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Esprit De Corps Students’ Newsletter Volume 7 Issue 1

Word Power 2012

Hindi Poetry Recitation Competition

Al Waha Graduation 2012– 2012– Part I

Looking into the Dictionary ...and much more! One School. One Voice.

Providing excellence in education, striving for continuous school improvement and targeting optimal student achievement are the core objectives driving all contemporary ideas on education today. Strong leadership and sound governance have been established as key factors in leading school development. On behalf of the school, I have had the privilege to attend the module on leadership at the Cambridge Teachers’ Conference 2012, hosted in July last year at the Cambridge University, UK. In addition to being a part of a great learning experience, I also feel proud of the fact that our own ideas on distributive leadership and shared responsibility have been re-enforced at a professional forum. With this profound thought I welcome you to this edition of the Esprit de Corps, the work of our young journalistic leaders, and to a vivid account of the activities that have defined our students’ learning experiences this term. In addition to the internal Youth Leadership Programme that has been organised for students in both

January 2013

the sections under the aegis of a local division of Toastmasters’ International, preparing students for leadership roles has now acquired a global dimension. Youth leaders from Al Waha are now taking on the world as Global Scholars leaving their mark as alumni at prestigious, international youth conferences. We feel proud to inform you that for the third year running, we have been able to nominate some of our outstanding students for three conferences this year – the Presidential Inauguration Conference 2013 (held once in four years in Washington, D.C, includes attendance at the swearing in ceremony of the US President), the 2013 Global Young Leaders Conference and the well-known college immersion program, the LeadAmerica Conference 2013. In keeping with our firm belief that striving for excellence in all that we do is a shared goal that both home and school bear responsibility for, it has given us immense pleasure to have been able to invite parents for several co-curricular activities in both the sections this term. We thank all the fa-

thers and mothers who have made the effort to share our students’ achievements in the stellar language activity, Word Power, Power and in the business venture of our young entrepreneurs from Grades 9 – 12, the Bake Sale, details of which will be found in our next edition. While details of the excellent 2012 CIE results have been available on our school website since the beginning of this academic session, the IGCSE, AS and A Level team of teachers and students have just concluded a critical lap of the CIE examinations trek, the Mock Examinations, and are currently working round the clock to ensure that the May/June 2013 CIE examinations are aced as well. Examination fever having abated with the Mid-Year/ Mock Examinations concluding today, I take this opportunity to wish all of you a restful break and happy holiday reading with your copy of the Esprit de Corps! Best wishes, Rubab Azad Director, Senior School


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MONITORSHIP: A LEARNING EXPERIENCE

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monitor is like building a model ship in a glass bottle – it’s dif*icult and requires a lot of time and paemember the Investi- tience, but the result is de*initely ture Ceremony? worth all the effort. As we go through the motions of being class Yes! That long assembly we have at monitors, we develop tolerance the beginning of every year, where and become more conscientious, the class monitors and the assis- among the several other qualities tant monitors from each grade go that we gain with time. up on stage and take the oath to be honest, diligent leaders. Then, all of For those who are not socially us walk back to class, thinking, adept, the position of monitor is an “Great, now we have a new pair of important tool for personality depeople to boss us around!” velopment. It requires increased interaction with classmates, helps What most of us don’t know is that one break out of their shell, cethere’s a lot more to being a moni- ments old friendships and builds tor than just telling people what to new ones. do. If you ask students around the campus what they think a monitor’s role in class is, their answer would sound something like this, "They are responsible for the conditions of the class and the actions of their classmates". That’s certainly easier said than done, though! MONITOR Being a monitor myself, I can honestly say that it is sometimes a ra- How can I say this with so much ther frustrating task. On the *ive con*idence, you ask? Because it’s days of the week that I’m around happened to me! my classmates, half my time is spent helping them (which actually Before I became a monitor, I did feels rewarding), while the other not socialise with my classmates half is spent trying to keep them very much. However, now that I’ve quiet and stop them from scurrying been assigned the responsibility, it out of the class during the period is part of my job to help each of breaks. them; in this process I’ve became closer friends with many of them; Although I say this, it is important a change which even I can say was to understand that it is part of the a pleasant surprise! :-) I’ve also responsibility that the title of ‘class learnt that trying to control people monitor’ brings, and it is this sense will rub them the wrong way. of duty that plays a vital role in What you can do is, achieve the character building, To me, being a same goals by being nice.

I would like to take this opportunity to advise my fellow monitors on the basis of my experience. First, do not shout at your classmates. No one likes listening to people who cannot keep their cool and resort to shouting. It’s human tendency to make mistakes; so, give them a chance. Or even two, maybe. But, if they do not listen to you, then it may be time to call in reinforcements: your class teacher! Second, try to incorporate a bit of fun into everything you do. A good joke or two could break the ice between you and others. But remember to keep fun in control, because sometimes, we tend to get carried away! That simply won’t do. Give time to yourself to understand your job as a monitor. If you are *inding it dif*icult and your classmates don’t seem to listen to you, then try talking to them about your struggles. Chances are, they will listen and help you out. So, if you are a monitor having a tough time, remember that it’s a give and take relationship that you have with your classmates: they will help you when you do your best for them, the way you would do your best to help them. - Alice D. Ferrao, Gr. 9G1


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Mind Your Language(s)! Celebrating the multi-culturalism and diversity at Al Waha, a wide range of language-based activities are conducted annually. This term’s second language activities moved a step forward.

The handwriting competition was one of several conducted this year for the second languages.

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For this competition, a paragraph was dictated within a stipulated time period in the respective second languages to students of Grades 4-9 and their writing was judged on the basis of legibility, neatness and spelling proficiency.

ooking for words in the dictionary is no longer as boring a task as it used to be! With the introduction of the event, ’Looking into the Dictionary’, to our already vast This was the first time that the French students array of co-curricular activities, our multi-linguists are participated in this contest. Students were instructed to write carefully, adding a certain je ne sais quoi to the French lanenriching their vocabulary banks substantially. guage. As the name suggests, the ‘Looking into the dictionary’ It was definitely a reinforcement of the fact that handwriting is event comprised of students looking for the English mean- as important as spellings and pronunciation for any language. ings of a list of words given to them, in their respective Poetry Recitation Competition dictionaries. This activity was held for the students of Grades 6-9. Within a stipulated time period of 15 minutes, The Hindi department held a Poetry Recitation Competition students had to put in tremendous effort to find meanings for students of Grades 4-6. This classroom activity hones the of as many words as possible. This activity is sure to add recitation and language skills of the students, and also quality to our budding authors’ write-ups, making them strengthens their ability to memorize.

interesting reads. Mrs Samar Azam, the Hindi teacher, said: “It was the first time we conducted such a competition. Flipping through the pages of the dictionary in search of the words was challenging, since the Hindi language has a vast number of letters. It was a moment of pride for me as students were able to find the meanings with ease.”

Poetry, in any language, serves as a powerful medium for expressing one’s feelings and can also be used as a sharp tool for imparting moral values. This activity taught students how to control the pace of their delivery and practise correct pronunciation, while enjoying the poetry that each of them shared with their classmates.

- Inputs from Hera Abdul Wahid (8G2), Rayyan Naeem (9B), Ayesha Aslam (9G2), Uzma Khan (9G1) and Shuruq Umar


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Urdu– Urdu– Looking into the Dictionary Position/ Grade

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

Grade 7

Grade 8

Grade 9

I

Abdullah Imran

Asma Arshad

Zain Abrar

Faizan Naeem

Hamail Siddiqi

Ayesha Rahman

II

Fatima Muzamil

Ahmed Ittefaq

Rawan Akhtar

Basmah Farooq

Areeba Ather

Shiza Riaz Ahmed

Urdu– Urdu– Handwriting Competition Position/ Grade

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

Grade 7

Grade 8

Grade 9

I

Najaf Ahmed

Ahmed Ittefaq

Sadia Muzamil/ Noorulaein Lakhani

Faizan Naeem

Hamail Siddiqi

Huzaifa Darogar/ Bilal Iqbal

II

Fatima Muzamil

Rania Ahmed

M. Osama

Natalia Islam

Hera Abdul Wahid

Fabiha Raheel

French– French– Looking into the Dictionary Position/ Grade

Grade 6

Grade 7

Grade 8

Anusha Jeelani Mariam Faizer Ayman Jeelani

I

Shreyas Rao

II

Sehaan Tarique

Zaki Khan

French– French– Handwriting Competition Grade 9

Position/ Grade

Grade 6

Grade 7

Grade 8

Grade 9

Alice Ferrao

I

Anusha Jeelani

Maheen Wajid

Zaki Khan

Ayesha Nizamudeen

-

II

-

-

Marwah Oozeeraully

Raseem Zaffar

Arabic– Arabic– Handwriting Competition Position/ Grade

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

Grade 7

Grade 8

Grade 9

I

Noorul Fatima

Saaliha Fazil

Mohammad Bshara

Mennah Salim

Abdullah Taj

Hanaa Rayees

II

Ahmed Sayed

Sama Osama

Yara Al Sayed

-

Maram Ismail

-

Hindi– Hindi– Handwriting Competition Position/ Grade

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

Grade 7

Grade 8

Grade 9

I

Nourain Khan

Nimra Rashid/ Ahmeduddin

Saima Liyakat/ Sahal Gazanfer

Amina Rafiq

Tashif Hanif

Waqas Zubair

II

Ramya Varshini

Mishal Abdul Karim

Jasir Alam

-

-

Jameela Challawala/

Mohammed Jaseem

Hindi– Hindi– Poetry Recitation Competition Position/ Grade

Grade 4 (Girls) Grade 4 (Boys)

Grade 5

Grade 6 Fatima Z. Javed

I

Nourain Khan

Umair Aslam

Nimra Rashid

II

Afnan Zubair

Masir Javed

-

Saima Liyakat Khan

Special Prize

-

-

-

Jameela Challawala


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It’s not just handwriting... “Take pains ... to write a neat round, plain hand, and you will find it a great convenience through life to write a small and compact hand as well as a fair and legible one.” - Thomas Jefferson (1743 – 1826) Forget about competing to see who’s fastest at typing or texting…useful a skill as that may be in today’s technology-ruled world, the real test of academic mettle is that of penmanship. Wouldn’t you agree? We do. That is why, even in an age where hands fly over keypads and keyboards but often stop short of picking up a pen, our school continues to give due importance to developing a striking handwriting. To underline the importance of this art, competitive, zealous handwriting competitions are held every year for students of Grades 4-9. Keeping with the spirit of striving for excellence, this competition too has come a long way. It is no longer just a training for good handwriting, but also helps in improving time management and listening skills. As worksheets were handed out and the teachers cleared their throats to dictate the set text, anticipation filled every classroom. Let’s see...Ballpoint or ink? Cursive or block? Questions flooded the students' minds, as they prepared to put their best ‘hand’ forward. The winners of the English Handwriting Competition :

Position/ Grade

Grade 4

Grade 5

I

Masir Javed, 4B1 Maha Abdul Rauf, 5G2

II

Umer Shoaib, 4B1

Nimra Rashid, 5G1

The students of Grade 6 were introduced to an exciting in-class activity this year, Designing a Leaflet.

Grade 6

Grade 7

Grade 8

Grade 9

Saima Liyakat Khan, 6G1

M. Razeen, 7B1

Shireen Rahmani, 8G2

Nabeela Zainab, 9G1

Saima Haque, 6G1

Momal Abdul Rauf, 7G2

taught them more about the various kinds of formatting tools available in such software. Students were also given the opportunity to learn more about a variStudents were instructed to make ety of different electronic devica leaflet on an electronic device of es. This took them to their their choice, from the revolution- dreamland of technology. ary ultra books to the latest As the world becomes a more iPhones and Kindles. computerized version of itself Colourful construction paper, almost with each passing day, acmarkers and other art supplies quiring the necessary knowledge were to be left behind; students and skills to thrive in today’s everhad to work on their computers changing society is sure to give us and produce pamphlets using a sim- that crucial head start that we ple word processing software. all need—which is what made this This activity not only enhanced the educational activity beneficial students’ computing skills, but also for all the participants.

Areeba Ather, 8G2 Humeira Mujeeb, 9G2

At the end of the day, the hard work of all the students of Grade 6 was reflected in their amazing leaflets that didn’t just look great but were also exhaustive of information. Amal Amgad and Shavana Yousuf, two

of

the

participants,

said,

“It was a wonderful experience, making the leaflets, and we even got to know a lot about the latest electronic devices, as we had to research a great deal about them before making them. We truly enjoyed designing the leaflets.”


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WORD POWER– 2012-13 At our school, there is an unwritten rule: co-curricular activities, designed to encourage children to learn through an enjoyable and exciting experience, go hand-in-hand with the rigorous academic programme. One such fun-learning experience is Word Power, the English activity conducted for students of Grades 4-9. Formerly known as the Spelling Bee, the scope of this competition has expanded far beyond its usual pattern, to help students explore the diversity of the English language. On the 13th of November 2012, Word Power was held in both the campuses of Senior School. But getting there was not easy at all..........so allow me to explain how twenty-eight participants, from each section, finally found their ways to the hot-seats on D-day. Before the Hajj Holidays, each student from Grades 4-9 and 11 was handed a sheet containing a list of fifty words along with their meanings and parts of speech, complied according to their grade level, to learn over the break. Once school re-opened, students had to battle through two elimination rounds in order to qualify for the finals. The first round, a dictation, was conducted on the 7th of November, where six words out of the specified fifty, along with four other randomly selected words were dictated to the students, who were required to correctly spell the words and accurately write their meanings. Next, the ten best spellers from each grade had to face the semi-final round, where they had to unscramble ten words correctly to earn their spot in the final round. However, this was easier said than done. A time limit of fifteen minutes was allotted to the students to unscramble a total of ten words! Those successful in their attempts made it to the top four. They were then divided into four teams with one student from each grade level. On the day of the event, students entered the school, buzzing with energy and excitement, awaiting the commencement of the event. With participants deeply immersed in revising their lists for the final challenge, the event began after the lunch break. The first round was conducted prior to the arrival of the audience, in which students were given a time limit to solve a question paper. Next, teams were subjected to a gruelling round, where they had to use the meanings provided on the huge screen to guess and spell the corresponding words. Next, was the Kangaroo Round, where the teams had to look for the hidden synonyms in the words they were given. The chance to win 100 points came next, with the Jackpot round. In these rounds, questions were shot at the four teams of logophiles, namely Dickens, Byrons, Kiplings and Johnsons, and if they were unable to answer...ZAP!....they were passed onto the other team. But there was no time to relax, as a last-ditch attempt to shoot up the scoreboard followed, with the Rapid Fire Round. But no! We weren’t off the hook yet. As scores were calculated, it was the audience’s turn to answer a few questions themselves. Up for grabs were delicious Galaxy chocolate bars. The event concluded with the announcement of the result, during which Team Kipling was declared the winner in the Girls’ Section, while in the Boys’, it was Team Dickens who emerged as winners. This year, proud mothers and fathers of the participants were invited to witness this event and most of them had no words to describe how they felt to see their children in the heat of battle, spelling, unscrambling, and giving the meanings to words, some that they’d never even heard of! Their moral support, for both students and the event as a whole, was invaluable. From the students’ point of view, the event was indeed a fun-filled and educationally rewarding experience. Uzma Liyakat Khan of 9G1 said, “It was fun to know that omnishambles was declared the Word of the Year by the Oxford English Dictionary, closely followed by YOLO (an acronym for You Only Live Once) and nomophobia (the fear of having to live without your mobiles). Until next time, happy spelling! - Marya Talha, 8G2 and Bilal Iqbal, 9B


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The Journey of a Lifetime As I took my steps towards the courtyard that houses the most sacred shrine on Earth – the Ka’bah – I held my breath as I had the first glimpse of the most glorious sight ever. The hypnotic chants in praise of the Creator filled the air and reverberated like a beautiful melody, repeated by the milling crowd of pilgrims who had assembled there, united in purpose, encircling the Holy House. They seemed to be attracted to it like iron to a powerful magnet. Although this was not the first time I was visiting Makkah (having in Jeddah for many years), there was something majestic about what my eyes were fixed on. Having previously only heard of Hajj as the greatest journeys in a Muslim’s life, the time had arrived for me to make mine. On the 24th of October, I was ready to embark on a fivefive-day spiritual journey— journey— one that was to be exclusive and unparalleled. I was prepared to knit together the determination, patience and faith that was required, and experience for myself all that had been only heard, said and studied, till then by me. The arrival in Mina, the first step of the journey, was fairly comfortable; the preparations and arrangements that had been made were commendable. We were very fortunate to be part of a group of pilgrims who were friendly and inspiring, and who, in a short time, became almost like family. Continuous sessions of Islamic discussions that stressed on the value of this sacred rite and on the importance of religion in our lives, an aspect we have the tendency to neglect, kept the fervour burning throughout. Spending time with people we had previously not known, but with whom we were now one in purpose, was wonderful. Moreover, the abundant time we had at our disposal for Ibadah, was a blessing truly immeasurable in value. The stay at Arafat was a precious gift from Allah. Being reminded of the Final Day, when the very same plain of Arafat would stretch to accommodate every soul on Earth, made me humbler, more submissive in my dua's. The truth of accountability came back more vigilantly, and I found myself asking and seeking forgiveness, with more humility than I had ever done before. One of the most unique and challenging experiences was the Rami (pelting ritual). Having to walk long distances along with a hoard of other pilgrims, some of whose energy and determination worked to inspire me, instilled in me patience and the quality to strive for the attainment of goals. Over the course of a journey that was spiritually enlightening, and which taught me several life lessons, I left a weaker Muslim behind, and emerged a better one, Alhamdulillah. I sincerely pray that Allah will accept my efforts, forgive my sins and grant every Muslim the chance to undertake this journey of a lifetime......at least once in a lifetime! - By Sarah Jamshed Alam, 12G


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SWANSONG: GRADUATION ‘12 (PART I - THE GIRLS’ SECTION)

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hen the nondescript brown doors opened, jaws dropped. Quite literally. The venue was resplendent in shades of purple and white, full of grandeur that would set the tone for the rest of the evening. Flowers in every corner, coupled with inspirational art that graced the walls created a display that called to mind the saying; ‘A picture is worth a thousand words.’ The Girls’ Section auditorium had been completely transformed. You had to see to believe what we’re talking about. On the 21st of June, the clock seemed to tick a little faster and the morning was more radiant than usual. This day was to be a celebration of the culmination of years of hard work, not only by the students but also by the Al Waha faculty and the parents of the graduates. It was a day to honour and acknowledge the work completed so far, while opening the doors into the future yet unseen, of things yet to come and be accomplished. This evening commenced with the beautiful verses from

Suratul Luqman, recited by Anam Riaz, who also delivered a short speech that conveyed a heartfelt message from all the 11th graders, wishing their seniors the best on the road ahead. The hall was then engulfed in complete silence as the audience sat with rapt attention, waiting for the evening’s honourees to arrive. And then *drum roll please* the 10th and 12th graders entered, *launting their *lowing gowns and tasseled caps, with their heads held high, *lashing radiant smiles.

To capture the cherished years they’d spent in their second home, from the time they’d been tiny tots treading up Al Waha’s steps, to the moment that was awaiting them- when they would break free from their cocoon and enter a whole new world, the Graduation Poem by Shifa Aftab and Sidra Raihan of Grade 9, proved to be a *itting tribute. This thought-provoking poem was written for their seniors, giving them a chance to reminiscence about the years that had whizzed by so quickly, and all those precious mo-

ments they had shared within the walls of Al Waha’s campus. It was truly a walk down memory lane! The valedictorian’s address was next on the agenda. Salma Zacky from 10G shared the sentiments of her class with the audience. It was not only a proud moment for the graduates and their parents, but also for their teachers, who had been constantly by their side through the two years of rigorous training for their IGCSE examinations. Although a cloud of trepidation hung over them as they were unsure of what awaited them, come August, at that moment, it seemed nothing could overshadow the joy and jubilation of the evening. Next, Muntaha Qadri from 12G expressed her excitement at *inally graduating from school. She also voiced the one thought that all the 12th graders seemed to be lost in - that they would miss Al Waha’s lively atmosphere, their teachers and friends, with whom they had formed unbreakable bonds of trust and friendship.


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Next on the programme for the evening was the presentation of the awards. The graduates sat with bated breath, *ingers crossed, and prayed that one of the pro*iciency awards held their name. The Dr. Abdullah Nadwi Award for Scholastic Achievement was received by Salma Zacky of 10G, for her outstanding performance in academics as well as extra-curricular activities. Since the list is very long, our heartiest felicitations go out to all who secured an award. Mrs. Farhadunnisa, Vice Principal of the International Indian School, Jeddah, who was the Chief Guest for the event, was an inspiring presence in our midst. Her inspirational speech, about heroes among us, who fought all odds to educate themselves, lingers in our thoughts. Next, Mrs. Rubab Azad, the Director of Senior School, proceeded to congratulate the graduates in an emotional speech that conveyed pride in her students and their achievements. Following her address, Mrs. Seema Anis, Headmistress of the

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Senior Girls’ Section, gave a speech where she acknowledged the graduates’ accomplishments and commended them on their relentless hard work. A beautifully designed piece of exquisite artwork, signed by all the graduates, was presented by the valedictorians, on behalf of both the graduating classes, to thank their alma mater for being a steady mentor, guide and home for every one of them. Finally, we had reached the part that everyone was waiting for... you guessed it right! The cake- cutting ceremony! ‘Ooh’s and ‘aah’s were heard from the audience at the entry of Mrs. Cake, who stole the show. The audience had their eyes riveted on the biggest cake they had ever seen, shaped like an open book, as it was cut by Salma Zacky. Half-chocolate and halfvanilla, it was absolutely divine! Everybody was tempted to sink their teeth right into the soft sponge! The cake was set aside as the graduating students came up on the stage, one by one, to express their gratitude to their mothers for being their constant companions through all of life’s storms. It

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served as a reminder to all of us in the audience, that come what may, our mothers will always be there, right by our sides. Once the tears were wiped and the vote of thanks proposed, everyone headed out for dinner. Stepping outside the auditorium, they were greeted by the tantalizing aroma of rows of mouthwatering dishes. Photographs were clicked, hugs exchanged and goodbyes said, almost too soon, it seemed. As the graduates walked out of the gates of Al Waha’s campus, they paused, to take one last, long look, at the place that had been, and for the students returning for the ‘A’ Level programme, would continue to be…home. - By Sidra Raihan, Hania Habib, Hibbah Irfan and Sarah Shaikh, 10G


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From the Editor’s Pen

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his editorial is particularly special to me as it is my first time writing as an Editor-in-Chief of the Esprit de Corps. Having started out as a reporter in Grade 8, I moved my way up to the sub-editor position and now, finally the Editor. 2012 was a fantastic year for Al-Waha and myself. Starting with the announcement of the new campus for the Girls’ Section, Al-Waha was rewarded with the spectacular results of the 2012 CIE May/June examination session, with two students achieving 9A*s (Alhamdulillah, I have been blessed to be one of the two)! So, as a first-time editor who has big shoes to fill, such as the likes of Noor Khalid and Rabeeah Taha, I was quite self-conscious about what I should write. Not only do I want to convey the gratitude I feel at being awarded the title of ‘Editor-in-Chief’ (it has a nice ring to it!), I also hope to maintain the level of seriousness required of a high-school newsletter editor. I can only hope that I have achieved my goals. Although I had to brave storms and sail through turbulent waters to finally write this page, it really hasn’t all been that bad. It has been a pleasure to work with everyone who made their own individual contributions to this edition of the newsletter. As a reporter, I didn’t know of all the work that went on behind the scenes, which is why this position really opened my eyes to all the effort that is put into a single edition. This issue, we have articles on most of the events that were conducted this term, including the Word Power and the second language activities, but not all of them… so, you have

something to look forward to in the next publication.

List of nominees for the 2012 Youth Leadership Conferences

It’s probably rather obvious, but I still feel the need to mention that this edition, we’re celebrating languages! We’ve had a vast range of handwriting competitions, spelling bees and several other new activities that have helped all of us appreciate the importance of language as a tool of communication and as a key to each of our cultures.

Gauthnam Raj Magesh 9B Mohammad Zain Sohail 9B Salman Ahmed Malik 9B Rizwan Javed Ahmed 9B Ahmed Raza 10B Mohammad Osama Sadiq 10B Nameer Rehan Khan 10B Shahbaz Khattak Haroon 10B Shaharyar Shahid 12B

I cannot end this editorial, though, without writing about one of the articles that certainly caught my attention – the graduation article! Yes, that’s right, everyone, I graduated! It’s great to see an article in the newsletter about that wonderful event. Thanks to all the teachers who put everything together and made the evening so memorable. Also, thank you to the Grade 10 students, who did such a great job of writing the article and practically recreating the event on paper. It really made me relive that unforgettable evening and remember how good that cake tasted! But I digress. Let us rejoice, friends, for although we shall part with the first term of this new academic year, we will do so in style - with a one week holiday! We have put our blood, sweat and tears into our preparation for the exams these last two weeks and now we have come to a well-earned break, which will hopefully distract us from any thoughts of what awaits us when our results are released. I must now put the last full stop and conclude my editorial. I shall spend the next few days in complete rest and relaxation so, enjoy your holidays everyone, and till the next issue, I bid you adieu. Salma Zacky, 11G, Editor-in-Chief

Alice Danielle Ferrao 9G Ayesha Abdul Rahman 9G Syeda Hiba Junaid 9G Shuruq Umer 9G Thahfa Thaha 11G …...and the list of alumni gets longer every year Ayesha Fazal Abdul Basit Jawad Fazal Moaz Shafique Salma Zacky Naila Muzammil


Newsletter January 2013