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A Magazine for Northwest Wyoming

PRIMROSE SUMMER 2010

Craftsman Home

IN THE HEART OF THE HIGHCOUNTRY

The Flavors of Summer Summertime favorites from local chefs Primrose

Summer 2010


Art For Living, is a colorful gallery full of handmade home accessories, furniture, fine art, and gifts. Whimsical clocks, ornate mirrors, pottery, fancy wine glasses, picture frames, and hand blown glass vases are some of the many great items available. Featured here our amazing line of Sticks® Sticks® 265 West Pearl St. • Jackson, WY • (307)733-4619

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Hit Town And Make A Big

Splash!

Your adventure starts here!

Call to res White Wa erve your ter or Floating Expediti on: 1-

800-4587238 www.madriv er.com

Mad River Boat Trips 1255 South US Highway 89 Jackson Hole, Wyoming 83001 rafting@mad-river.com Primrose

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KA ent O R A S AB uresPres

vent d A y l i Fam

Wyld West A acation V ncierge Services and Co

Howdy Pardners’ If your planning a vacation to Yellowstone then our Wyld West All-Inclusive Vacation Packages are the way to go!

• Wonderful adventures for every age

Relax, enjoy your vacation, leave the details to us at Absaroka Family Adventures. You’ll get an insiders tour of the parks, and you and your family will have the time of your life!

• Small, intimate groups • Personal attention • Family packages are what we do best Our “All-Inclusive” Packages Include: 7 Nights Lodging Nearly all your freshly prepared, mostly organic meals. An extensive activity package which includes: • Trailride on Horseback • Indian Experience • Half Day ATV • Cowboy Cookout • Rodeo • Whitewater Rafting • Yellowstone excursion

The Ultimate Yellowstone Experience! Call today to book your action-packed week of adveture on a Wyld West Vacation!

1-877-449-WYLD (9953)

The verdict is in and our guests tell us this little hamlet nestled between two mountain ranges is the ultimate way to experience cowboy country and Yellowstone! Dubois’ slogan, “Where real cowboy’s work and play,” is oh so very right. You’ll have a great place to stay and call home (7 nights in one of our unique vacation rooms, cabins or guest facilities), and 7 days of activities with well-planned itineraries. You will not be disappointed unless you miss out due to our very limited availability! Known for convenience and affordability our dedication to families makes it one of the most user friendly gateway communities into Yellowstone National Park. You’ll come to know it as base camp. Check out our suggested 7-Day All-Inclusive Itinerary at:

www.yellowstonefamilyvacation.com Summer 2010

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contents Primrose Summer 2010

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Exploring the Calico Gardens

42

Edible Gardens

46

Welcome Home A lovely Craftsman style home shows off it’s western flair

68

The Tastes of Summer

80

The Dope On Soap

99

“On Top Of The World”

Local chefs share their recipes

What’s really in there?

Telecommuting in the mountains Primrose

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contents

Summer

in every issue 13 O The Beaten Path

62 A Good Time

24 In the Garden

84 Local Artist

Adventures on a Dude Ranch

Summer care

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Pulled Pork Sandwiches Je Vanuga


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I NEED A TECH

911

Computer Repair

PRIMROSE A Magazine For Southern Nevadans

PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Fawn Primrose-Raines MANAGING EDITOR Leolani Kirkendal COPY EDITOR Lois Wingerson PHOTO EDITOR Fawn Primrose-Raines

new y u b Why can e w n whe ra o f t i r repai ost” c e h t f on o “fracti

FOOD EDITORS Fawn Primrose-Raines Frances Primrose CREATIVE DIRECTOR Fawn Primrose-Raines GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Darian Primrose-Glenn Fawn Primrose-Raines CONTRIBUTING ARTICLES Leolani Kirkendall WEB MASTER Gaylord Dia ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Ian M. Primrose-Raines ADVERTISING Fawn Primrose-Raines Barbara Harrison

(307)455-3347

PO Box 1592 Dubois, WY 82513 www.primrosewyoming.com

(307) 335-3422 Serving Fremont and Teton Counties Remote Support • LAN and WAN

FREE Diognoses & Quote Flat Rate “On-Site” Repairs (so there are no surprises)

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Made with recycled material. In Loving Memory of: M.D. “Ike” Primrose Primrose Magazine is published six times per year by Primrose LLC. All prices, products and availability are subject to change without notice. Neither the advertisers or Primrose Magazine are responsible for the accuracy contained with either advertising or editorial within the publication. Statements, opinions, photographs and points-of-view expressed by the advertisers and writers are their own and do not necessarily represent those of the publisher. All photographs, artwork, editorial and advertising designs printed in Primrose Magazine are the sole property of Primrose Productions, Inc. unless otherwise indicated before the publication or noted in the publication. Photographs, artwork, designs and text may not be duplicated or reprinted without the expressed written consent of Primrose magazine.


PRIMROSE INK

S

Mountain Massage

PRIMROSE INK

ummer in Northwestern Wyoming sinks into the soul. More then just the dark tans or impossibly blue sky’s. It’s a bone deep warmth and often expectant feeling. It’s getting out of our long-underwear after the long cold winter. Perhaps it’s the excitement of eternally long sun-drenched days lounging on the lake,. Or hikes into the high-country. There are so many recreational things to do! Best of all, no school for the children means vacation time for all! It all comes together and forms memories that as a child becomes all that you associate with summer. Horeback riding, tubin’ down a river. Independence Day Parades, live music in the park, sumptuous barbecues. It’s summer! In this edition of Primrose you’ll find expert advice on what to do in the garden, this time of year! You’ll learn about soap and some of the ingredients that are less then safe. We found a lovely home we couldn’t wait to share with you. Enjoy the decor and western motif in this craftsman style country home. Did I mention recipes, yep! Lot’s of barbecue ideas and fast summer favorites! You’ll love our new web site too, I think. Be sure to use the calendar of events to keep “in the know” about what’s going on!

aines

F

se-R o r m i r P awn

Body Work • Massage Therapist Susan Tobey 602.380.6651 - mobile

Deeo Tisue • Relaxation Massage Reflexology • Body Balancing Heat • Aromatherapy Primrose

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Exploring Adventures Off The Beaten Track

A Road Less Traveled


by

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DUDE, WHERE’S MY HORSE? Taking a closer look at the Triangle C Dude Ranch

Since Northwest Wyoming means Cowboys, great food and geysers, we couldn’t think of a better place to start the first edition of Primrose Wyoming than with one of our local dude ranches. There are a variety of theories about how the term “Dude Ranch” was popularized, and it was interesting to learn about the originations of the name used for one of the last vestiges of the “Old West,” during the writing of this story. Guest ranches started in the late 19th Century. Many people had feelings of nostalgia for bygone days, and began to romanticize the American West. As the risks of a true frontier were gone, people were now able to indulge this nostalgia in relative safety. People “true” Westerners referred to as a “tenderfoot” or a “greenhorn,” were finally able to safely visit and enjoy the advantages of western life for short periods of time.

These Western adventures, which were made fashionable by such famous individuals as Theodore Roosevelt, were now available to paying guests from cities of the East, whom Westerners called “dudes.” Visitors would arrive via the transcontinental railroad network, where a waiting wagon or buggy would transport people to a ranch. Some believe this concept arose from the ranches’ need for warm bodies to help work the ranch, as well as the city folks’ desire to “be a cowboy.” After World War I, postwar prosperity, the invention of the automobile and the popularity of Western movies all contributed to a heightened interest in the west. Guest/dude ranches are now a long-established tradition and continue to be a popular vacation destination. They also offer many college students the chance to work in the fields of housekeeping, dining or office staff, babyPrimrose

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Being a cowboy just comes naturally in this environment, you can’t help but get caught up in it. Riding horseback is a daily occurrence and the horses at the Triangle C are well cared for and even tempered.

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Everywhere you look is an experience in ranch life. Children are enthralled by the tree fort, mechanical bull and petting zoo.

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sitting, or even as a wrangler during the summer months. Some working ranches supplement their income by taking in paying guests for part of the year. One of these ranches, the “Triangle C Lodge,” is perched on a sage bluff overlooking the winding Wind River, with views out to the snow-capped Absaroka Range. The large 8,000 square foot, newly remodeled rustic log lodge has a full-service spa, conference rooms, lounge, two pool tables, home theatre, library, swim spa and the Wind River dining room that seats up to 65. It is as luxurious The landscape as any resort and guests there at Triangle C are anything but Ranch unfolds “roughing it.”

like a storybook telling tales of outlaws, indians, mountain men and wagon trails.

The landscape at Triangle C Ranch unfolds like a storybook, telling tales of outlaws, indians, mountain men and wagon trails. There are places where you’ll have to hold your breath so you won’t startle the big game in the clearing. The wild west dream comes alive here!

Triangle C Ranch is off Highway 26 at the base of Togwotee Pass, just 20 miles west of Dubois, 1/2 hour drive from the North Gate of Grand Teton National Park, and 1 hour drive from the South Gate to Yellowstone National Park. They’re located within view of the Pinnacles and Absaroka Range, and the Wind River flows through the ranch. Triangle C is the historical site of the Tie Hack Camp, which has been on the National Historical Sites registry since 1906. It is now owned and operated by the Garnick family, who have created a family-run atmosphere that attempts to recreate the good ol’ days.

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• Distinctive lodge and cabin decor • Custom-tanned wildlife skins. • Handmade lodgepole pine and aspen wood furniture

• Luxurious buffalo robes • Unusual gift items • Interior decoration, design and furnishing of your dream cabin or lodge.

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West of Dubois

1414 Warm Springs Drive Dubois, WY

307-455-2440

www.absarokawesterndesign.com

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Dining at the ranch is a treat, the chef prepares a menu to rival any exclusive resort and the altitude heightens your taste buds...

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In the kitchen you’ll find a local treasure who whips up 5 star quality dinners nightly. Antonia Miller is a formally trained chef who uses local ingredients and does things to them that are that are simply divine. As an accomplished cook myself, I was pleasantly thrilled. They’ll even pack you a picnic lunch should you request it.

These fabulous wonders occur throughout the year, and the ranch will also arrange guided Snow Coach Adventures to the Park in the Winter Season.

Guests get to experience the “cowboy” lifestyle throughout their stay and are treated to a guided day trip to Yellowstone National Park. Yellowstone offers unique wildlife viewing, and is a place you will never forget. You’ll visit Old Faithful Geyser (she’s still on time!), marvel at the geothermal activity, see the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone, overlook Yellowstone Lake and search for wildlife.

The drive north from Jackson to the Triangle C Ranch offers a firsthand glance at this wild country. If you look carefully you can spot a moose hiding in the willows, or a coyote lookin’ for dinner on Antelope Flats. From the Ranch you can experience the grandeur of this Park by car, boat or foot.

The park is home to an abundance of animals: rainbow trout, bald eagles, otters, coyotes, bison, elk, moose, wolves and much more. It is also home to the world’s largest geyser field. A trip to Yellowstone is a step back in time to the days of explorers and mountain men.

Guests get to experience the western lifestyle throughout their stay and are treated to a guided day trip to Yellowstone National Park.

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Optional activities include Scenic Rafting on the Snake River or, for adrenaline junkies, rush down the classes 2-to-4 rapids on a Whitewater trip! Hike mountain trails that follow mountain streams or walk through the meadows of wildflowers and experience wildlife viewing from foot (From Lava Mountain you can see as far as the Tetons!). Excellent fly fishing and casting is available in the Wind River and at nearby mountain lakes. Often if you Guided fishing trips are available for an additional fee, as are pack fishing trips, which require advanced reservations and can be customized for your needs. Call the Lodge for Overnight Horse Pack Trip information. The Triangle C Ranch boasts of nightly entertainment and activities, such as Square Dancing, Ranch Rodeo, wine tasting, jewelry and boot shows, archery, Black Powder Shoots, Tomahawk Throwing, marshmallow roasts over an evening campfire, Western Dinner Theatre, hay rides or a sunset horseback ride on Wapiti Ridge. There is even a specialized mountain bike campout for the teens. The best part of a dude ranch vacation is you can do as much or as little as you like. Life is truly good at the Triangle C Dude Ranch.

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look carefully, you can spot a moose hiding in the marshes or willows in the area surrounding the ranch. Up here time can stand still as you enjoy the high mountain meadows and the laughter of the pretty girls and ranch hands.

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The best part of a dude ranch vacation is you can do as much or as little as you like. Life is good at the Triangle C Dude Ranch.

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by Linn Mills

in the

garden Summer 2010

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Gardening Tips For the High Country As anyone who has ever tried their hand at gardening will attest, gardening in Northwest Wyoming can be “very” challenging. We asked a few local gardeners for thier “sage” advice on what to do in the garden to keep them at peak performance. Summer temperatures can be very hard on humans as well as plants. Garden early in the morning and evening when it’s cooler and you’ll both happier, especially if you’re doing heavy work or transplanting. Here are some things to help your plants florish in the summer:


Watering, most important – A stress for water leads to browning along leaf edges, leaves drop, and slows the growth of your plants. Sometimes gardeners think diseases cause these symptoms, but it’s just drought. Small containers may need water twice a day. Check your sprinklers often to prevent “brown out” of lawns. America’s Flower – Roses – Expect smaller blooms during summer. Encourage more blooms by removing fading flowers to stimulate new buds. Before feeding roses, give them a good soaking. Add a balanced rose food at one half the regular dosage. Yellow leaves on a bush indicate it is suffering from an iron deficiency. Delphiniums, Columbines and Malltcross – Spice up your yard with delphiniums, columbines and other summer bloomers. It’s time to divide your Double Buttercups if you haven’t for a couple of years. Save 6 inches of the bulb leaves to write the name of the bulb (if you know it) on the leaves and store in a cool area to plant in September.

Forever Plants—For summer color without the continual hassle of replanting annuals, plant marguerite daisy, gaillardia, lupis, dusty miller and Peruvian verbena. They make great accent plants and mix well with existing flowers. Proven Summer Color – For annual summer color, plant marigolds, periwinkles, cosmos, zinnias, portulaca, sunflower and other bedding plants. Lightly feed your flowers often. To encourage side-branching, bushy growth and generate more blooms on bedding plants and chrysanthemums, pinch off growing tips and faded flowers. Put Houseplants on Vacation – If you’re taking a vacation and must leave houseplants unattended, drench the soil thoroughly and let it drain. Set pots in shower and close curtains or door. Place the plants out of direct sunlight or the heat inside will fry plants. Occasionally, insects and disease attack indoor plants, so spray with the recommended pesticides. Primrose

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Your Extended Room – The patio is a great place to grow plants when the temperatures soar. To reduce soil temperature and frequency of watering, place plants inside of pots at least 3 inches larger. Fill the empty space between pots with organic mulch and keep moist. Group containers and planters together to shade each other and water with extra care. The Right Foods – There is still time to plant lettuce and spinach or other greens. Mist tomatoes on hot days to encourage better fruit set. Tomatoes do well as container gardens and make it easy to bring them inside should we get an early frost. Keep an eye on bugs and treat as necessary. Since you’re watering more, add fertilizer to keep vegetables in full production. Hedges – Keep your shrubs compact and full by lightly pruning them. Because we must water more, feed them a light application of nitrogen. Treat yellow, sick shrubs with iron. Tree’s Nature’s Air Conditioners – Prune out low hanging, misdirected branches, especially on mulberries. A light nitrogen feeding will aid trees through the summer. If you planted trees this spring, check the support ties and loosen them if necessary to strengthen the trunk.

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Research shows fruit increases in size by 40% during the last month of development, with ample water.


Much Needed Mulch – Mulch with organic products to reduce evaporation, cool the roots and prevent weeds. Apply 3 to 4 inches around thirsty trees, shrubs, vines, flowers and vegetable beds. If weeds are a problem, consider using a barrier such as newspaper. The paper will let water soak through to the soil but prevent weeds from growing. The newspaper will deteriorate by the end of the season. There is no damage of lead from the ink. Fruit of the Trees – Protect ripening fruit from birds by using scarecrow devices such as wind chimes or plastic bird netting. If necessary, pick fruit before it fully ripens. Never

stress apples for water a month before harvest. Research shows fruit increases in size by 40% during the last month of development with ample water. If you haven’t already done so, feed your fruit trees. If the leaves are yellowing, apply iron chelates. Desert’s Offering for Color – Give cactus and succulents a good irrigation but the roots can’t stand to be in water or they rot. Cushiony scale and mealy bugs can be problems. Wash them off by directing a strong force of water on pads. If they still persist, spray with insecticidal soap.

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Calico Gardens Inspire and Enchant Primrose

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The gardens were began by Susan Walker, a waitress at the Calico, who would sell the fresh veggies from her garden by ďŹ lling the basket on her bike and pedalling them around town.

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by F. P rimrose-Raines

For over 30 Years the Calico Gardens Have Been Delighting Gardeners, Families and Diners Alike

Tucked away at the base the Tetons are the tranquil gardens of the Calico restaurant. The gardens, which were planted about 30 years ago, are nothing short of breathtaking. A local Jackson landmark, this delightful spot was created initially by a waitress working for then-owner of the restaurant (at the time a pizza parlor), John Becker. The young woman, Susan Walker, came to John and asked if she could plant a garden out in the back, in the pasture. Rather amused, he acquiesced and after a few weeks (and his first taste of fresh radish), you could say he was hooked! After several seasons, Susan was able to supplement her income by selling the unused fresh veggies her garden produced to other local restaurants. “She would load up the basket of her bike with lettuces, spinach and root veggies and, literally, pedal her wares,” John recalls fondly. Much of the garden’s bounty was used by the pizza parlor, making it sustainable long before it was ever popular. Even today, the restaurant is not on the grid. Unfortunately Susan was killed in a hiking accident soon after. While out hiking alone, she surprised a sow and her cubs in the woods. In an attempt to escape harm, she climbed a nearby tree, which tragically happened to contain another of the bear cubs, and Susan was knocked out of the tree by the angry momma bear and fell to her death. After a period of grieving, John and the love of his life, Theresa, began dabbling in the garden, and it has evolved into Theresa’s life-long love affair with the gifts of the earth. She created the Great Barrier Reef in order to separate the restaurant grounds from the vegetable beds. The separation barrier is compiled of blooming shrubs and trees and dazzling annuals! Eventually, John sold the pizza parlor to Jeff Davies, another local restaurant owner. However, he and Theresa continue to nurture and care for the spectacular gardens. Today’s vegetable beds are very impressive and the food that comes from them is always organic. Truly a model garden in terrain that is very rocky, and with the challenge of a very short growing season, it’s easy to be impressed! In the rows, expect to find salad greens, root crops such as potatoes, beets, turnips and parsnips; also carrots, beets, kale, radishes, broccoli and peas (when the moose don’t eat them.). As you meander down walkways lined with brightly colored flowers and towering pines, Primrose

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Wild Iris, Sinks Canyon, Cirque of Towers, Wind River, Gannet Peak Specialists

Climbing Hiking Backpacking Survival Gear

Equipment and Apparel for Adventurers 333 Main Street • Lander, WY 82520 • (307) 332-4541


you’ll feel as though you’ve stepped into a magical place. Here you’ll find yourself in gardens full of sweet-smelling flowers with borders and walkways that transport you. While at the Calico, enjoy al’ fresco dining on the veranda-style deck. Here you’ll have a relaxing, panoramic view of the gardens, the nearby Teton Mountains, and the open lawn where kids are often playing (instead of finishing their food). Large plants and Summer 2010

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flowers are hung around the deck’s canopy, separating the conversations of each table. It’s a step back in time and you’ll love the entire experience. Much of the fresh greens and vegetables are grown right out in back from a garden that was started nearly 30 years ago by a young waitress with a very green thumb. You can see a picture of Susan and her bike in the restaurant lounge.


Theresa and John sharing the garden Calico, built in 1905, was originally erected as a church serving the Mormon homestead community that settled and thrived along Mormon Row just north of the town of Jackson. Sixty-one years later (1966), two partners purchased and moved the then abandoned church to Teton Village Road, naming it Calico Pizza after a California ghost town. Changing ownership in 1995, proprietor Jeff Davies rebuilt and remodeled the old building while preserving

the original church structure – thus creating today’s Calico Italian Restaurant and Bar. Thanks to their foresight, Calico remains an important part of Jackson Hole history. There are a variety of vegetables that do well in Northwest Wyoming even with a short growing season. We’ve compiled a list to consider when you are planning your garden. Primrose

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Thanks to the founders foresight, Calico remains an important part of Jackson Hole history.

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Root Vegetables

Veggies that grow quickly and can be planted more than once in a Zone 3 growing season. Root Vegetables Radishes Beets Kohlrabi Turnips Carrots Rutabaga Leeks - grown from seed can be harvested in a short period of time if you do not mind a smaller size. Parsnips - are slow to germinate and usually take 100 to 120 days before harvest, but parsnips still do well in Northwest Wyoming if you can plant early.

Green Vegetables

There are some fast-growing green vegetable seeds as well as cool weather-loving green vegetable seeds that perform well in our area also. Snap peas Pole beans Garden cress (seeds produce in 12 short days.) Spinach Chard Parsley Cilantro Basil Plants that will continue to grow well in cool fall weather: Radicchio Collards Kale Escarole

Other Vegetables (Best if started indoors several weeks

before planting time): Cabbage Endive Chives Brussels sprouts Broccoli (six weeks before the recommended planting time.) Plant the seeds of lettuces (black-seeded Simpson, romaine, bibb, arugula, mesclun mix, ďŹ ve weeks before the recommended planting time.)

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Build more than a log home. Build memories. W hisper Creek Log Homes ha s created a unique building process that combines the beaut y of a ha ndcra f ted log home with the integrit y of modern building methods. Our homes have the authentic look a nd feel of a “traditiona l � log home without the shortfa lls a nd ma intena nce a ssociated with traditiona l log home construction.

Stop Dreaming. Start Building. www.whispercreekloghomes.com

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Painted Valley Ranch Supply 307 S 1st Dubois, WY 82513 (307) 455-2991


A symphony of owers grace the grounds of the restaurant. The original building is one of the oldest in Jackson Hole. Primrose

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The directions to the Calico Gardens are as follows: • From Jackson, head north on Highway 22 towards Teton Village. • Take a right on the Village Road (Hwy 390) and drive 1.5 miles. • The restaurant is on the right side of the road, just across from the fire station. Learn more at: www.calicorestaurant.com Primrose

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edible gardens Too many gardeners hide their vegetables way out back, and that’s a mistake. Put your vegetables on display in flowerbeds, pots, hanging baskets and under shrubs. These vegetables are just as spectacular as petunias or pansies, and they are edible. I find having them near the kitchen keeps our attention on the crops, so we take better care of them. Many of us feel like we don’t have enough room to plant vegetables. If that’s the case, turn your imagination loose. Cluster them in whiskey barrels, boxes and discarded pots. Better still, recycle washtubs, abandoned toilets, old shoes and any other container and place them on a balcony.

by Linn Mills

Leafy crops add beauty to the landscape wherever they grow. Imagine a large head of lettuce with those elephant-eared leaves flagging you down for close inspection. Butterhead varieties are an even prettier sight with their appetizing colors. Loose-leaf headed varieties come with flapping, crinkly leaves. Chard comes with its rhubarb-type leaves, and deep red stems and brilliant red veins will put on a colorful Christmas-colored show through the summer. Also include perennial vegetables -- artichokes, asparagus and horseradish in your landscape. These perennials are so easy to care for you can almost forget about them. Note their additions to the landscape:

Foliage, shapes and colors Jerusalem of many artichoke vegetables produces are sunflower-like attractive. stalks towering Put some up to 8 feet bends and high to make curves in an excellent your garden tall hedge or and watch cover a blighted the interest area. They top go up. themselves with Visualize in beautiful daisy your mind like sunflowers eating fresh in the late vine-ripened summer as an tomatoes added bonus. and sunwarmed Globe artichoke cantaloupes. is a member of Or red the thistle family cabbage with and is striking its colorful in the landscape foliage, string with its huge, This herb garden is the handiest addition to a “kitchen garden.” beans with deeply cut, purple flowers, the many varieties of lettuce with their interesting silvery-green leaves. The artichoke bud is a cluster of overlapping leaf patterns and heavenly purple globes of eggplant are effective fleshy scales and that is where you find the food. Buds grow larger in flowerbeds. as the bush matures. For a beautiful display of colors and textures, group vegetable plants with your annuals and perennials. Edge a bed of ornamentals or line a path with red-leafed lettuce or green onions with low and appealing foliage. In the background, use boldfoliage, such as Swiss chard to accent the area. Remember that some vegetables are a one-shot proposition. For example, if you planted carrots to furnish a fernlike border or edging, you’ll remove the effect as you harvest. Plant parsley for the same effect, and it will last a season. Summer 2010

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Asparagus is an amazing plant with its feathery, decorative plumes during the summer. Next spring, new spears arise and soon the feathery ferns emerge to “recharge the batteries” for the next season. Horseradish is related to cabbage, turnip and mustard. Its large fleshy yellowish-green leaves bring a tropical effect to the landscape. When you purchase horseradish from the nursery, you’ll wonder if they sold you an old dog bone when you see the root.


Enjoy the fruit of your labor and the fair weather by hosting a Summmer Garden Party. We served homemade Lemon-Raspberry Poundcake with fresh berries and melon as well as fresh-squeezed lemonade. The lemonade was served in an antique glass pitcher and matching glasses, each individually hand-painted.

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Don’t omit herbs in your landscape. Basil is one of the most popular ones. Basil is as ornamental as it is edible. It is right at home in the traditional herb garden, vegetable bed of red- and green-leaf lettuces or edging a bed of tomatoes. Use both the green- and purple-leaved varieties in borders; the latter is beautiful with perennials and annuals. With its natural round shape, the dwarf basil makes a wonderful edging for any type of garden: perennial, rose or herb. Try the old-fashioned technique of keeping flies away by planting basil around a patio or in containers on a deck.

As a lovely addition to your garden party, try:

Lemon Raspberry Pound Cake

2 cups sifted cake flour (sift before measuring) 1 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 cup granulated sugar 1 tablespoon grated orange zest 1 teaspoon grated lemon zest 2 sticks (1/2 pound) unsalted butter, softened 4 large eggs, at room temperature 1⁄2 cup mayonnaise 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 1/2 cup raspberry jam Frost with Lemon Icing Preheat oven to 325°F with rack in middle. Spray or butter an 8” bundt pan. Sift together flour, baking powder, and salt. Mix together sugar and zests with an electric mixer at low speed until sugar is evenly colored, then add butter and beat at high speed until pale and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Beat in eggs 1 at a time at medium speed, scraping down side of bowl frequently, then beat in mayonnaise, juices and vanilla. At low speed, mix in flour mixture until just incorporated. Spread batter in loaf pan and rap pan several times on counter to eliminate air bubbles. Gently dollop jam by rounded tablespoon into batter and swirl once. Bake until golden and a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean, 1 to 1 1/4 hours. Cool in pan on a rack 30 minutes, then run a knife around edge of pan and invert cake onto rack. Cool completely, topside up. Cooks’ note: Cake improves in flavor if made at least 1 day ahead and can be made 5 days ahead and kept, wrapped tightly, at room temperature.

Lemon Icing 1/2 cup powdered sugar 3 teaspoons (about) fresh lemon juice Place sugar in small bowl. Mix in lemon juice as needed to make icing just thin enough to drip off fork.

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Mr. and Mrs. Smith (not their real names) like their privacy. So much, in fact, that six years ago they left their home back east to move to the quaint little cowboy town of Dubois, WY, a community of less than one-thousand. Dubois was selected as their destination for many different reasons, not the least of which was an article written by National Geographic many years ago recognizing Dubois as being the most remote place in the lower forty-eight states. It was also because the Upper Wind River Valley is the life-long home of one of Mr. Smith’s closest friends, a local rancher. Having spent a majority of his life in the construction industry, Mr. Smith knew exactly what kind of home he wanted to build. With a tremendous amount of decorating input from his lovely wife, they employed the services of local building contractors, Ken Cobb and Darren Oard. Utilizing the design stylizations of a traditional Craftsman home and blending in local Western traditions, they built a home of such architectural interest and design we thought our readers would enjoy taking a peek into this interesting couple’s abode. Summer 2010

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Welcome Home

A Lovely Craftsman Style Home in the High Country

A traditional ranch Craftsman-style home oers western pizzaz. Unusual features include: all of the interior woodwork and faux pant, giving the walls an aged patina. Primrose

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The exterior of the home was designed with ease of maintenance in mind. The siding is concrete with stacked stone, requiring minimal upkeep. The addition of some natural logs and decorative steel railings give it a western flavor.

WIDE SELECTION • GREAT PRICES • EXPERT INSTALLATION Primrose Summer 2010


The bedroom decor is from the time Mrs. Smith spent volunteering at a Zoo and was able to have contact with some of the large cats there, hence the collection of “Big Cat” prints. The drum was a wedding present from a relative who served in the Peace Corp in Africa during the seventies. While she was there, a local chieftain’s son offered the drum as a pre-wedding gift to her in anticipation of marrying her. She was quickly escorted out of the country, but she took the drum with her! The rest of the bedroom decor is from the time Mrs. Smith spent volunteering at a Zoo and was able to have contact with some of the large cats there; hence the collection of “Big Cat” prints. “The style of the house is a compilation of the many different houses we have lived in. The basic floor plan is a walk-out basement, with the main floor having the basic living area. The lower level has the guest areas. The traditional woodwork came about from a combination of things. We lived in a traditional Tudor home built in the twenties that had magnificent doors and moldings. When choosing the doors for this house, we fell in love with some knotty alder doors with a ten-step stain and glaze. They helped us design the frames for the windows and doors.” Mrs. Smith did all the staining herself, and Ken Cobb did a fabulous job installing it.

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Photography by Fawn Primrose-Raines

The white “shabby-chic” hutch also came from that house. It was originally painted a “hideous shade of pea green,” but was repainted white in the eighties and now fashionably resides in Mrs. Smith’s dressing room. Primrose

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Everywhere you look you will find a trifle or accessory that embraces the old west. We couldn’t help but be thrilled by the embellishment offered in the craftsmanship of local artisans. Beautifully stained moulding dresses up the powder room.

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Featuring a fabulous island-style kitchen with stainless appliances and successfully blends the old-world ambience with modern amenities. Hardwood floors on the main level make cleaning a breeze and sets a country mood. Summer 2010

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From the old house came the large ice box, which has been refinished. Mr. Smith has carted it around the country, and jokes that he will one day be buried in it.

The home abounds with the little and not-so-little details that make a house a home. 59 Primrose Spring Summer 2009 2008 52 Primrose Summer 2010


The entire kitchen was custom designed with bean bin drawer fronts and beadboard wainscoting. The crown molding and custom top-lit display case are fitted to stock cabinets. The 1940s style features a plate rack and a continuous slab granite countertop. Some key French Country style characteristics include natural materials such as stone, wood carved furnishings, rich colors, textured wall finishes (irregular plaster), stone fireplace, aged metal accents, and patterned fabrics.

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There when are so ma ny de it com e s to cho cisions right o fl Than ooring su sing the k go rfac only o odness th e. ere ne wher e to p choice for ’s ur CAR PET chase them... 890 CO

(in th S Us H WBO e Mo viewioghway 89 YS Jacks on, Wrks Plaza) 307Y

733-

6321

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Restaurant Wine & Beer Convenience Store Gifts and Souvenirs Campground Showers Campground Rest Rooms Laundromat Dog and Horse Friendly Gasoline and Diesel

Wilderness Boundery Restaurant

ven” a e H o ay T w f l a H “ Bully Bingo 4 Charity

Saturday

3pm to 8pm Summer 2010

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Lava Mountain Lodge

Saturday & Sunday BBQ 3pm -8pm Live Music

Wednesday Night! Prime RIb www.lavamountainlodge.com $19.95 P.O. Box 658 3577 US Hwy 26 Dubois, WY 82513 Telephone: (307) 455-2506 • 1 (800) 919-9570 Togwotee Pass Wyoming


Mrs. Smith has a whimsical collection of old cowboy boots which also come in handy when company visits and they would like to play cowboy. The home is designed to commune with nature initiating elements that invite the outside in. As such the grounds and interior abound with potted owers. Many of the trinkets in the house were acquired from the diligent pursuit of back-roads antique barns across the country.

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Gardening in the mountain west is always a challenge, between the weather and the deer. Some of the great successes are daffodils, peonies and white poppies. By the time the baskets of mixed flowers are at their peak, the early fall frost is ready to do them in. The back porch overlooks the river and mountains. Classic craftman styling is apparent throughout the home. Summer 2010 56

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ON THE MENU

Sparkling Limeade Grilled Asparagus Barbeque Beef Sandwhiches with Homemade Buns Tangy Coleslaw Chocolate Mouse Log

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E

A Good Time

veryone loves a baebeque! And there is nothing more fun then a mountain barbeque to cool off and enjoy good company. Se we got together with a few friends and headed for the hills. Serving up succulent pulled pork on homemade bun’s paired with tangy, sparkling limeade and grilled asparagus your tastebuds are sure to be hoppin’.

Sparkling Limeade 3 limes 2/3 cup white sugar 2 quarts cold water

Cut limes in half and squeeze lime juice into a 2 quart pitcher. Add sugar and stir until dissolved. Fill pitcher with cold water, stir and chill in refrigerator.

Hamburger Buns

2 cups whole milk 1/4 cup warm water 2 (1/4-ounce) packages active dry yeast 1/4 cup plus 1/2 tsp sugar, divided 1/2 stick unsalted butter, cut into pieces and softened 2 large eggs, lightly beaten 1 tablespoon salt 6 cups all-purpose flour, divided 1 large egg mixed with 1 tablespoon water for egg wash Equipment: a stand mixer with paddle and dough-hook attachments; a 3-inch round cookie cutter Bring milk to a bare simmer in a small saucepan over medium heat. Remove from heat and cool to 105 to 115°F. Meanwhile, stir together warm water, yeast, and 1/2 tsp sugar in mixer bowl until yeast has dissolved. Let stand until foamy, about

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5 minutes. (If mixture doesn’t foam, start over with new yeast.) Add butter, warm milk, and remaining 1/4 cup sugar to yeast mixture and mix with paddle attachment at low speed until butter has melted, then mix in eggs until combined well. Add salt and 4 cups flour and mix, scraping down side of bowl as necessary, until flour is incorporated. Beat at medium speed 1 minute. Switch to dough hook and beat in remaining 2 cups flour at medium speed until dough pulls away from side of bowl, about 2 minutes; if necessary, add more flour, 1 Tbsp at a time. Beat 5 minutes more. (Dough will be sticky.) Transfer dough to a lightly oiled large bowl and turn to coat. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm draft-free place until doubled, about 2 1/2 hours. Butter 2 large baking sheets. Punch down dough, then roll out on a lightly floured surface with a floured rolling pin into a 14inch round (about 1/2 inch thick). Cut out as many rounds as possible with floured cutter and arrange 3 inches apart on baking sheets. Gather and reroll scraps, then cut out more rounds. Loosely cover buns with oiled plastic wrap and let rise in a draft-free place at warm room temperature until they hold a finger mark when gently poked, 1 1/2 to 2 hours. Preheat oven to 375°F with racks in upper and lower thirds. Brush buns with egg wash and bake, switching position of sheets halfway through baking, until tops are golden and undersides are golden brown and sound hollow when tapped, 14 to 20 minutes. Transfer to racks to cool completely. Cooks’ notes: ·If you don’t have a stand mixer, stir ingredients together in same sequence with a wooden spoon until a dough forms. Knead dough on a floured surface, incorporating just enough flour to keep dough from sticking, until smooth and elastic, 7 to 8 minutes.. ·Buns can be frozen, wrapped well, up to 1 month.

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Carolina Pulled-Pork Sandwiches

yield: Serves 12 In this recipe, a “dry rub” of brown sugar, pepper, paprika and salt flavors the meat before it is cooked, and a vinegary “mop” is brushed onto the pork to add more taste as it is smoked. Once cooked, the meat is “pulled,” that is, shredded into slivers that are just the right size for piling onto a bun. The sandwich —drizzled with a bit of the vinegary sauce, which cuts the richness of the meat — is the ultimate in Carolina barbecue. Cook this in a smoker or a barbecue that has been converted to a smoker. For dry rub 3 tablespoons coarsely ground black pepper 3 tablespoons (packed) dark brown sugar 3 tablespoons paprika 2 tablespoons coarse salt 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper 2 untrimmed boneless pork shoulder halves (also known as Boston butt; about 6 pounds total) For mop 1 cup apple cider vinegar 1/2 cup water 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce 1 tablespoon coarsely ground black pepper 1 tablespoon coarse salt 2 teaspoons vegetable oil 8 pounds (about) 100% natural lump charcoal or charcoal briquettes 6 cups (about) hickory wood smoke chips, soaked in cold water at least 30 minutes Homemade Hamburger Buns Carolina Red Barbecue Sauce Tangy Coleslaw preparation Make dry rub:. Mix first 5 ingredients in small bowl to blend. Place pork, fat side up, on work surface. Cut each piece lengthwise in half. Place on large baking sheet. Sprinkle dry rub all over pork; press into pork. Cover with plastic; refrigerate at least 2 hours. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Keep chilled.) Make mop. Mix first 6 ingredients in medium bowl. Cover and refrigerate. Following manufacturer’s instructions and using lump charcoal and 1/2 cup drained wood chips for smoker or 1 cup for barbecue, start fire and bring temperature of smoker or barbecue to 225°F. to 250°F. Place pork on rack in smoker or barbecue. Cover; cook until meat thermometer inserted into center of pork registers 165°F., turning pork and brushing with cold mop every 45 minutes, about 6 hours total. Add more charcoal as needed to maintain 225°F. to 250°F. temperature and more drained wood chips

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(1/2 cup for smoker or 1 cup for barbecue with each addition) to maintain smoke level. Transfer pork to clean rimmed baking sheet. Let stand until cool enough to handle. Shred into bite-size pieces. Mound on platter. Pour any juices from sheet over pork. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Transfer pork and any juices to baking dish. Cover with foil; chill. Before continuing, rewarm pork, covered, in 350°°F. oven about 30 minutes.) Divide pork among bottoms of buns. Drizzle lightly with barbecue sauce. Top with coleslaw. Cover with tops of buns.

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Carolina Red Barbecue Sauce Makes about 2 cups

1 1/2 cups apple cider vinegar 1/2 cup ketchup 1 tablespoon (packed) brown sugar 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper Stir all ingredients in small bowl until sugar and salt dissolve. (Can be prepared 3 days ahead. Cover and refrigerate.)

Tangy Coleslaw

1 cup mayonnaise 1/2 cup Carolina Red Barbecue Sauce 1 2 1/2-pound green cabbage, quartered, cored, very thinly sliced Whisk 1 cup mayonnaise and 1/2 cup barbecue sauce in large bowl to blend. Mix in sliced cabbage. Season slaw to taste with salt and pepper. Refrigerate 3 to 8 hours, tossing occasionally.

Chocolate Mousse Log

We must confess we cheated when making this delightful confection. Because this was also for a birthday celebration we purchased the cake in the photo from Cake World Bakery, then purchased the flowers, bees and butterflies at a craft store. The following recipe is an incredible one for you and your family to enjoy however, if it has to be perfect, call in the experts. 1 cup all-purpose flour 1/4 teaspoon salt 5 egg yolks 2 tablespoons sherry or milk 1 cup granulated sugar 5 egg whites 1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar Powdered sugar 1 recipe Chocolate Mousse (see recipe below)

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recipe Rich Chocolate Frosting (see recipe below) Grease and lightly flour a 15x10x1-inch jelly-roll pan; set aside. Stir together flour and salt; set side. Beat egg yolks and sherry with an electric mixer on high speed about 5 minutes or until thick and lemon-colored. Gradually add 1/2 cup of the granulated sugar, beating until sugar is almost dissolved. Thoroughly wash beaters. In a very large bowl beat egg whites and cream of tartar on medium to high speed until soft peaks form (tips curl). Gradually add the remaining granulated sugar, 2 tablespoons at a time, beating on medium to high speed until stiff peaks form (tips stand straight). Fold 1 cup of the egg-white mixture into egg-yolk mixture. Fold egg-yolk mixture into remaining egg-white mixture. Fold in flour mixture; spread in prepared pan. Bake in a 375 degree F oven for 12 to 15 minutes or until top springs back when lightly touched. Immediately loosen edges of cake from pan. Turn cake out onto a towel sprinkled with powdered sugar. Roll up warm cake and towel, jelly-roll style, starting from a short side. Cool on a rack.


Summertime cook-out’s are a time to rejoice in the bounty of the season with great food, close friends and family. Gently unroll cake. Spread Chocolate Mousse Filling on cake to within 1 inch of the edges. Roll up cake without towel, jelly-roll style, starting from 1 of the short sides. Cut a 1-1/2-inch slice from 1 end of cake. Frost cake with Rich Chocolate Frosting. Place the slice on side of log to form a branch. Frost branch. Using the tines of a fork, score the cake lengthwise to resemble tree bark. Makes 10 servings. Chocolate Mousse: 1 1/2 cups milk 1/2 cup granulated sugar 7 bars (1.5 ounces each) Godiva® Dark Chocolate, chopped 3 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 1/2 cups heavy cream Heat the milk and granulated sugar in a small saucepan over medium heat to a boil. Remove from heat. Add chocolate. Let stand for 5 minutes. Stir until melted and smooth. Stir in oil and vanilla. Let cool for about 10 minutes or until tepid.

Beat cream in a chilled bowl with mixer at high speed until stiff peaks form. Gently fold one-half of the whipped cream into the tepid chocolate mixture. Gently fold in the remaining cream, being careful not to overmix. Carefully spoon mousse on top of cake, spreading evenly with a spatula. Refrigerate for at least 2 hours or until cold. Rich Chocolate Frosting: 3 ounces unsweetened chocolate 3 tablespoons butter 3 cups sifted powdered sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla, 1/4 cup milk Heat and stir 3 ounces unsweetened chocolate and 3 tablespoons butter in a saucepan until chocolate melts. Remove from heat; stir in 11/2 cups sifted powdered sugar, 1 teaspoon vanilla, and 1/4 cup milk. Add 1-1/2 cups additional sifted powdered sugar and enough milk to make of spreading consistency (about 1 to 2 tablespoons). Makes about 1- 1/2 cups. Note:The bear is a Wilton’s mold available at local craft stores

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Local Chef ’s Share Thier Secrets For Summertime Food “On The Go” We have some fabulous restaurants in Northwest Wyoming, many of which are owned and/or operated by “world-class” chefs. We thought our readers would enjoy a few inspiring recipes that are summer-time favorites of a few of our noted favorite eateries. The ingredients are fresh and readily available in the summer and are easy to prepare on a “hot summers’ night.” Our first selection is from the Nostalgia Bistro the newest addition to the many restaurants in Dubois. Owner Shannon Chandler prepared a wonderful meal featuring Lump Crab, Mango and Avocado Summer Roll with Mango Coulis and a fresh Berry Tart for dessert . Simply exquisite. Next we visit the Calico Italian Restaurant and Bar, Jackson Hole’s oldest restaurant with exceptional Italian dishes accompanied by salads and vegetables right out of thier own gardens, grown on the premises. There we’re treated to Organic Grilled Chicken with fresh beets and Spinach salad with Vanilla Chianti dressing and Tirimisu for a decided treat. At the Sweetwater Grille we enjoyed a Club sandwich served with Sweetwater’s Cranberry Chicken Salad that was truly a showstopper! The grand finale was Russian Cream served with fresh berries. Enjoy the recipes and enjoy the flavors of Summer!

Our first confection is a berry and custard confection from Nostalgia Bistro. This wonderful dessert was prepared for us by the “Queen of Tarts” herself, Susie Chandler. A great way to show off your culinary skills and be patriotic too!

Berries and Custard in a Coconut Crust 10 servings Begin about 3 1/2 hours before serving or early in the day Coconut Pastry 1 cup all purpose flour 3/4 cup shredded coconut 6 tablespoons butter (3/4 stick) 2 tablespoons sugar 1 large egg yolk Lemon-Custard Filling 11 large lemons 6 tablespoons butter (3/4 stick) 1/3 cup sugar 1 tablespoon cornstarch 4 large egg yolks Summer 2010

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1 cup heavy whipping cream 2 1/2 pints raspberries 1 pint blueberries Prepare Coconut Pastry dough: Into medium bowl, measure flour, coconut, butter, sugar and egg yolk. With fingertips, mix together just until blended. Press dough onto bottom and up the side of 10-inch tart pan with removable bottom.bWith a fork prick tart shell in many places to prevent puffing and shrinkage during baking. Preheat oven to 350 F. Line tart shell with foil; bake 10 minutes. Remove foil; again prick dough. Bake tart shell 10 to 15 minutes longer

until golden (if pastry puffs up, gently press into the pan with a spoon) Cool tart shell in pan on a wire rack. While tart shell is baking, prepare Lemon-Custard Filling: From lemon, grate 1 teaspoon pee ad squeeze 2 tablespoons juice; set aside. In a heavy 2-quart saucepan over medium-low heat, heat margarine or butter, sugar and cornstarch, stirring constantly, until mixture thickens and boils. Boil 1 minute. In small bowl, with fork, beat egg yolks; stir in small amount of hot sugar mixture. Slowly pour egg-yolk mixture back into sugar mixture in pan, stirring rapidly to prevent lumping. Cook, stirring constantly until mixture thickens and coats spoon well, about 1 minute (mixture should be about 170 to 175 F.) Remove saucepan from heat.

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Stir lemon peel and lemon juice into custard; cover custard and refrigerate until cold, about 1 hour. In small bowl, with mixer at medium speed, beat heavy or whipping cream until sti peaks form. With rubber spatula or wire whisk, fold 2 whipped cream into custard.

Evenly spoon Lemon-Custard Filling into cooled art shell. Decorate with your choice of berries.

Lump Crab, Mango and Avocado Summer Roll with Mango Coulis For the Mango Coulis:

1 cup chopped ripe mango 2 tablespoons mirin 2-3 tablespoons fresh lime juice 1/2 cup olive oil Kosher salt to taste

For the Summer Rolls:

12 (8 inch) Vietnamese spring roll wrappers (rice paper)

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1 pound lump crab 1 (1/2 pound) avocado, sliced 3 Tbl picked cilantro leaves 2 1/2 teaspoons chopped fresh mint 1 cucumber, cut into 1/4-inch sticks 1 mango cut into 1/4-inch sticks 1/2 red pepper cut into 1/4-inch sticks Kosher salt and fresh cracked pepper to taste Prepare the sauce by pureeing the mango, mirin, lime juice, and olive oil until smooth in a blender. Season to taste with salt, and refrigerate until ready to serve. Soak a spring roll wrapper in a bowl of warm water until just pliable, about 30 seconds. Gently shake o excess water, and place onto work surface. Place some of the sliced lobster, avocado, mizuna, mint, sea vegetables, heart of palm, and mushrooms in a strip on the bottom edge of the spring roll. Fold once towards the center, then fold in the sides and continue rolling into a cylinder. Repeat with remaining ingredients.


Nostalgia Bistro and Bakery Dubois, Wy

For over 100 years the Ramhorn Inn has given folks somhing to talk about.

Why stop now!

The Talk Of The Town

Nostalgia Bistro and Bakery, for the bourgeois of Dubois, serving lunch, tea and dinner in a turn of the century atmosphere at the Historic Ramshorn Inn. Offering a world travel inspired menu with emphasis on Asian and European preparations, of Rocky Mountain regional ingredients including: venison, buffalo, local Wyoming honey, and huckleberries. Enjoy lunch dishes like Silky Lobster Coconut Soup or Five Spice Roasted Duck Breast Salad with a Chile Lime Dressing. Also on the lunch menu, the Lindbergh Sandwich, boneless BBQ St. Louis Ribs on a toasted Baguette with grilled onions and Nostalgia Bistro’s original BBQ sauce. Seafood lovers at dinner can try Tempura Fried Soft Shell Crab Maki Rolls or maybe Rice Flour seared Scallops with an Almond Caper Cherry Chutney. If game or beef is more your style, try the Seared Rare Venison Loin with a Wyoming Raspberry Vinaigrette or Slow Braised Beef Short Ribs with Wyoming Honey and Whole Grain Mustard. The setting is sophisticated, warm and inviting.

World travel inspired menu with an emphasis on Asian and European preparations of Rocky Mountain regional ingredients . In the historic Ramshorn Inn, Corner of First and Ramshorn in downtown Dubois.

For rervations lease call:

455-3528

In the coffee house and bakery expect a bohemian vibe while you enjoy casually elegant dining. Imagine sipping tall spiked Irish coffee while sampling cheese croissant in a lush relaxed atmosphere. In the bakery owner/chef Jacki Blakeman is using recipes that are both her own and those that have been passed down generations directly from her mother Twila Blakeman who has been tempting the palette with her baked goodies in Dubois for over 40 years. Steeped in history rich on flavor; Nostalgia Bistro. Bistro hours: lunch 10-2, dinner 5-10 Bakery hours: 10-8 • Private parties, catering, wine and beer pairings and tasting menus • Environmentally conscious cuisine and bakery • Dinner reservations suggested, call: 307-455-3528

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At the Calico Restaurant you’ll step back in time to a simple Italian garden with food like mama makes with... Spinach salad with Vanilla Chianti dressing

baby spinach vanilla chianti dressing spicy walnuts poached pears 1/4 and sliced gorgonzola cheese crumbles toss spinach with desired amount vanilla chianti dressing and garnish with pears, walnuts and gorgonzola poached pears 4 red pears peeled 1 1/2 cups chianti 1 1/2 cups cold water 3/4 cup white sugar 1 vanilla bean split lengthwise bring all ingredients to a boil except

pears. reduce to a simmer and add pears. simmer until soft, about 45 minutes. remove pears from poaching liquid and cool. strain poaching liquid through a coffee filter and chill for the dressing. vanilla chianti dressing 1/2 cup chilled poaching liquid 1/4 cup red wine vinegar 2 shallots peeled and rough chopped pinch salt 1 1/2 cups canola oil blend all ingredients in a food processor or blender except oil. when shallots are almost dissolved slowly add canola oil until dressing is emulsified. spiced walnuts 1/4 pound unsalted butter 1/2 cup brown sugar 2 tsp cayenne pepper 2 cups toasted walnut halves in a small sauce pot melt butter. whisk in sugar and and cayenne pepper. when butter is dissolved mix with walnuts away from heat. spread out on a cookie sheet to cool.

Organic Chicken Breast with Roasted Beets and Watercress in a White Balsamic Dressing:

4 organic chicken breasts 1 tbsp fresh chopped rosemary 1 tbsp fresh chopped sage 1 tbsp fresh chopped thyme salt and pepper 2 tbsp olive oil roasted red beets sliced 1/4 inch thick 1 bunch living water cress 1/4 cup warm white balsamic dressing sprinkle chicken breasts with fresh herbs, salt and pepper. in a large skillet brown the chicken breasts on both sides and place into a 375 oven. cook until an internal temperature of 160 about 15-20 minutes. when the chickens are cooked about 1/2 way, lay the roasted beet slices onto another cookie sheet and place in the oven. clip the watercress about half way down the stem and toss with the balsamic dressing. remove the chicken from the oven and plate with beet slices, water cress and chicken breast. Drizzle


www.calicorestaurant.com

Call (307)733-2460 for Reservations.

Al Fresco Dining

Open 5:00pm - 10:00pm nightly. On Teton Village Road Between Jackson and Teton Village.

Pizza

Come for the food, linger for the gardens

Enjoy our extensive wine selection


the remaining dressing left behind from the water cress over the beets and chicken roasted beets: 2 red beets washed pre-heat oven to 350. Place the beets in a pyrex dish add about a 1/4 inch of water. cover and bake in oven until soft. Cooking times vary due to the size of the beets, they can take up to 4 hours. Check them often. When they are soft remove from oven and cool. When they are cool, peel. It is a good idea to wear latex gloves when handling them, they will turn your hands red! White balsamic dressing: 1/2 stick unsalted butter 2 tbsp olive oil 1/4 cup white balsamic vinegar 1 shallot chopped fine 1 tsp chopped fresh oregano 1 tbsp caper brine salt and pepper to taste In a small sauce pot brown butter. when the butter starts to turn brown it will have a very nutty odor. remove from heat immediately and transfer into a stainless steel bowl. Be careful this is hot oil Summer 2010

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and can cause a severe burn. Let cool for 10 minutes. Add remaining ingredients slowly. Check butter temperature with a drop of liquid first. If it is too hot it will boil over. Serve dressing warm

Tiramisu

makes 6 glasses prepare the “misu juice” prior to making the egg mixes in a small mixer with a whip attachment mix 2 oz pasteurized egg yolks 6 oz mascarpone cheese add: 1/2 cup white sugar mix until volume is increased about 5 minutes remove from mixing bowl and place into stainless steel bowl thoroughly clean mixing bowl and dry. Any grease left behind will inhibit the next step from working. 3 oz pasteurized egg whites Working with the whip attachment, whip until stiff peaks form then gently fold in egg whites to mascarpone mixture 1/2 at a time, being sure to keep it fluffy.

“misu juice” 1/2 cup water 1/2 cup sugar 3 tbsp instant espresso 1/4 cup myers rum 1/4 cup brandy 1 1/3 cup cold water dissolve sugar in water. mix in espresso, rum and brandy until dissolved. add cold water. to assemble: 24 each ladyfingers 12 tbsp shaved chocolate cocoa powder in a dredge or sifter Set out glasses or shallow bowls. dip lady fingers (one at a time) into the “misu juice” and place on the bottom of the bowl/glass. There should be 2 lady fingers on the bottom of each bowl/glass. They can be broken in half if necessary. Place a spoonful of egg mixture on top of the lady fingers being careful not to use to much mixture (it should be divided into 12 equal parts) sprinkle 1 tbsp of chocolate shavings and a very light dusting of cocoa powder on top of the egg mixture. Repeat process for the second layer. Wrap and refrigerate until ready to serve.


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Sweetwater Cafe embraces summer with a Cranberry Chicken Salad and delightful Club sandwich with Russian Cream for dessert At the Sweetwater Cafe in Jackson Hole you’ll find incredible sandwiches and salads for lunch and an avante garde gourmet menu for dinner, did we mention desserts? All your yummy favorites and then some! Owner/Chefs Dennis and Trey prepared a lovely repast for us of Cranberry Chicken Salad and Club sandwich

Sweetwater’s Cranberry Chicken Salad

1/2 bunch celery, diced 1 cup craisins 1 bell pepper, diced 1/2 bunch green onions, diced 1/4 cup lemon juice 1 cup mayonnaise 4 cups cooked chicken, shredded Salt and Pepper to taste Combine all ingredients and refrigerate one hour before service. Yields 1 quart

The Sweetwater Club

3 slices thick-cut bread, toasted Black Forest Ham, sliced thin Roasted Breast of Turkey, sliced thin Summer 2010

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Cheddar Cheese slices Swiss Cheese slices Crispy bacon slices Vine Ripened Tomato, sliced Fresh Iceberg Lettuce Mayonnaise Begin with one slice of bread, spread mayonnaise and layer lettuce, tomato, cheddar, turkey and bacon. Top with another slice of bread, spread mayo and lay ham, swiss, tomato and lettuce and top with the third slice of bread. Using a serrated knife, slice on the diagonal and serve immediately.

Russian Creme

4 cups Sour Creme 1 cup SuperďŹ ne Sugar 2 teaspoons vanilla extract Freshly Whipped Creme Combine all ingredients and chill at least 2 hours before service. Garnish with fresh seasonal berries and mint.

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Jack s o n’s Or igi n a l C a bi n R e s t au ra n t se r v i ng C o w b o y C omf o rt Fo o d si nce 1976

All-U-Can_Eat PrimeRib Buffet Every Thursday begins at 5:30

Sweetwater Restaurant

(307) 733-3553 • 85 S King St • Jackson, WY One block off Town Square • Corner of King and Pearl

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THE DOPE ON SOAP

It sounds odd, I imagine, ‘soap for health’... but in fact the act of hand washing with soap, is one of the greatest single advances in medicine. Soap bonds on a molecular level with both grime and water, thus enabling dirt and germs to be rinsed away. Before soap, and later before the discovery of microbes and the idea of ‘germs’ became common knowledge, medical procedures from the common to the extreme were performed with no attention to cleanliness. Not only the environs in which treatment was done, Summer 2010 Summer 2008

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but the hands of the healer were often filthy and doctors went from patient to patient without washing, as did the others who attended the wounded and ill. Little did they know that they carried with them the infection and contagious disease that often spread wildly among their charges. It was actually in fairly recent history that cleanliness became ‘scientifically’ accepted as a means of preventing disease. But are all soaps created equal? Could the cure be worse than the cause?

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What the manufacturers don’t tell you is that it is potentially deadly. Chloroform, already suspected to cause cancer, has been found by researchers to form when people use antibacterial soaps containing these ingredients, Sodium laureth sulfate (SLES), sodium lauryl sulfate or SLS) and ammonium lauryl sulfate (ALS). Why would you want to knowingly take that risk? Not to mention the effects on sensitive skin Products containing these substances can affect those prone to eczema and other irritants. These substances provide a foaming quality to the product, allowing for better distribution of the product while washing hair or skin and while brushing teeth. When rinsed off, the product will have cleaned the area but will have taken moisture from the top layers of skin. In people with sensitive skin (prone to dermatitis, acne, eczema, psoriasis and chemical sensitivity), the drying property of these type of detergents can cause flare-ups of skin conditions or may worsen existing conditions. Toxicology The Cosmetic, Toiletry, and Fragrance Association (CTFA) and the American Cancer Society have stated that the common belief that SLES is a carcinogen is an urban legend, a view confirmed by toxicology research by the OSHA, NTP, and IARC.SLES and SLS, and subsequently the products containing them, have been found to contain parts-per-thousand to parts-per-million levels of 1,4dioxane, with the recommendation that these levels be monitored. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency considers 1,4-dioxane to be a probable human carcinogen (having observed an increased incidence of cancer in controlled animal studies, but not in epidemiological studies of workers using the compound), and a known irritant (with a no-observed-adverse-effects level of 400 milligrams per cubic metre). While the U.S. Food and Drug Administration encourages manufacturers to remove this contaminant, it is not currently required by federal law.

...researchers wondered if, in fact, antibacterial soap might actually be detrimental to one’s health.

Sodium laureth sulfate, or sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES), is a detergent found in many personal care products (soaps, shampoos, toothpaste etc.). It is an inexpensive and very effective foamer. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (also known as sodium lauryl sulfate or SLS) and ammonium lauryl sulfate (ALS) are commonly used alternatives to SLES in consumer products. While SLS is a known irritant, some evidence and research suggest that SLES can also cause irritation after extended exposure.

But wait there’s more... Environmental chemist Peter Vikesland and collaborators at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) in Blacksburg studied soap that contains triclosan, the ingredient Primrose Summer 2010

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Who knew soap was poison? Well, we did. The media and and manufacturers have been telling us for years that soap “kills” germs. Why wouldn’t it be potentially harmful to us as well?

that produces the antibacterial feature within soap. With it being already known that antibacterial soap is no better than regular soap for use around the house, the researchers wondered if, in fact, antibacterial soap might actually be detrimental to one’s health.

They based their work on previous research that showed triclosan reacts with chlorine (which disinfects drinking water). This research showed that chloroform was produced, which has been implicated in the past for possibly causing cancer. Who knew soap was poison? Well, we did. The media and and manufacturers have been telling us for years that soap “kills” germs. Why wouldn’t it be potentially deadly to us as well? So what do you do? How do you protect your family? Well for one you can buy glycerin based soaps (which does not usually contain SLS) found in specialty health food stores, or natural grocers, Switch out all your soap: get rid of all that antimicrobial soap and switch to a product like Dr. Bronner’s soap, which is only scented with natural oils like peppermint and almond oil. It’s a wonderful soap, and my family has been using it for years. We also use shampoo and conditioners that do not contain sulfates, (I personally love Abba). One of my favorite ways to spend an afternoon is to make homemade soap. Using all natural essential oils and good old-fashioned glycerin I can make up a batch that will last for some time, or better yet take a few bricks, wrap them in ribbon and give them as gifts to good friends or family. This is a wonderfully fun project is perfect for kids of almost any age and of course, they’re fun to use in the bath, too! Summer 2010

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Basic Glycerin Soap What you’ll need: Glycerin soap, clear or white (This only works with glycerin soap). Soap dye comes in a variety of colors Soap or candy molds Microwave safe liquid measuring cup Spoons Popsicle stick or coffee stirrer Knife (adults only) How to make it: If using bars of soap, cut into three pieces. If using purchased glycerin blocks, cut off 2-3 pre-measured chunks. Put glycerin soap into a measuring cup, microwave according to package directions (or 20 seconds), then in 10-second intervals until melted. If you want colors, this is the time to add the dye. Add a few drops and stir with a spoon. If you want the color darker, simply add more dye. Slowly pour the liquid soap into the mold. Set aside to harden for 45 minutes to an hour. Some soaps may harden sooner than others. Rinse out measuring cup and repeat process for other colors. After soap has cooled completely, pop them out of the molds. If you find this difficult, you can place the soap into the freezer for ten minutes and try again. Tips: For a tie dye effect, don’t add dye until after you have poured white soap into the molds. Add random drops of dye into white soap in mold and swirl with a coffee stick or toothpick. For multicolor layers, pour the first color in and allow it to cool enough to form a skin (about 5 minutes). Carefully and very slowly add the second color over that. For pastel shades, add only a couple drops of dye. For more bold colors, add more drops. Make your own colors by mixing the dyes, or create a tie dye effect by using two or more colors instead of just one. Of course you can make your own soap from scratch but lye is becoming increasingly hard to find. The following websites will give comprehensive instructions and recipes.

One of my favorite ways to spend an afternoon is to make homemade soap.

http://www.teachsoap.com/ http://www.millersoap.com http://www.soapcrone.com/ebook.php


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Life through a shutter lens

by F. Primrose-Raines

Seeing the world through a camera’s lens takes a certain type of person. The ability to capture an emotion or make an impact with a photo requires personal depth and absolute focus. Jeff Vanuga is that type. As a self-taught photographer, Jeff started (like many other photographers) with a Kodak Instamatic camera. He took a couple of workshops and a one-week lighting course, and this propelled him quite far into the hierarchy of professional photographers. As an internationally renowned professional focusing on nature photography, Jeff has traveled the world in pursuit of his art. “I’ve shot well over a million images,” he says, “and as the saying goes, practice makes perfect. Combined with reading, researching, and shooting with many other pros over the years, one learns the tricks of the trade.” Jeff favorite camera to shoot with? “Pretty narrow focus these days,” he says, “I shoot 100% digital.” Photoshop transforms his already fabulous images into works of art. “I tend to gravitate towards the creative side of photography regardless of the subject matter,” he says. “Initially I started with wildlife and nature, and over the years branched out to outdoor recreation, western themes, people, and just about anything that perks my interest. I’ve shot fashion, celebrities, advertising, national news stories. The list goes on. But my real specialization is nature photography.” Jeff began in photographic art when his first submitted image and published picture won him the 1979 National Wildlife Photographic Competition. “I was in college. so there was not any opportunity to continue my passion for photography until I graduated,” he says. “The published image piqued my interest, however, and after college I gradually invested in better equipment, traveled, and photographed at every opportunity.”

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“I believe my work taps into people’s emotions and brings them to distant places and events. Says Jeff, “this is accomplished by giving the viewer a style and perspective that gives even a common scene a fresh and distinct look.

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His pursuit of the shot has brought adventures in unusual settings far and wide. He tells of escaping an elephant stampede during a safari in Africa. Jeff fled for his life. Meanwhile, a fellow photographer was taking shots of Jeff afoot, with the elephants thundering behind-one of which won an award. One of Jeff’s more harrowing experiences, however, occurred not far from home in Northwest Wyoming and not on assignment. He was on a trip with his family, packing with llamas in the mountains outside Lander. A constant deluge of rain had spoiled their pleasure, and then Jeff’s teenage daughter Anna fell into a fast-moving river and was dragged downstream. Of course he jumped in after her. The two became separated from the rest of the family and spent several days in the wild without food. Despite hypothermia from the exposure, they managed to survive the ordeal. We asked whether being a parent affects his art. While being a parent alone is a huge responsibility and a drain both on creativity and the realities of running a home business, anyone who has children could predict his answer. “I have 2 fantastic children,” he says. (Now young adults, Levi and Anna are both attending college.) “They were extremely understanding and supportive of my passion. We moved many holidays, birthdays, and worst of all several Halloweens, due to the fact that I was making images. They understood from an early age that time away capturing certain images was necessary, and special days can fall on any day of the calendar. Today they are my inspiration for creativity and they know that Dad is doing something special that they both fully support.” From a photographic standpoint, Jeff is inspired by Art Wolfe, who is considered a premier nature photographer. “His work stands out from the rest,” says Jeff, “For the canvas, I would have to say Albert Beirdstadt, who captured the light and landscape of the American West.”

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Practically 100% of Mr. Vanuga’s work is sold through advertising and editorial media; he comments that he is “not really in the business of selling prints.” He does have some prints available in limited edition, but generally sells these only as demand warrants. Jeff’s long-term goals are to develop a few coffee-table books from the region around his home. “From photographing the area for almost 30 years,” he says, “I have a nice collection of images from the parks and the State of Wyoming in which I would like to showcase.” “I believe my work taps into people’s emotions and brings them to distant places and events,” says Jeff. “This is accomplished by giving the viewer a style and perspective that gives even a common scene a fresh and distinct look. Besides the mechanics of the camera, the photographer uses the elements of light, shape, and form to create an image. I would like to think I am expressing that translation in a unique artistic way and conveying that to the viewer—an image full of shape, form, light and emotion.”

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Mr. Vanuga’s immediate goals are to continue to photograph in and around Wyoming. Having made a nice niche for himself photographing within a few hundred-mile radius of home in Dubois, he will continue with the endless variety of subjects the region has to offer. Some of those projects are within a stone’s throw of his front door. “I moved to the area over 25 years ago because what Dubois was,” he said, “and will probably stay for what Dubois is.” When asked how he would like to be remembered, Jeff responded: “Not that I plan on going anywhere soon, but I guess I would like to leave a visual legacy. To know that your work was remembered, made an impact, or moved someone would be very special. Some people leave a diary of their journeys and experiences. I would like to consider mine a visual one.”


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Je loves the thrill of capuring moments lost in time... Thundering Bualo Primrose

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Wild Horses

You’ll find Vanuga’s work all over post cards and promotional material advocating wildlife.

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What advice or suggestions would he offer to aspiring photographers? “Push your comfort zone,” says Jeff, “and think out of the box. As artists we tend to zone in on one area, medium, a particular way of seeing and creating, and therefore we never grow as photographic artists. It may be a formula for your business, but you never grow as an artist.” “I would like to think that over the years I’ve become a better photographer by always pushing the envelope,” he adds, “in learning to see light and interpret that on film, which is the real skill. Learn whatever and wherever you can about your camera, lenses, lighting effects, flash, etc. The more you know, the more you grow as a photographic artist. It keeps the synopsis and artistic creativity moving.” Words to live by, this writer thinks.

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