jazz world, Hassel proceeded tone is widely imitated, as Eno ambient sound now is a Hollywood stable, but as always, check the originals.


PSYCHIC TV DREAMS LESS SWEET Listen to this scarring yourself in a trance ritual fully erect inspired by Crowley´s “Magic In Theory and Practice” , wearing a grey catolic shirt (shaved head optional) or during weapon training. Someone must make a big Hollywood movie of Psychic TV´s main man Genesis P.Orrigde’s life: first, he was a fluxus hippie making avant-garde performance body-art, before he turned into the evil Elvis of his self invented Industrial music genre, spearheaded the mythologic Throbbing Gristle. They provided the most uneasy listening ever, taking stoner drone space post-rock into a bad trip diving into our collective nightmares, historical failures and primitive impulses, in a macabre cabaret of noise, toying with images of fascism.


Genesis P.O. assumed his preacher role, evoking daemons like a modern Alister Crowley, chanting mantras and barking army commands in an attempt to discipline the audience into a critical, higher consciousness. TG split at the peak of success due to internal erotic tensions, and G.P.O. regrouped with master sound alchemist Peter Sleazy Christofferson, conning a huge advance from major label Warner, crafting a string-ladden album verging on muzak, but filled with subliminal occult references. This was the fundraising and propaganda wing of their new Temple of Psychic Youth (TOPY), turning fanboys into a uniformed chaos magic global network, receiving personal ritual instructions for magical tantric sigils, performed on the 23 every month worldwide. Their second album, Dreams less sweet, is the tour de force, recorded in locations chosen for their occult history with a dummy head instead of a microphone for a 3-d effect. Quotes from cut-up beat godfather and author William S. Burroughs, imprisoned hippie cult leader Charles Manson and suicide cult shaman Jim Jones make a tapestry of ideas soundtracked by oboe, wolf howls, uzi and cellos, shifting between bittersweet folkish emulator pop and naturalistic musique concrete weirdness, complete with tibetan thighbone solos. After this, Peter Sleazy Christofferson formed Coil, intensify his sound design and post-gay psychedelic journey until his untimely death. G.P.O. transformed into a third gender, complete with silicon and steel teeth. Go investigate yourself.


YELLO STELLA Listen to this puffing cigars in a tailor-made suit in a highstreet gallery, browsing thru painting and models with a black book with own poetic musings in inner pocket near your heart or lounge on a vintage yacht feeling lonely reading Lyotard. Yello is the Swiss maximalist cousin to the dry stark minimalism of Kratwerk. Founded by conceptual artist, painter and writer Dieter Meier and the lovely named sonic genius Boris Blank, they continue to churn out lush dramatic ear movies using the broadest of brushes. Blank is self-taught non-musican, but a master of equalizing and space and the daft playful collage, juxtaposing odd samples. After a few albums, he finally tamed his Fairlight keyboard and the SSL mixer to an seemingly hyperreal level, making even Frankie Goes to Hollywood producer Trevor Horn tremble in envy. Thematically, and contrary to the bleak black and white postpunk and electropop of their opponents, Yello dived full on into the good life, emulation a Raymond Chandler-like universe of postmodern desire, crime and seduction in cars, bars, and aircraft with a distinct Cannes yacht feel. A cosmopolitan Memphis-styled mix of crooning, latin percussion, guitar hysterics, b-movie horn riffs, divas and field recordings integrated to make perfect pop singles and clubby yet stylish kitchy 12” vinyl. In the middle of it all was Dieters vocal, a tuneless dark patinated instrument better suited for storytelling than for singing. After “Stella”, they infiltrated the world of advertising jingles and soundtracks and became their own cliche, copying themselves endlessly like a electropop equivalent to the Stones. It´s still a nice formula, but the new not so mad adventures feels more like a souped up Audi TT than pieces of art today. Use their app and make your own Yello music now, or take Stella for a spin.


V I N TAG E

2 0 0 4 WORDS BY JACK PETERS

Earlier this year Nordic Man joine guests from around the world together with Chef de Cave Richard Geoffroy at the Abbey of Hautvillers, the spiritual birthplace of Dom Pérignon, for the declaration of the new Dom Pérignon Vintage 2004. The journey was composed of modular experiences integrating all senses. In the gardens in front of the Abbey, guests were first invited to discover the wine on their own, experiencing their first impressions isolated in transparent bubbles immersed in music, overlooking the vineyards and the valley. This moment of full sensation and meditation was followed by a technical tasting led by Richard Geoffroy. Later, guests were invited to visit the Abbey of Hautvillers, founded in the 7th century, to discover the specificity of its rich history.

The journey concluded with a Dark Revelation dinner at the Abbey where all senses and experiences blended together. To reveal the different nuances of the 2004 vintage, Richard Geoffroy and the Maison Chefs composed six accords and steps of tasting to accompany the wine. One by one, the different colors – silver grey, red, dark, yellow, green and white – open up new horizons. As you travel from one to the next, you glide between the density and buoyancy of a vintage that mixes reverie and precision with ease. Refined and coherent, the wine leads you into its universe, in a quest for harmony.


DOM PERIGNONON VINTAGE 2004

Delicate nose and very clean and demure attack. Aromatic and floral and then very sharp and crisp on the palate, the finish grows and grows. Interesting flavour trajectory – very attractive and mesmerising. The vintage was ‘easy’ apparently, with no botrytis or other issues and this shows in the pristine lines of this wine. With more Pinot Noir than usual (53%) this offsets the creamy ripe Chardonnay and gives it a more restrictive silhouette. With a little longer lees ageing than normal and a later release, too, this is a very subtle and correct wine with a stunning crescendo of flavours and it already looks ravishing!


Tell me a little about what Kaj Bojesen stand for? For me he was plane and simple a unique Danish designer, where shapes, materials, function, and not least the quality was unconditionally important in all his work. Everything he touched was to be steeped in perfection. What is your relationship with Kay Bojesen's products? Since Kay Bojesen was my grandfather, I grew up with many of his products and art work, but not all, since he was incredibly productive. All in all, he has designed more than 2,000 different products, including several hundred silver objects, toys, misc. wooden animals, bowls, plates, chopping boards, pots, etc. Now and then there still emerges items that I have never seen, for many of our products exist only as single copies. For over 25 years I have been involved in Kay Bojesen and his design. In the beginning I worked in our family shop in Bredgade, taking care of everything from customer servies to warehouse work. Today, I myself have become a distributor of my grandfather's products, which means that my grandfather's art work and products have always followed me at home as well as at work. Why have you decided to relaunch the cutlery? Since the early '90s I have held the rights to Kay Bojesen silver, including his ‘Grand Prix’ silver cutlery, it was evident that I should take over the steel cutlery of the same collection. Besides the desire to work with steel cutlery, I thought the idea of ​​it disappearing completely, from the market would be a true shame, as there are many collectors of cutlery, who wish for it to continue forever. Moreover, it is also in all Danish embassy residences around the world, which is anther good reason for it to be available. on the market. It won first prize at the world exhibition in Milan in 1951, hence the name Grand Prix. Overall, it seemed to me that I was required to re-energize the cutlery, which my grandfather would have appreciated. How does the cutlery fit into our way of living anno 2013? It was designed in the 30s, but is so timeless that it could just as well have been designed in the 00s. It's incredibly functional, simple and nice to hold. It is a cutlery that last for generations, you will not get tired of it, and in other words, a kind of investment time. Is there any prospect for launching other items? As for silver items, there are quite a few. Alone in the cutlery series there are 57 parts. For example there is an asparagus fork, an oyster dredge, a cream spoon and many more. In addition, bowls, pitchers, jewelry and mugs. Some of these items, we already have in stock, but all products are available on request. Compared to the Grand Prix series in steel, we have so far launched 25 parts where 3 of them are new. How would you characterize Scandinavian design? Scandinavian design is characterized by simplicity, functionality and quality. -SUS BOJESEN


B OJ E S E N WORDS BY JACK PETERS AN INTERVIEW WITH SUS BOJESEN

Kay Bojesen was the born silversmith, trained by famous Georg Jensen. Contrary to the trend of his time, Kay Bojesen had no need for decoration. He understood how to honour the finest craftsmanship. He loved the pure profile and tension in design, which gave his design a look and feel of timelessness. Kay Bojesen was awarded the finest honours for his pieces. He took part in exhibitions all over the world. In 1952 Kay Bojesen became silversmith by Appointment to H. M. the King of Denmark. Sus Bojesen Rosenqvist is Kay Bojesen’s granddaughter. In 2011, as the sole proprietor of all copyrights, she reintroduced the Grand Prix cutlery in its original shape and now manufactures true to granddad’s spirit and intentions.


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