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annual report for the academic year 2017–2018


contents

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Mission and Goals

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Research

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Message from the Director Mission and Goals Research Areas Selected Events Timeline 2017-2018

6 Research 8 Faculty News 10 Research Highlights 12 2018 Innovative Research 13 Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellows 14 Lab to Market

16 18 20 23 25

External Partnerships Annual Meeting 2017 E-ffiliates Highlights Energy Systems Analysis Group Visiting Fellows Program

External Partnerships

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26 Education

Cover: Young Global Leaders, an international group of individuals selected by the World Economic Forum for making meaningful change in their communities, at Princeton’s first executive education module hosted by the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, with University President Christopher Eisgruber, and program supporter, Howard Cox Jr. ’64, special limited partner of Greylock Partners, in July 2018. (Photo by David Kelly Crow)

26 Education 28 Certificate Programs 30 Summer Internships 32 Maeder Graduate Fellowships 33 Young Global Leaders 34 In the News

37 39

Leadership Supporters


Photo by David Kelly Crow

message from the director

Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo Director of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment Theodora D. ’78 and William H. Walton III ’74 Professor in Engineering Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering

We are amidst one of the most daunting global challenges humanity has ever faced. And while the impacts of a changing climate are unevenly distributed, this past year has demonstrated what kind of environmental challenges we’re up against. California experienced the largest fire recorded in the state’s history. East Asia experienced an intense typhoon season that, along with earthquakes and tsunamis, killed thousands. The effects of a warming planet are reaping serious damage on communities and livelihoods today. As the planet continues to warm, climate scientists estimate that flooding will displace 5 million people. Concurrent growth in global population will further strain resources. By mid-century, we will need twice as much food and energy as we consume today. Yet, to cap global temperature rise, annual carbon emissions must be half of what they are today. The need to decarbonize is urgent and unrelenting. “It is only

teaching. We welcomed our first three Gerhard R. Andlinger Visiting Fellows in Energy and the Environment, as well as our two cohorts of Distinguished Postdocs to the center from the policy sector, the industrial sector, and academia. We also welcomed Zhiyong “Jason” Ren to our faculty. In July, the Andlinger Center hosted Princeton’s first executive education module in partnership with the World Economic Forum. Our faculty and students equipped these Young Global Leaders with the energy and innovation savviness to lead us confidently into a world where environmental decisions carry more weight.

The growth and development of our family is what brings me the most pride this year. By bringing more voices into our community, we not only diversify the ways we think about the same problem, we build a with support system for each of our programs continued… and expand opportunities for new research, participation that and for student and industry engagement.

While it is true that we have struggled to find a large-scale solution to the climate we can succeed crisis, it has also become clear that regional in building a more This is our mission. But we’ve got a long and local efforts are powerful. This summer sustainable future way to go. It is only with continued support alone, California passed legislation that together.” and partnership that we can succeed in requires solar panels to be installed on all building a more sustainable future together. new roofs starting in 2020. Texas is about to shatter the It requires collaboration across disciplines, geographies, 20% ceiling of wind and solar electricity generation across sectors and every other kind of border. the state. And here in the Garden State, we’re investing in clean energy — a signal that we value an environmentally On a more personal level, I hope that what you read in sustainable future. the following pages inspires you to join me in making a conscious effort to do what we can on the individual scale At the Andlinger Center, our goal is to develop reliable —to place a value on small-scale efficiency, sustainable ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from our power, infrastructure, transportation, and consumer goods. transportation, and industrial sectors without sacrificing We need to be ambitious in our research and in our economic stability and quality of life. But we don’t stop personal habits. there. We fuse innovative technology that uses mitigative and adaptive strategies with smart public policy, and what Finally, I invite you also to join us in our mission. we know about human behavior to build effective solutions. Engage with us on social media, attend a seminar or our annual meeting, share our fellowship opportunities with This year, the Andlinger Center has worked hard to convene your colleagues and friends, and support the funding of and contextualize the climate challenge by first gathering our activities. voices from across the scope of the problem and then by fostering opportunities for collaborative investigation and Welcome to our Andlinger Center community.

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mission+goals

to develop solutions for our energy and environmental future accelerate innovation through funding, infrastructure, and intellectual discourse foster a vibrant and interdisciplinary community partner with industry, not-for-profit, government, and peer institutions train the next generation of leaders in a broad context be the leading center for information and advice

Photo by tobago77/stock.adobe.com

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research areas

built environment, transportation, and infrastructure

Smart infrastructure, resilient cities, building efficiency systems and retrofits involving faculty from the School of Architecture; microgrids and networks, green cements, cleaner burning combustion engines, electric vehicles, and water desalination technologies

electricity production, transmission, and storage

Emerging technologies to harvest wind and solar power, nuclear fusion, power electronics and superconducting materials that enable more power transmission, grid-scale electricity storage, and modeling of grids with high renewables penetration

fuels and chemicals

Advanced fuels and chemicals from engineered microorganisms and artificial photosynthesis, development of catalysts with abundant elements, and technoeconomic and lifecycle assessments of advanced biofuel production systems

environmental sensing and remediation

Sensors to detect emissions of carbon and nitrogen cycle gases to the atmosphere from the energy, water and food sectors; carbon capture and storage; and wastewater treatment and soil remediation technologies using nanoparticles and microorganisms

decision and behavioral science, policy, and economics

In partnership with faculty and researchers at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, individual and collective decision-making and economic analysis related to energy and environmental policy

environmental and climate science

In partnership with faculty and researchers at the Princeton Environmental Institute, environmental monitoring and modeling of Arctic sea ice, carbon dioxide absorption by oceans, extreme weather, and coastal impacts

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Andlinger Center appoints inaugural cohort of Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellows, Rebecca Ciez and Bastien Wild.

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Andlinger Center awards funding of $600,000 for two ambitious fuel and transportation projects involving 19 researchers from seven departments on campus.

Andlinger Center publishes the fourth installment of the Energy Technology Distillates “Sunlight to Electricity: Navigating the Field.”

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Andlinger Center establishes and starts taking applications for the inaugural Gerhard R. Andlinger Visiting Fellows in Energy and the Environment and Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellowship programs.

Cumulative external grants funding growth from 2012–2018. 2012

$19 million

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$6.7 million

Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment and Princeton E-ffiliates Partnership Annual Meeting, featuring keynote speaker, Fred Krupp, president of the Environmental Defense Fund.


selected events timeline 2017-2018

2018

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31 25

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Cumulative number of ACEE research projects funded each year from 2012–2018.

june

Andlinger Center hosts a film screening and discussion of An Inconvenient Sequel.

april

march

january

february

American Tower and Siemens Corporate Technology become newest members of Princeton E-ffiliates Partnership.

Hongshan Guo and Evan Zhao are the new Maeder Graduate Fellows.

may

Andlinger Center welcomes inaugural Gerhard R. Andlinger Visiting Fellows in Energy and the Environment, Judi Greenwald and Darren Hammell.

42 Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo discusses “the energy transition” with University President Christopher Eisgruber’s Advisory Council in Hong Kong.

Diane Carlino joins the Andlinger Center as associate director for administration.

Andlinger Center holds Undergraduate Certificate Program in Sustainable Energy Symposium.

47 Cumulative number of certificate graduates from 2013– 2018.

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One of the most critical challenges that scientists, engi20 0 neers, andCMpolicymakers face right now is providing energy 0 0 100 Y 0 to population while ensuring the solutions 19 a growing K world 60 are sustainable, economically practical, and take into account the needs of multiple stakeholders. Threading the needle to meet all of these conditions requires boundary-pushing thinking and innovative research. The Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment at Princeton University rises to this challenge by building a collaborative, interdisciplinary research practice and atmosphere. Our faculty and researchers in every discipline - from engineering to architecture to the social sciences - seek to align the needs of the planet with those of humanity. The Andlinger Center was uniquely built to solve these problems. With 10 jointly appointed faculty members and 121 affiliated faculty straddling established disciplines and the evolving field of energy studies, the center facilitates cross-sector research focused not just on the study of energy and environmental problems, but also, new solutions to them. The Andlinger Center faculty are building a comprehensive research portfolio that addresses all of the key areas that affect, and are affected by, this century’s energy and environmental challenges. A constel-

lation of six interacting research areas forms the heart of the center’s focus: Built Environment, Transportation, and Infrastructure; Electricity Production, Transmission, and Storage; Fuels and Chemicals; Environmental Sensing and Remediation; Decision and Behavioral Science, Policy, and Economics; and Environmental and Climate Science. From building advanced energy storage systems to developing building-integrated organic solar cells, everything we do at the Andlinger Center moves the dial forward on practical solutions that reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Our faculty have received top awards and grants for their research and teaching, been recognized in prestigious journals for their discoveries, and earned national and international patents for their discoveries. They have produced research that sparked new companies that are launching technologies from lab to market. The interdisciplinary nature of the center and our singular research focus on developing practices, tools, and technologies that help the world adapt to and mitigate the effects of climate change make the Andlinger Center a distinguished, cutting-edge 21st century institution.

“The Andlinger Center fosters creative, collaborative thinking, which is demonstrated by the work that our faculty undertakes and the ambitious, innovative, cross-sector research projects that the center funds. The center is built to solve our energy and environmental issues in the near term and long term, and the wide range of research across the energy and environmental sphere reflects that.” —Peter Jaffé, associate director for research at the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, the William L. Knapp ‘47 Professor of Civil Engineering, and professor of civil and environmental engineering

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76

publications resulting from Andlinger Center seed fund support

research projects supported by the Andlinger Center, $5.9 million invested

2017 2016 2015 2014 2013

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+24

2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013

+$600,000

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$1.9 million

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external grants totaling

2017 2016 2015

$19 million

2014 2013

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2018 2017 2016 2015 2014

+17 +$3.4 million

$6.7 million

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patent disclosures and applications

m ill io n

2017 2016 2015 2014

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2018

+$4.5 million

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graduate students & postdocs supported

+$600,000

218

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+14 +11

+$ 50 0,0 00

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2 +2

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Faculty News

Z. Jason Ren

Catherine Peters

Ning Lin

Z. Jason Ren joined the faculty as a professor of civil and environmental engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment in July 2018. He founded the Water & Energy Technologies (WET) Lab at Princeton. Ren’s research focuses on resource recovery during waste management processes, using microbial and electrochemical processes to convert solid, liquid, and gaseous waste carbon and nitrogen into energy, fuels, and other useful materials. He was previously an associate professor at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and a visiting professor at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). At the Andlinger Center, Ren continues to investigate processes at the nexus of energy, water, and climate to ultimately enable a circular economy. Catherine Peters, professor of civil and environmental engineering and director of Princeton’s Program in Geological Engineering, was appointed chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering in July 2017. In her research, Peters focuses on geochemistry, including the intersection of water quality and energy technologies, such as carbon sequestration, geothermal energy, and hydraulic fracturing.

Four professors affiliated with the Andlinger Center were promoted to associate professor in summer 2018. They are Ning Lin of civil and environmental engineering, David Wentzlaff of electrical engineering, and Marcus Hultmark and Michael Mueller, both from mechanical and aerospace engineering. Lin studies hurricanes and how to mitigate the impacts of extreme wind, rainfall, and storm surge on natural and built environments. Wentzlaff studies data centers and cloud computing, and lends a materials perspective to the study of sustainable computing systems, aiming to build systems that minimize waste from electronics. Hultmark studies turbulent flows and methods to observe them. He has developed a novel facility to experimentally investigate how air moves around wind turbines. Mueller creates computational models of combustion reactions for developing advanced gas turbines and reciprocating engines. Recently joining the Andlinger Center research community are Pierre-Thomas Brun and Sujit Datta, assistant professors of chemical and biological engineering; and Xinning Zhang and Laure Resplandy, assistant professors of geosciences and the Princeton Environmental Institute.

David Wentzlaff

Marcus Hultmark

Michael Mueller

Faculty and staff of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment in 2017. (Photo by David Kelly Crow)

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Selected Faculty Award Highlights

José Avalos

Emily A. Carter

Howard Stone

Craig Arnold

Margaret Martonosi

José Avalos, assistant professor of chemical and biological engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, received an NSF CAREER award for his design of a closed-loop control system for metabolic engineering, which uses biosensors and optogenetics to more precisely control enzyme concentrations during fermentation reactions. Using optogenetics, or by harnessing light to control cellular processes, Avalos is able to use organisms, such as yeast, to produce useful chemicals and biofuels. He also was named a Pew Scholar in June 2017. Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo, director of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, the Theodora D. ’78 and William H. Walton III ’74 Professor in Engineering, and professor of chemical and biological engineering was recognized as a “Leader in Higher Education” by the publication NJBIZ in their Vanguard Series profiles in summer 2018. Loo was recognized for her work leading the Andlinger Center and her startup, Andluca Technologies, a company she co-founded to commercialize a self-powered smart window technology developed in her Princeton lab. In April, Loo gave the 29th annual Julian C. Smith Lecture at the Robert Fredrick School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Cornell University. Emily A. Carter, dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science, received the American Chemical Society’s 2018 Award in Theoretical Chemistry. Carter was recognized for her pioneering work predicting the behavior of molecules and materials under conditions that are difficult or impossible to probe experimentally. Carter is also the Gerhard R. Andlinger Professor in Energy and the Environment, and professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and applied and computational mathematics. She served as the founding director of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment from 2010 to 2016.

and Applied Science Excellence in Teaching Awards ceremony in February 2018. Award recipients were chosen jointly by the graduate and undergraduate engineering councils. Craig Arnold, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, and director of the Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials, was awarded the 2017 Edison Patent Award from the Research & Development Council of New Jersey. He was recognized for his work in the technology transfer category for “Tunable Acoustic Gradient Index of Refraction Lens and System,” a new kind of lens whose refractive index is controlled by sound. Margaret Martonosi, director of the Keller Center for Innovation in Engineering Education and the Hugh Trumbull Adams ‘35 Professor of Computer Science, was honored with the IEEE Computer Society 2018 Technical Achievement Award. She was recognized for contributions to “power-aware computing and energy-constrained mobile sensor networks.” Ian Bourg, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering and the Princeton Environmental Institute, received an NSF CAREER award to study the hydrology and mechanics of fine-grained soils and sedimentary rocks, which contain or overlay much of the Earth’s groundwater, carbon, and energy resources. Richard Register, the Eugene Higgins Professor in Chemical and Biological Engineering, received the engineering school’s Distinguished Teacher Award. The Distinguished Teacher Award is granted to professors who demonstrate excellence in teaching and significantly advance the educational mission of the school. Register investigates the synthesis, properties, and applications of complex polymeric materials to inform material design of electronics, lightweight vehicles, and separation membranes.

Ian Bourg

Howard Stone, chair of the mechanical and aerospace engineering department and the Donald R. Dixon ‘69 and Elizabeth W. Dixon Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, was honored with a lifetime achievement award at the annual School of Engineering

The list of awards and awardees represents select highlights from the past year and does not reflect all of the achievements of our faculty and affiliated faculty.

Richard Register

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research highlights Pride, not guilt, motivates sustainable action Is guilt-tripping people an effective way to encourage sustainable behavior? Elke Weber, associate director for education at the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, the Gerhard R. Andlinger Professor in Energy and the Environment and professor of psychology and public affairs, came to the conclusion that guilt-based messages on the environment can backfire in a recent study published in PLOS ONE. In a survey with more than 900 participants, Weber and her research partners at Columbia University and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst asked people to anticipate feelings of pride or guilt when making a choice that would have an environmental impact. Participants who were exposed to anticipation of pride consistently reported higher pro-environmental intentions than those exposed to anticipated guilt.

“Because most appeals for pro-environmental action rely on guilt to motivate their target audience, our findings suggest a rethinking of environmental and climate change messaging.”

Photo by David Kelly Crow

—Elke Weber, associate director for education at the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, the Gerhard R. Andlinger Professor in Energy and the Environment and professor of psychology and public affairs

Harnessing light to create useful chemicals Yeast is plentiful and cheap and can be engineered into special chemical factories that churn out useful compounds. In the lab of José Avalos, he and his team tweak the genes of yeast to enable the yeast to make biofuels, new drugs, and other useful chemicals that

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José Avalos addresses fundamental questions that offer opportunities for new technologies in his Princeton bioengineering lab. (Photo by David Kelly Crow)

would otherwise be costly and energy intensive to make via conventional methods. In recent research, Avalos is using a technique called optogenetics: harnessing light to control cellular processes. By shining light, which can be a renewable resource, on specially-engineered yeast and controlling its intensity when applied, Avalos can produce the desired amount of a chemical compound from yeast, reducing reliance on fossil fuels in manufacturing processes and producing bio-based fuels.

Carbon capture leaking will not be a major issue One proposed method of curbing climate change is to employ carbon-capture technologies at carbon dioxide (CO2) emitting sources, such as power plants, then compress the captured CO2 and inject it deep underground for permanent storage. One worry with this technique is that CO2 could easily leak from underground storage formations and re-enter the atmosphere, making the procedure not worth the expense. A team of Princeton engineers, including chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Catherine Peters, have used computer modeling to study the potential leaks. The modeling was based on both the geophysical aspects of carbon capture and storage, such as flow through subsurface geological formations, and economic modeling of the global energy market, using an integrated assessment model. The team concluded that the leaks will be minimal and will have little impact on the economic viability or the positive environmental effect of carbon capture technology.


Nanostructures and light make producing fertilizer and industrial chemicals more efficient Most fertilizers are produced by combining hydrogen and nitrogen, two gases found in air. However, to prepare nitrogen to bind with hydrogen, the bonds in naturally occurring nitrogen (N2) must first be broken in a furnace, an energy-intensive process which accounts for almost two percent of the world’s energy usage each year. A team led by Emily A. Carter has used computer modeling to demonstrate that sunlight can break the bonds in N2. Instead of heating the molecules in high temperature chambers, the research points to using sunlight-driven processes at room temperature to weaken the bonds, and allow elemental nitrogen to bind with hydrogen. The advance may have implications for using light, a renewable energy resource, to aid in other conventional high-temperature, energy-intensive chemical manufacturing processes, including producing hydrogen from natural gas.

Global warming increases inequality and hurts the U.S. economy Michael Oppenheimer, the Albert G. Milbank Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs and the Princeton Environmental Institute, co-authored a study that examined

the impact of climate change on the U.S. economy. Using aggregated climate models and statistical methods, the study showed that a climate which continues to change without intervention would hurt economies in the southern and lower midwest states, which are home to some of the poorest areas of the nation.

Better sensors mean a better understanding of greenhouse gases Understanding how atmospheric gases, such as methane and ammonia, originate and move is key to understanding how climate change is occurring. However, most accurate sensors for these gases are bulky, inefficient, and hard to deploy. The lab of Mark Zondlo, associate director for external partnerships at the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment and associate professor of civil and environmental engineering, is developing laser-based atmospheric sensors which are small, efficient, and accurate. Sensors developed by his lab have already been used as part of an agricultural emissions project in Michigan and in a national farming and vehicle emissions study done in conjunction with NASA. Most recently Zondlo deployed the sensors on the Big Island of Hawaii to measure volcanic fog, or “vog,� and catalog air quality following the 2018 volcanic eruptions.

Mark Zondlo uses atmospheric sensors developed in his lab to measure the impact on air quality of the 2018 volcanic eruptions on the Big Island of Hawaii. (Photo by G. Brad Lewis)

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2018 Andlinger Center Award for Innovative Research in Energy and the Environment Decarbonizing the Energy Sector Fossil fuels continue to dominate the world’s energy mix, significantly contributing to the global climate challenge. In the latest funding cycle, the Andlinger Center Innovative Research award was given to a group of Princeton researchers who are working to accelerate the shift to a low-carbon energy future. “Rapid Switch” is led by Eric Larson, senior research engineer in the Energy Systems Analysis Group (ESAG) at the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, Elke Weber, and Christopher Greig, director of the Dow Centre for Sustainable Engineering Innovation at the University of Queensland and a 2018 Gerhard R. Andlinger Visiting Fellow in Energy and the Environment at the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment. The project’s name, “Rapid Switch,” refers to the goal of the multidisciplinary initiative — a quick transition to a global power system that runs on low carbon resources. The project team seeks to identify technological, industrial, organizational, socio-behavioral, and economic barriers to decarbonization of the energy sector. The team aims to propose pathways to overcome such barriers in hopes of informing public policies and private investment decision making. The project is an international collab-

Graduate students Kengran (Blake) Yang, Maria Curria, and Christine Pu measure sustainable cement samples on the non-destructive ultrasound equipment in Professor Claire White’s Sustainable Cements Lab. (Photo by Tori Repp/ Fotobuddy)

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oration with researchers in China, India, and Australia. By taking a regional and subregional approach, and engaging a global community of actors, the project seeks to enable solutions tailored to local contexts throughout the world. Among the team members are Simon Levin, James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Denise Mauzerall, professor of civil and environmental engineering and public and international affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School, and Claire White, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment.

Investigating Impacts of High Intensity Wind on Infrastructure The Andlinger Center Innovative Research award also supports research with a one-of-a-kind wind tunnel under construction on Princeton’s Forrestal Campus. “Climate Forces Across Scales” tests and models how air interacts with surfaces of large infrastructure. The project explores the impact of extreme weather events and high intensity wind on urban buildings. The high-pressure tunnel enables the team to accurately model how wind would interact with skyscrapers and bridges in the lab. The project is led by Forrest Meggers, assistant professor of architecture and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment. One goal is to better model how extreme weather affects infrastructure and urban life. The project will simulate intense


Andlinger Center Funded Research Return on Investment (Since inception in 2011)

Total amount awarded: $5.9 million Derivative funding: $5.2 million Projects supported resulted in: 42 derivative research projects 76 journal publications 11 patent disclosures and applications

wind conditions to study how wind affects building heat loss, how wind moves between infrastructure, and how wind affects building integrity. The tunnel also will be used to study how wind flows between wind turbines, which has implications for wind farm design. Other project team members include Elie Bou-Zeid, professor of civil and environmental engineering and director of Princeton’s Program in Environmental and Water Resources Engineering; Marcus Hultmark, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, who was instrumental in developing the specialized tunnel; Sigrid Adriaenssens and Ning Lin, both associate professors of civil and environmental engineering; and other faculty from mechanical and aerospace engineering, architecture, and geosciences. The results will advance the study of fluid mechanics, and improve the design of buildings, cities, and wind farms. Funding for the Andlinger Center Award for Innovative Research in Energy and the Environment was provided by Addy/ISN North American Low Carbon Emission Energy Self-Sufficiency Fund; Clifford and Helen Cross Memorial Charitable Lead Annuity Trust; Peter C. Klosowicz ’76 Fund for Energy and the Environment; Sally Liu ’87 and Bay Chang ’87 Fund for Energy and the Environment; High Meadows Foundation’s Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment Director’s Fund; Laurie and Jay P. Mandelbaum ’84 Fund for Energy and the Environment; Parallax Fund for Energy and the Environment; Ruehl Family Fund for the Environment; Richard and Enika Schulze Foundation; and anonymous gifts.

One Year Later – Recipients of the 2017 Andlinger Center Innovative Research Awards Working Toward a Carbon-Neutral Fuel Source in Ammonia Paul Chirik, the Edwards S. Sanford Professor of Chemistry, is leading a team to explore sustainable ways to produce ammonia, an energy-dense molecule used in everything from the pharmaceutical industry to cleaning supplies. The team received the 2017 Andlinger Center Innovative Research award to experiment with light to break bonds to create hydrogen, the primary element in ammonia, a process that typically requires high tempera-

ture, energy-intensive steam to create. In the year since receiving the grant, the team has discovered how to synthesize ammonia from protons and electrons generated from visible light. By using the energy from light, a renewable energy source, to produce low-pressure hydrogen and bonding it to nitrogen, the scientists are aiming to reduce the carbon footprint of ammonia production. They anticipate that ammonia will be used for a variety of applications beyond the ones common today, including as a potential replacement for oils and synthetic liquid fuels.

Electrifying Transportation The 2017 Andlinger Center Innovative Research award is also supporting research on the technical challenges of electrifying transportation, a move that, as the grid becomes cleaner and more reliant on renewables, is slated to significantly reduce the carbon impact of the transportation sector. Yiguang Ju, the Robert Porter Patterson Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and director of the Program in Sustainable Energy, leads the research efforts to design safe, fast-charging batteries for electric vehicles (EVs). In the year since receiving the grant, researchers have developed novel aerosol flame synthesis methods for low cobalt and high energy capacity lithium ion battery cathode materials. The researchers founded HiT Nano Inc. and filed a patent to commercialize this technology. Moreover, the team has developed an active battery balancer technology for fast charging and a new optimizing simulator for driverless fleets of EVs.

Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellows To foster the next generation of research leaders, the Andlinger Center recently launched the Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellows Program. Outstanding scholars at the start of their careers are invited to develop and collaborate with faculty and research staff on inventive, interdisciplinary projects that will seed future solutions in energy and the environment. The 2017-2018 Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellows are: Tapomoy Bhattacharjee, who earned his doctoral degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Florida in Gainesville works on developing ways to design and control bacterial communities at Princeton. Bhattacharjee is

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“By broadening my network of collaborators and mentors and challenging me to think critically about the many technology attributes and assumptions in energy systems research, the Andlinger Center Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellowship provides an opportunity for me to substantially grow my interdisciplinary research.” —Rebecca Ciez

Tapomoy Bhattacharjee

developing 3D-printed biofilms to remediate contaminated water. Sujit Datta serves as Bhattacharjee’s mentor. Bhattacharjee’s work focuses on understanding the fundamental mechanisms by which bacterial communities behave, and uses novel fabrication approaches to control and optimize biofilm-mediated remediation. In addition to Professor Datta, Bhattacharjee will work with Professors Peter Jaffé, Howard Stone, and Robert Austin, professor of physics. Kian Wee Chen, who earned his doctoral degree in architecture and buildings systems at ETH Zurich in Switzerland, works on sustainable buildings with concentrations in sustainable design and computational design tools. At Princeton Chen is developing advanced digital tools to create more energy-efficient built environments. Forrest Meggers serves as Chen’s mentor. Chen also plans to engage Professors Mark Zondlo and Elie Bou-Zeid, along with Niraj Jha, professor of electric engineering and Naveen Verma, associate professor of electrical engineering and associate director of the Program in Robotics and Intelligent Systems in his work. Rebecca Ciez, who earned her doctoral degree in engineering and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University, works on electric vehicle transportation and electricity generation technologies at Princeton. Daniel Steingart, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, and Elke Weber, are her research mentors.

Kian Wee Chen

Rebecca Ciez

Bastien Wild

Bastien Wild, who earned his doctoral degree in earth science from the University of Strasbourg in France, works on the degradation of silicate materials, such as cements, rock-forming minerals, and glasses at Princeton. These materials have implications for green cements, carbon dioxide sequestration, and nuclear waste storage. He works under the mentorship of Ian Bourg and Claire White. Wild will also work with Professor Howard Stone. For more information on the Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellows program, visit https://acee.princeton.edu/opportunities/

Moving Research from Lab to Market at the Andlinger Center The Andlinger Center actively creates an entrepreneurial atmosphere, resulting in startups and patented technologies that help to solve the world’s energy and environmental problems. Below are research projects that are being moved from lab to market.

Hearth Labs – Measuring the missing half of thermal comfort A team of three have founded Hearth Labs to commercialize a technology that can better measure occupant comfort and reduce energy consumption in buildings. Forrest Meggers, co-founder and chief technology officer of Hearth Labs, and his team first developed the Spherical Motion Average Radiant Temperature (SMART) building sensor in 2014. The sensor measures the spatial geometry, surface temperatures, air temperature, and humidity of rooms using thermal radiation and rangefinding sensors to more accurately measure the factors that affect occupant comfort. The technology has won multiple awards from institutions, including the Department of Energy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and PSEG for its ability to reduce heating and cooling loads in buildings, which account for a significant percentage of energy use in the United States and globally. Researchers in Meggers’ Princeton lab include Nicholas Houchois, the company’s CEO, and Eric Teitelbaum, a doctoral student in architecture, who serves as Chief Scientific Officer. The research was supported by Princeton’s Intellectual Property Accelerator and the Campus as a Lab program.

Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo, director of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, measures temperatures inside a courtyard tent using a thermal camera as part of an interactive teaching exercise on heating and cooling buildings. (Photo by Molly A. Seltzer)

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HitNano Inc. –  Rethink Energy Storage

Andlinger Startups – Where are they now? Andluca Technologies – Smarter Glass Untethered Established in 2017 by Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo and Nicholas Davy, a doctoral student in chemical and biological engineering, to commercialize a self-powered solar smart window that allows users to control the amount of light or heat coming through the window. • Selected for FedTech Startup Studio, an 8-week customer discovery program in Washington, D.C. for hard science startups • Launched a collaboration with Princeton Power Systems to develop a plugand-play, wireless, self-powered smart glass platform for architectural glass and luxury automotive markets • Earned media coverage in The Wall Street Journal, ExxonMobil’s Energy Factor, and Clean Technica, among other outlets

Feasible Inc. – See Batteries Differently Established in 2015, Feasible Inc. launched out of the lab of Daniel Steingart to commercialize a battery diagnostic tool that uses sound to gauge battery health. Other co-founders include CEO and former postdoctoral research associate at the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, Andrew Hsieh, and postdoctoral research associates in Steingart’s lab, Barry Van Tassell and Shaurjo Biswas. • Ramped up to 10 employees • Launched projects with companies on three continents • Won funding from the Department of Energy’s ARPA-E agency, and the National Science Foundation’s Small Business Innovation Research program

Flux Marine – Where Performance Meets Sustainability Established in 2017, Flux Marine set out to design and manufacture zero-emissions, electric boat motors. Ben Sorkin, Class of 2017, and Jonathan Lord, Class of 2018, both graduated with a bachelor’s degree in mechanical and aerospace engineering from Princeton, and serve as the company’s CEO and CTO, respectively. • Established a headquarters in Boston, Massachusetts • Selected as a finalist for the MassChallenge Boston cohort for its “potential to create widespread impact across industries” • Launched strategic alliance with research and engineering firm, Navatek Ltd.

In spring 2018, Yiguang Ju founded a battery company to produce low cost, high performance batteries for electric vehicles. Ju has patented a process for producing the nanomaterials that comprise battery cathodes, the positive part of a battery, using combustion. In the last year, the company has signed an exclusive license for the underlying technology and raised a seed round of funding. Using a high temperature process to produce the nanomaterials means the process is quicker and can start with more common materials, instead of rare earth materials often found in batteries. With a more efficient cathode production process and fewer rare materials, the battery is more environmentally and financially sustainable. The company was also accepted as an inaugural tenant of the Princeton Innovation Center’s Startup Incubator, Biolabs, whose opening ceremony was attended by NJ Governor, Phil Murphy.

Staff News Three new staff members joined the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment in 2017-2018. Diane Carlino joined the center in February 2018 as the associate director for administration. Carlino participates in strategic planning and provides leadership to execute the center’s vision, including the areas of financial management, communications planning, and administrative management. Lisa Kraut joined the center as a financial assistant in March 2018. She is responsible for financial reporting, purchasing, accounting and grant administration. Molly A. Seltzer joined the center in June 2018 as a communications specialist. She is responsible for producing articles and multimedia content that highlight the center’s events and research. Seltzer joins the center after completing a year-long environmental journalism project as part of the George Washington University’s Shapiro Traveling Fellowship.

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A core pillar of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the 20 C 0 to foster an interdisciplinary community of Environment is 0 M 0 100 Y 0 stakeholders from industry, government, not-for-profit, and peer 19 K 60 institutions. To this end, the Princeton E-ffiliates Partnership, a corporate membership program administered by the Andlinger Center, connects the Princeton community with academic experts and practitioners outside of Princeton to spark and advance innovations in technological, socio-economic, and policy innovations that address the world’s most complex and urgent energy and environmental challenges.

—Mark Zondlo, associate director for external partnerships at the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment and associate professor of civil and environmental engineering.

Photo by Tori Repp/Fotobuddy

The center’s faculty, researchers, and students work together within this ecosystem to focus on helping the world meet increasing resource demands while also reducing greenhouse gas emissions on a global scale. The center supports this diverse community by sponsoring and organizing various forums, conferences, seminars, and workshops at Princeton and across the globe to engage with leaders and decisionmakers.

“To realize a future that is both economically vibrant, equitable, and environmentally sustainable, academic research successes must translate to industry, and industry findings and challenges must be brought to academic labs and classrooms. That is the approach that the Andlinger Center takes, and it’s that engagement between academia and industry that yields effective and impactful solutions.”

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Andlinger Center and Princeton E-ffiliates Partnership 2017 Annual Meeting Despite the gloom of the United States withdrawing from the Paris Climate Agreement, there are still reasons to be hopeful, according to Fred Krupp, president of the Environmental Defense Fund. Krupp outlined three positive mega trends in a wide-ranging keynote speech at the annual meeting in the Andlinger Center’s Maeder Auditorium on November 10, 2017. The three trends are forward-thinking multi-national companies, innovation in energy technologies, and leaders from across the globe who acknowledge the need for a price on carbon and for the end of an era of unlimited, free climate pollution, Krupp told a rapt audience. “We will solve the carbon problem. The only question is if we do it in time.” —Fred Krupp, president of the Environmental Defense Fund Fred Krupp, president of the Environmental Defense Fund, gives the keynote address at the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment and Princeton E-ffiliates Partnership 2017 Annual Meeting. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

“We still have a chance to win this race,” said Krupp at the day-long event that brought together over 180 energy researchers, industry leaders, E-ffiliate corporate partners, government officials, and students. The meeting featured lively discussions and panels on cutting edge topics, including electric transportation, resilient coastal infrastructure, and solar panel efficiency. A reception and poster competition featuring energy-related research bookended the day. Invited speakers and audience members mingled and talked with the 36 undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers who participated in the competition.

2017 Annual Meeting Poster Award

Hongshan Guo wins the ExxonMobil Graduate Student Poster Award, with Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo and Mark Zondlo. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

PSEG Undergraduate Poster Award William Atkinson, Class of 2018 “The Role of Minerals in Stabilizing Soil Carbon from Greenhouse Gas Feedbacks” Advised by Satish C.B. Myneni, Department of Geosciences Samuel Smiddy, Class of 2018 “Fluid-driven Cracks and Flowback in a Multi-Crack System” Advised by Howard Stone, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

ExxonMobil Graduate Student Poster Award Hongshan Guo “Geothermal Harvested at Depth with Seasonal Implications — A New Method for Year-Round Heating & Cooling” Advised by Forrest Meggers, School of Architecture and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment

ExxonMobil Postdoctoral/Researcher Poster Award Nicholas Houchois “SMART Sensor (Spherical Motion Average Radiant Temperature)” Advised by Forrest Meggers, School of Architecture and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment

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Annual E-ffiliates Retreat How can industry leaders and researchers magnify their joint efforts with Princeton to solve the world’s pressing issue of meeting growing energy demand while also addressing the environmental challenges of the 21st century? That was the central, animating question at the heart of the annual E-ffiliates retreat in June 2018. Faculty, researchers, and students joined representatives from the Andlinger Center’s E-ffiliates corporate partners for the two-day event in New York City.

Xinyi (Minnie) Liu, graduate student in mechanical and aerospace engineering, asks a question of afternoon panelists at the 2018 Annual E-ffiliates Retreat in June. (Photo by Tori Repp/Fotobuddy)

Darren Crosse, Chief Technical Officer for Europe, Middle East and Africa at American Tower Corporation, an international owner and operator of wireless and broadcast communications infrastructure, was the star of the keynote conversation with Daniel Steingart, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment. They discussed the technical, economic, political, and cultural challenges to rapidly deploying resilient and self-sustaining energy systems in developing countries within continental Africa. There were also discussions on carbon capture, juicing the efficiency of power electronics, and technologies and solutions that can lead to a decarbonized future, among other talks. The first day concluded with an evening poster fair, where attendees networked with students and postdoctoral researchers who presented their research. The retreat’s second day featured a walking tour of Lower Manhattan infrastructure and buildings impacted by Hurricane Sandy. Attendees saw the high-water mark left on the exposed brick of Pasanella & Son Vintners, a wine shop, and other places flooded during the storm.

Undergraduate student, Lindsey Conlan, presents her research to E-ffiliates members.

“It was important to show participants, nearly six years after Superstorm Sandy struck New York, all of the places that were impacted, the rebuilding efforts, and the work that is still under way to fortify Lower Manhattan against sea-level rise, storm surges, and stronger storms” said tour guide Catherine McVay Hughes, Class of 1982, who earned a bachelor’s degree in civil and environmental engineering from Princeton and is a founding member of CB1’s “Manhattan Tip” Resiliency Task Force.

(Photo by David Kelly Crow)

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energy for the world, but Chiaramonte’s research is asking whether this resource can be exploited using safe and acceptably sustainable methods.

E-ffiliates Member Highlights ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company at Princeton The Andlinger Center established a partnership with ExxonMobil in 2015 to align research initiatives with realworld problems and applications.

David Dankworth (second from left), a 1991 Princeton doctoral graduate in chemical engineering and distinguished scientific adviser at ExxonMobil Corporate Strategic Research in residence at the Andlinger Center, at the 2018

E-ffiliates Funds Two Projects to Advance Energy & Environmental Solutions in 2017-18 Improving Electric Efficiency with Direct Current (DC) Power Architecture

Princeton faculty, researchers, and students work side-byside with ExxonMobil researchers on a portfolio of collaborative research projects spanning 18 faculty research labs across eight departments. David Dankworth, a distinguished scientific adviser at ExxonMobil Corporate Strategic Research and a 1991 Princeton doctoral graduate in chemical engineering, is continuing his roles as visitor-in-residence at the Andlinger Center and portfolio adviser of ExxonMobil’s research programs at Princeton.

Annual E-ffiliates Retreat. (Photo by Tori Repp/Fotobuddy)

Minjie Chen, assistant professor of electrical engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, received E-ffiliates funding to develop a novel power delivery architecture system so that future smart homes and buildings can efficiently use renewable energy and interface with the grid. Chen’s lab has set out to design bi-directional power electronics that minimize energy loss during power transmission to and from the grid.

Deep Sea Methane Harvesting Coupled with Carbon Dioxide Storage, an Exploration of New Energy Resources

Egemen Koleman

Maurizio Chiaramonte, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering, received E-ffiliates funding to study the feasibility of extracting methane from hydrates, naturally occurring crystalline solids found in deep sea deposits, by exchanging methane molecules with carbon dioxide. The exchange process would stabilize methane depleted sediments, and by storing carbon dioxide beneath the ocean floor that would otherwise be released to the atmosphere, would effectively reduce net carbon emissions. Methane in these hydrates represents a source of

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Maurizio Chiaramonte

ExxonMobil provided $1 million in FY18 to support collaborative research projects related to sustainable energy technologies as part of the company’s pledge to contribute $5 million over five years. Some of the key collaborations this year are highlighted below: Egemen Kolemen, assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, and Yiguang Ju, Robert Porter Patterson Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and director of the Program in Sustainable Energy, study plasma, one of the four primary states of matter (gas, solid, liquid). The goal of their research is to examine the applicability of lowenergy plasmas in chemical synthesis. Plasma may aid in converting natural gas into larger molecules and has the potential to reduce the amount of energy required to produce chemical feedstocks and fuels. Robert Nielsen of ExxonMobil is collaborating on the research.


Daniel Sigman, Dusenbury Professor of Geological and Geophysical Sciences investigates how past periods of warming have impacted the ocean’s role in the global carbon cycle. These findings will provide clues as to how quickly the ocean will absorb carbon dioxide that is emitted by human activities. Bill Heins is the program lead for ExxonMobil on the project. Daniel Steingart, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, leads a project that studies degradation pathways of electric vehicle batteries. Steingart uses diagnostic tools recently developed in his lab to understand a battery’s health and ultimately study how to extend its lifetime and improve cycle efficiency. Understanding the lifecycle of a battery and how it degrades may enable “second life” applications for used batteries. Paul Stevens of ExxonMobil is collaborating on the research. Alistair Adcroft, research oceanographer, and Olga Sergienko, research glaciologist, both in Princeton’s Program in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, study the degradation of sea ice. They are developing sea-ice models that produce more accurate long-range and seasonal forecasts of sea ice melting and formation. Laurent White is the program lead for ExxonMobil on the project. Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo, director of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, Theodora D. ’78 and William H. Walton III ’74 Professor in Engineering, and professor of chemical and biological engineering, studies semiconducting conjugated polymers for next-generation flexible electronics. Her research examines how complex microstructures within polymeric thin films Catherine McVay Hughes, Class of 1982 and founding member of CB1’s “Manhattan Tip” Resiliency Task Force, engages with faculty and researchers at the 2018 Annual E-ffiliates Retreat. (Photo by Tori Repp/Fotobuddy)

can be used to control electron transport in applications such as smart window coatings. Mark Disko and Gus Bosse of ExxonMobil are collaborating on the research. Barry Rand, assistant professor of electrical engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, studies metal halide perovskite and organic semiconductors for use in photovoltaics and light emitting diodes. Today, the efficiencies of perovskite hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells rival those of conventional silicon cells but are much easier to produce. One area of Rand’s research focuses on how the organic molecules of the perovskite layer interact with other layers of the cell, such as the gold or aluminum electrodes, in order to inhibit degradation and improve stability of the solar cells. Heather Elsen of ExxonMobil is collaborating on the research. Ali Yazdani, director of the Princeton Center for Complex Materials (PCCM) and Class of 1909 Professor of Physics, leads a project studying 2D crystalline materials, or sheets of atoms, at the subatomic level. The project involves stacking the sheets and studying the behavior and property of these 2D materials, which is of interest in multidisciplinary research, including physics, chemistry, electronics, and surface science. One hope is to determine whether the surfaces can be used to understand how chemical reactions can be accelerated by these types of materials. Yunlong Zhang of ExxonMobil is collaborating on the research.  

PSEG at Princeton Since joining E-ffiliates in 2011, Public Service Enterprise Group (PSEG), a NJ-based diversified energy company, has continuously engaged in various forums with the Princeton community including through educational and recruiting activities. In March 2018, President and CEO Ralph Izzo delivered the keynote address at “NJ’s Energy Future,” a conference organized by the Princeton University Energy Association. Izzo also served as a panelist at the executive education module for Young Global Leaders to discuss the challenges and opportunities of renewables penetration in the utility sector. PSEG held its 3rd round of annual targeted information sessions for undergraduate and graduate students in November 2017.

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—Maggie Cutlip, Class of 2016, Reliability Engineer at PSEG

Photos courtesy of Maggie Cutlip

“Learning about the most recent advances in the industry from extremely interesting speakers and even presenting to them at the annual E-ffiliates retreat played a critical role in helping me transition into the energy industry. Out of school I was looking to gain experience in the traditional energy sector. I wanted to understand how the industry works and its history over the past century in the United States. I definitely have found that my work at PSEG continues to challenge me every day.”

Producing Industry-Ready Energy Engineers (PSEG) Maggie Cutlip’s relationship with PSEG began during her undergraduate studies at Princeton’s School of Engineering and Applied Science and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, and continued to develop throughout her educational career at Princeton. Cutlip earned her bachelor’s degree in 2016 in chemical and biological engineering with a focus on materials science, and a sustainable energy certificate from the Andlinger Center. Through her coursework and engagement with Princeton

American Tower Corporation Joins E-ffiliates In November 2017, American Tower, one of the largest global real estate investment trusts and a leading independent owner, operator, and developer of multitenant communications real estate, joined E-ffiliates as a corporate member. American Tower is headquartered in Boston, Massachusetts and has a global portfolio of approximately 170,000 sites across 17 countries. As part of their E-ffiliates membership, American Tower is sponsoring Princeton faculty and students to explore

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E-ffiliates Partnership she connected with PSEG, a NJ-based diversified energy company. By attending Andlinger Center on-campus conferences, the annual E-ffiliates retreat, and presenting her research at various E-ffiliates events, she met PSEG employees and was exposed to the mission and work of the company. Her junior year she received the PSEG Scholarship for Advancing Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Majors. In 2016, Cutlip graduated with a job with the company first as a generation engineer and now as a reliability engineer, playing scientific and technical consulting roles in the company.

and solve fundamental challenges to developing self-sufficient communications tower sites. Andrew Kim, a doctoral student in Daniel Steingart’s group, led a team of undergraduate seniors including Tenley Shield, Aliya Greenberg, and Bar Kadosh (Class of 2018), that built a solar-battery system on the Andlinger Center’s rooftop lab. The team monitored battery health as a function of temperature during the changing seasons as the system powered a simulated communications tower site in Uganda. Additional experiments were conducted in Steingart’s lab to study battery degradation under the hotter temperatures typical of American Tower sites in sub-Saharan Africa and India.


Power Survey Company at Princeton In October 2017, Power Survey Company demonstrated its patented mobile electric field detection system to Princeton faculty and students, and showed how the system can be used to locate leaking electricity from degraded and damaged underground transmission cables. The technology demonstration was part of a study conducted by the Andlinger Center’s Energy Systems Analysis Group (ESAG) of the economic and sustainability benefits of finding and fixing these leaks in low-voltage buried electric cables in London.

NRG Energy (NRG) at Princeton During its first full year as an E-ffiliates member, NRG partnered with ESAG to study how decarbonization of the power sector might impact electricity markets. NRG’s Vice President for Regulatory Affairs Group and Deputy General Counsel, Abe Silverman, spoke about electricity markets and decarbonization at multiple campus forums, including the Andlinger Center’s 2017 Annual Meeting, the Bradford STEP seminar series, and NJ’s Energy Future conference.

Siemens at Princeton Siemens’ engagements during its first full year as an E-ffiliates member centered on participating in campus forums and co-authoring grant proposals with Princeton faculty. Siemens research scientist Tao Cui was awarded funding by the Advanced Robotics for Manufacturing Institute. The successful grant submission includes proposed research in Forrest Meggers’ lab to use his patented SMART sensor technology to improve energy efficiency in manufacturing. Meggers is an assistant professor of architecture and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment and co-founder and chief technology officer of Hearth Labs. In July 2018, engineers and scientists from Siemens presented their research alongside Princeton faculty, postdoctoral researchers, and graduate students for two days of idea exchange hosted by Frederik Simons, professor of geosciences, with an eye towards opportunities for collaborative research and education initiatives.

Energy Systems Analysis Group Collaborations The Energy Systems Analysis Group is led by senior research engineer, Eric Larson. The group includes Thomas Kreutz, senior technical researcher; Ali Daraeepour, postdoctoral research associate; and Christopher Greig, a Gerhard R. Andlinger Visiting Fellow in Energy and the Environment.

Deep Decarbonization of the Electric Grid The Energy Systems Analysis Group (ESAG) at the Andlinger Center launched a project to study deep decarbonization of the electric grid, including an evaluation of carbon pricing and the effects of a hypothetical carbon tax on electricity markets, storage technologies, and grid operation. The project received support from Princeton’s Dean for Research Innovation Fund and is an ongoing collaboration with NRG Energy.

Making Renewables Work using Stored Hydrogen as Supplement ESAG researchers, collaborating with Dr. Pedro Haro, a visiting Fulbright postdoctoral scholar from the University of Seville in Spain, are studying how stored hydrogen, a clean burning fuel, can be used as a power plant fuel to help balance the intermittency of renewable electricity from solar and wind. The team is exploring how hydrogen might be continuously produced from natural gas, with co-product carbon dioxide captured and permanently sequestered underground. The hydrogen would be used for gas turbine power generation when electricity is needed to balance variable renewable generation and stored in salt caverns during times when balancing power is not needed.

Capturing CO2 from Industrial Processes using Fuel Cells Professor Stefano Consonni and postdoctoral fellow Luca Mastropasqua from Politecnico di Milano in Milan launched a research project on carbon capture with ESAG while in residence at the Andlinger Center for the spring 2018 semester. The project studies how to capture and concentrate carbon dioxide for underground storage

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Other Engagements E-ffiliates also convened several high-profile events that engaged stakeholders who are making direct investments in energy and climate solutions. The Andlinger Center hosted a day-long event for Breakthrough Energy Ventures, the investment arm of Breakthrough Energy Coalition. This group, dedicated to funding future clean energy companies, counts among its founders several important industrial leaders, including Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, Class of 1986, and Microsoft founder and philanthropist Bill Gates. The event featured several faculty members and researchers who presented on leading-edge technologies, such as energy-efficient power electronics and genetically-engineered yeast that produce biofuels. Researchers from the Energy Systems Analysis Group tour Petra Nova, a commercial demonstration of carbon dioxide capture at one of the country’s largest coal-fired power plants outside of Houston, Texas. (Photo courtesy of Eric Larson)

produced from steel mills and hydrogen production plants using molten carbonate fuel cells. This reduces greenhouse gas emissions at industrial plants while producing additional low-carbon electricity and hydrogen. It is a collaborative project supported by ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company. In summer 2018, the team toured Petra Nova, a commercial demonstration of carbon dioxide capture at one of the country’s largest coal-fired power plants outside of Houston, Texas to learn about the system. The coal plant is owned and operated by NRG Energy. The group also visited Net Power, a demonstration of a natural gas power plant with integrated carbon capture in La Porte, Texas.

Reducing Electricity Loss and Improving Public Safety in the U.K. Power Sector Eric Larson, senior research engineer at ESAG, and Minjie Chen, co-authored a report on electricity that is lost from the grid in the United Kingdom through breaks in buried low voltage power lines, or “contact voltage losses.” The report was commissioned by UK Power Networks, the power utility that operates and manages the regulated electricity distribution networks for 18 million residents in Great Britain. The team determined that contact voltage losses are the single largest avoidable electricity loss in UK electric grids.

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The center also hosted representatives from Oil and Gas Climate Initiative’s (OGCI) Climate Investments. OGCI is made up of oil and gas companies dedicated to meeting the ambitious goals of the Paris Climate Agreement. The mission of OGCI’s Climate Investments arm is to invest in startups that can help reduce the carbon footprint of the energy sector and other industries. Princeton faculty presented their research on sustainable cements, decision-making studies associated with climate change, China’s energy future, climate mitigation, and land use. Industrial representatives from Shell, BP, Statoil, Eni, Repsol, Total, and Petrobras were in attendance. In May, the center hosted the Northeastern Legislative Climate and Energy Summit, a meeting of 70 legislators and government officials from ten East Coast states and Quebec, Canada. The nonpartisan summit, which was organized by the Council on State Governments, facilitated conversations on reducing carbon emissions while fostering economic growth. Guy Nordenson, professor of architecture and structural engineering, organized a one-day summit on climate adaptation in October 2017, which brought together academics, researchers, architects, economists, and industry consultants to discuss holistic approaches to counter the effects of climate change. Presenters spoke about the impacts of sea level rise and storm surge,


and various infrastructure strategies to protect cities and coastal communities most vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Later in the fall, researchers from the Stockholm Resilience Center at Stockholm University joined Princeton faculty and staff for a symposium on “Earth in 2050: Boundaries, Obstacles, and Opportunities.” The symposium, cosponsored by the Andlinger Center, focused on research initiatives that are important for a sustainable future, including efficient agriculture, urban infrastructure, and management of complex, resilient systems.

The Gerhard R. Andlinger Visiting Fellows Program The Andlinger Center welcomed our inaugural class of Gerhard R. Andlinger Visiting Fellows, a program launched in summer 2017 to attract distinguished visitors from industry, academia, government, and the nonprofit sector, who will collaborate with our faculty, researchers, and students to enrich the research and teaching at the center. Judith Greenwald, Class of 1982, is a former U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) executive with more than 35 years of policy experience working in government and the nonprofit sector. She is a graduate of the School of Engineering and Applied Science and returned as a fellow in spring 2018. During her time at the center, she collaborated on research, lectured, advised students, brought in speakers, and convened industry, government, and NGO leaders. She liaised with PUEA to facilitate the group’s inaugural conference to examine New Jersey’s power markets and policy reforms in April 2018. Greenwald guest lectured at the Keller Center for Innovation in Engineering Education and at Conversations on the Environment and Responsible Energy and Life (CEREAL). She organized “Accelerating Climate Action in the United States: What Are We Doing and What More Can be Done,” a September 2018 public conference, featuring keynote speaker Tammy Snyder Murphy, First Lady of New Jersey. In her lectures, Greenwald emphasized that the causes of and solutions to climate change rest at the intersection of public policy, technology, market forces, and human behavior.

Darren Hammell, Class of 2001, is co-founder and president of Princeton Power Systems, a designer and manufacturer of microgrid and battery solutions. He founded the company as an undergraduate at Princeton’s School of Engineering and Applied Science and the company is now a global leader with thousands of deployments across North America, Europe, Africa, and the Caribbean. Hammell has returned for a fellowship during which he is providing support to start-up companies that have been founded at the Andlinger Center. He led discussions and served as a panelist at the 2018 Annual E-ffiliates Retreat and lectured on his experience commercializing energy technology during the Andlinger Center’s executive education module for Young Global Leaders in July 2018. Christopher Greig is a chemical engineer who earned his doctoral degree from the University of Queensland (UQ), and is a fellow of the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering. Greig leads both the Energy Initiative and the Dow Centre for Sustainable Engineering Innovation at UQ and was selected as a Gerhard R. Andlinger Visiting Fellow beginning in July 2018 for two years. Greig will use his fellowship at the Andlinger Center to nucleate a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional, cross-sector collaboration to identify hotspots and bottlenecks that impede deep decarbonization of the global economy. The core of Greig’s role at the center is to develop this major international research collaboration, known as the Rapid Switch initiative, which the Andlinger Center and UQ’s Dow Centre will lead. His main interests lie in energy transitions, economics and policy, energy for development, mega-project implementation, and carbon capture and sequestration. For more information on the Gerhard R. Andlinger Visiting Fellows Program, please visit: https://acee.princeton.edu/ opportunities/

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What will it take to set the world on a more sustainable, 20 C 0 resilient path? An essential component is the cultivation 0 M 0 100 Y 0 19 future problem K 60 of solvers and leaders steeped in smart policy solutions and leading-edge technologies who can help support our growing need for energy while healing our world. The Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment at Princeton University seeds this by fostering an exciting, dynamic setting where undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows can engage with faculty, researchers, and practitioners on the biggest challenges facing our planet. Students from a wide variety of concentrations can enroll in the center’s educational certificate programs, apply for fellowships and internships, and take part in a myriad of enriching activities that will help them grow into the future leaders that this world needs. Students of the center are trained to be fluent in

“It’s an essential part of our mission to build the next generation of leaders — to both create interdisciplinary researchers who sharply think about energy and environmental solutions, and to also disseminate that information outside of the university to inform the public and critical stakeholders. Knowledge is key to solving many of our issues, and the Andlinger Center fulfills this through its innovative programmatic initiatives.” —Elke Weber, associate director for education at the Andlinger Center, the Gerhard R. Andlinger Professor in Energy and the Environment, and professor of psychology and public affairs, Woodrow Wilson School. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Certificate Programs Highlights

Greenberg, Roan Gideon, Caleb Gum, Marissa Webber, and junior Oliver Hsu, at the Andlinger Center’s Certificate Symposium. (Photo by Greta Shum)

The Andlinger Center offers two certificate programs that uniquely prepare undergraduate students for careers or to pursue graduate studies in energy and the environment. Students can pursue the Program in Technology and Society: Energy Track or the Program in Sustainable Energy. As an interdisciplinary center, students learn about energy and the environment through many lenses, with courses in engineering, architecture, policy, anthropology, and geosciences, among others. The Program in Technology and Society is offered jointly with the Keller Center for Innovation in Engineering Education. It is comprised of a series of courses that explore the intersection of technology and society, and how their co-evolution affects innovation in energy technologies. The Program in Sustainable Energy is geared toward undergraduates interested in technical careers or graduate education in sustainable energy science and technology. In each program, students have the opportunity to take classes where they can help develop the next generation of solar cells and batteries, grapple with the societal and economic impacts of energy and environmental trends and policies, and engage with the wide array of faculty associated with the center to be exposed to exciting, boundary-pushing research in multiple fields.

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This year the Program in Sustainable Energy graduated 13 undergraduate students from six concentrations: chemical and biological engineering, civil and environmental engineering, mechanical and aerospace engineering, operations research and financial engineering, computer science, and economics. The graduates have swiftly taken up careers in industry, working in investment banking, electricity trading, and software engineering, as well as in advanced studies, including at Boston University and Carnegie Mellon University.

Certificate Symposium In May, the Andlinger Center held its annual certificate symposium, an opportunity for students enrolled in the center’s certificate programs to present their research projects to fellow students, faculty, and staff. Research topics ranged from hydropower to carbon sequestration and showed the breadth of work at the Andlinger Center. The following students presented their research at the symposium event: Oliver Hsu ’19 (Program in Technology & Society: Energy Track) “Managing Sustainable Development Goal Trade-offs


Regionally: Hydropower in the Mekong Region” Advised by Jin Sato, visiting research scholar at the Woodrow Wilson School Aliya Greenberg ’18 (Program in Sustainable Energy) “Lithium-ion Batteries: An Analysis of Commercial Viability and an Application in an Off-Grid Solar-Battery System” Advised by Dan Steingart, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment Roan Gideon ’18 (Program in Sustainable Energy) “Integrated Wave and Offshore Wind Energy: Benefits and Challenges” Advised by Elie Bou-Zeid, professor of civil and environmental engineering and director of the Program in Environmental Engineering and Water Resources Caleb Gum ’18 (Program in Sustainable Energy) “WellVision, A Modular Analytic Framework for Characterizing the Impact of Oil and Gas Wells” Advised by Alan Kaplan, lecturer in computer science; Denise Mauzerall, professor of civil and environmental engineering and public and international affairs at the

Woodrow Wilson School; and Stuart Riddick, associate research scholar in civil and environmental engineering Marissa Webber ’18 (Program in Sustainable Energy) “Seismic Chimneys: Potential for Leakage from Snøhvit’s Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Storage Formation” Advised by Karl Bandilla, associate research scholar in civil and environmental engineering; and Michael Celia, Theodora Shelton Pitney Professor of Environmental Studies, professor of civil and environmental engineering, and director of Princeton Environmental Institute

Andlinger Center Class Day Celebration On June 4, 2018, the Andlinger Center feted its 13 graduating certificate students at its inaugural Andlinger Center Class Day Celebration. Faculty members gave remarks celebrating the achievement of the seniors and honoring the support of their family and friends. “Seniors, you are the first class to have completed your certificate requirements since our new building opened in the fall of 2015,” said Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo, director of the Andlinger Center. “You are the first cohort of grad-

Roan Gideon, class of 2018, receives the inaugural Andlinger Center Senior Thesis Prize in Energy and the Environment at the Andlinger Center Class Day Celebration in June 2018 from Yiguang Ju, director of the Program in Sustainable Energy. (Photo by Greta Shum)

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“We want to give students a myriad of opportunities during the summer, such as lab experience, time to experiment and explore new ideas, and access to people who work in the field, whether on campus or off. The internship program at the Andlinger Center fulfills this by connecting students with faculty and impactful organizations who are working on energy and environmental solutions.” —Elke Weber, associate director for education at the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment

uates to have taken energy courses in our classrooms and conducted laboratory experiments in our facilities at the Andlinger Center. We are so proud to have had you be a part of our growth,” said Loo, the Theodora D. ’78 & William H. Walton III ’74 Professor in Engineering, and professor of chemical and biological engineering. During the event, Roan Gideon ’18, a civil and environmental engineering major, was awarded the first Andlinger Center Senior Thesis Prize in Energy and the Environment, which recognizes outstanding achievement in a senior thesis. The recipient is determined based on nominations by the students’ advisers and review of the students’ theses by Andlinger Center directors and faculty. Gideon’s thesis, entitled “Integrated Wave and Offshore Wind Energy: Benefits and Challenges,” explored whether co-locating offshore wind farms and wave energy generation arrays produces positive results. Elie Bou-Zeid served as his adviser. In addition to the certificate in sustainable energy, Gideon also received the certificate in African studies and was recognized with the School of Engineering and Applied Science’s J. Rich Steers Award. After graduation, Gideon began working as a water resources engineer at Dewberry, an engineering firm.

Course Updates and Highlights In addition to our certificate programs, which draw on coursework from across the University, the center offers courses in energy studies under the “ENE” designation. The Andlinger Center offered 38 courses in energy studies, with 31 and seven cross-listed at the undergraduate and graduate levels, respectively. Barry Rand, assistant professor of electrical engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, taught “ENE 431: Solar Energy Conversion,” in fall 2017. Students explored the four main energy conversion routes: solar to electricity, solar to heat, solar to mechanical energy, and solar to chemical energy (fuel), both in class and lab settings. Rand’s students had access to a new piece of equipment at the center, a solar simulator, a device that provides light approximating natural sunlight. By using the solar simulator, students gained a firm understanding of how solar cells operate, how

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Barry Rand teaches on solar light using a solar simulator in his course, “Solar Energy Conversion.” (Photo by Greta Shum)

efficiency is measured, and gained an appreciation for solar light content. In fall 2017, Claire White, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, took a group of students on a day-long trip to the federal-government-run NIST Center for Neutron Research in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The trip was part of White’s course, “ENE 506: Synchrotron and Neutron Techniques for Energy Materials.” Each time she offers the course, White takes her students on a field trip to a national laboratory. During this trip, the students saw a research reactor, a source of neutrons for materials characterization from molecular structure and dynamics to macroscopic imaging. These facilities are useful in assessing the qualities of green cements, White’s main research focus.

Summer Internships at the Andlinger Center In the summer of 2018, the Andlinger Center supported seven students to conduct research related to energy and the environment. Five students worked with faculty on campus and, for the first time, two students went in the field to intern at non-governmental organizations in Washington, D.C. and Chicago. Since inception, 52 students have participated in the Andlinger Center’s summer internship program.


Sam Berman, Class of 2021 Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Mentored by Emily A. Carter, dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science, the Gerhard R. Andlinger Professor in Energy and the Environment, and professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and applied and computational mathematics, Berman focused on improving the efficiency of solar cells made up of the semiconducting compound copper zinc tin sulfide, which is a promising material because it is plentiful and non-toxic compared to other compounds used in thin-film solar cells. Heidi Kim, Class of 2021 Department of Electrical Engineering Mentored by Barry Rand and Minjie Chen, both assistant professors of electrical engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, Kim studied the design and placement of solar panels to increase the power output of a constructed system, testing the layout on the Andlinger Center rooftop. Understanding how the tilt and directional orientation of the panels affect power production can help optimize design of solar systems and improve system efficiency.

“My internship was an incredible learning experience. It allowed me to ‘get out of the lab’ and explore the social sciences, something I have now become very interested in learning more about here at Princeton. The ACEEE was an inspiring place to work and I plan on continuing my study of energy and the environment…”

Saira Reyes, Class of 2021 Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering Mentored by José Avalos, assistant professor of chemical and biological engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, Reyes’ research involved bioengineering yeast cells to produce biofuels and other useful compounds via the use of biosensors, and by optimizing the metabolic pathways of yeast. These biofuels and alternatives to petroleum could be used to fuel transportation systems.

Natalia Miller, Class of 2021

Photo by Anita Fresolone

—Natalia Miller, Class of 2021, undergraduate concentrating in chemical and biological engineering

Connor Matthews, Class of 2020 Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Mentored by Howard Stone, chair of the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and the Donald R. Dixon ‘69 and Elizabeth W. Dixon Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and Ankur Gupta, a postdoctoral research associate in Stone’s Complex Fluids Group, Matthews analyzed the flow and electrical properties of carbon slurries for use in flowable electrochemical capacitors, a potential platform for future energy storage devices. Flowable capacitors are particularly suitable for high power applications such as airplane exits, elevators, and buses.

At the beginning of her educational journey, freshman Natalia Miller, Class of 2021, looked to the Andlinger Center summer internship program for an opportunity that would expand her horizons. As a chemical and biological engineer, her coursework is technical, but a communications campaign at The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) enabled Miller to approach an energy project from a behavioral perspective. For 10 weeks, she worked with

energy auditors, behavioral scientists, and graphic designers, studying variables across various existing home energy assessment reports. Message framing including cost, discounts, health and safety benefits, and design were all examined to determine the most effective way to tell homeowners how they could save power. The ongoing project aims to help utility companies educate the public on the steps residents can take to make their homes more energy efficient.

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Kim Sha, Class of 2019 Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering While interning at the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), a large environmental nonprofit, at their Chicago, Illinois office, Sha helped craft policy recommendations for clean energy legislation for Illinois and the Midwest along with EDF economists, lawyers, media, and program staff. Teerit Vongkovit, Class of 2019 Department of Physics Mentored by Alejandro Rodriguez, assistant professor of electrical engineering, Vongkovit worked on developing theoretical methods that capture how quantum and thermal fluctuations of light impact nanoscale forces and heat flow in semiconducting materials, which is important for understanding nanoscale electronic devices, solar cells, and computer chips. This work utilizes advances in the field of nano-fabrication and the study of nano materials, or structures with features at the scale of or smaller than the electromagnetic wavelength. The Andlinger Center’s summer internships are funded by the Peter B. Lewis Fund for Student Innovation in Energy and the Environment and the Dede T. Bartlett P03 Fund for Student Research in Energy and the Environment. “I’m very excited to receive the Maeder Fellowship. It was already a huge privilege for me to be working in the Andlinger Center with so many different researchers from drastically different disciplines. The fellowship encourages me to push those collaborations further and I hope to keep up the momentum for the rest of my career.” —Hongshan Guo, Maeder Fellow in Energy and the Environment

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Maeder Graduate Fellowships in Energy and the Environment Two doctoral students received Maeder Fellowships to fund their continued energy and environment-related research. These graduate fellowships are supported by the Paul A. Maeder ’75 Fund for Innovation in Energy and the Environment. Hongshan Guo is a fourth-year architecture doctoral student researching urban water issues, geothermal energy delivery, and energy-efficient temperature regulation in buildings. She is advised by Forrest Meggers, assistant professor of architecture and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment. Evan Zhao is a third-year chemical and biological engineering doctoral student whose research involves using light to control microbes in chemical reac-

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Previous Maeder Winners –  Where They Are Now? 2018 Ching-Yao Lai (mechanical and aerospace engineering) is now a postdoctoral researcher at Columbia University. 2017 Clark Chen (chemical and biological engineering) is now a postdoctoral researcher at Northwestern University. 2017 Ryan Edwards (civil and environmental engineering) is now a William L. Fisher Congressional Geoscience Fellow in Washington, D.C. 2016 Wenkai Liang (mechanical and aerospace engineering) is now a postdoctoral researcher in the mechanical and aerospace engineering department at Princeton. 2015 Jennifer Obligacion (chemistry) is a senior scientist-process chemist at Merck Pharmaceuticals. 2014 Warren Rieutort-Louis (electrical engineering) is an engineering manager at Apple. 2013 Josephine Elia (chemical and biological engineering) is a senior chemical engineer-refinery modeling specialist at Honeywell UOP.

tions, which produce biofuels and other useful chemicals. He is advised by José Avalos.

Energy Technology Distillates The Energy Technology Distillates are an educational resource on existing and emerging energy resources and technologies. Each of the Distillates focuses on a specific topic, and include solar energy, nuclear fusion, small scale nuclear reactors, and grid scale electricity storage. The center’s fifth Energy Technology Distillate, “Wind Power” is scheduled to be released in early 2019. To read the latest Distillate and others, visit https://acee.princeton.edu/distillates


Young Global Leaders Collaborate on World Energy Issues

encouraging to get together with like-minded peers and talk about how to move forward on climate and energy.

In July 2018, the Andlinger Center held Princeton’s first executive education module, a four-day training, “Leadership in Energy Innovation and Environmental Consideration” for global changemakers. The program was designed for the Young Global Leaders, an international group of individuals selected by the World Economic Forum for making meaningful change in their communities. The program was funded by Howard E. Cox, Jr. ‘64, a graduate of the Woodrow Wilson School and special limited partner of Greylock Partners. The 30 participants were executives, entrepreneurs, government officials, and scientists from 22 countries.

It was the first time the University partnered with the World Economic Forum to educate the Young Global Leaders. The course focused on team exercises and also offered lectures, workshops, and panel discussions on various topics from commercializing energy technologies to energy policy and the behavioral science behind climate action.

“When I look at where everyone has come from, we’ve truly assembled a world class group in terms of background and accolades,” said Cox. “Collaboration in this room, among global leaders from NGOs, academia, and business yields far-reaching impact. This is how we change the world.” Young Global Leaders cool off while attending Princeton’s inaugural executive education module at the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment in July 2018. (Photo by Molly A. Seltzer)

The module provided participants the opportunity to discuss the challenges of and possible solutions to increasing global resource demands and a changing climate. For program participant Akira Kirton, managing director of BP Ventures for Europe and Asia, it was

2017-2018 Highlight Seminar Series The Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment hosts distinguished professors, researchers, government dignitaries, and practitioners from various institutions across the field of energy and the environment for a diverse and informative lecture series, Highlight Seminar Series. Find videos of the series at https://acee.princeton.edu/videos. Cristina Archer (September 2017) Associate Professor University of Delaware “Wind Energy, Atmospheric Turbulence, and Hurricanes” Marcelo Mena Carrasco (September 2017) Minister of the Environment Government of Chile “Chile’s Energy and Environment” Esther Takeuchi (October 2017) SUNY Distinguished Professor; William and Jane Knapp Chair in Energy and the Environment Stony Brook University “Advancing Energy Storage Through Materials: The Need for Multiscale Investigation From the Molecular to the Mesoscale” Seth Darling (December 2017) Director, Institute for Molecular Engineering Argonne National Laboratory “Water Technologies by Interface Engineering: Purification and Pollution Remediation”

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Energy Regulatory Commission; Ralph Izzo, CEO of E-ffiliates partner PSEG; and Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo. The conference covered topics on how to promote affordable, reliable, and clean power in New Jersey. Judith Greenwald, inaugural Gerhard R. Andlinger Fellow in Energy and the Environment, helped to organize the conference. The Andlinger Center also supported various activities of the Princeton Conservation Society, the Princeton Environmental Ideathon, Princeton Student Climate Initiative, and PUEA’s high school energy competition. The center also provided funding for graduate students to attend the following conferences: World Symposium on Climate Change Communication, SimAUD 2018, International Metabolic Engineering Society, and Bloomberg New Energy Finance’s “Future of Energy.”

In the News

Undergraduates Todd Baldwin and Noah Schochet learn from attendees of “NJ’s Energy Future,” a conference organized by the Princeton Undergraduate Energy Association in April, 2018 at the Andlinger Center. (Photo by Greta

Matthew Posewitz (March 2018) Rowlinson Professor of Chemistry Colorado School of Mines “Photosynthetic and Metabolic Networks in Salt-Water Photoautotrophic Microorganisms for the Production of Sustainable Biocommodities”

Shum)

Paul Langan (April 2018) Associate Laboratory Director Oak Ridge National Laboratory “Neutron Sources for Energy and Environmental Research” Steve Koonin (May 2018) Director, Center for Urban Science and Progress New York University “Urban Data”

More Student Activities In April, the Andlinger Center hosted the inaugural student-run conference “NJ’s Energy Future.” The conference was organized by the Princeton University Energy Association (PUEA), an undergraduate student organization devoted to energy issues. The event featured speakers from academia, industry and non-profit groups, such as Cheryl LaFleur, Class of 1975, commissioner of the Federal

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In 2017-2018, faculty and researchers affiliated with the Andlinger Center were referenced in various news sources, such as The New York Times, The Guardian, The Washington Post, Reuters, and Newsweek. A small sampling representing the range of sources and topics is below:

Michael Oppenheimer Albert G. Milbank Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs and the Princeton Environmental Institute; director of the Center for Science Technology and Environmental Policy New York Magazine, “Michael Oppenheimer on the ‘Unknown Unknowns’ of Climate Change” Source:http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2017/07/ michael-oppenheimer-10-percent-chance-we-meet-paristargets.html

Denise Mauzerall Professor of civil and environmental engineering and public and international affairs Science Friday, “How China Is Reinventing Its Energy Economy” Source: https://www.sciencefriday.com/person/ denise-mauzerall/


“When it comes to any impact on solar-energy conversion, the good thing about the solar eclipse is that it is infinitely predictable and a rare event. Utilities and power companies can compensate for the decrease in solar power and take action by having power plants burn more fuel during the eclipse.” ­ —Barry Rand, assistant professor of electrical engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment

Forrest Meggers Assistant professor of architecture and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment Reuters, “Feature: Extreme heat—an ‘unseen threat’— burns U.S. urban poor” Source: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-heatwave-usacities/feature-extreme-heat-an-unseen-threat-burns-u-s-urban-poor-idUSKCN1BW037

Associate director for education at the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment Deutsche Welle, “Change your ways, save the environment” Source: https://www.dw.com/en/change-your-ways-savethe-environment/a-42259024

Claire White Assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment Scientific American, “Cement Producers Are Developing a Plan to Reduce CO2 Emissions” Source: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/cementproducers-are-developing-a-plan-to-reduce-co2-emissions/

The Andlinger Center Speaks is a Q&A news series designed for expert faculty to comment on noteworthy topics in the news related to their research areas. Throughout

Nathan Li, and Levi Golston, calibrate a quantum cascade laser-based ammonia sensor prior to taking field measurements of human perturbations to the nitrogen cycle and the formation of unhealthy particulate matter in Professor Mark Zondlo’s lab. (Photo by David Kelly Crow)

The Impact of a Total Solar Eclipse on the Electric Grid Barry Rand Assistant professor of electrical engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment

Elke Weber

The Andlinger Center Speaks

Graduate students, Rui Wang,

2017–2018, the series tackled questions around the solar eclipse and solar production, Hurricane Sandy, and sustainable cements.

The solar eclipse of August 21, 2017 was slated to be quite a show. Not since 1918 has a total solar eclipse stretched across the continental United States. Many people across the country were making plans to be in the 168-mile wide “path of totality” (the moon’s shadow on Earth) and experience the full grandeur of one of the most awe-inspiring events of the natural world. But some people had concerns. What did the eclipse mean for solar energy production? To answer that question, Barry Rand participated in The Andlinger Center Speaks Q&A series. Rand’s research explores the physics of thin film electronics, such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and solar cells, and refines them to be more efficient and lower cost. Rand said concerned media reports about the solar eclipse’s impact on solar production were overblown and overhyped, and the power grid would, more or less, be fine.

The Impact of Large Companies Getting Serious About Green Concrete Research Claire White Assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment Link: https://acee.princeton.edu/acee-news/the-andlingercenter-speaks-the-impact-of-large-companies-getting-serious-about-green-concrete-research/

Lessons Learned, and Some Unheeded, After Hurricanes Sandy, Harvey, Irma, and Maria Ning Lin Associate professor of civil and environmental engineering Link: https://acee.princeton.edu/acee-news/the-andlingercenter-speaks-lessons-learned-and-some-unheeded-afterhurricanes-sandy-harvey-irma-and-maria/

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Undergraduate students tour the University’s solar field in West Windsor, New Jersey as part of Professor Minjie Chen’s class, “Renewable Energy and Smart Grids.” (Photo by Greta Shum)

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The Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment

Leadership and Staff Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo Director, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment Theodora D. ’78 and William H. Walton III ’74 Professor in Engineering Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering Peter Jaffé Associate Director for Research, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment William L. Knapp ’47 Professor of Civil Engineering Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering Elke Weber Associate Director for Education, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment Gerhard R. Andlinger Professor in Energy and the Environment Professor in Psychology and Public Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School Mark Zondlo Associate Director for External Partnerships, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering Jennifer L. Poacelli Associate Director for Administration (through January 2018) Diane Carlino Associate Director for Administration (beginning February 2018) Sharon Adarlo Communications Specialist (through March 2018)

Jeffrey Fitts Research and Development Strategist Sarah Jackson Administrative Assistant Lisa Kraut Financial Assistant Brenda Mikeo Business Manager Moira Selinka Education and Outreach Coordinator Greta Shum Digital Communications Specialist Molly A. Seltzer Communications Specialist (beginning June 2018) Charmaine Smiklo Faculty and Program Assistant

Faculty and Researchers José Avalos Assistant Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment Minjie Chen Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment Egemen Kolemen Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment Thomas Kreutz Energy Systems Modeler Energy Systems Analysis Group

Eric Larson Senior Research Engineer Energy Systems Analysis Group Forrest Meggers Assistant Professor of Architecture and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment Barry Rand Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment Daniel Steingart Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment Elke Weber Associate Director for Education, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment Gerhard R. Andlinger Professor in Energy and the Environment Professor in Psychology and Public Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School Claire White Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment

External Advisory Council D. Michelle Addington Dean, School of Architecture Henry M. Rockwell Chair in Architecture University of Texas, Austin A. Paul Alivisatos Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost Samsung Distinguished Professor of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology University of California, Berkeley

Robert Eich Program and Financial Assistant

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Gerhard R. Andlinger ’52 P80 P91 g21 (D) Chairman of the Board Andlinger & Company, Inc. Merrick G. Andlinger ’80 President Andlinger & Company, Inc. Sally Benson Director, Global Climate and Energy Project Co-Director, Precourt Institute for Energy Professor, Energy Resources Engineering Stanford University Yet-Ming Chiang Kyocera Professor of Ceramics Massachusetts Institute of Technology David Eaglesham Chief Executive Officer Pellion Technologies Ralph Izzo Chairman, President, and CEO PSEG Paul A. Maeder ’75 Managing General Partner and Founder Highland Capital Partners Gregory H. Olsen President GHO Ventures, LLC Mark F. Rockefeller ’89 President and Chief Executive Officer IEG SponsorDirect Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall Senior Fellow Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs Harvard Kennedy School of Government Vijay Swarup Vice President of Research and Development ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company

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Matthew Tirrell Dean and Founding Pritzker Director Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago Deputy Laboratory Director for Science Argonne National Laboratory William H. Walton III ’74 P21 Managing Member and Co-Founder Rockpoint Group, LLC Maura Wong ’88 Founder The IDEA

Michael Oppenheimer Director, Center for Science Technology and Environmental Policy Albert G. Millbank Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs and the Princeton Environmental Institute Athanassios Panagiotopoulos Chair, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering Susan Dod Brown Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering

Executive Committee

Stewart C. Prager Professor of Astrophysical Sciences

Craig Arnold Director, Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Daniel Steingart Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment

Rene Carmona Paul M. Wythes ’55 Professor of Engineering and Finance Professor of Operations Research and Financial Engineering

Sankaran Sundaresan Norman John Sollenberger Professor in Engineering Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering

Michael Celia Director, Princeton Environmental Institute Theodora Shelton Pitney Professor of Environmental Studies Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Elke Weber Associate Director for Education, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment Gerhard R. Andlinger Professor in Energy and the Environment Professor in Psychology and Public Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School

Paul Chirik Edwards S. Sanford Professor of Chemistry Peter Jaffé Associate Director for Research, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment William L. Knapp ’47 Professor of Civil Engineering Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo Director, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment Theodora D. ’78 and William H. Walton III ’74 Professor in Engineering Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering

David Wilcove Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Public Affairs and the Princeton Environmental Institute Mark Zondlo Associate Director for External Partnerships, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Supporters

Photo by Andrea Kane

The Lasting Impact of Gerhard “Gerry” R. Andlinger Class of 1952, 1931-2017

A respected businessman and philanthropist, Gerhard R. Andlinger brought passion, vision, and managerial acumen to building companies and supporting institutions. His leadership and integrity have inspired and shaped generations of thinkers and leaders. Andlinger’s dedication to moving the needle forward on the world’s most daunting energy and environmental challenge propelled him to give $100 million in 2008 to found the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment at Princeton University. “The research, in my opinion, is the basis for solving what I consider the largest problem that mankind has,” he said. “My decision to try to do something about it is out of a sense of responsibility.” Andlinger challenged researchers and students to face the problems of energy and the environment with open minds. He believed in the power of scientific research and innovative technology to solve problems, particularly when aligned with and supported by public policy and business. This interdisciplinary approach continues to guide the center’s work. Andlinger served as chair of the center’s advisory council. The center will forever be grateful for his vision, leadership, and contributions to the Princeton community and to the world.

The Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment at Princeton University is grateful to the following supporters whose gifts help to realize the vision of the center. 20172018 donors are denoted with asterisks. Gerhard R. Andlinger ’52 P80 P91 g21 Founding Gift Solomon D. Barnett ’05 to further the center’s mission* Howard E. Cox, Jr. ’64 for the WEF/Young Global Leaders Executive Education Module* John P. Drzik ’83 and Ann L. Thorsell ’83 to further the center’s mission* Fred W. Kittler, Jr. ’70 P08 P19 to further the center’s mission* Sally Liu ’87 and Bay-Wei W. Chang ’87 P21 to the Sally Liu ’87 and Bay Chang ’87 Fund for Energy and the Environment*

Tia Barancik ’83 P19 to establish the Class of 1983 Fund for Energy and the Environment James W. and Dede T. Bartlett to the Dede T. Bartlett P03 Fund for Student Research in Energy and the Environment John E. Bartlett ’03 to establish the Dede T. Bartlett P03 Fund for Student Research in Energy and the Environment Peter Bartlett ’77 and Erin T. Bartlett P09 P10 P14 to further the center’s mission Charles A. Bernheim ’57 to further the center’s mission Erik C. Blachford ’89 to further the center’s mission Patricia and Dante Bonardi F57 to the David P. Simons Fund for Energy and the Environment John E. Cross ’72 and Mary Tiffany Cross to further the center’s mission

Patrick and Mary Scanlan F52 to further the center’s mission*

Nancy A. Curtin ’79 and John Stafford P18 to establish the Nancy A. Curtin ’79 and John Stafford Research Innovation Fund

Kent C. Simons ’57 to the David P. Simons Fund for Energy and the Environment*

John O. Dabiri ’01 to establish the John O. Dabiri ’01 Family Fund for Excellence in Energy and Environmental Research

Alexander Smorczewski ’07 to further the center’s mission*

Charlene de Carvalho-Heineken P09 P14 to establish the de CarvalhoHeineken Family Fund for Environmental Studies for faculty and student research

Lydia and William M. Addy ’82 P14 P19 to establish the Addy/ ISN North American Low Carbon Emission Energy Self- Sufficiency Fund to support innovative research, equipment, policy development, and teaching Dwight Anderson ’89 to establish the Anderson Family Professorship in Energy and the Environment

John P. Drzik ’83 and Ann L. Thorsell ’83 to establish the John Drzik and Ann Thorsell Fund for Innovation High Meadows Foundation to establish the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment Director’s Fund

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Kerry and William F. Holekamp P14 for equipment Thomas W. Horton Family P15 for equipment Peter C. Klosowicz ’76 P19 to establish the Peter C. Klosowicz ’76 Fund for Energy and the Environment for research and teaching David T. Liu ’99 *04 to further the center’s mission Paul A. Maeder ’75 for construction of Maeder Hall and to establish the Paul A. Maeder ’75 Fund for Innovation in Energy and the Environment for graduate fellowships Jay P. Mandelbaum ’84 P17 P20 P22 to establish the Laurie and Jay P. Mandelbaum ’84 Fund for Energy and the Environment Lisa Lee Morgan ’76 *79 for research in renewable energy William N. Neidig ’70 and Christy E. Neidig P08 to further the center’s mission Nicholas J. Nicholas, Jr. ’62 P83 P00 to establish the Nicholas Family Fund for the Environment to advance public understanding of important issues related to energy and the environment Nicholas G. Nomicos ’84 and Kathleen Connor Nomicos ’84 to establish the Nicholas and Kathleen Nomicos Class of 1984 Fund for the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment to advance public understanding of important issues related to energy and the environment Sarah Finnie Robinson ’78 and Jackson W. Robinson to further the center’s mission Mark F. Rockefeller ’89 to establish the Renee and Mark F. Rockefeller ’89 Fund for the Environment for faculty and student research

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Ernest H. Ruehl, Jr. ’85 P19 to establish the Ruehl Family Fund for the Environment for faculty and student research Elchin A. Safarov and Dilyara Allakhverdova P15 to further the center’s mission Gloria and Karl F. Schlaepfer ’49 P85 to further the center’s mission and to establish the Schlaepfer Family Fund for equipment Richard and Enika Schulze Foundation for research Tapesh Sinha and Sandra Jin P19 to establish the Sandra and Tapesh Sinha P19 Fund Lewis W. van Amerongen ’62 P06 to establish the Lewis W. van Amerongen ’62 Fund for Energy Research for equipment William H. Walton, III ’74 and Theodora D. Walton ’78 P21 to further the center’s mission Maura Wong ’88 and Kenneth Chen ’87 P20 to further the center’s mission Anonymous gifts for construction of the Andlinger Center building Anonymous gift for environmental policy research Anonymous gift for the highest priorities of the center, including research, equipment, and a visitors program Anonymous gift for research Anonymous gift to establish the Peter B. Lewis Fund for Student Innovation in Energy and the Environment for student projects, particularly field work and laboratory research Anonymous gift to establish the Sustainability Fund for student research

Anonymous gift for research in carbon sequestration, solar energy, and fusion energy Anonymous gift to establish the Parallax Fund for Energy and the Environment for faculty and student research


Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment 86 Olden Street Princeton University Princeton, NJ 08544

Project Manager

Email acee@princeton.edu

Molly A. Seltzer

Phone 609-258-4899

Additional Design

Web https://acee.princeton.edu Twitter @AndlingerCenter Facebook @andlingercenter Youtube @AndlingerCenter

Robert Eich Design Phillip Unetic, UneticDesign.com Writer and Editor

Ilanna Canale Additional Writers and Editors Sharon Adarlo, Diane Carlino, Jeffrey Fitts, Anita Fresolone, Alden Hunt, Brenda Mikeo, Moira Selinka, Greta Shum Photographers David Kelly Crow, Sameer Khan, Tori Repp, Frank Wojciechowski Research Areas Icon Design Neil Adelantar

Inside back cover Karina Alventosa, graduate student in Professor Claire White’s Sustainable Cements Lab, prepares silicate samples for hydrothermal treatment. (Photo by Tori Repp/Fotobuddy) Back cover Top left: Graduate student, Levi Golston, uses atmospheric sensors to measure the impact on air quality of the 2018 volcanic eruptions on the Big Island of

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Hawaii. (Photo by G. Brad Lewis). Top right: The 2018 graduates of the Andlinger Center’s certificate programs at the center’s inaugural class day celebration in June 2018. (Photo by Greta Shum) Bottom left: Graduate student, Christine Pu, loads a sample in the isothermal calorimeter for in situ heat flow measurement in Professor Claire White’s Sustainable Cements Lab. (Photo by Tori Repp/Fotobuddy) Bottom center: Walmart Senior Director for ESG, Trust and Transparency, Katherine Neebe, talks with Tom Murray, Vice President of Environmental Defense Fund’s “EDF +Business” program, at the executive education module for Young Global Leaders in July 2018. (Photo by Frank Wojciechowski)

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Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment 2017/2018 Annual Report  

Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment 2017/2018 Annual Report