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A Magazine for Southern Nevadans

PRIMROSE WINTER 2010

“LADIES AND GENTLEMAN START YOUR ENGINES”

SOUP’S AND BREADS AND PIE’S OH MY!’ MY!

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contents

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Bike Sharing New ways to get it in gear

39

Romantic Environments Ideas to make your home more inviting

49

Love Is In The Air Local author tells us what that smell is

Of Gardening Interest

52

Honey

Homemade Soups & Breads & Pies “Oh My!”

71

Taylor Barton Local boy hit’s the race track and wins

15

First Friday Re-visited

29

Winter Landscape Protecting your yard

30

Edible Gardens Prepping for Spring

31 33

Learning the health benefits of honey

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contents

Winter

Our Very Own Ghost Town

in every issue 13

Get Out Of Town

25

In the Garden

74

76

Local Artist

Winter guide

67

Locals Only

Family Traditions

86

Parting Shots

Exploring Southern Nevada Culture

Tailgate Barbecue

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Gina

NASCAR Zooms onto the scene Local beauty, poetry and seasons


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PRIMROSE A Magazine For Southern Nevadans

PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Fawn Primrose-Raines MANAGING EDITORS Stephanie Hartman Leolani Kirkendall PHOTO EDITOR Henri Sagalow FOOD EDITOR Frances Primrose Fawn Primrose-Raines LANDSCAPE/GARDEN EDITOR Leslie Doyle CREATIVE DIRECTOR Fawn Primrose-Raines GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Darian Primrose-Glenn Fawn Primrose-Raines CONTRIBUTING ARTICLES Angele Florisi Jimmi McGee ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Ian M. Primrose-Raines WEB MASTER Gaylord Dia A SPECIAL THANK YOU TO OUR MODELS AND GUESTS Ian M. Primrose-Raines Gina and Gabriel Quaranto Larry Powell (702)287-1943 6955 N. Durango Dr. Suite 1115 Las Vegas, NV 89149 www.primrosemagazine.com Made with recycled material.

In Loving Memory of: M.D. “Ike” Primrose Primrose Magazine is published six times per year by Primrose. All prices, products and availability are subject to change without notice. Neither the advertisers or Primrose Magazine are responsible for the accuracy contained with either advertising or editorial within the publication. Statements, opinions, photographs and points-of-view expressed by the advertisers and writers are their own and do not necessarily represent those of the publisher. All photographs, artwork, editorial and advertising designs printed in Primrose Magazine are the sole property of Primrose unless otherwise indicated before the publication or noted in the publication. Photographs, artwork, designs and text may not be duplicated or reprinted without the expressed written consent of Primrose magazine.

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inter in Southern Nevada is such a pleasant time. It’s time to cozy up with family watching favorite movies, playing games or enjoying long talks with good friends around the fireplace. Our winters are so mild in Southern Nevada it’s rather fun on a particularly blustery day to cuddle up, bake some cookies and/or curl up with a good book. I thought our readers would enjoy some of my favorite winter-time dishes; soup, homemade breads and pies. We put together quite a collection sure to bring out the domestic in almost anyone. What a wonderful treat for a cold winters night. We hope you can find time to cook. It seems there a lot of fun things to do in the garden or around town at some our local museums this time of year. And what better time to take in a museum then when Mother Nature raises her frosty head. In this edition you’ll also enjoy learning all about First Friday our very own artistic extravaganza!

In deciding where to shop, or what professional service you should hire, please take a moment to check out the Primrose List. When local citizens visit the Primrose List, they are able to print out coupons to save at a variety of local businesses. In addition to saving a few dollars on something they would normally purchase anyway, the businesses are in turn giving back to the community by donating a portion of the sale to the school of the customer’s choice! Collectively, it has the possibility to adequately finance the entire school district all on a voluntary community basis. Just as importantly, it helps the local economy on every level. It stimulates the economy by helping the local business owner to develop new customers. It helps the consumer to save a few dollars (something we are all trying to do). And ultimately it enables the schools to gain much needed funds. We ask that you please support this project; it is a win/win situation in a city of unsure bets.

Until the next edition, from our family to yours, stay warm and enjoy our cool weather while it last’s. The “heat” is just around the corner.

aines R e s o r rim Fawn P

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Culture in our

Desert Home

Learning to Appreciate Our Own Unique Culture We in Southern Nevada have often heard the words “Las Vegas would be a nice place to live but they have no culture here,” this is often cited by newbie’s or worse visitors who haven’t been able to pry their hand off the slot machines long enough to figure out there’s a whole different world outside the casinos. In all seriousness, we don’t have the formidable museums found in places like New York or Paris. We do however, have Broadway-style shows. We also have more 5-star restaurants than anywhere west of the Mississippi. Our culture may not be as dignified as some may aspire to, but we do have culture. It is uniquely ours. And while it may be a little kitchy to some, I’ll claim it. This is Las Vegas, Nevada; “The Entertainment Capital of the World” we have international notoriety and in many 13 Winter 2010

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cases we are applauded our impropriety! However in the case of culture? “We got your culture right here baby...” Since we’re on the subject of ‘culture’ let’s take a look at the “Cultural Corridor. There are seven (count em’ seven) local museums, libraries and event centers, and that’s just what is directly north of downtown: Old Las Vegas Mormon State Historic Park Cashman Center Las Vegas Library Las Vegas Natural History Museum Lied Discovery Children’s Museum The Reed Whipple Cultural Center Neon Museum The Cultural Corridor Coalition is a downtown nonprofit organization comprised of seven member cultural institutions as well as local arts and culture professionals, interested in promoting the six block neighborhood along Las Vegas Boulevard between Bonanza Road and Washington Avenue. You can find out more by visiting: http://www.culturalcorridorvegas.org


Get ready for a little local adventure Primrose

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FIRST FRIDAY by Leolani Kirkendall and F. Primrose-Raines

Over the next several issues expect to see more of these wonderful centers and museums as we explore our own unique culture. With that in mind in this edition of Primrose we’ll visit a two Southern Nevada cultural attractions the Lied Discovery Children’s Museum and First Friday. These are both wonderful ways to explore with your family some interesting art and artifacts. Both are nice to visit while the weather is a little cooler. Once a month, Las Vegans turn out in droves to experience “First Friday,” a street festival put on by the non-profit Whirligig, Inc. in conjunction with the Las Vegas artists community. With streets blocked off, live performances and street vendors, First Friday has become “Las Vegas’ favorite community art event.” Yet after 4 years of living in Las Vegas, I just finally experienced First Friday for my first time on January 1st, and finally discovered what I’d been missing. If you’re new to First Friday, a good place to start is on the corner of Main St. and Colorado, where you might be as lucky as I was to find parking. And then just start walking. First Friday covers about 20 city blocks, but don’t worry about getting lost; everywhere you go you’ll see plenty of friendly faces, and everyone you meet will gladly point you in the right direction. You might not get to each of the more than 80 art galleries, restaurants and small stores, in one trip, but don’t worry: there’s always next month! So take your time, stroll through the stalls and galleries, pick up an antique, work-of-art or other souvenir, sit and enjoy some live entertainment, and if it’s cold, maybe try some of the hot chocolate with marshmallows at one of the vendors or the hot wine at another. Resolve to do something different this year, and experience new things. But most of all, resolve to take advantage of all the wonderful events the Las Vegas community has to offer. The next time you find yourself sitting around on the First Friday evening of the month, head on downtown, join in the festivities, and show your support for your Las Vegas arts community.

A showcase of some of our community’s finest artists and up and coming talent. Primrose Primrose

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Shopping and entertainment are everywhere you look!.

So many things to see for both adults and families! Winter 2010

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First F

The air is rliiday at a glanc the drinks cght, the spirit festivee once a mon old in Downtown, and streets tran th the pedestrian-fr where, party durinsform into a huge bloiendly celebration g FIRST FRIDAY. E ck and multip , the entertainment ach breathers anlies as ice sculptors, shifts a back-drop d fortune tellers serfire of art perus for this ongoing fe ve as bands perfoal and appreciation. stival ning, and t rm throughout the Local vasses for c he streets turn into cevedecorate withildren (young and oanis a stage fo h chalk. FIRST FR ld) to gas’ vital D r local galleries and IDAY a place to mowntown cultural scLas Veand rejoice eet friends new andene. It’s innovation in the preservation a old, hood. In th of an historical neig nd malls, visitois land of suburbs anhborto people-w rs come from near a d strip rants and re atch, sample new re nd far stauvel at area b ars.

While the First Friday event has it’s share of “characters” I have found that our police department patrols the area well enough to keep the peace. And frankly those same “characters” are what gives this urban festival it’s cutting edge appeal and pizazz. Primrose

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Fine art and whimsy are featured arm and arm

Sometimes the impromptu “street musicians“ steal the show! Local artist Alexander P. Huerta in his gallery “Peace-n-Art Studio” Winter 2010

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Lie d D i s c o ve r C h i ld y re n’s Muse um by Stephanie Hartman Ever wonder what lies north beyond the casinos on Las Vegas Boulevard? For most people it is certainly a surprise to find that for twenty years, the Lied Discovery Children’s Museum (LDCM) has been encouraging hands-on learning for children and adults alike.

the use of an electric keyboard. Another face of the museum is the Everyday Living Pavilion that allows children to explore a miniaturized adult world complete with a grocery store, bank, autoshop and post office.

As you walk into the museum, past the snacking area, there is a large painted mural on the wall with the quotation, “In 1829 the Las Vegas Valley was explored by an 18-year-old Mexican named Rafael Rivera. Like him, what wonders will you find?” The question sets the tone for the wonders awaiting museum visitors. The inspirational quotation also establishes that discovery and excitement are not tied to a particular age, but to a sense of adventure and an open mind.

Linda of Las Vegas is the mother of a four-year-old girl. Regarding the museum, she said, “it’s great for the kids to learn. It keeps them so interested. I’m glad I discovered it. All children should come here once.” She also noted the value of Einstein’s Corner, where science comes to life with interactive shows that happen three times daily, saying, “nothing else seems to hold her [four-year-old’s] attention the same way” as the science shows do.

Over 400,000 Las Vegas students may recall a field trip to the museum at one point or another, yet one visit is not enough. Although the LDCM has been open to the public since September 1990, the museum is constantly changing and updating its exhibits. In fact, as of March 2009, over two-thirds of exhibit space has been changed or updated from the original. The museum boasts having over 100 plus interactive exhibits and daily craft activities available to visitors. Of course, there are always the classic parts to the museum that have, in many ways, become icons of LDCM. There is the 8-story Science Tower showcasing density tubes and neon lights that light up in conjunction with

Another popular area was the bubble making arena where you can actually make a bubble that surrounds your body. This was highly recommended by seven-year-old, Sara, who said, “the bubbles are awesome.” Elementary school teacher Janie described her time-and-time-again experience with the museum, “I’ve taken several of my classes [to LDCM] on field trips. They love it. It’s hands-on and fun for them. One of their favorite items is the giant bubble.” Other fairly new exhibits include the Green Village which explores managing greener lifestyles, and the It’s Your Choice which presents the science of nutrition in a more palatable form for youths. Primrose

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The museum recently finished a Grossology: The (Impolite) Science of the Human Body exhibit that creatively explored bodily functions. Visitors were so enthused with the exhibit that it was extended well beyond its initial summer end date. The end of Grossology means the beginning of the museum’s newest addition, Little Builders, which opens at the end of January 2010 and will run through the beginning of May. It will focus on basic aspects of simple machines, construction, as well as characteristics of motion. The mission of Lied Discovery Children’s Museum is “to provide a vibrant and engaging experience, through exhibits and programs, where children from economically and culturally diverse backgrounds actively participate in playful learning experiences that ignite a love of lifelong learning.” In a random survey of visitors it was evident that the mission was alive and well. Relatives suggested that California native, Nelson, and his three-year-old son make a day trip to the museum. He emphasized how much he liked the hands-on quality of the museum. He enjoyed that it was spacious enough “so that kids can run around to touch, play and feel.” As I finished questioning him in

16 Autumn 2009 Winter 2010

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the autoshop portion of the Everyday Living Pavilion his son began to ask questions about cars and about a bottle of pretend antifreeze, and his father began to explain its purpose in the auto world. LDCM is highly recommended for all age groups. A visit is great not only for parent-child interaction and field trips. It is a unique place to add an edge to any birthday party, for teenagers to volunteer in a fun learning environment and a place for professionals to have vacation workshops. For a low annual fee you and your family can become members of the museum. If you have not yet made it to the museum, go. If you’ve been before, but not been in a while, go again. There are always new exhibits to see and areas of science to explore. Go to learn, go to interact with the exhibits, go to spend time with a loved one. GO! Like the provocative quote on the mural prompts: “What wonders will you find?” You might be surprised at how entertaining the experience may be for you regardless of your age or previous attendance. If you’re interested in learning about upcoming exhibits, volunteer opportunities or information on how to donate to the museum, visit: http://www.ldcm.org/.


Public hours are: Tuesday – Friday, 9AM – 4PM Saturday, 10AM – 5PM Sunday, noon – 5PM Closed Monday, except school holidays Admission Fees: $8 adults $7 children 1-17/Seniors/Military Free for children under 1 Exhibit Space: 22,000 square feet on two floors 8-story science tower 2 classromms 3 birthday party rooms Annual attendance: Aproximately 90,000 Opened: 1990 Annual Operating Budget: $1.5 million

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WHEN PLANTING TIME ARRIVES THIS SPRING, YOU’LL WANT BLOOMS AND MORE BURSTING FORTH IN YOUR YARD. PLAN NOW! Winter 2010

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in the

garden

January is our beginning of spring! It’s time for dormant-season chores such as pruning, fertilizing and spraying. It’s also a great time to add some trees, shrubs and flowers to your landscape. Your nursery has a fine selection of plant materials to choose from. Here is what to do as we move into January: Start your own transplants: Start tomatoes, peppers and eggplant for planting outside in March. Use a cold frame or a window with southern exposure to grow the transplants. If you like peas, plant them directly in garden. PRUNE, PRUNE, PRUNE all established trees and shrubs to remove undesired growth and induce proper growth. Don’t attempt to alter natural develop-ment of trees and shrubs any more than necessary. Sharpen your know-how and your tools before you start. Remember, you can’t undo a pruning cut! So make the right cut the first time. AMERICA’S FLOWER - To get colossal blooms, feed your roses. If their leaves are yellow, add an iron chelate to the feeding. New canes will soon emerge from the crown. These tender canes easily wither because of the spring winds. Protect the canes by covering the crown with mulch. BLOOMIN’ POWER - Brighten your garden by adding petunias, calendulas, alyssum, stocks, marigolds, and many other flowers. Concentrate the flowers in one or two locations to intensify the effect. But, plant them at the same depth found in their original containers. Many annuals die because we plant them too deep. These tenacious plants need an occasional shot of fertilizer to boost them along. If you have a patio, plant them in containers and hanging baskets to add to enhance their display. NATURE’S BLANKET - Mulching adds a touch of class to your trees, shrubs, vegetables and flowers. It’s nature’s way of frustrating weeds, conserving water and cooling the soil. As an added bonus, microorganisms use mulch to feast on and beef up your struggling soils.

Linn Mills INDOOR PLANTS - Give your plants a shower to wash away dust and discourage insects. Drench soil in each pot; let it drain well before moving plants back into their place. Avoid moving them around as leave may drop. PLANT TATERS - Early in February plant potatoes. Cut them into small, egg-sized sections containing at least “two eyes.” Then set the potatoes about three inches deep and a foot apart in the garden. VEGETABLES - Its time to sow cool-season vegetables such as radishes, carrots, beets, cauliflower, chard, spinach but get them in early to take advantage of the remaining cool days. When vegetables get an inch tall, thin and feed them. Plant your beans, tomatoes, sweet corn, cucumbers, peppers and eggplant’s before St. Patrick’s Day for better results. Many gardeners are anxious to sow pumpkins, squash, cantaloupes and watermelons, but wait until April for better growing conditions. They still have plenty of time to mature. PERENNIAL VEGGIES & HERBS - Plant perennial vegetables (artichoke, asparagus, horseradish and rhubarb) and herbs (chives, fennel, lavender, balm, mint, oregano, rosemary, sage, sorrel, thyme, and winter savory) in a permanent spot in your garden PLANT OVER CALICHE - If your yard sits on caliche, build a raised garden over it. Enclose the garden with railroad ties, or redwood 2 x 12-inch boards. Make beds as long as needed but no more than five feet across for easy maintenance. Fill the bins with a 50:50 mixture of sand and organic matter and blend in a balanced vegetable fertilizer. Now plant one of the easiest gardens you’ll ever raise. GRAPES - Finish pruning and feeding your grapes. Avoid using manure as it induces yellow leaves or iron chlorosis. PATIO FRUIT - Put your dwarf trees on casters to bring to your patio door to show off while in bloom. These small trees are fast becoming the fashion in decorative containers. See to it that the trees get about eight hours of sun, regular feedings and frequent irrigation’s and they will reward you with bushels of fruit. But keep trees out near the edge to catch plenty of sunlight for good fruit development. Primrose

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GROOM TREES AND SHRUB Always try to maintain the natural form of a plant unless it is used in a formal situation to make your landscape more interesting. Remove all the dead, diseased wood. Clear out the center of plant so light can enter and remove all closely paralleled branches. EMERALD GREEN - Hide the dead grass that abounds in your lawn by mowing an inch shorter. Return to the regular mowing height with the next cutting and allow the new growth to cover the brown. “They’ll wonder where the dead junk went.” Wake up your lawn with a good feeding. For a more intense green lawn, add iron. It’s a good time to plant a new lawn. If you wish to conserve water, plant hybrid Bermuda. BUSHY PLANTS - Warmer weather brings on a flush of new growth. That is the way shrubs tell you to feed them. Keep shrubs compact and natural by nipping back new growth. If your shrubs are early bloomers, enjoy the blooms and then prune. If shrubs show signs of yellowing, add iron chelates. A SHADY DEAL - Begin deep watering shade trees to encourage deep rooting and flush away those dreaded salts. Run the sprinklers under the tree longer than normal twice a month. If water runs off, wait until the next day to allow water to soak in and then irrigate again. Shallow irrigation’s will create surface roots, stress trees and waste water. Winter 2010

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Autumn 2009 Primrose

Early in February plant potatoes. Cut them into small, eggsized sections containing at least “two eyes.” Then set the potatoes about three inches deep and a foot apart in the garden.

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Winter Land Scape A few ways to protect your landscape, yourself and your investment.

Many people in Las Vegas and hot climates focus on how to care for their plants and trees in extreme heat and low water situations. Not everyone knows it, but there are some very specific dangers your landscaping faces during the cold Las Vegas winter. Here I will explain some of the worst threats and how to protect yourself and your home from significant loss and damage: How to irrigate during the winter • Use drip irrigation to water your trees and plants, not sprinklers. There are no specific water restrictions on the days you can use your drip irrigation system. As long 29 Winter 2010

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as you are watering one day a week during the winter months, with a drip system it can be any day you choose. • Water long and deep – this will keep the roots moist. • On windy days, try not to water. Water instead on days that are not forecasted to be windy. This will protect your trees & save on evaporation. • Only water during the mid-morning, about 9-11 am. Watering too early or later in the day will lead to freezing, or could be a set up for fungus.


Take care of your pipes and your trees. • Make sure your pipes are protected & trees are correctly staked.

• Another reason to hire a licensed contractor is as a property owner, you have more recourse if there are problems than with someone acting without a license.

• Pipes should be completely buried under rock or dirt several inches.

Beware: according to the contractor’s board, a person by law may not act in the capacity of a contractor without a contractor’s license. According to Nevada law, for any work done to your property in excess of $1000.00, including parts and labor, a person must be a licensed contractor.

• Your anti-siphon valve or PVB, which is above-ground, should be wrapped with foam or a complete insulator cover & can be purchased from your local Star nursery. This valve is connected to your main water supply & enables you to shut the water off to the landscaping if needed. It can be difficult and expensive to replace if not properly protected. • Protect your valves by placing them in a below-ground box, if not already done. • Make sure all trees are properly staked & check the tree stakes after each wind storm to make sure they are still secure. We get a lot of wind during the winter months that can damage the trees & stakes, so be diligent to protect them.

In short, pay attention to your landscaping during all seasons, and always hire a licensed contractor to protect yourself and your investment. Jimmi Mckee is the owner of S & J Lawn Service LLC. You can learn more by calling (702)767-3886 or by visiting: www.snjlawnservice.com

Take special care with your palm trees • Queen palms have to be wrapped – especially at the heart where new growth comes from. Wrap them in clothe weed barrier and burlap. This should have been done before the onset of winter. • Pigmy date palms – aka patio palms – also need to be wrapped. If they are in pots the best thing is to bring them inside the house and set them by a window. They can’t tolerate temperatures below 40 degrees�. Remember when considering hiring a team to care for your property or having landscaping/re-landscaping done, make sure you get references. It is always advisable to hire a licensed contractor. Most landscape contractors also do maintenance and are very good with plants and irrigation. They will give you a written bid with their license number and bid limit on it so there are no surprises. • Some of the benefits of using a licensed contractor are that they are insured. Ask if they carry general liability & workers comp insurance. This protects you, the home owner or business owner, in the event of damage to the property or someone getting hurt. Some people think it is cheaper to hire an unlicensed contractor but it is not necessarily so. • Don’t be fooled by a city, county or Pipe state business license vs. a Contractor’s u s ndes license. A licensed contractor will carry r rohould them all. A Nevada State Contractor’s license ck o be c is no more than 7 digits long. You can always go to r di omp rt s let the Nevada State contractor’s board web site at http://www. ever ely b nvcontractorsboard.com & click on contractor’s license search al in uri che ed to search by name or license number, or call (702)486-1100 s. to be sure. Primrose

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Y

our Yard Could Grow a Smorgasbord of Good Things to Eat,

Start NOW. Spring isn’t the only time for planting food crops in Las Vegas. In fact you can start to transplant leafy greens, broccoli, cabbages, etc. in about mid-January, these are known as cool season crops. Did you know that you can do year-around planting in Las Vegas? Did you know you can harvest delicious food from your garden every month of the year?

by Leslie Doyle As I write this, on the day before Christmas, I can see my veggie seedlings sprouting and growing under lights on my shelves. It’s a promise of good things to eat February through spring - and when I start more cool season veggie seeds every 2 weeks, from mid-November - mid-January, I am assured of veggies to replace the ones we harvest. I can pick food from my garden every month of the year when I follow my vegetable planting guide.

The Vegetable Planting As I think back on Guide I use is in my book, which veggies I transMeyer Lemon tree at Christmas-time “Slam Dunk Easy Desert Gardening.” I wrote it plant and when I transplant them it occurs to for you to take the mystery out of gardening; a simple and uncomme to mention that December is the only month I don’t transplant plicated hobby, really. It’s available at Plant World, or mail-order by veggies outside. But, December is an excellent time to plant trees phone: 702-658-7585. and shrubs and November/January is when I start many of my cool season veggie seeds inside the house. Today in my garden I can harvest leafy greens from veggies planting in the fall, plus Meyer lemons If you would like to subscribe to my monthly gardening tips by e-mail, please send me an e-mail and request it: gardeningnewsletter and nuts. They taste so much better when they are fresh from the @lvcoxmail.com. garden - and they are so convenient.

I start more cool season veggie seeds every 2 weeks, from mid-November to mid-January, I am assured of veggies to replace the ones we harvest.

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Of Gardening Interest Composting In Small Spaces

Join University of Nevada Cooperative Extension (UNCE) on Saturday, January 16, 2010, for a one-day workshop on composting in small spaces. The class runs from 8 a.m. to Noon. and explains how to make a balanced compost and. The workshop, taught by Dr. Angela O’Callaghan, is designed to provide the gardener with knowledge on how to make a balanced compost, vermicomposting and more. Homeowners and other interested parties are welcome to attend. Class space is limited to 25 and pre-registration is required. There is a $15 fee per class which covers class materials. To register for this class, held at the Lifelong Learning Center (8050 Paradise Road, LV 89123, I-215 & Windmill Lane), contact Elaine Fagin at fagine@unce.unr.edu or call 702-257-5573.

Landscape Retrofit Classes

Learn how to convert your water-guzzling, water-wasting yards into less thirsty, water efficient, energy saving and attractive landscapes through University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s landscape retrofit classes. You will be coached through the design process, creating your own design for building a new or redesigning an old landscape. Over 500 Las Vegas residents have completed the classes with outstanding results; some have been presented landscape design awards. The eight-week class begins on February 1 and continues each Monday morning from 9 a.m. to Noon through March 22 at the Lifelong Learning Center located at 8050 Paradise Road, Las Vegas. Class size is limited and there is a $50 fee per landscape. (The fee is waived if associated with the Master Gardener program.) For more information, please contact either the Master Gardener Help line at 257-5555, Bob Morris at morrisr@unce. unr.edu, or the instructor, Mel Hengen, at mojavemel@aol.com. University of Nevada Cooperative Extension is an outreach arm of the University that extends unbiased, research-based knowledge from the University—and other land-grant universities—to local communities. Educational programs are developed based on local needs, sometimes in partnership with other agencies and volunteers. For more information about University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, please visit the website at www.unce.unr.edu or call (702) 222-3130.

edible gardens Primrose

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THE PLIGHT OF THE HONEYBEE

The beekeeper’s biggest enemy in recent years, has been a miniature, blood-red arachnid called the varroa mite. A remarkably adaptive, ticklike creature, the mite burrows into unborn brood and adults alike, feeding, as a tick does, on the bee’s body fluids. It is, said Miller, a “sinister predation” that slowly saps the strength and vigor from a hive, either killing the brood outright or causing deformities that weaken adult bees and make them more susceptible to viruses. And this mite is — besides labor, pasture, honey prices, pollination prices, bacteria, fungi, unpleasant neighbors and other invading insects — what beekeepers think most about these days.

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the wonders of

HONEY

As this year’s allergy season begins, it’s time to boost your immune system against the pesky pollens that pollute the air. These virtually invisible sources of so much misery can be thwarted with a little help from an unexpected source: Mother Nature provides her own remedy in the form of honey! Honey - Essential for strengthening your immune system, can also mitigate your allergic reactions to local pollens through repeated exposure (to local honey).

Allergies develop as an abnormal response of the body’s natural immune system. The immune system normally protects the body by identifying potentially harmful invaders, such as bacteria or viruses. It then responds to by sending antibodies to kill them. When the reaction is caused by other substances, such as dust or pollen, people are considered “allergic”. Many species of plants are pollinated by both insects and the wind. Honeybees collect pollen from each of these species of plants, which are then present in small amounts of honey gathered by the bees working in the areas where the species are growing. When people living in these same areas eat honey that was produced in that envi-

by F. Primrose-Raines ronment, the honey will often act as an immune booster. The effects of this local honey are optimized when the honey is taken a little bit (a couple of teaspoons-full) each day for several months, prior to the pollen season. How local should the honey be for allergy prevention? The best honey will have been raised closest to where you live (yes we have several hives right here in Southern Nevada). Annsley Naturals Southwest local honey and local bee pollen is derived from a myriad of plants in our very own Mojave Desert region, thus acting as a natural remedy in regard to allergies. The closer the better, since it will contain more of the variety of plant pollen that will benefit you the most. Nearly all local health food stores carry it. It may seem odd to some that exposure to pollen can trigger allergies, yet exposure to pollen in the honey usually has the opposite effect. This is, however, a common outcome. Through honey, the allergens are delivered in small, manageable doses, and the effect over time is similar (yet far less painful!) to undergoing a whole series of allergy immunology injections. The major difference, of course, is that the honey is a lot easier to take and a lot less expensive. It’s therefore surprising that this powerful health benefit of ingesting Primrose

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local honey is not more widely understood; it is simple, easy, and often amazingly effective. In order to understand why honey can be used to treat seasonal allergy symptoms, you first need to know how honey is made: Honeybees (the female worker bees) travel from flower to flower, drinking nectar and storing it in sacs in their tiny bodies. Then they buzz back to their hives and use their “honey stomachs” to regurgitate and ingest the nectar a number of times until it is partially digested. The nectar is stored in the honeycombs, and after fanning it with their wings to evaporate the water, it turns into the thick, sweet honey we know and love. Eating this pollen-containing honey will now act as an immune booster, reducing your allergy symptoms to the local flowering plants on which these bees feasted. Taking 2-3 spoonfuls each day for several months should diminish your body’s reaction in the upcoming pollen season. If it doesn’t help with your sniffles and sneezing, your body is still benefiting from the wide variety of nutrients found in honey: vitamins B6, thiamin, niacin, riboflavin and pantothenic acid and minerals like calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Honey is also rich in antioxidants and vitamin C. All that and it tastes good too - good news for Southern Nevadans who suffer the sneezing, sniffling and coughing of hay fever! Honey has long been used as an ancient remedy to help heal many kinds of wounds, and has even been found to work with serious ones that don’t respond well to conventional treatments. In some studies, honey has proved to be effective against the flesh-eating strain of Staphylococcus aureus, which has become resistant to the semisynthetic antibiotic methicillin. Part of the reason honey may work so well is due to an enzyme added by bees that results in the formation of small amounts of hydrogen peroxide, an effective germicide against many bacteria that cause wound infections. But beyond that, honey’s healing properties aren’t yet well understood. Researchers have yet to determine which of its many components (about 600 are known) contribute to its therapeutic effects. Still, evidence is accumulating to confirm its health benefits, and modern science is hard at work to discover the nature of honey’s many positive actions. A review published in the March 1, 2006 issue of International Journal of Lower Extremity Wounds looked at the results of 22 clinical trials involving more than 2,000 patients. It concluded that honey quickly clears up existing wound infections and protects against further infection, reduces swelling and minimizes scarring, helps remove infected and dead tissue, and speeds healing by stimulating new tissue growth. The Waikato Honey Research Unit at the University of Waikato in New Zealand is one of the leaders of research into honey’s healing properties. Studies are also ongoing in Germany, where pediatricians have been using honey to treat wounds in children with cancer. The German physicians are finding that even persistent wounds that have refused to heal for years can be brought under control with the particular type of honey being studied. The honey used in the New Zealand research is available commercially as “manuka honey” (it’s a type of honey, not a brand name). The German physicians are using Medihoney, developed in Australia. Don’t rush out to treat your next cut or burn with regular store-bought honey, but consider giving one of the medicinal honeys a try. However, if you have a bad burn or an open wound, be sure to get prompt medical treatment; using honey correctly to treat a serious wound requires considerable expertise. Winter 2010

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The Joy of Youth Restored Bike-Sharing Program

Bike-Sharing Program Free of Charge at Humana Guidance Center in Green Valley Do you remember the pure joy of hopping on a bicycle and going for a ride? Well, you can relive that experience with a visit to the Humana Guidance Center in the Green Valley area of Henderson. Join Humana for Freewheelin, a free bike-sharing program open to the community. Anytime Monday-Friday, from 8am to 5pm, anyone 18 or over can come by and check out a bike - for free. The Guidance Center is equipped with 18 bikes and everything anyone might need for a ride. Just wear a comfortable pair of shoes and bring a sense of fun and adventure. “After Freewheelin’s success at the 2009 National Senior Games, we are so excited to host a Freewheelin station here at the Guidance Center,” said Curt Howell, Market President for Humana. “With over 2,400 rides taken during those 14 days, I’m sure the Henderson community will really enjoy this resource.” In addition to giving riders a free helmet and a lock to use while they ride, Humana hosts safety information sessions during which participants review some cycling safety basics. Whether it’s been 20 years or 2 weeks, the goal is to make Freewheelers comfortable on a bike. Does a group ride sound appealing? There will be a Freewheelin Guide available to lead riders on the road. Pick up a Humana Guidance Center calendar or call ahead to get a schedule for group rides. The rides range from a casual 2-3 mile ride to a more athletic 8-10 mile ride - but they are always based on your comfort level. Bring a friend to the group ride or come in and create your own ride. The Humana Guidance Center, located at the corner of North Green Valley Parkway and Pebble Road, is a resource to everyone 34

in the community, regardless of whether or not you have Humana insurance. Visitors are welcome to join us for a complimentary cup of coffee, one of our many social events or even a game of Wii bowling. Bring your neighbor or your grandkids. Freewheelin details: Hours of Operation: Monday-Friday, 8am-5pm. Each bike must be returned before the Guidance Center closes at 5 pm. Who can ride: Anyone 18 or over is eligible to use the program. To become a Freewheeler: 1. Come into the Humana Guidance Center and register. Freewheelers will need two things: • A government issued id (driver’s license, military id, state issued id or passport) • A valid credit card to ensure that we get the bike back 2. Attend a safety information session. There will be multiple sessions scheduled per week, just check the Guidance Center calendar. 3. Get a free helmet fitted and pick out a bike. 4. Enjoy the ride! For more information: Humana Guidance Center 1000 N. Green Valley Parkway, Suite 720 Henderson, NV 89074 (702) 269-5200 www.humana.com Primrose

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When you step in to the foyer of this home, you’re taken back to a time of romance and extravagance. In her own home, interior designer Rio Habbas surrounds herself with the things she and her family love: rich sumptuous textures. Fine art and trompe l’oeil adorn the walls. “Being a designer by profession, I wanted more for my house. I wanted my house to have warmth so my family could feel like they were living in a home, not a showplace. The use of textures and color are very important to me,” states interior designer Rio, of Rio Designs. “I like a traditional style that lets the inside elements and outside elements become one, and contributes to a relaxing atmosphere. I want our house to be the place where everyone, including our kids’ friends, wants to come.”

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To integrate the exterior design of her home with the interior the owner, Rio sought a color - and texture scheme that would fit the sumptuous rich warmth of her design aesthetic. She accomplished this with a tropical color palette, contrasting it beautifully with the green of the front vegetation. The asymmetrical lines of her front yard, although perfectly groomed, represent the roughness of nature, and the beautiful lines and symmetry of the house’s façade symbolically illustrate order coexisting with, but ultimately triumphing over chaos. Winter 2010

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As grand as the ďŹ nest luxury hotel suite, Rio manages to bring a personal touch to her design, imbuing it with a sense of approach-ability and a hominess that invite you to come in, relax, and stay a while. Glass tile and stone work is by Walker Zanger

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These richly appointed bedrooms are a perfect example of Hammas’ careful attention to detail, combining the formality of old-world furniture with soft, draping fabrics in warm and inviting shades. Below left - Guests love this retreat! Furniture from Thomasville collection.

The theater room is designed as a place for the whole family to enjoy. Adding fabric and upholstering on the walls to contain and improve sound, Rio chooses fabrics that create the perfect backdrop for the room’s custom furniture. Winter 2009 2010 36 Autumn

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Interior Designer Rio Hammas continues her design theme by combining old fashioned pieces with warm, flowing fabrics and exquisite drapery. Fusing these elements lends approachability to what could have been an overly-informal setting. Clockwise from top left - Candles and rose petals invoke a relaxing bath. An inviting fireplace is the focal point in the less formal family room. Lavish details make a statement such as this light fixture with crystal accents. An elaborate hall flanks the courtyard. Wine Room-An extensive collection of wines is showcased in the custom cabinetry. The formal dining room is the Russian Red Room. Formal living room with antiques fine art and treasure from around the world.

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Cooking with style: Rio accented this gorgeous kitchen with homey touches, making it a warm room for family and friends to gather, in addition to being any food-lover’s dream. Stone work provided by walker zanger. Counter stools from Kessler Furniture.

The upstairs open deck area invokes a Casablanca-like atmosphere perfect for entertaining. Rio again uses fabric and drapery to create texture, and to bring warmth to her environment. Breathtaking views and plenty of light lend a casual air to any daytime fetes, while evening celebrations draw the eye inward to the detailed decorations. The result is two completely separate environments in the same room.

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A touch of whimsy laced with practical componants of comfort, combine to make this is a room designed for daydreams. What more could a girl want... Stanley headboard w/custom upholstery. Custom window & bedding treatment from Rio Designs. A beautiful plaster ďŹ nish adds depth to the walls.

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LOVE is in the Air... Can you smell it?

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LOVE

is in the Air by Sherial Bratcher

“There are four questions of value in life... What is sacred? Of what is the spirit made? What is worth living for, and what is worth dying for? The answer to each is the same. Only love.” Don Juan deMarco (1995) We’ve all heard that phrase... “Love is in the air.” However, when most of us think about that, we think about spring... “spring fever...” everything in bloom, soft, warm breezes. The “mating season” is on!!!! The fact is, however, in reality, love is always in the air. While most animals have a particular mating season, for human beings it’s always the season. Human beings are, by nature, social and sexual beings. Our sexuality and need for love, companionship and community are part of our very existence and essence. In this light, let’s turn to the elusive and little understood subject of pheromones. You can’t see, feel or smell them, but they have an enormous influence on who you find attractive and whom you attract. These pheromones are chemical messengers that are emitted by animals and humans to evoke some type of response in another of the same species. There has been a great deal of study about pheromones in animals, indicating, for example, that pheromones help mother animals show their babies what is edible and what is poison. Pheromones are also used by animals to attract mates and mark their territory. There is much less known about pheromones in humans... but, nevertheless, we’ve got them. Researchers believe that the menstrual cycles of women who live or work together tend to synchronize over time. It is believed that this might be due to the women picking up on each others’ pheromones. Along these lines, it is important to understand that the sense of smell (olfactory sense) goes right to the limbic part of the brain... the emotional center. The main areas the body exudes odors from are: the underarms, pubic/genital area, lips, eyelids and outer ear. Pheromones can promote sexual attractiveness and elicit romantic attention from the opposite sex. There is a big, “HOWEVER,” here. Since all human beings are “broadcasting” some amount of pheromones into the air, we need to be very careful what we are actually broadcasting. Most men and women are “in heat” in one way or another all the time and most of the time they are broadcasting their heat

unconsciously. Most people don’t know what they exude and aren’t able or don’t want to read what other people broadcast either. If people were better able to read their own and other’s emotional and sexual energy, they would be more careful with whom they get involved. It is important to understand that everything negative, unworthy, and needy you feel about yourself, you are broadcasting to others and attracting to yourself. It’s in the “air” around you. Think about the air as water you are swimming around in... don’t you want that water to be clean, clear and full of light? Even if it’s not, you want to know how to protect yourself from the dirty water so you can maintain your own beauty. Consciously knowing you are broadcasting certain pheromones and/or certain energy is the first step toward learning how to attract what you are seeking in a mate and/or increase the positive energy that you exude. How does a person broadcast who they really are and what they really want? By hard work. Hard work doesn’t mean taking more showers or using a better deodorant. What I mean by hard work is the work of looking inward to work on unresolved pain, anger and disappointment. Many of us carry around unhealthy and useless self images from our childhoods and past relationships. One must do honest and relentless self examination and appraisal to get to the root of how you think and feel about yourself. It is very easy to say, “I always get hurt,” or “I’ll never find love,” and even more importantly, “I don’t deserve...” Think of yourself like a radio station that might be broadcasting static. It is possible to “change the station” on what you broadcast. You are the only one who has control over what station you listen to. Most people have approximately 60,000 thoughts per day running through their minds. Listen to your own self talk. Keep a journal, writing down what your thoughts were for the day and as you put head to pillow at night. How many thoughts were negative and self-defeating? How many “what if ’s” did you have? How many “I can’ts” did you have? How many “I’m too fat, short, stupid, tall, etc.,” did you have? This is how most of us walk around... with an internal dialogue, much of which we learned as children, that broadcast our irrational feelings of lack of self worth, self esteem and self confidence. Winter Primrose 2010

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Now write down all the positive things about yourself. Every day, write down and think about how wonderful, beautiful, unique, precious and special you are. Feel it... Be it... visualize it... because this beautiful and extraordinary being is who you actually are and what you can actually broadcast. Think of this as cleaning up your energy and pheromone field so that you are exuding your inner radiance and beauty, your True Self. It is then that the love you send out into the air can begin to attract anything and everything you want, need and deserve in your life. As you send this Splendid Love into the air, your eyes will sparkle, and your skin will glow. You no longer will broadcast and attract the same type of person that wasn’t right for you or will hurt or abandon you. You have the power within yourself to project the most beautiful aspects of yourself, knowing your flaws, but not living in them and being ruled by them. You can even actually make friends with them as you are friends with people like yourself who just are just as imperfect... and just as wonderful. You have the power to live in your strength, joy and radiance. Every person that makes this type of inner change adds to the wonderful Love that is always in the air: true, passionate, compassionate, honest, joyful love. There is no time like the present to delve into, remember and recover your True and Magnificent Self. Sherial Bratcher has a passion for bringing people together and is an author, social entrepreneur, matchmaker, radio talk show host and founder of two highly successful organizations, Perfect Match by Sherial.com and Diamondstarnetworkingevents. Sherial is co-author of “Blueprint for Success” with Stephen Covey and Ken Blanchard and the soon to be released “Life Choices,” an anthology of inspirational stories by and about extraordinary people overcoming adversity. Sherial has also represented internationally-known speakers and authors such as Michael Losier, Judi Moreo and Peter Fogel. She is a contributing writer to www.vegascommunityonline.org; www.thevegasvoice. net, Tradeshow Lifestyle Magazine and Primrose. Sherial is a “Law of Attraction” coach and mentor, believing that people attract what they think about. She has learned the great gift of how to change her thoughts to change her life and shares this knowledge with others on every level. Sherial utilizes both her personal and professional experience to help people live their dreams in every area of life and make the shift from the ordinary to the extraordinary. She is an innovative businesswoman who brings a fresh, compassionate approach to business and social networking. Sherial believes in “The Law of Attraction” and practices it each and every day. This not only helps her daily life but also creates a positive atmosphere for everyone around her. For more information please call: 702-248-3568

Listen Live to Sherial Saturday night at 10:00 on AM 720 KDWN Winter 2010

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Homemade Soups and Bread and Pie, Oh My!

on the menu

Lentil Soup Crusty Cracked Wheat Bread Apple and Dried Cherry Lattice Pie 52

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Lentil Soup

2 russet (baking) potatoes 2 medium carrots, cut into 1/4-inch dice 2 celery ribs, cut into 1/4-inch dice 3 garlic cloves, chopped ďŹ ne 1 medium onion, chopped ďŹ ne 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 pound French green lentils), picked over and rinsed (about 2 cups) 8 cups low-salt chicken broth chopped fresh parsley leaves, for garnish

Peel potatoes and cut into 1/4-inch dice. In a 5- to 6-quart heavy kettle cook potatoes, carrots, celery, garlic, and onion in butter over moderate heat, stirring frequently, until onion is softened, about 4 minutes. Add lentils, broth, and salt and pepper to taste and simmer, uncovered, stirring occasionally, 45 minutes, or until vegetables are tender and soup is thickened. Serve soup garnished with parsley.

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This recipe will be your best friend when time is a concern you can have a wholesome homemade soup on the table in 30 minutes.

Chicken & Gnocchi Soup

1 rotisserie cooked chicken, (use leftovers) bones removed, cut up 5 cup container chicken broth 1 c. chopped celery 1 1/2 c. chopped carrots 1/4 c. chopped onion 1 c. fresh or frozen peas 1 tsp. seasoned salt 1/2 tsp. cayenne dash of Thyme 1 package frozen Gnocchi Salt & Pepper to taste

on the menu

Chicken & Gnocchi Soup Artisan Flatbreads Deep Dish Apple Pie

Place all ingredients except gnocchi in large pot and bring to boil for about 10 minutes. Add gnocchi, let soup simmer on low heat for 20 minutes. Recipes continue on page: 62

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Bean with Bacon Soup

1 (16 ounce) package dried navy beans 9 cups water 1 pound bacon 2 onions, chopped 2 stalks celery, chopped 4 - 5 cups chicken broth onion soup base 1 bay leaf 1/3 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves 1 (16 ounce) can diced tomatoes

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Boil the beans in 9 cups of the water and then let sit for one hour. Drain and set aside. Cook the bacon to your desired texture (it can be soft or crisp, whatever you prefer) and drain except for 1/4 cup grease. Coarsely chop the bacon. Add the onions and celery to the reserved grease and bacon and saute until soft, do not drain. Add the chicken base, beans, bay leaf, salt, pepper, and cloves, and simmer for 2 hours. Stir in the tomatoes with their juice. Serve. Recipes continue on page: 64


on the menu

Bean with Bacon Soup Corn MufďŹ ns Chess Pie Lem

on Che ss P ie

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Vegetable Beef Soup 3/4 gallon water or beef stock 2-3 large onions, sliced 2-3 lbs. of beef chunks cut into 1 1/2” cubes 2-3 tablespoons flour (for dredging) 2 tablespoons olive oil 4 stalks of celery, sliced, strings removed 3 tablespoons beef soup base or bouillon 2 tablespoons wine (sherry, port or marsala) 4 potatoes, peeled, cut into 2 inch cubes 6 large carrots, peeled, sliced into 1/2” coins 2 bay leaves 2 16 oz. bags frozen mixed vegetables (optional) 1 16 oz. can tomato sauce or 1/2 cup ketchup 1/2 tablespoon fresh basil (optional) 1 tablespoon fresh garlic, peeled and minced 1 tablespoon flour (for thickening, optionally) garlic and onion powder, salt and pepper, to taste Select lean, less expensive cuts of meat. By choosing a pot roast and slicing into cubes yourself, money can be saved over pre-cut stew beef. Cut and cube beef, slice onions and celery. You can optionally choose to prepare fresh parsnips or turnips at this time, for a heartier vegetable mix. Mince garlic. Dredge beef in flour and sauté in olive oil until browned, adding garlic during last few minutes of browning. Add wine to remove browned bits from bottom of pan. Add water or stock, bay leaves and tomato sauce or ketchup. If you have beef broth it can be used to good advantage in place of bouillon or water; reduce bouillon or soup base to 1 teaspoon for added flavor, if desired, when using beef stock; add and bring to a boil. If you have no broth available, soup base is preferred over bouillon. Add basil, if desired, and 2 whole bay leaves. Other seasonings may also be added

at this time (a pinch of oregano, a dash of garlic or onion powder, salt and pepper, etc - season to taste). Reduce heat to low. Stew may be transferred to a CrockPot at this time). If cooking on the stove, simmer for an hour or two or until onion is transparent and tender. Stir in cubed potatoes, sliced carrots and frozen vegetables, if using, during final 40 minutes of cooking, and simmer just until vegetables are fork tender. Or, if using a slow cooker, set to low, add remaining ingredients at the start and leave to simmer for several hours or more, until ready to serve.

on the menu

Vegetable Beef Soup Hearty White Bread Pumpkin Pie

Remove bay leaves before serving.

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Maple Sugar Tartlets For pastry dough 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon sugar 1 stick (1/2 cup) cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 cup cold water For filling 2 large eggs 1/2 cup dark amber or Grade B maple syrup 6 tablespoons packed light brown sugar 3/4 stick (6 tablespoons) unsalted butter, melted and cooled 3 tablespoons granulated maple sugar (see cooks’ note, below) 1 1/2 tablespoons cider vinegar Rounded 1/8 teaspoon salt 2/3 cup pecans (2 1/2 ounces), finely chopped

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Special equipment: a pastry or bench scraper (optional); a 4 1/2-inch round cookie cutter; 8 (3 1/2-inch) fluted round tartlet pans; pie weights or raw rice Accompaniment: unsweetened whipped cream print a shopping list for this recipe. Make dough: Blend together flour, sugar, butter, and salt in a bowl with your fingertips or a pastry blender until mixture resembles coarse meal with some small (roughly pea-size) butter lumps. Drizzle water evenly over mixture and gently stir with a fork until incorporated and dough forms a ball. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured

surface and divide into 4 portions. With heel of your hand, smear each portion once in a forward motion to help distribute fat. Gather all dough together with scraper or your hands and press into a ball, then flatten into a 5-inch disk. Wrap disk in plastic wrap and chill until firm, at least 1 hour. Make tartlet shells: Put oven rack in middle position and preheat oven to 375°F. Roll out dough on a lightly floured surface with a lightly floured rolling pin into a 16- by 14-inch oval (1/8 inch thick). Cut out 8 (4 1/2-inch) rounds with cutter and fit each round into a tartlet pan, pressing lightly to fit into pans.


Transfer tartlet pans to a baking sheet and chill until dough is firm, about 15 minutes. Line each tartlet shell with foil and fill with pie weights. Bake until edges are pale golden, 8 to 10 minutes. Carefully remove foil and weights and continue baking until bottoms are golden, about 5 minutes more. Cool completely in pans on a rack, about 10 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350°F. Make filling and bake tartlets: While shells cool, whisk together all filling ingredients except nuts until combined well. Return cooled tartlet shells (in their pans) to baking sheet and divide nuts among shells. Ladle filling into shells, dividing it evenly.

on the menu

Seafood Bisque Sourdough Baguettes Maple Sugar Tartlets

Bake tartlets until filling is just set, 15 to 18 minutes. Cool in pans on rack, about 15 minutes, then carefully remove tartlets from pans. Serve warm or at room temperature. Recipes continue page 64 Primrose Primrose Winter Winter2010 2010

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Cracked Wheat Bread

1/2 cup cracked wheat -- fine 1 1/2 cups boiling water 1 package active dry yeast 1/3 cup warm water -- 100-110 deg. 1/4 cup butter -- softened 1 1/2 tablespoons salt 2 tablespoons molasses 2 tablespoons honey 1 cup milk 1 cup whole-wheat flour 4 cups all-purpose flour Cook the cracked wheat in the boiling water about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking until all the water is absorbed. Dissolve the yeast in the 1/3 cup lukewarm water in a large mixing bowl and let proof. Stir the butter, salt, molasses, honey, and milk into the cooked cracked wheat. Cool to lukewarm, then add to the yeast mixture. With a large spoon or with one hand, start stirring in the flours, 1 cup at a time. When the dough is stiff enough to work, turn out on a floured board and knead a good 10 to 12 minutes, working in a little of the remaining flour as necessary. When smooth and elastic, shape into a ball and put in a buttered bowl, turning to coat with butter. Cover, place in a warm, draft-free spot, and let rise until doubled in bulk, about 1 1/2 hours. Punch down and shape into two loaves. Put in well-buttered 9 x 5 x 3-inch loaf pans, cover, and let rise again until doubled in bulk, or until the dough reaches the tops of the pans. Bake in a preheated 375 degree oven 30 to 35 minutes, or until the loaves sound hollow when tapped on top and bottom. Cool on racks. Makes 2 loaves.

Apple and Dried Cherry Lattice Pie Crust 1 1/2 cups all purpose flour 1/2 cup cake flour 1 tablespoon sugar Winter 2010 2010 62 Winter

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3/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup (1 stick) chilled unsalted butter, cut into pieces 1/4 cup chilled solid vegetable shortening, cut into pieces 5 tablespoons cold whole milk Filling 5 Granny Smith apples (about 1 3/4 pounds total), peeled, cored, cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices, slices cut crosswise into thirds 3 tablespoons sugar 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

minutes. Transfer to large bowl. Stir in cherries, brown sugar, and vanilla. Cool completely. Butter 9-inch glass pie dish. Roll out dough disk on floured surface to 12inch round. Transfer to pie dish; trim overhang to 1/2 inch. Spoon filling into crust. Roll out dough rectangle on floured surface to 11x6-inch rectangle. Cut lengthwise into 8 strips. Arrange 4 strips across pie, spacing evenly. Place remaining 4 strips across first 4 strips, forming lattice pattern. Fold dough overhang over ends of strips; crimp edge. Brush strips and edge with 1 tablespoon butter. Bake until pie is golden and filling is bubbling, covering edge with foil if browning too quickly, about 40 minutes. Cool 45 minutes. Dust pie with powdered sugar. Continued from page 55

Artisan Flatbread

1 cup dried Bing cherries 1/4 cup (packed) dark brown sugar 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract Powdered sugar For crust: Blend both flours, sugar, and salt in processor until just combined. Add butter and shortening. Using on/off turns, process until mixture resembles coarse meal. Add milk. Using on/off turns, process until moist clumps form. Gather dough into ball; divide into 2 pieces, 1 slightly larger than the other. Flatten larger piece into disk and smaller piece into rectangle. Wrap each in plastic; chill 1 hour. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Keep chilled.) For filling: Preheat oven to 375°F. Place apples on large rimmed baking sheet; toss with 3 tablespoons sugar, 2 tablespoons butter, and lemon juice. Roast until apples are tender, stirring occasionally, about 45

3 1/2 cups + bread flour 1 tsp salt 2 Tblsp powdered yeast 1 cup warm water 2 Tblsp + olive oil misting bottle of water

In medium size bowl: Mix the flour, salt and yeast together. Slowly stir in the warm water and olive oil to make a soft, tacky dough. Transfer dough to a floured surface and knead for about five minutes until the dough springs back to the touch, use extra flour if needed. Shape dough into one large ball, Place in large bowl. Brush with a little olive oil. Cover and leave to rise in a warm place for about one hour (cover the dough with a flour sack tea towel, will double in size). After rising - Feel free to add various herbs, cheeses, spices if you like. Preheat oven to 475 degrees. Knead dough again on a floured surface and divide into six


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pieces, rolling each piece into a ball. Let rise for 10 more minutes. Roll and press the balls flat until they are round and about 1/8” thick Place on greased baking sheet/s Cover again with tea towel and let flat rounds rest for 30 minutes. Spray the flat rounds with mists of water and bake in a preheated 475 oven for three minutes. You want them firm but not hard or too brown.

For filling the pie shell; fill in circular layers the pie shell until you have a large (heaping) top. Sprinkle the sugar mixture all over the top and put dollops of butter (cubes if you have cut it cold) and put into the oven for about one hour at 425 degrees. If you choose to, you can put a second pie shell in a lattice form over the top by cutting parallel strips out of a second store-bought pie shell and weaving it over, under, over under, etc., alternating each row accordingly. Just be sure to cover the top with foil for most of the baking time either in the beginning or the end of the baking time.

Remove from the oven and serve immediately or brush lightly with a little more olive oil and Store tightly covered until ready to use. Reheat them by briefly heating them in a frying pan right before serving. Some “artisan” variations: Add about 2 Tblsp or mix and match your favorite fresh herbs: oregano or coriander rosemary italian herb mix and you can also add about 1/2 cup of your favorite grated shredded cheese.

12-15 large apples (I sometimes us multiple varieties; however, my fav. are Fuji w/some Granny Smith’s mixed in) peeled, take the cores out, and sliced a bit thin 1 c. sugar 1/2 c. brown sugar (use sugars to taste when mixed with the cinnamon, nutmeg and ginger) ground cinnamon pinch of ground nutmeg pinch of ginger unsalted butter 1 large egg white beaten with a little water, for brushing pie crust Prepared or homemade pie shells Using prepared or homemade pie shells, pre-bake at 325 for 15 minutes to brown. Winter 2010 Primrose 58 64 Primrose Winter 2010 58 Autumn June • 2009 July 2008Primrose Primrose

Place muffin paper liners in a 12-cup muffin tin. Evenly divide the cornbread mixture into the papers. Bake for 15 minutes, until golden.

Hearty White Bread

4 1/4 cups bread flour 1 tablespoon vital wheat gluten (optional) 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened 3 tablespoons lard 1/2 cup milk, scalded 1 cup water 2 teaspoons active dry yeast 1 1/4 teaspoons salt 1 egg yolk 3 1/2 tablespoons sugar or honey This is a good sized loaf for the larger bread machines, but can also be made conventionally. If you want your bread to rise higher and be lighter, scald the milk. Yes, it does make a difference. There is a protein in milk which also exists in non-fat dry milk solids, that has been proven to retard yeast development. Scalding and skimming the milk removes some of this protein, making for a lighter bread product.

I sometimes us multiple varieties; however, my fav. are Fuji w/some Granny Smith’s mixed in.

Deep Dish Apple Pie

Into a large bowl, mix the cornmeal, flour, baking powder, sugar, and salt. In another bowl, whisk together the whole milk, eggs, butter, and honey. Add the wet to the dry ingredients and stir until just mixed.

Let cool and serve a la mode or with whipped topping and a drizzle of chocolate over the top.

Honey Corn Bread Muffins 1 cup yellow cornmeal 1 cup all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon baking powder 1/2 cup granulated sugar 1 teaspoon salt 1 cup whole milk 2 large eggs 1/2 stick butter, melted 1/4 cup honey Special equipment: paper muffin cups and a 12-cup muffin tin Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

Note: That having been said, you may opt to skip the scalding process if you’re in a hurry, and you will still have a flavorful loaf of bread, albeit a somewhat heavier one than if you had taken the extra step.


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In a small saucepan, bring milk nearly to a boil, (little bubbles will begin to form around the edges of pan). Remove immediately from heat and allow to sit without stirring or moving for about 20 minutes. A film will form on the surface of the milk. Skim this protein layer off carefully with an upside-down spoon, removing as much as possible. Add butter, lard, salt, and allow to cool to lukewarm before adding to remaining ingredients in bread machine. This makes a 2 lb. loaf for bread machines. A hearty white bread with a lovely crusty crust

Pumpkin Pie

1/2 12” pumpkin insides baked and blended to smooth consistency; or 20 oz canned pumpkin(about 2 1/2 cups) 1 can of sweetened condensed milk 1/4 c. cake flour 2 large eggs 3/4 cup packed light brown sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice/allspice 1/4 teaspoon salt Prepared or homemade pie shells Using prepared or homemade pie shells, pre-bake at 325 for 15 minutes to brown. Mix all ingredients together until blended well. Pour the pie filling into the shell and bake at the same 325 degrees for approximately 1 hour or until it doesn’t “jiggle” but seems firm. Cool and dollop with a generous serving of whipped cream and eat to your heart’s content!

Transfer the pie to a wire rack and cool to room temperature before cutting; don’t fret when the filling begins to fall. This is what gives chess pies their silken texture. Cut into slim wedges and serve. About Pie Crusts If you still make your own pastry, good for you. Many people are too busy to do so today and I occasionally plead guilty myself. Some frozen pie crusts are excellent; find a brand that you like and stick with it. Note: If you use a frozen pie shell, choose a deep-dish one and recrimp the crust to make a high, fluted edge. This will minimize spillovers, which so often happen with pies. Recrimping is easy: Simply move around the edge of the crust making a zigzag pattern by pinching the dough between the thumb of one hand and the index finger and thumb of the other. Takes less than a minute. Also, before you fill the pie shell, set it—still in its flimsy aluminum

Seafood Bisque

1 lb. bacon 1/2 lb. shrimp, deveined and cut in half crosswise 1/2 lb. scallops, coarsely chopped 1 clove garlic, crushed 1-2 onions, chopped 1/8 to 1/4 c. flour 2 cans chicken broth 1 c. milk 1 c. grated Parmesan cheese 2 tsp. basil, dried 4 red potatoes, peeled and chopped into 1-inch pieces Fry bacon. Remove bacon; let cool and crumble. Saute garlic and onions in bacon grease until soft. Add shrimp and scallops and cook until done. Add broth. Slowly add flour to thicken. Add potatoes; heat to a boil, stirring constantly for 1 minute. Simmer 15 minutes. Stir in milk, crumbled bacon pieces, cheese, and basil. Heat thoroughly; do not let boil.

Lemon Chess Pie

1 1/2 cups sugar Finely grated zest of 3 large lemons Juice of 3 large lemons 5 large eggs 1/3 cup butter, melted One 9-inch unbaked pie shell (see About Pie Crusts, below) Preheat the oven to 325°F. Combine the sugar, lemon zest, and lemon juice in a medium- size bowl. Beat the eggs in, one by one, then add the butter in a slow stream, beating all the while. Pour the filling into the pie shell, slide the pie onto a baking sheet, and bake on the middle oven shelf for about 45 minutes or until puffed and delicately browned.

tin—inside a standard 9-inch pie pan; this is for added support. To avoid spillovers, I slide the pie onto a heavy-duty rimmed baking sheet, preheated along with the oven to ensure that the bottom crust will be as crisp as possible.

Enjoy these warming dishes this winter or anytime you want to feel cosy inside... Primrose Primrose

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“LADIES AND GENTLEMEN START YOUR ENGINES” NASCAR returns to the Las Vegas Speedway February 26th to the 28th

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This years NASCAR race will be full of excitement and fun as racing enthusiasts the world over gather in Southern Nevada for the Sam’s Town 300 NASCAR Nationwide Series. Notable racing celebrities such as Danica Patrick and Las Vegas’ own Kurt & Kyle Busch gather at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway as they race for the cup! Families will gather for the festivities with stockpiles of wonderful recipes for some “power barbecue” for tailgate parties and even in February the sun lotion will go on. Permeating the arena with the sweet aroma of exhaust, lotion, gas, beer and barbecue, which is a sensory delight for many in our community.

the NASCAR Sprint Cup event at Las Vegas Motor Speedway. The event on Feb. 28 will be called the Shelby American to honor the 45th anniversary of the Shelby G.T. 350 and 427 Cobra introductions in 1965. “We are ecstatic to have the legendary Shelby name on our NASCAR Sprint Cup race for a second consecutive year,” said LVMS President Chris Powell said. “This year’s event was a tremendous success, and we’re looking forward to giving more exposure to the Shelby brand that has, over the years, become synonymous with the best in high-performance cars.”

Racing events, like this local family tradition have been part of our Las Vegas culture for as long as I can remember. Watching the Mint races as a child, and being thrilled at the deafening roar of the engines is a wonderful memory. The much anticipated tailgate barbecues are the subject on many fans lips weeks in advance with the menu looked forward to and planned out... with relish.

The 2010 NASCAR Weekend will kick off with qualifying for the Shelby American NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race on Friday, Feb. 26. The Sam’s Town 300 NASCAR Nationwide Series race is set for Saturday, Feb. 27. Tickets for all 2010 events at Las Vegas Motor Speedway, including the Shelby American on Sunday, Feb. 28, can be purchased by calling 1-800-644-444 or online at www.lvms.com. Neon Garage, Lucky 7 Preferred parking and driver introduction passes also are on sale.

This years race has some new, old faces at least in the sponsorships as Shelby Automobiles, a wholly owned subsidiary of Carroll Shelby International Inc. (CSBI:PK), will return in 2010 as the sponsor of

Look forward a few pages to find a recipe we love for a tailgate party and you’ll also learn a little more about another local professional racer; Taylor Barton as he begins his race to the top! Primrose Primrose Winter Winter2010 2010

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2010 NASCAR Event Schedule Friday, Feb. 26 Neon Garage and Ticket Gates open at 10 a.m. 11 a.m. - 11:50 a.m. Sam’s Town 300 practice Noon - 1:30 p.m. Shelby American practice 1:40 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Sam’s Town 300 final practice 3:40 p.m. Shelby American qualifying (two laps, all positions) 6 p.m. Dirt Track – Spectator gates open 7 p.m. Neon Garage Closes 7 p.m. Dirt Track – World of Outlaws Sprint Cars Saturday, Feb. 27 Neon Garage and Ticket Gates open at 8 a.m. 9 a.m. Sam’s Town 300 qualifying (all positions) 10:40 a.m. - 11:20 a.m. Shelby American practice 11:45 a.m. - 12:50 p.m. Shelby American final practice 1 p.m. Sam’s Town 300 driver introductions. 1:30 p.m. NNS Sam’s Town 300 (200 laps, 300 miles) 5:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Richard Petty Driving Experience Rides 7-9 p.m. Neon Garage Post-race Party – Open to the public Sunday, Feb. 28 Neon Garage and Ticket gates open at 7 a.m. 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. Speedway Children’s Charity Track Walk 9:30 a.m. Pre-race entertainment begins 11:30 a.m. Shelby American driver introductions (Hot pass required) Noon - NSCS Shelby American (267 laps, 400.5 miles) 4 p.m. (approx) Neon Garage Post-race Party – Open to the public 7 p.m Neon Garage Closes * Schedule is subject to change

Tak Las Ving the C h egas nativ ampions e Kyl h e Bus ip ch

LVMS is hosting the annual Speedway Children’s Charities Track Walk on Feb. 28 �Monday, January 4, 2010 �Las Vegas Motor Speedway will host the annual Speedway Children’s Charities Track Walk on Sunday, Feb. 28, at 8 a.m. as part of the 2010 NASCAR Weekend. Shelby American NASCAR Sprint Cup race ticket holders will have the opportunity to walk the 1.5-mile superspeedway to raise money for the Las Vegas Chapter of Speedway Children’s Charities. Making a difference in a child’s life is the focus of Speedway Children’s Charities. SCC strives to do this in collaboration with the non-profit organizations it supports nationwide. Individually, SCC’s local chapters identify the needs of children in their communities and award grants to organizations that address them. Last December, the Las Vegas Chapter of Speedway Children’s Charities granted $275,000 to 78 local children’s causes during its annual grant distribution ceremony. Pre-registration for the Track Walk will begin Jan. 8 online or by mail. Fans are encouraged to register in advance to save $10. Cost for pre-registration will be $25 per person and the day-of-event entry fee will be $35 per person.

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Whoa, That’s a Girl Driving That Car! Danica-mania” is coming to Las Vegas Motor Speedway. �Openwheel racer Danica Patrick plans to compete in the Sam’s Town 300 on Feb. 27, scheduling Las Vegas Motor Speedway as one of her stops in the 2010 NASCAR Nationwide Series. “We’re ecstatic to be the site of one of Danica’s first races in NASCAR competition,” said LVMS president Chris Powell. “Danica is one of the most recognizable figures in all of sports, and her decision to place the Sam’s Town 300 on her schedule will add tremendous excitement to our 2010 NASCAR Weekend.

Danica Sue Patrick (born March 25, 1982) is an American auto racing driver, currently competing in the IndyCar Series, as well as a model and advertising spokeswoman. Patrick was named the Rookie of the Year for both the 2005 Indianapolis 500 and the 2005 IndyCar Series season. With her win in the 2008 Indy Japan 300, Patrick became the first woman to win an Indy car race. Patrick currently drives the #7 GoDaddy.com Honda/Dallara for Andretti Autosport. In 2010, Patrick will race in the NASCAR Nationwide Series, driving the #7 GoDaddy.com Chevrolet Impala for JR Motorsports part-time.

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acs i r o l y Ta ed v l o v n i tively e Boys with th ls Club r and Gi ys, as a and sa eer, he volunt teach tries to s the the kid ance import wing of follo eams, their drg hard workin ying in and sta ool sch Winter 2010

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Taylor Barton

Hometown Boy Makes Good! by F. Primrose-Raines

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s the publisher of Primrose I am often asked where do I get my story ideas, and it is often suggested that I must look far and wide to come up with such interesting stories. Amusingly enough, I seldom have to ever leave my block when it comes to fun and interesting subjects to write about. As was the case when I decided to do a story about the upcoming NASCAR races and a tailgate barbecue. I knew that my neighbors Delilah and Larry Powell would be a great source of recipe inspiration (great barbecues) also as avid race enthusiasts they would be able to give me some valuable information on a sport I don’t know much about. Little did I know... Larry and Delilah’s’ godson is Las Vegas native and internationally known race car champion Taylor Barton. After a few conversations I was thoroughly excited about doing a story about one of our very own community treasures. At 25 years old one could say Taylor Barton has been around the track a few times. His father is an owner of the Las Vegas Mini Grand Prix (a place Taylor also works at when not racing) so at a the very young age of 2 he began to feel the, ‘need for speed.’ “Since I was a kid, said Taylor, “I had hunger for going fast and using wheels to do it! My dad, who’s owned go-kart tracks most of my life, shared the same passion. I wanted to watch dirt bikes non-stop, but they were not always on TV, so my dad would tape them so I could watch dirt bike racing all the time. However that wasn’t enough I wanted to do it myself, thus my dirt bike career started. Because my parents were concerned about the danger of dirt bike racing and the injuries related to dirt bikes, we tried go-karts, which I was instantly addicted to...from that point on racing was not a hobby, it was my life.”

Taylor has been racing in the NASCAR Whelen All-American series since 2005 when he won the rookie of the year. We are currently heading into the NASCAR Camping World West Series. Our sponsor (Full Tilt Poker) is very supportive and they are wonderful people to work with. Our combined goal is to go all the way to NASCAR Sprint Cup series. As Taylor is moving up in the ranks of NASCAR competing in the Camping World West Series and maybe even a few NASCAR truck races next year. He has other career aspirations. He would like to do a reality show about racing, which is currently in the works, and besides racing he will continue his work with kids and teach them that anything is possible with hard work and dedication. Taylor is also actively involved with the Boys and Girls Club and says, as a volunteer, he tries to teach the kids the importance of following their dreams, working hard and staying in school. In fact that is how he got his sponsor, Full Tilt Poker. Taylor was working on an auction for the charity and Full Tilt Poker actually purchased the first sponsorship at the Boys & Girls Club auction event. At the time they had an interest in NASCAR, but were more intrigued with the fact I was a Club kid and represented one of their favorite charities. The relationship grew from there and continues to grow. The financial support through sponsorship helps to pay for the cost of racing, but more importantly it’s their personal belief in me that is most inspiring! As if that were not enough Taylor speaks at different Clark County schools, volunteers for Positively Kids, and partners with companies like the Palms to serve underprivileged families in Las Vegas. When not racing Taylor loves playing poker (especially on Full Tilt Poker. Net), basketball, boating, off road ATV riding, anything with a motor. “Also anyone is welcomed to challenge me to an air hockey or basketball game,” he says. Primrose Primrose Winter Winter2010 2010

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I was born and raised here in Vegas so it is my home. It’s where so many people and businesses have supported me in my racing career. My goal is to give back to the community that has supported me this far... kids that grow up here get a bad rap from those living outside of Las Vegas, but I want those people to see, good does come from Sin City. I know there are lots of other local kids waiting to do the same... follow their dreams. I believe that everything happens for a reason. If you believe in something and work hard enough at it, nothing is going to prevent you from achieving your goal. With that being said, I would love to compete with race car drivers in the states where racing is more prevalent, to better my skills and challenge my growth. However there are no regrets here... all in good time. A long-term goal is to compete in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series and find someone special to share all of this with and start a family. When asked or who he gives credit to for his talent and passion for racing? “There were several people that taught me a few things along the way about racing; however my father was the instrument who put it all together for me,” says Taylor, “He was my right hand man. When I fell he picked me up and dusted me off. He always looked outside the box to make things successful for our team. Way to go Taylor! Winter 2010

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COLOSSAL SHRIMP YOU CAN’T EAT FAST ENOUGH

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Grilled Pork-Chops with Cherry Barbecue Sauce 1 cup canned low-salt chicken broth 1/3 cup cherry preserves 1/3 cup orange juice 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice 1/2 teaspoon grated lemon peel 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves 1/2 cup ruby Port 2 teaspoons cornstarch 1/4 cup orange marmalade 1 tablespoon ketchup Generous pinch of cayenne pepper eight 1-inch-thick boneless pork chops Combine chicken broth, cherry preserves, orange juice, lemon juice, lemon peel, cinnamon, and cloves in heavy medium saucepan. Boil over medium-high heat until broth mixture is reduced to 1 1/2 cups, about 6 minutes. Whisk Port and cornstarch in small bowl to blend. Whisk Portcornstarch mixture, orange marmalade, and ketchup into reduced broth mixture. Bring to simmer over medium heat, whisking constantly. Simmer until flavors blend and sauce thickens slightly, whisking frequently, about 5 minutes. Season sauce to taste with salt, pepper, and cayenne. Serve warm or at room temperature. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate. Bring to room temperature or rewarm over low heat before using.) Pat the chops dry with paper towels, rub both sides of each chop with the oil, and season the chops with salt and pepper. Grill the chops on an oiled rack set 5 to 6 inches over glowing coals for 6 to 8 minutes on each side, or until they are just cooked through. Spoon the sauce over them the last minute or two.

Pineapple Upside-Down Cake For topping: 1/2 medium pineapple, peeled, quartered lengthwise, and cored 3/4 stick unsalted butter 3/4 cup packed light brown sugar For batter: 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour 2 to 3 teaspoons ground cardamom 2 teaspoons baking powder 1/4 teaspoon salt 3/4 stick unsalted butter, softened 1 cup granulated sugar 2 large eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla 1 tablespoon dark rum 1/2 cup unsweetened pineapple juice 2 tablespoons dark rum for sprinkling over cake Special equipment: a well-seasoned 10-inch cast-iron skillet Winter 2010

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For topping: Preheat oven to 350°F. Make topping: Cut pineapple crosswise into 3/8-inch-thick pieces. Melt butter in skillet. Add brown sugar and simmer over moderate heat, stirring, 4 minutes. Remove from heat. Arrange pineapple on top of sugar mixture in concentric circles, overlapping pieces slightly. Make batter: Sift together flour, cardamom, baking powder, and salt. Beat butter in a large bowl with an electric mixer until light and fluffy, then gradually beat in granulated sugar. Add eggs, 1 at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat in vanilla and rum. Add half of flour mixture and beat on low speed just until blended. Beat in pineapple juice, then add remaining flour mixture, beating just until blended. (Batter may appear slightly curdled.) Spoon batter over pineapple topping and spread evenly. Bake cake in middle of oven until golden and a tester comes out clean, about 45 minutes. Let cake stand in skillet 5 minutes. Invert a plate over skillet and invert cake onto plate (keeping plate and skillet firmly pressed together). Replace any pineapple stuck to bottom of skillet. Sprinkle rum over cake and cool on plate on a rack. Serve cake just warm or at room temperature.

MENU

Colossal Shrimp with Orange Chili Glaze Grilled Pork-Chops with Cherry Barbecue Sauce Fresh Fruits Pineapple Upside-Down Cake


FAMILY

TRADITIONS

Barbecue compliments of Larry Powell

Colossal Shrimp with Orange-Chili Sauce 1/2 cup freshly squeezed orange juice (about 2 oranges) 1/2 cup fresh cilantro 1 tablespoon red chili paste (check the Asian section of your grocer) 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 2 garlic cloves 4 scallions, cut into pieces 1 chipotle chile in adobo sauce 1/4 teaspoon salt 2 pounds extra-large shrimp (16 to 20-count size), shelled and deveined

Put the orange juice, cilantro, chili paste, olive oil, garlic, scallion, chipotle, and salt in a blender or food processor ďŹ tted with the metal blade and blend until smooth. Place the shrimp in a re-sealable freezer bag or airtight container and pour the juice mixture over the shrimp. Chill in a refrigerator or iceďŹ lled cooler for 2 to 3 hours but no longer. (Can be skewered if your container will hold them.) Remove the shrimp from the marinade and discard the marinade. Grill the shrimp over medium-high heat until they are opaque in the centers, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Remove from heat and serve immediately.

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The art of Gina Quaranto 76 Autumn Winter 2009 2010

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Thinking of You


Gina’s “books” are incredibly novel and tell quite a story. The tree branches with dangling charms are an incredibly charming use of mixed media. It would make an exquisite gift for a loved one. The Family Tree pictured below, and The Tree of Charms, pictured left

The world... through the eyes of an Autistic child and artist mom.

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n this season of warm fires on cold nights, Primrose Magazine has chosen Gina Quaranto as our featured local artist for her heartfelt paintings that, to us, radiate a wonderful dichotomy of chilly warmth, resulting in some of the most interesting art we’ve seen in a while. Originally from Brooklyn, New York, Gina graduated from Bonanza High School here in Las Vegas and went on to the Las Vegas School of Design. She learned much of her craft from other artists, however, but hopes one day to be able to fulfill her dream of more formal training, calling it “...a dream and goal of mine for years.”

by Leolani Kirkendall Gina’s greatest influence is her high-functioning autistic son, 6 yearold Gabriel. His presence is visible in her life, her art, and her entire world. But it wasn’t always this way. Gina’s career as an artist began in 1996-97 when she started “inking” for comic books. She became a success commercially, producing art that appealed to many and garnering her a following. She now calls that period of art her “commercial” pieces, and will still create them if needed, knowing that it’s a way to “...make a quick buck and put food on the table, at least for that week.” Primrose

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That “commercial” phase of her artistic career no longer holds the same appeal for her, however; not since her son’s first words changed her art forever. Gabriel “inspires me every day... I try to imagine what our crazy world looks like through his eyes and I paint it.” Having a highfunctioning autistic child comes with a unique set of challenges, as no one autistic child will conform to any set of guidelines or standards, and the benchmarks most parents take for granted with their children have to be completely discarded. In Gabriel’s case, he didn’t speak his first words until he was 4, and they were not his own: “For a couple of years, he only spoke “through” movies... meaning he copied what he heard. If he was feeling sad, he would say, word-for-word, a conversation he heard in one of his favorite movies, when it was a sad scene. Or if he was frustrated and angry he would do the same, only with a scene from someone fighting. The copying was amazing... but it made it almost impossible to take him places and do “normal” things like I always imagined a great mom would do with her kids. I was happy he was talking at all, but so sad that I wasn’t ever able to “know’” the real Gabriel, just what he would repeat or copy from others. It was very stressful and disheartening. No matter how hard I tried and how patient, nothing really would get through to him. “Then all of a sudden, about a year and a half ago, we were driving home from school and we were looking out the window, like we have done many times before, to find the moon, when Gabe stated all on his own: ‘Gina, can we get a ladder, so we can go to the moon?’ This may not sound like a big thing, but at 5 years-old this was one of his first statements to me ever, that really came from “him” and not a movie he was copying from. “At first, I was shocked... there was this little pain in my stomach and I found myself crying and at the same time hiding my happy 82 Autumn Winter 2009 2010

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Gabriel’s Ladder To The Moon tears so he wouldn’t get freaked out and think he did something wrong. And starting that night, I wrote his things down, the words and phrases I knew came from him, and then I painted them in a series called “love. loss. and beauty?” last year. It was the first completely personal work I have ever done. And it was so well received, I could not have asked for a better response.” Although her art had just undergone a huge transformation, her fans remained loyal, loving the new pieces, and she suddenly gained


Gina and six year old son Gabriel; Animal Park, right; The Thought, below.

Ballerinas Vegas

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many new ones. Her pieces were loved so much and sold so quickly the one regret she has is that she never photographed them; they were gone before she had time to blink. Her new career as an artist was a resounding success. And now, although she will still make the occasional piece in her old style, “...my real love and passion is to express the very personal art in me.” This is tempered, of course, with her needs as a parent. “Being a parent [has] everything to do with what and how I create, paint, market and sell my work.” When asked what she’s expressing through her art that hasn’t been done before, she thoughtfully responds, “I’m not sure if my art has been done before. I’m sure every mother is inspired by her children.” Gina currently prefers working with acrylic paints, glue and found objects, but adds that, that can change on a weekly basis. She enjoys advising the young, up-and-coming artists in our community, “helping out where I can, and most importantly encouraging and nurturing their talent. My best advice to any artist, is do it everyday. Even 82 Winter 2010

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Your Words Here if you’re in the middle of a ‘block,’ just put your pencil to the paper for a few minutes anyway, everyday.” As a member of our Las Vegas community, Gina is very involved. She says she really loves Las Vegas, but wishes the art community here received more attention, support and nurturing from the residents of Las Vegas. “People are always so quick to say that there is no culture here. Actually there is. These are the same people who never come to a local gallery to support it, visit any of the hundreds of art events we try SO HARD to have. Look in any of the weekly papers and you will find more than 3 pages of art galleries listed. We have dozens, the culture is here! So I refuse to accept that attitude. That’s why I’m down-town every minute I am able to, making my gallery/studio the best it can be. For the artists and city alike. WE ARE HERE! You just have to come down to see.” When asked about her immediate and long-term goals, Gina confesses her “...immediate goals are to keep creating art, keep the


gallery open with new shows and artists flowing through the doors.” She also thinks she might one day like to be an art teacher. And what would she teach our kids? “When creating your art, the personal stuff I mean, be true to yourself, and mean what you say. The feeling, no matter the amount of talent, will show through.” And what does Gina teach us? “I hope in seeing some of my work, people who would normally not understand the pain and triumphs of Autism will maybe take a second and think, maybe have a bit more compassion.” Because her son is her world. And at the end of the day, “I would rather be remembered as a good mother, a good friend or a compassionate person rather then a great artist.” We’re sure she’ll be remembered for both. Gina’s work can be seen at the “My Place on Main” Gallery, located at: 1054 S. Main Street just north of Charleston. Stop by any chance you get, and make sure you head over there next time you’re out experiencing First Friday! So Why Do I Stare, right; Keep It Close Or Let It Go, below

“...at the end of the day, “I would rather be remembered as a good mother, a good friend or a compassionate person rather then a great artist.” Primrose Primrose

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On My Own. above; Tres, right

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The Months “January cold and desolate; February dripping wet; March wind ranges; April changes; Birds sing in tune To flowers of May, And sunny June Brings longest day; In scorched July The storm-clouds fly, Lightning-torn; August bears corn, September fruit; In rough October Earth must disrobe her; Stars fall and shoot In keen November; And night is long And cold is strong In bleak December.”

- Christina Giorgina Rossetti, The Months

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Trust –noun 1. 2.

reliance on the integrity, strength, ability, surety, etc., of a person or thing; confidence. confident expectation of something; hope.

In the old Roman Calendar, in the days of the republic the year began March 1 and ended December 31. January and February were added later.

• January 3 - J. R. R. Tolkien born, 1892 • January 17 - Benjamin Franklin born,1706 • January 25 - First Olympic winter games, Chamonix, 1924 Owls mate in January, and their mating calls can be heard this time of year. The owl’s name apparently comes from its call-in Latin it was ulula, which became ule and then owl.

March was the beginning of the legal year in Great Britain and the Colonies until 1752.

• March 6 - Elizabeth Barrett Browning born, 1806 • March 15 - Julius Caesar assassinated, 44 BC • March 20-Vernal Equinox (First day of Spring) If February give much snow A fine summer it doth foreshow

February is Black History month

March borrows of April Three days, and they be ill; April borrows of March again Three days of wind and rain

• February 2 - Alexander Selkirk, the real Robinson Crusoe, is rescued, 1709.

• February 7 - Charles Dickens born, 1812 • February 22- George Washington born, 1732 Having only 28 days in common years, February is the only month of the year that can pass without a single full moon.

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