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Turning Point Panel Engages Environmental Activism (Continued from page 1)

of the largest natural gas fields in the world. In his book, Seamus tells the story of “how my family, my neighbors, and the people I grew up with were trying to come to terms with doing the right thing in a tremendously challenging situation when the right thing is not always what you imagine it to be.” Seamus also talked about United States’ struggle to promote effective energy conservation while capitalizing on resources such as natural gas. “[Natural gas] is still a fossil fuel, and if we are still burning this stuff in 30 years we are [in trouble]. The idea is to turn around and use it as a bridge fuel to build wind turbines, with 7,000 acre facilities that provide energy to 440,000 homes . . . repeated thousands of times to provide energy for millions of people.” Teaching appreciation of natural resources is a top priority for Eric Clark, the Director of SPLASH (Student Participation in Learning Aquatic Science and History). Eric joined the Steamboat Floating Classroom on the Delaware River and became an onboard instructor at the request of the organization’s founder, the late Bart Hoebel, who was a Princeton professor of psychology. “The first thing that we tell children when they come aboard is that 17 million people depend on the Delaware for their drinking water, so it is a bio-resource,” Eric said. Eric

credits the work of two Princeton Community Volunteers for SPLASH as critical to the organization’s ability to continue to meet its educational mission. Wynn Madrigal ’91, a communications professional, is redoing SPLASH’s website to make it a more effective marketing tool. Haewon Park *05, a geoscientist who earned her PhD from Princeton, is serving as a grant researcher to expand SPLASH’s funding options. T u r n i n g Po i n t i s a Community Volunteers initiative, featuring speakers whose transformative experiences led them to make a measurable impact in their community and effect social change. Community Volunteers connects similarly inspired alumni with significant career Seamus McGraw writes about experie nce to nonprof it the conflict over the Marcelorganizations that have capacity lus Shale natural gas deposit. -building needs. For more information about Community Volunteers opportunities at PEEC, SPLASH, and other organizations, please visit alumnicorps.org.

Listening to Our Partner Organizations: Jack McCarthy, President and CEO of the DC-based AppleTree Institute for Education Innovation and AppleTree Early Learning Public Charter School, shares his thoughts on how a partnership with Princeton AlumniCorps has contributed to his organization. AppleTree Institute for Education Innovation has seen tremendous impact from both the Princeton Project 55 Fellowship Program and Emerging Leaders. The Project 55 fellowships have given us access to a pipeline of bright, mission-driven talent that has increased our capacity, especially in communications. Schuyler Softy ’11, our first Project 55 fellow, has a background in grassroots politics, and with her support we completed foundational communication tasks such as building message maps, unifying our language, updating our materials, and engaging in social media. Schuyler was instrumental in producing DC LINKs, a series of events AppleTree held with PNC Bank, Fight for Children, and the Washington Area Women’s Foundation that served as a forum to highlight our awardwinning Every Child Ready instructional model. This innovative model is featured in Gaston Caperton and Richard Whitmire’s new book, The Achievable Dream: ColFall 201 2

lege Board Lessons on Creating Great Schools and in an upcoming issue of the American School Board Journal. This year, we welcomed Sara Wallace ’12, who has a background in journalism. We especially appreciate her ability to generate compelling content that effectively tells the AppleTree story. AlumniCorps’ Emerging Leaders program has also left its mark on AppleTree’s leadership team, including Chief of Research and Innovation Lydia Carlis. As a participant in the program’s inaugural year, Lydia explored how she could proactively strengthen organizational alignment and improve stakeholder support for management decisions. By forming an “All Hands” committee consisting of members of AppleTree’s executive, senior, and middle management, Lydia was able to improve the sharing of information and diverse perspectives on key initiatives within the AppleTree community. The project’s benefits extended deep into the organization, and Lydia received positive feedback from colleagues who appreciated the opportunity to be heard and work with AppleTree staff members outside of their usual focus areas. Lydia commented, “I learned that I could be honest without being ‘brutally honest’ and still feel authentic.” Page 5

Shared Effort Fall 2012  

Princeton AlunmniCrops Quartley Newsletter

Shared Effort Fall 2012  

Princeton AlunmniCrops Quartley Newsletter

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