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CONTENTS

EDINBURGH

2019 Published by the Primary Science Teaching Trust 12 Whiteladies Road, Bristol BS8 1PD www.pstt.org.uk

WELCOME

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THE PRIMARY SCIENCE TEACHING TRUST

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THE SCOTTISH SCHOOLS EDUCATION RESEARCH CENTRE

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BURSARY DONORS

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GENERAL INFORMATION

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MAPS OF EDINBURGH

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THE EDINBURGH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE CENTRE – ORIENTATION

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OVERVIEW OF DAILY TIMINGS

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CONFERENCE SOCIAL EVENTS

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WRITING FOR PSEC SPECIAL ISSUE JOURNALS

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PROGRAMME DETAILS

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THE PSTT CHILDREN’S CONFERENCE AT PSEC

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PERSONAL PROGRAMME PLANNERS

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THE EXHIBITION HALL

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ALPHABETICAL LIST OF EXHIBITORS WITH STAND LOCATIONS

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LIST OF EXHIBITORS BY STAND LOCATION

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FULL LIST OF EXHIBITORS WITH LOGOS

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CONFERENCE HANDBOOK DESIGN www.fresh-creative.com Copyright © Primary Science Teaching Trust Trading Ltd 2019 The reproduction or transmission of all or part of this work, whether by photocopying or storing in any medium by electronic means or otherwise, without the written permission of the owner, is prohibited. The commission of any unauthorised act in relation to the work may result in civil or criminal actions.

DISCLAIMER PSTT is not liable for the actions or activities of any reader or anyone else who uses the information in this handbook. PSTT assumes no liability with regard to injuries or damage to property that may occur as a result of using the information contained in this handbook. Primary Science Teaching Trust recommends that a full risk assessment is carried out before undertaking in the classroom any practical investigations based on any of the content in this handbook. 2

Primary Science Education Conference 2019 3


WELCOME TO THE SECOND INTERNATIONAL PRIMARY SCIENCE CONFERENCE As the new Chair of Trustees for the Primary Science Teaching Trust (PSTT) this is an excellent way to start my term of office. Welcome to Scotland and the Primary Science Teaching Trust’s second international conference (PSEC) on the teaching of science at primary school level. A particular welcome to our delegates from overseas and our distinguished list of keynote speakers; your contributions are appreciated greatly.

The Trust is delighted to bring PSEC to Edinburgh and hopes that your stay here will be a memorable one. The conference brings together the very best teachers, education researchers and scientists and we look forward to the exciting programme that follows the ‘No barriers, no boundaries’ theme from our first conference in Belfast in 2016. We are particularly excited by the Children’s Conference on Friday on climate change, where we have heard recently the extremely powerful voice of young people on this important subject. Edinburgh is an outstanding capital city and we are delighted to be in Scotland - a country that is well known for producing exemplary scientists and engineers who have changed the world. Scientists and engineers that include: Alexander Fleming (the first antibiotic), Joseph Black (discovered carbon dioxide and its greenhouse gas properties), Alexander Graham Bell (the telephone), and John Logie Baird (the television). But do you know about Maria Gordon (geologist), Muriel Robertson (zoologist), Charlotte Auerbach (geneticist) and Wilhelmina Fleming (an astronomer and no relation to Alexander), to name but a few outstanding female scientists and engineers?

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I congratulate the winners of the Primary Science Teacher of the Year Award and look forward to celebrating their awards at the dinner on Thursday, and to welcoming them as Fellows of the PSTT’s College of outstanding teachers. There are many people to thank for making this conference possible: delegates, sponsors, exhibitors, the PSTT conference team, the EICC, my fellow Trustees and many more. However, it would be remiss not to take this opportunity to formally thank Dr. Mike Rance MBE, the outgoing chair of Trustees, for his incredible service to the Trust over the past 14 years and for overseeing the amazing transformation of the Trust over this time. I look forward to meeting as many of you as possible over these three days and wish you a successful conference. Ian G. Dormer CBE Chair of Trustees, The Primary Science Teaching Trust

Welcome to the beautiful city of Edinburgh and the Primary Science Teaching Trust’s second international conference. If you were at our first conference in Belfast in 2016, welcome back.

We welcome especially those who have travelled to the U.K., making this a truly international meeting. The programme brings together primary science teachers, primary science education researchers, and a wide range of scientists and science communicators. The broad range of material covered over the course of the conference shows that science at primary school level is dynamic, engaging and can develop young learners’ science enquiry skills and knowledge.

There are many people to thank for making this conference possible and it is impossible to name them all, but we thank EICC for hosting this event and for all their support, all sponsors and exhibitors, SSERC, our partner organisation for this conference, our Fellows and staff, in particular Ali Eley, Sue Martin and Colette Mackie, and the PSTT trustees whose unwavering support for these conferences has been second to none.

We are delighted to welcome all our speakers and in particular our keynote speakers: Prof. Jim Al Khalili, Kate Bellingham, and Prof. Laura Schulz from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the U.S.A. and look forward to all their talks. We are delighted by the strong contribution to the conference by primary school teachers and in particular the Fellows from the Primary Science Teaching Trust’s College of outstanding primary science teachers.

Professor Dudley E. Shallcross CEO, The Primary Science Teaching Trust

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THE PRIMARY SCIENCE TEACHING TRUST

SCOTTISH SCHOOLS EDUCATION RESEARCH CENTRE (SSERC)

The Primary Science Teaching Trust (PSTT) is a charitable trust whose vision is to see excellent teaching of science in every primary classroom in the UK.

SSERC’s mission is to inspire and support STEM educators through health and safety advice and practical, hands on, experiential professional learning, for the benefit of learners.

PSTT works with award winning teachers (Fellows of the PSTT College), clusters of schools, academic institutions, initial teacher educators, researchers and partners. We facilitate collaboration between these groups of excellent practitioners and researchers, which enables us to support the development and dissemination of excellence in the teaching, learning and leadership of primary science. Research tells us that a child can decide that science is not for them before they leave primary school. This presents a huge concern, because whether a child chooses a career in science or not, they still require a level of scientific literacy to make

informed and responsible decisions about their personal health and well-being, and the important wider issues for society. Furthermore, the future of the UK economy depends on a continuous pipeline of skilled scientists entering the workforce.

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A good primary teacher nurtures a child’s innate curiosity about the world around them which is crucial for the development of scientific skills, understanding and positive attitudes to science. This is no easy task and teachers need continued support.

• Health and safety advice for schools and Local Authorities, enabling hands on experiential learning in the classroom.

Our International conference, devoted specifically to primary science, is a powerful way for us to extend our impact and reach and we welcome you to be a part of it.

• STEM engagement, connecting STEM professionals with young people to bring STEM subjects alive through real life experiences.

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OUTSTANDIN

SSERC offers teaching and learning support for primary and secondary STEM education in the following three areas:

Visit SSERC’s primary pages www.sserc.org.uk/subject-areas/ primary/ to access their primary bulletin which is full of ideas, inspiration and resources to support teaching and learning in primary science.

• Professional development programmes for science and technology teachers, technicians and managers.

scottish schools education research centre

primary science teacher?

primary science & technology bulletins 2019 PRIMARY SCIENCE TEACHER AWARDS

Each winner receives:  £1,000 personal prize money  A set of science resources from TTS for their school  A year’s membership of the ASE  Fellowship of the Primary Science Teacher College

> Now available online! > www.sserc.org.uk/publications/primary-bulletins/

Nominations now OPEN!

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Deadline for nominations: July 12th 2019, 5pm

Providing inspiration, ideas and advice for Primary and Early Years practitioners.


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BURSARY DONORS

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The Primary Science Teaching Trust is extremely grateful to the following organisations and individuals who have given generous donations to our teacher bursary fund. This fund has enabled more than 130 teachers to attend PSEC.

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The Wellcome Trust

The Ogden Trust

AstraZeneca PLC

The Institute of Physics

Professor Laura Schulz

The Royal Society

(through donation of her keynote speaker fee)

Spark your pupils’ curiosity and develop their thinking skills. Explorify is a free digital resource of activities to help strengthen science teaching in primary schools. Join us and find out more at PSEC: •

Find us on stand E24

Help! How can I get more science into my teaching? Friday 7 June, 13.30–14.45, Harris 1. A practical workshop to help you get the most out of Explorify.

Drinks reception, sponsored by Wellcome. Friday 7 June, 17.00–18.30, Exhibition Hall. Hear from other teachers using research in school to inform their practice, and explore the science of learning. Sign up at explorify.wellcome.ac.uk

The Wellcome Trust is a charity registered in England and Wales, no. 210183. E-6560.35/04-2019/RK

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Resources

Inspired by You

All your favourite

Science resources - in one place!

VISIT US AT STAND

SC10072 - Can You Convince Me? £32.95

IT01121 Easi Scope £39.95

B30

www.tts-group.co.uk

SC00117 Easi-Torch £64.95

SC01155 Handheld Microscopes 6pk £50.95

SC00945 Rechargeable Stopwatches £89.95

PSTT International Conference 2019 9


GENERAL INFORMATION If you have not registered already on arrival, please make your way to the registration desk to sign in and to pick up your delegate badge. Please ensure that you sign in each day of the conference so that we have a record that you are in the building. CHOOSING YOUR PROGRAMME

Choosing your sessions – points to note

We hope that you have already viewed the conference programme for PSEC on Sched. Many of you may have already signed up for the sessions that you want to attend.

• Options for each session are colour coded:

If you have not yet signed up for the sessions you would like to attend, please visit the reception area and the PSTT staff in attendance will be pleased to do this for you. You will be able to access Sched to add or change your session choices between: 18.30 on Thursday 6th June and 08.30 on Friday 7th June, and 18.30 on Friday 7th June and 08.30 on Saturday 8th June If outside of these times (i.e. during the conference day) you would like to make any changes to your chosen programme, please ask at the registration desk in the conference centre and we will be pleased to do this for you.

Green = interactive talks: thought-provoking, illustrative and grounded in theory – ideas presented will be relevant and applicable to classroom practice, with time for questions and discussion. Blue = practical workshops: hands-on activities, practical strategies and solutions for making an impact in the classroom – plenty of ideas to take away and to share with colleagues back at school. Pink = reflective seminars: three short talks giving theoretical and practical perspectives on a particular aspect of science education, followed by questions and an open discussion.

• We recommend that you choose a balance of different sessions so that you enjoy a varied programme. Based on delegate feedback from our Belfast conference, we suggest that to get the best experience from PSEC, you select up to four workshops, and at least one or two interactive talks, and one or two reflective seminars. • You will only be able to select one option for each session and this will guarantee you a place in this session. If on Sched you select an option for a particular session and then later want to change to a different option for the same session, you can unclick to remove your original choice and then you will be able to select a new one. If you select a session that is already full, you will get a pop-up message saying that you have been added to the waiting list. You can either remain on the waiting list and you will be notified if a space becomes available, or you can unclick this choice and make a different selection which will then mean you are no longer on the waiting list for your original choice.

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Sessions held in the Carrick, Harris or Ochil rooms (Galloway suite – level1) Numbers for the sessions held in these rooms are limited and we are operating a sign-in system for them. Please ensure that on arrival you sign against your name on the list of booked attendees. If you have not booked but hope to attend, you are welcome to come to the start of the session and wait to see if all those who booked it do turn up. If this happens, you will need to go to a different session. We are using this system to ensure that all delegates who have booked a particular session are able to attend it, and also to comply with the health and safety arrangements at the venue as there are restrictions on maximum numbers allowed in some of the session rooms. Some presenters have specified a maximum number of delegates for their session and we also need to respect this. If you have booked a session that is taking place in one of these rooms please ensure that you arrive a few minutes early so you have time to sign in. If you arrive after the session start time, we reserve the right to give the place to someone waiting, in which case you will be asked to select a different session.

Our practical pick and mix sessions are a lunchtime bonus in the exhibition hall – a selection of excellent suggestions and resources for delivering exciting practical science lessons. Although you can sign up for these in Sched you do not actually need to as they are a drop-in event. Everyone is welcome to come and find out more over lunch.

INFORMATION FOR PRESENTERS All session rooms at the EICC will have a computer, a screen and a projector. We ask that you bring your presentation with you on a memory stick and on arrival at the EICC please let the staff on the registration desk know that you are a presenter. You will then be shown to the Speaker Preview (In the Lomond Foyer) area where the technician will install your presentation and you can check it is as you want it. The technician will then send your presentation to the room where you are presenting at the time of your session. If you take your presentation to your session on your own laptop or on a memory stick instead of using the EICC speaker preview system, we cannot guarantee any technical support for you should anything not work as you had anticipated.

EQUIPMENT The business centre on the ground floor (entrance level) is available for you to store any equipment needed for your session. This room is not staffed and anything you leave in this room is entirely at your own risk. PSTT and the EICC cannot be responsible for any presenters’ possessions that are stored in this room. We recommend that you do not leave anything there overnight. Please note that you are responsible for all the equipment that you bring with you and the health and safety of delegates with regards to this. Please also note that there is no pre-storage at EICC and no equipment or resources can be sent ahead of time or left behind for collection at a later date. SETTING UP FOR YOUR SESSION All presenters can access their rooms at least half an hour before the start of their session. There are coffee/tea or lunch breaks between all sessions, so there are no back to back session changeovers. If your session is immediately after the keynote on Saturday, you will be able to set up before the keynote starts and we suggest you arrive at the beginning of the registration time in order to do this. If you are timetabled to be in the same theatre as the keynote talk, the technicians on hand will be able to assist you beforehand and during the changeover to make sure everything is in place for your session.

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GENERAL INFORMATION CONFERENCE CATERING All delegate tickets include refreshments and lunch which will be served in the exhibition hall at several catering stations in the hall. Thursday 6th June 10.30 – Coffee/tea, pastries and fruit 13.15 – Lunch – selection of sandwiches and hot bites, coffee/ tea, fruit and a sweet bite 15.15 – Coffee/tea, biscuits and fruit Friday 7th June 10.30 – Coffee/tea, shortbread and fruit 12.30 – Lunch - finger buffet, coffee/tea and a dessert 14.45 – Coffee/tea and biscuits Saturday 8th June 11.30 – Coffee/tea, sweet bite and fruit 13.15 – Lunch: selection of sandwiches and hot bites, coffee/ tea, fruit and a sweet bite During registration on Friday 7th June and Saturday 8th June, the EICC Coffee Pod will be open in the Strathblane Hall for delegates to purchase coffees and teas.

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If you have notified us that you have any dietary requirements, please inform a member of staff at conference registration and they will direct you to a member of the EICC catering team. Refreshments and lunches for anyone with dietary requirements will always be served from the central catering station in the exhibition hall. Please show your conference badge to any staff who are serving at this station and they will be pleased to make sure you are given appropriate refreshments and lunches. You are welcome to use the tables in the café area in front of the stage for eating and drinking. Please note that this area is also being used for workshops and so ten minutes before the end of refreshment and lunch breaks it will need to be cleared so that the next session presenter can set up their resources. We ask that you kindly vacate this area promptly when asked by the EICC staff. Unless stated otherwise, exhibitors’ refreshments and lunches will be served immediately before the delegate refreshments and lunches are served. Water coolers with cups are available for delegates to use at various points throughout the conference centre – please help yourself as you wish. FILMING AND PHOTOGRAPHY Professional videographers and photographers will be taking footage throughout the conference. If you would prefer not to be photographed or videoed, we ask that you notify the registration desk and they will ensure that you are issued with a different coloured lanyard which will signify your wish not to be included in any footage.

REMINDER TO SIGN UP FOR A FOLLOW UP CPD DAY THE PRIMARY SCIENCE TEACHING TRUST TRADING LTD NEW RESOURCES – MEET THE AUTHORS Please come to the PSTT stand in the exhibition hall and browse our resources to support teaching and learning in primary science. We are offering 10% off any purchases made at the conference, and in your delegate bag you should have found a voucher that will give you additional discounts. We have also arranged some ‘Meet the Author’ sessions where you can come and ask the creators of our newest resources more about them, and if you would like signed copies, they will be happy to oblige. Thursday 1.30 – 1.50: Playground Science – Tom Holloway and Ruth Shallcross Explore, Engage, Extend – Tracy Tyrrell Friday 1.00 – 1.20: Standing on the Shoulders of Giants – Alison Trew and Alex Sinclair The Molliebird – Jules Pottle and Rufus Cooper Saturday 1.30 – 1.50 See Through Science – Paul Tyler and Alex Farrer Let’s Go! STEM Trails – Jeannette Morgan Science In My Pocket – Nina Spilsbury and Michele Grimshaw

Your delegate ticket includes an opportunity to attend a postconference follow-up CPD day* delivered by PSTT in your region. If you would like to be included in this, you must register your name, contact e-mail, school name, region and postcode to enable us to let you know the date and venue of your nearest CPD day event. To sign up for this you will need to go to the PSTT stand in the exhibition hall. *Terms and conditions apply – PSTT will only provide the training but will not cover any travel, subsistence or supply costs.

BURSARY HOLDERS All bursary holders please note that you MUST ensure that you sign in every day and that the registration desk has recorded your attendance for all three days. Failure to do this is a breach of the terms and conditions of your bursary and may result in non-payment of the bursary. Please also note that the deadline to claim back the agreed bursary sum awarded is 6th July 2019. PSTT cannot guarantee to process any claims received after this date. You should have already been e-mailed a claim form and this must be completed in full and returned with all receipts to finance@pstt.org.uk. Further copies of the claim from can be requested from Sagra on sagra.diaz@pstt.org.uk

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EDINBURGH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE CENTRE (EICC) DYNAMIC EARTH – VENUE FOR THE AWARDS DINNER ON THURSDAY 6TH JUNE GREYFRIARS KIRK – VENUE FOR THE CONFERENCE CEILIDH ON FRIDAY 7TH JUNE

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THE EDINBURGH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE CENTRE AND NEARBY HOTELS

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EDINBURGH’S CULTURAL AND HISTORIC SITES

MAPS OF EDINBURGH

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THE EDINBURGH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE CENTRE – ORIENTATION

PSTT RESOURCE

EXPLORE, ENGAGE, EXTEND Explore, Engage, Extend includes twenty sets of highly engaging practical activities to support teachers with assessment for learning in science. The activities generate rich assessment data, enabling the teacher to plan the topic in response to the children’s specific needs. The topics presented cover the upper primary age range, but they are also transferable across year groups, and can be easily adapted for the particular

curriculum being followed by the school. The activities are intended to be used at the start of a topic, but are equally valuable for providing a practical approach to learning at any stage of a topic. WRITTEN BY TRACY TYRRELL

Level 3: The Pentland Suite

Explore, Engage, Extend is excellent assessment for learning. The children are more engaged and motivated and make good progress.

Level -2: The Cromdale Hall

PENTLAND

GALLOWAY SUITE

Keynote talks

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EXPLORE, ENGAGE, EXTEND Eliciting children’s knowledge and understanding in science to inform the planning of new learning experiences

Key concepts The Sun, Sun, Earth Earth and and Moon Moon are are approximately approximately •• The spherical spherical bodies. bodies. The Sun Sun is is aa star star at at the the centre centre of of our our solar solar system. system. •• The The Earth Earth and and other other planets planets orbit orbit the the Sun. Sun. •• The

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Science in my classroom is now much more child-led.

EARTH AND SPACE

Moon is is aa celestial celestial body body that that orbits orbits aa planet. planet. •• AA Moon Earth has has one one Moon Moon and and the the Moon’s Moon’s orbit orbit gives gives rise rise to to •• Earth the the phases phases of of the the Moon Moon we we observe observe on on earth. earth.

Explore, Engage, Extend includes twenty sets of highly engaging practical activities to support teachers with assessment for learning in science. The activities generate rich assessment data, enabling the teacher to plan the topic in response to the children’s specific needs. The topics presented cover the upper primary age range, are transferable across year groups and can be easily adapted for the particular curriculum being followed by the school. The activities are intended to be used at the start of a topic, but are equally valuable for providing a practical approach to learning at any stage of a topic.

The Earth’s Earth’s rotation rotation about about its its axis axis explains explains day day and and •• The night night and and the the apparent apparent movement movement of of the the Sun Sun across across the the sky. sky.

Key Key vocabulary: vocabulary: Earth Earth Planet Planet Sun Sun Solar Solar system system Moon Moon Celestial Celestial body body Sphere Sphere Spherical Spherical

ISBN: 978-0-9954811-4-5 Primary Science Teaching Trust 12 Whiteladies Road Bristol, BS8 1PD £20 www.pstt.org.uk

Rotate Rotate Rotation Rotation Night Night and and day day Mercury Mercury Venus Venus Mars Mars Jupiter Jupiter Saturn Saturn

A Primary Science Teaching Trust Resource

Explore, Engage, Extend is excellent assessment for learning,

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Moorfoot LOMOND SUITE

Uranus Uranus Neptune Neptune Pluto Pluto ‘Dwarf’ ‘Dwarf’ planet planet Orbit Orbit Revolve Revolve

TRACY TYRRELL 127 127

LOMOND FOYER

Year 5 – Earth and Space

Level 0: Main Entrance, The Strathblane Hall

Year 5 – Earth and Space

Level 1: The Galloway Suite

CROMDALE HALL

Business Centre

Children's conference Whale

Exhibition

The children are more engaged and motivated and make good progress. Science in my classroom is now much more child-led.

STRATHBLANE HALL

Main Entrance

LEVEL 0

LEVEL -2

MEET THE AUTHOR at the PSTT stand Thursday 1.30 – 1.50

All our resources are available to buy in our Primary Science Teaching Trust Trading Ltd. online shop. For more information please take a look at our resource pages:

www.pstt.org.uk/resources 16


PSTT RESOURCE

THURSDAY 6 JUNE

STANDING ON THE SHOULDERS OF GIANTS

PSTT welcome all delegates to a networking event in the exhibition hall

Introducing historic and contemporary scientists’ discoveries in the primary classroom through practical investigations.

Please join us from 5 – 6.30 pm for an engaging and interactive series of thought-provoking activities designed to help you reflect on your teaching practice, connect with like-minded colleagues and generate some real excitement for creative science pedagogy. Enjoy a complimentary drink, browse the exhibition, meet with old friends and new and pick up a free raffle ticket – there are many prizes to be won! This event is facilitated by Andy Carley and Mike Hargreaves of School Outdoor Learning (SOUL). SOUL are UK leaders in accessing your outdoor spaces for creative teaching and learning. www.schooloutdoorlearning.com All welcome to attend – no tickets needed.

The Conference and Primary Science Teacher Awards Dinner

Cross-curricular links between history and science are really valuable in the primary classroom, but how much of the focus is on developing scientific understanding and the skills of working scientifically? Standing on the Shoulders of Giants offers a series of engaging practical investigations based on the scientific work of a historic figure that encourage children to generate their own questions to explore and develop their understanding further. The resource links the work of 10 famous historic scientists to the work of contemporary scientists, giving children an appreciation of how wider scientific understanding develops over time.

• A Classroom Presentation (downloadable resource) that guides you through the scientist’s work, the nature of their enquiry, and how a contemporary scientist has developed ideas.

Included in the resource for each of 10 historic scientists and their contemporary counterparts:

• An overview of opportunities for cross-curricular links.

• A Teacher Guide (printed book) outlining learning objectives, resources required and a practical activity to carry out with the children. Extension activities, vocabulary and focus questions are included.

Entry strictly by ticket only Drinks Reception 6.45pm with a tour of the interactive galleries at Dynamic Earth. Awards 7.30pm Dinner 9.00pm

• 3 Timelines (downloadable resources): one to provide a teacher with background information (also printed in the book); one that is simplified for children’s use, providing questions and their answers; and one that includes pictures and simple questions. • A Template (printed in the book and in digital format) to help structure the lesson. WRITTEN BY ALEX SINCLAIR, AMY STRACHAN AND ALISON TREW

CURRICULUM AREA: MATERIALS 22

After dinner address by Prof. Sir James Hough, OBE Carriages at 11.30

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WHAT DID PEOPLE ALREADY KNOW? Lots of different materials could be used to keep dry – e.g. oiled silk and waxed clothes.

WHAT DID THE SCIENTIST NOTICE?

CHARLES MACINTOSH

There were problems with making materials both waterproof and comfortable.

Venue: Dynamic Earth, Holyrood Road, Edinburgh EH8 8AS a

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WHAT QUESTION DO YOU THINK THE SCIENTIST ASKED?

CHARLES MACINTOSH

CONFERENCE SOCIAL EVENTS

How can I easily make material waterproof?

WHAT DID THE SCIENTIST DO? Macintosh brushed different substances onto cheap cotton and compared how waterproof the materials were.

WHAT WOULD YOU DO NEXT?

WHAT DID THE SCIENTIST FIND OUT?

WHAT DID OTHER SCIENTISTS DO NEXT?

Putting rubber between two layers of cotton was the best method to create waterproof cloth.

Scientists have developed modern materials, some which have ‘smart’ properties. Others are trying to design invisible cloaks.

Located at the bottom of Holyrood Road, neighbouring the Scottish Parliament and the Palace of Holyrood House, Dynamic Earth is approximately a fifteen minute walk from the city centre. To travel by bus from the city centre to Dynamic Earth, take a number 6 or a number 35, or hop on any Edinburgh City sightseeing bus tour. Please visit www.lothianbuses.com for more information about routes and prices.

MEET THE AUTHOR at the PSTT stand Friday 1.00 – 1.20

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1969 / 2011

Scientists continued to develop new materials and fabrics for different sports. These include Gore-Tex and Voormi, which are often used to make coats today.

Although the Macintosh coat was lightweight and waterproof, it was very uncomfortable and potentially dangerous for energetic sports such as mountaineering. It could also be damaged by salt and sweat. The Burberry jacket was created as a direct response to Macintosh’s development. The fabric was lightly waxed and had gaps for self-ventilation. Because of its lightness and wind and snow resistance, Burberry jackets were used by polar explorers including Nansen, Amundsen, Shackleton and Scott and on the 1920s Everest expeditions.

‘SMART clothing’ are made from fabrics that enable digital components, such as a battery, light or small computers and electronics to be embedded in them.

All our resources are available to buy in our Primary Science Teaching Trust Trading Ltd. online shop. For more information please take a look at our resource pages:

www.pstt.org.uk/resources 18

1823

Waterproof clothes were needed for outdoor work of all kinds from seafaring, to farming, for the military, for riding and for driving horse drawn transport, as well as for sports. Many of the early solutions came through trial and error, using materials that came to hand such as treating heavy duty sail cloth with linseed oil and a mix of other waxes to make weatherproof capes.

CURRENT

The Aleut American Indians needed a totally waterproof jacket for hunting in their kayaks. They used dried seal or whale intestines and sealed the seams with animal glues. To check how waterproof they were, the Aleuts would tie off the cuffs and neck and fill them with water.

In 1823, at his factory of fabric developments, Charles Macintosh invented a double textured fabric sandwiched around a layer of rubber. This was developed into the first patented waterproof jacket.

1920S

300 AD – 1800S

The development of waterproof, windproof, breathable textile fabrics began with silk and wool in ancient civilisations and continued with cotton and linen in the 19th and 20th century. Oiled silk is strong, waterproof, windproof and extremely light and was one of the first high performance fabrics. It was first used in umbrellas by the Chinese over 1,000 years ago and vegetable oil was used on silk up until the 19th century.

1800s

Animals, birds and insects have evolved to stay warm and dry. Humans also need to stay warm and dry to survive. They do this by using combinations of insulating furs, plant materials and even animal intestines. We can learn much from looking at how indigenous people kept warm and dry. Vegetable fibres were used widely for homes and clothing for protection from the rain.

PRE-1800s

THE TIMELINE OF A RAINCOAT

The awards are given to outstanding classroom teachers who demonstrate innovative and creative practice, and who support colleagues in and beyond their own schools.

30,000 YEARS AGO

Our Awards Dinner will celebrate our 2018 Primary Science Teacher Award winners.


CONFERENCE SOCIAL EVENTS FRIDAY 7 JUNE The Wellcome Trust sponsored drinks reception in the exhibition hall Mind buzzing after two days of the conference? Excited about primary science and wondering how you could make a bigger impact in your school? All delegates are warmly invited to join The Wellcome Trust for a drink in the exhibition hall from 5.00 – 6.30 pm to explore more about the science of learning and how you could use research to inform practice in your school. Hear from other teachers who have done just that and be inspired to try something yourself. All welcome to attend – no tickets needed.

The Conference Ceilidh

Lewis Hou and his award-winning Science Ceilidh band are providing a night of traditional Scottish dances. Tickets include a one course street food style supper and the venue has a pay bar. Entry strictly by ticket only. Please contact reception to find out if there are any tickets still available.

Greyfriars Kirk is 800m from the Edinburgh International Conference Centre. Buses from the city centre 23, 27, 41 and 42 all stop on George IV Bridge – just a 30-second walk across the road from the entrance to the Kirkyard. Please visit www.lothianbuses.com for more information about routes and prices.

Start time 7pm Carriages at 11.00 Venue: Greyfriars Kirk Greyfriars Place, Edinburgh EH1 2QQ

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WRITING FOR PSEC SPECIAL ISSUES OF ASE JOURNALS Post-conference special issues of Primary Science and the Journal of Emergent Science ALL PRESENTERS OF SESSIONS AT PSEC ARE ENCOURAGED TO SUBMIT A PAPER OR AN ARTICLE TO A SPECIAL ISSUE OF AN ASE JOURNAL.

Post-conference submission of articles to the special issue of Primary Science Primary Science aims to share information and ideas that support effective practice, publishing articles that provide new insight into familiar activities or present novel ways to approach primary science. Special issue articles should describe the practice and context, together with reflecting on implementation and impact within or beyond school. For example, an article might briefly explain the practical activity or approach demonstrated in a PSEC workshop, noting its origins, but then go on to consider the pros and cons of its implementation across the school and the impact this has had on pupil enquiry and potential next steps. The selection of articles to be published will be based on the following criteria: 1. Is there a clear focus and structure to the article? 2. Is the article relevant and interesting to primary teachers, addressing a topical issue? 3. Does the article offer practical suggestions for primary teachers underpinned by some clear evidence and/or theory? Wordcount: 1500-2000, including a small number of references and weblinks.

Format: Contributions should be written in a clear, straightforward style, accessible to professionals and avoiding acronyms and technical jargon wherever possible and with no footnotes. Please include a title, a ‘strapline’ indicating the article’s content, subheadings to break up the text, and information about yourself (e.g. job title, email) at the end of the article. Tables and pictures are useful for readers (high res jpegs should be sent separately and the author is responsible for permissions). The closing date for submission of articles is 1st September 2019. Articles should be sent to Kate Redhead: kate.redhead@pstt.org.uk FURTHER SUPPORT WITH WRITING FOR SPECIAL ISSUES If you have any questions about writing for the special issues, the editors will be running drop-in support sessions during the conference. Please visit the Primary Science Teaching Trust Academic Collaborator stand in the Exhibition Hall at either of these times: Thursday 6th June from 10.30 – 11.30 Friday 7th June from 13.00 – 13.30

Post-conference submission of articles to the special issue of the Journal of Emergent Science The Journal of Emergent Science (JES) is an ‘open-access’ e-journal focusing on research and the implications of research on practice and provision. Special issue articles can discuss small scale practitioner research or larger projects. Colleagues delivering as part of a seminar can submit either an individual article based on the contribution, or a collaborative article written with the colleagues sharing their seminar.

Format: Contributions should be written in a clear, straightforward style, accessible to professionals and avoiding acronyms and technical jargon wherever possible and with no footnotes. Please include a title, a 150-word abstract and up to five keywords, subheadings to break up the text, and information about yourself (e.g. job title, email) at the end of the article. Tables and figures are useful for readers (for images high res jpegs should be sent separately and the author is responsible for permissions). Use UK spelling and single ‘quotes’ for quotations. There should be a section which considers the implications of the research for practice, provision and/or policy.

The selection of articles to be published will be based on the following criteria:

The closing date for submission of papers is 1st September 2019.

1. Is there a clear focus and structure to the study?

Papers should be sent to Sarah Earle: s.earle@bathspa.ac.uk

2. Does the research draw on an appropriate range of literature?

Guidance on referencing: References should be cited in the text (Author, date), et al can be used for more than two authors (Author et al, date). The reference list at the end of the paper should be in alphabetical order.

3. Does the paper clearly describe the research methods, design and study context? 4. Is the data (evidence) well organised and presented in a coherent manner that is aligned with the research questions? 5. Are the arguments or interpretations of data plausible and is there an appropriate level of criticality?

Book Piaget, J. (1929) The Child’s Conception of the World. New York: Harcourt.

6. Do the conclusions contribute valuable insights to teaching and learning in science education?

Vygotsky, L. (1962) Thought and Language. Cambridge. MA: MIT Press.

7. Have the findings been appropriately interpreted to offer useful implications into teaching/learning/researching science education?

Chapter in book Piaget, J. (1976) ‘Mastery Play’. In Bruner, J., Jolly, A. & Sylva, K. (Eds) Play – Its role in Development and Evolution. Middlesex: Penguin. Pp. 166–171.

Wordcount: up to 2500, excluding references and weblinks.

Journal article Reiss, M. & Tunnicliffe, S.D. (2002) ‘An international study of young people’s drawings of what is inside themselves’, Journal of Biological Education, 36, (2), 58–64.

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OVERVIEW OF DAILY TIMINGS DAY 1 – THURSDAY 6 JUNE

DAY 3 – SATURDAY 8 JUNE

10:30

Arrival, Registration and Coffee

08:30

Arrival and Registration

12:00

Welcome

09:00

Keynote Talk

12:15

Keynote Talk

10:15

Session 6

13:15

Lunch and Exhibition

11:30

Coffee

14:00

Session 1

12:00

Session 7

15:15

Coffee

13:15

Lunch and Exhibition

15:45

Session 2

14:00

Science Show

17:00

Drinks Reception hosted by PSTT

15:00

Conference close

18:30

Finish

DAY 2 – FRIDAY 7 JUNE

VIS IT US AT STAN D A1 0

Help research come alive in your classroom

Ocean World

Be part of the Royal Society Schools Network

08:30

Arrival and Registration

09:00

Keynote Talk

10:30

Coffee

11:15

Session 3

● Eight fully resourced enquiry based-learning activities

12:30

Lunch and Exhibition

● Introductory PowerPoint for each activity

13:30

Session 4

● Information Sheets give you facts at your fingertips

14:45

Coffee

● Identification charts and game cards.

15:30

Session 5

17:00

Drinks Reception hosted by the Wellcome Trust

18:30

Finish

Teachers Resource Pack

● Six original films are included in the pack with a comprehensive film guide to take you into the underwater world

£45.00 +£4.80 P&P

Ocean W

orld

“Ever yth to tea ing you ne ch e world about the d ’s oce A box full of a n s ” resou • tried rc es:

and te sted • learni ng-cen tred • easily integr ated across your curric ulum

● Participants can be awarded ‘An Ambassador for the Oceans’ certificate at the www.fo otprintt end of the activities when othefu ture.co. uk knowledgeis shared with others. (Age 8-1

2)

Footpr

TO THE

int

FUTURE

Contact us at

info@footprinttothefuture.co.uk 24

By signing up to the Royal Society Schools Network you will have first-hand access to the latest opportunities and resources available for use in the classroom. Whether it is accessing funding opportunities via our Partnership Grants Scheme, accessing funded CPD, or using the Brian Cox School Experiments, the Royal Society Education Outreach team are committed to supporting teachers to undertake experimental work and problem solving activities across the STEM subjects. Brian Cox School Experiments A series of six simple experiments covering subjects from clean water to melting chocolate. Each experiment comes with resources and four short videos to support the teacher through set-up, the scientific method and health and safety. One of the videos shows the real world context of the science being investigated – a great way to get your pupils enthused.

Partnership Grants Scheme Funding of up to £3,000 is available to enable pupils across all Key Stages to carry out investigative projects in all STEM subjects. The funding, which is used to purchase equipment not normally found in UK schools, must be applied for in partnership with a STEM professional (from research or industry). For more information about these opportunities and the Royal Society Schools Network, visit us at stand A10 or contact the Education Outreach team at education@royalsociety.org


PROGRAMME DETAILS DAY 1 – THURSDAY 6 JUNE

10:30

ARRIVAL AND REGISTRATION; REFRESHMENTS IN THE EXHIBITION HALL

12:00

WELCOME BY RICHARD LOCHHEAD MSP, MINISTER FOR FURTHER EDUCATION, HIGHER EDUCATION AND SCIENCE

12:15

KEYNOTE TALK – THE HUGH LAWLOR LECTURE DELIVERED BY PROFESSOR JIM AL-KHALILI OBE FRS

13:15

LUNCH – SERVED IN THE EXHIBITION HALL

A LUNCHTIME BONUS IN THE EXHIBITION HALL Come to stand A28 to see a selection of excellent suggestions and resources for delivering exciting practical science lessons.

ROOM: PENTLAND WHAT THE FUTURE LOOKS LIKE: SCIENCE IN THE 21ST CENTURY Our scientific understanding is changing rapidly and the technologies that it is based on seem to be coming thick and fast. And yet what might seem fantastical to us, young children simply take in their stride. After all, they know no different. So what does the future hold for the next generation? What will the world look like two decades from now? What new technologies will transform our lives and tackle the world’s biggest challenges, from climate change to health? In this talk, Jim Al-Khalili will reveal some of the most exciting areas of current research, from gene editing to AI, and try to predict how our world will change. Indeed, this will require a rethink of the sort of science that is taught at schools. In a few decades, older children will no longer be learning the traditional subjects: physics, chemistry and biology, but will very likely be studying interdisciplinary topics such as nanotechnology, genetics and robotics. The talk will also focus to a large extent on the biggest transformation of all – potentially bigger even than the internet – namely, AI. To emphasise his point, he will show clips from his recent BBC4 documentary the Joy of AI, but also issue words of caution about whether society is adequately prepared for such profound changes brought about by these new technologies. JIM AL-KHALILI OBE FRS is an academic physicist, author and broadcaster. Since 2005, he has held a joint professorship in physics and in the public engagement in science at the University of Surrey, where he also holds the title of Surrey Distinguished Chair. Despite his many public commitments, he continues to teach undergraduates and conduct his research in quantum physics. He received his PhD in nuclear reaction theory in 1989 and has published over 100 papers in the field. Jim is a prominent author and broadcaster. He has written 12 books, between them translated into over twenty languages, mostly on popular science and the history of science, such as Pathfinders: the golden age of Arabic science, which was shortlisted for the Warwick Book Prize in 2013, and Life on the Edge: the coming of age of quantum biology, shortlisted for the 2015 Royal Society Winton Prize. He has just published his first novel, Sunfall.  He is also a regular presenter of TV science documentaries, including the BAFTA nominated Chemistry: A Volatile History and Shock and Awe: The Story of Electricity. Most recently. He presented the BBC documentary, The Joy of AI, on artificial intelligence. For the past eight years he has presented the award-winning weekly BBC Radio 4 programme, The Life Scientific. Jim is the current president of the British Science Association. He is a board member of CaSE (The Campaign for Science and Engineering), a trustee of the Institute of Physics and on the judging panel of the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering. He is a recipient of the Royal Society Michael Faraday medal, the Institute of Physics Kelvin Medal and the Stephen Hawking Medal for Science Communication. He received an OBE in 2007 for ‘services to science’ and was elected a fellow of the Royal Society in 2018.  Jim is married with two, now adult, children and lives in Hampshire. 

PRACTICAL PICK AND MIX

STAND D26 EXHIBITION HALL

FAMILY LEARNING - STEM BAGS

UP-CYCLED SCIENCE

JANEY IRVING

DEBBIE JONES

Find out about the Family Learning STEM Bags project in Moray. These STEM bags not only engage parents and children in fun STEM activities, but also help to improve the children’s overall STEM enthusiasm with the aim of raising attainment and achievement and building Science Capital within families.

Are you concerned about the environment we live in? Do you struggle to fund science projects in school? We may have a solution for you! Concerns about the use of plastics and the damage they are causing to our environment - particularly in the Oceans and the impact on wildlife - has caused us to look at ways to recycle plastic bottles for a scientific purpose. Debbie will show you innovative ways to up-cycle materials which are difficult to dispose of and turn them into something you can use in science lessons.

RUBBISH SCIENCE

PRACTICAL STEM IDEAS

LINDA MCKEE AND LESLEY HUNTER

GILLIAN REILLY

Linda and Lesley will share a selection of practical STEM activities suitable for all schools, including those with a limited science budget. Take away a raft of simple, practical and effective ideas to take back for immediate use in any classroom. Easy to resource, easy to make, easy to use ……

A selection of practical ideas, activities, photographs and planning guides to support the exploration of STEM related concepts that relate to real life. Come and gather ideas, including the use of STEM ambassadors and training opportunities

HUGH LAWLOR was the first and founding director of what is now the Primary Science Teaching Trust. When in 1997 he was approached by Zeneca Pharmaceuticals about how they might support science education, he suggested that they endow a charity specifically to support the continuing professional development of science teachers. Soon after he became director of the AstraZeneca Science Teaching Trust and for more than ten years he oversaw the investment of Combining his love of science and his love of teaching, Hugh’s incredibly varied career in science education included working in Libya and Brazil. He devoted his working life to ensuring that children received high-quality science education.

Please note that all session descriptions and room allocations were accurate at time of going to press. For fully up to date information please look on Sched. Any room changes will be announced via the conference PA system and/or notices outside the relevant rooms.

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Primary Science Education Conference 2019 27


PROGRAMME DETAILS DAY 1 – THURSDAY 6 JUNE 14.00 SESSION 1 SESSION 1

14:00

INTERACTIVE TALKS EFFECTIVE PRIMARY SCIENCE: WHAT DOES THE ACADEMIC RESEARCH TELL US?

WORKING SCIENTIFICALLY WITH WOW MOMENTS

CLARE WARREN, JANE TURNER ROOM: PENTLAND

SUE LUKE, SALLY HARDMAN ROOM: MOORFOOT

This talk will share ideas from academic literature about effective primary science education. We will focus on issues of both curriculum and pedagogy, including hands-on, minds-on science enquiry, cross-curricular science, science as a series of stories, talk for learning (including argumentation), misconceptions and conceptual change, and models and representations. Participants will depart with not only a range of classroom strategies but a deeper understanding of why they might be effective and greater knowledge to help them evaluate the strategies they currently use. In line with the best practice in professional development, the audience will be expected to be hands-on, minds-on too!

Children are naturally inquisitive about the world around them and are often fascinated by everyday objects and experiences. Primary school teachers can use capitalise on this emotional engagement in order to develop their learning in science (McCrory, 2011). Using examples of WOW moments in the classroom this talk reflects on the crucial role teachers’ play in creating WOW moments to nurture children’s curiosity. The talk explores how WOW moments can provide opportunities for children to work scientifically and share their knowledge and understanding of science ideas.

DRAMA AS A FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT TOOL IN PRIMARY SCIENCE DAVID ALLEN ROOM: TINTO Can drama be used to assess children’s conceptual understanding in science sessions? This talk will explore the findings from a recent classroom study which explored the use of drama as a formative assessment tool. We will examine the use of drama as a vehicle for observation and as a means to increase levels of dialogue. Attendees will gain first-hand experience of improvised drama activities within scientific contexts from a child and a teacher’s perspective whilst making links with theory.

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PROGRAMME DETAILS DAY 1 – THURSDAY 6 JUNE 14.00 SESSION 1 REFLECTIVE SEMINARS THE IMPORTANCE OF ENGAGING CHILDREN IN REAL SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH

TAPS: MAKING A LASTING WHOLE SCHOOL IMPACT

ROOM: FINTRY

ROOM: SIDLAW

OVERVIEW This year pupils from Mearns Primary School had the opportunity to take part in a project to launch a weather balloon into the upper atmosphere to study changes in atmospheric composition and pollution. The project was run by hi-impact consultancy with support from Bristol University. The focus was on giving pupils an opportunity to be involved in every stage of a scientific research project from asking the initial questions through project planning to data collection, analysis and presentation. This type of high-profile project and the subsequent research opportunities has had a significant impact on pupil engagement in science and their understanding of scientific research. It has enhanced the work the school already do on developing the Science Capital of their pupils and the Citizen Science projects they engage in. The project was part funded by the Royal Society who offer partnership grants to support schools collaborating in real scientific research in a variety of contexts. This seminar will explore the importance of pupils having opportunities to engage with scientific research in a variety of ways, how schools can access grants to support projects and how you can find opportunities to get involved in scientific research. Talk 1 – Professor Dudley Shallcross Research shows that when pupils have the opportunity to get involved in real scientific research there is an increased engagement with science. In the opening section of the seminar Professor Dudley Shallcross will discuss the importance of engaging pupils in scientific research to inspire and engage them and raise their awareness of the importance of science in a wider world context. He will discuss different ways in which scientific research can be brought into the classroom and how it can be used effectively. He will explore the importance of accessing current scientific research, adapted for their level, as a way to improve understanding of the importance work scientists do. He’ll also look at the positive effects of schools engaging in high impact scientific researchers with academic partners. It will discuss current research around engaging pupils and how carefully planned scientific experiences can benefit pupils and schools.

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REFLECTIVE SEMINARS

Talk 2 – Paul Tyler Paul is a primary teacher and science lead and has a history of engaging pupils through ‘real’ science experiences at his school. He has used a wide variety of Citizen Science projects throughout the school and organised large scale programmes of STEM visits and visitors. Recently the school have been involved in a project to launch a high altitude weather balloon up to the edge of space to study atmospheric conditions. The project involved 130 Primary 7 pupils working alongside STEM experts in a wide variety of fields to plan the mission, programme the detectors, monitor the launch and flight, collect the data and analyse it. The inspiration and pupil engagement of such a project contribute hugely to the Science Capital of the pupils who took part. Talk 3 – Jo Cox Jo Cox will discuss the Royal Society’s schools’ grant scheme and how her team can support schools to get involved in research projects with academic partners. She will explain the Royal Society’s focus on getting young children involved in scientific research from an early age, the value of expert partners in a school setting and the benefits to teachers of becoming engaged in research . As part of this session she will walk teachers through the application process, which can appear daunting, so that they can access the £3000 grant in 2020 following a step by step timeline. The Royal Society Partnership Grant scheme is unique in that it is fully supportive of time pressures that teachers are under and recognises that support with the application process is as important as support during the project. Pitfalls, advice and eligibility criteria will be discussed along with project ideas for teachers to consider. Chaired by Sue Martin

OVERVIEW The PSTT’s flagship Teacher Assessment in Primary Science (TAPS) project, has worked with teachers in all four countries of the UK to develop support for valid, reliable and manageable school assessment processes. Following a brief introduction to the TAPS project, its scope and resources; the speakers will explore how development and use of the TAPS resources has driven change in schools, with a range of examples from different regions. They will provide guidance on making the most effective use of the TAPS self-evaluation tool and focused assessment resources for enquiry, to support teacher assessment literacy and ensure whole school lasting impact. Talk 1 – Sarah Earle Dr Sarah Earle, project lead for TAPS, will briefly introduce the TAPS project, its scope and resources (Earle et al. 2015, Davies et al. 2017, Earle et al. 2018). She will then describe how development and use of the TAPS resources has led to changes in practice in a range of schools from different regions (Earle 2017, Earle 2018). Talk 2 – Elaine Stockdale Elaine Stockdale is a PSTT Fellow, science subject leader and Foundation Phase teacher at Tongwynlais Primary School in Cardiff, Wales. As part of the TAPS Cymru team she identified examples of assessment good practice in her school (Earle et al. 2018) and helped to develop a range of scientific enquiry focused assessment activities. She will explore the focused assessment approach and consider how the TAPS Cymru resources can be used to lead to staff development.

Talk 3 – Pauline Rodger Pauline is a PSTT Fellow, science subject leader and Key Stage 2 teacher at Holt Primary School in Wiltshire, England. She has been a TAPS project teacher since its inception in 2013. Pauline will describe how she has developed and used the TAPS resources in her school and cluster. She will explore how to support staff to develop their assessment literacy, for example, by using moderation (Rodger 2018) and how to ensure whole school lasting impact. Chaired by Derek Bell References

Davies, D., S. Earle, K. McMahon, A. Howe & C. Collier (2017) Development and exemplification of a model for Teacher Assessment in Primary Science, International Journal of Science Education, 39:14, 1869-1890. Earle, S, Davies, D, McMahon, K, Collier, C, Howe, A and Digby, R (2015) Introducing the TAPS pyramid model (interactive pdf). Bristol: Primary Science Teaching Trust. Earle, S. (2017) Use of case study to develop and exemplify a model of teacher assessment. In ESERA 2017: 12th Biannual Conference of the European Science Education Research Association, 21-25 August 2017, Dublin, Ireland. Earle, S. (Ed.) (2018) Teacher Assessment in Primary Science (TAPS) special issue, Primary Science, 1-23. Earle, S., Jones, B., Coakley, R., Fenn, L. and Davies, D. (2018) The Teacher Assessment in Primary Science (TAPS) Pyramid Model: TAPS Cymru: examples from Wales. Bristol: Primary Science Teaching Trust. Rodger, P. (2018) Making more effective use of moderation, Primary Science TAPS special issue pp.11-12.

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PROGRAMME DETAILS

PSTT RESOURCE

DAY 1 – THURSDAY 6 JUNE 14.00 SESSION 1

TITANIC SCIENCE

REFLECTIVE SEMINARS

Where the story of Titanic meets science enquiry

SCOTLAND’S NATIONAL PRIMARY CLUSTER PROGRAMME IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: IMPACT ON LEARNING AND TEACHING

This resource tells the story of the titanic through practical enquiry based science.

ROOM: CARRICK 1

It demonstrates how science played a pivotal role during the key moments in the history of the world’s most famous ship. By following the science of the Titanic, children explore a series of exciting practical investigations, with accompanying historical narrative.

OVERVIEW As a result of a number of drivers, the Scottish Government, SSERC and the National STEM [then Science] Learning Centre, identified the need for a national programme to improve the confidence and expertise of primary teachers in science and technology. The SSERC career-long professional learning (CLPL) approach with teacher mentors supporting their cluster schools at its core is informed by practice and also grounded in research evidence and the wider literature. It has been consistently shown that teachers’ professional development is much more likely to be successful when it “involves collaboration between staff and that effective mentoring and coaching is key to this professional development” (CUREE, 2012). The programme has been subject to extensive internal and external evaluation since its first year of delivery in 2012.

Talk 2 – Kevin Lowden and Stuart Hall In this presentation I will reflect on the findings of a recent multimethod research project that assessed the impact of a national CLPL programme that suggests that teacher CLPL, particular in science and technology education, is particularly effective when it adopts a collaborative mentoring approach deployed across school clusters. This model is underpinned by collaborative professional dialogue, action research and a focus on promoting teachers’ confidence and expertise in science and technology using practical skills as a vehicle. I will examine the model adopted by the programme, drawing on research evidence in the literature on effective professional learning for teachers and in particular, apply Desimone’s (2009) conceptual framework. I will explore how the PCP has been instrumental in bringing about positive change in classroom practice and consequent impact on pupils’ confidence in carrying out science tasks.

• Pupils’ learning, motivation and outcomes; and

Talk 3 - Nicola Connor The SSERC PCP has had a significant effect on professional practice of colleagues across my cluster. As a nominated mentor, I attended the PCP and I was able to gain a range of skills and expertise which, together with my fellow mentors from the cohort, have allowed me to lead developments in my school and cluster. The benefits for my teaching colleagues and the quality of learning and teaching within their classrooms has been significant. In my presentation I will explore how my experiences of working with the team at SSERC has enabled me to become a more confident and proficient practitioner. The opportunity to lead professional learning across my cluster has provided both personal and professional satisfaction of a high level.

• Pupils’ confidence in completing science tasks.

Chaired by Alastair MacGregor

In this seminar we will explore the design of the Primary Cluster Programme in Science and Technology and its impact on: • Teachers’ commitment, beliefs, attitudes, self-esteem and confidence in making a difference to their pupils’ learning; • Teachers’ repertoires of strategies and their ability to match teaching approaches to pupils’ different needs;

References Talk 1– Kath Crawford I will explore the rationale behind the development of the Primary Cluster Programme (PCP) and the implementation strategy. Mentors from a cluster work as a group with a view to jointly devising an approach to the task of designing and implementing a programme of Professional Learning that will support promoting science and technology teaching for all their colleagues in their cluster. The mentors adopt a collaborative action research approach to implement and evaluate their task. Cluster mentors, working as a group, showcase progress and impact of their work some 8 months after our initial interventions. We have now worked with clusters of primary schools from across all 32 Local Authorities in Scotland. The impact of PCP on the quality of learning and teaching has been subject to internal and external evaluation. I will explore the key factors that have led to the success of PCP in Scotland.

HM Inspectorate of Education (Scotland) (2009) Learning together: improving teaching, improving learning: the roles of continuing professional development, collegiality and chartered teachers in implementing Curriculum for Excellence. Available at: https: // education.gov.scot/Documents/LearningTogetherImprovingTeachingImprovingLearning.pdf

Titanic Science has been written by teachers for teachers, therefore it is designed to support, empower and inspire teachers to deliver high quality and engaging science lessons. Individual investigations can be used to highlight scientific concepts, or the whole resource can be used to examine the full story of the Titanic. As a multi-disciplinary resource, it will also provide material for other curriculum areas, such as creative writing, history and numeracy.

THE BOOK INCLUDES: • Clear learning intentions for each investigation. • Science context section outlining the scientific phenomena of each investigation. • Comprehensive list of equipment you may need. • Easy instructions on how to set up and carry out the investigations. • Key questions provide teachers with useful prompts to assist children in their investigations. • ‘Titanic Trivia’. • Extension and enrichment activities. • Recording sheets - allowing more time for enquiry. • Beautiful, authentic photographs of the Titanic. WRITTEN BY JIM MCDAID

TITANIC SCIENCE WHERE THE STORY OF TITANIC MEETS SCIENCE ENQUIRY

CUREE (2012). Understanding what enables high quality professional learning: A report on the research evidence. Available at: www.curee.co.uk/files/publications/[site-timestamp]/CUREEReport.pdf Desimone, L. M. (2009) Improving impact studies of teachers’ professional development: toward better conceptualisations and measures. Educational Researcher, 38: 181-199

Courtney #3 Photograph © National Museums Northern Ireland Collection Ulster Folk & Transport Museum

JIM MCDAID A Primary Science Teaching Trust Resource

nce Contains 15 scie ed to the investigations relat introduced ic, Titan of story acters by ‘real life’ char g narrative. through engagin Topic Web, Also includes a s and a full Curriculum Map . Scientific Glossary

CHAPTER THREE - “WE ARE SINKING FAST!”

CHAPTER FIVE - ABANDON SHIP

JIM GORDON JONES Marconi Operator from Glasgow

WILLIAM (BILL) MOORE Greaser from Southampton

My name is Jim Gordon Jones but my friends call me Jack. I am the senior radio operator on the ship RMS Titanic and I have one assistant. We take it in turns to send messages for the passengers but it is difficult work as we have to concentrate very hard, sit still for long periods of time and listen to what is little more than a whisper for up to 18 hours a day. We tend to send most messages at night as the wireless communications send better then and are clearer to intercept. It was my 25th birthday on 11th April 1912 and my assistant Mr. Bride covered for me so I could eat some buns and cakes from the first class decks to celebrate. It’s been a great week so far and I can’t wait until I get to New York to see the city of lights and enjoy all it has to offer.

There are 33 of us who worked as greasers. We work in the turbine and engine rooms alongside the engineers. We are responsible for maintaining and supplying oil and lubricants for Titanic’s engines. They say that Titanic is the biggest moving object in the world and it is her mighty engines and my grease that keeps her moving! It's a filthy and noisy job, but the men I work with are all good company. But I never get to see the wonderful luxury of Titanic. We live and work right down in the bottom of the ship. The passengers above might be treated to fine music from the orchestra, but I get to listen to the greatest music of all, the engines of the greatest ship ever built!

CHAPTER FOUR - DISTRESS SIGNALS

CHAPTER SIX - SINKING OF TITANIC

ANNA CATHERINE KELLY Irish emigrant passenger on deck when the rockets were being fired

STANLEY MARSHALL Steward in First Class from Liverpool

I was born in 1891 in Cuilmullagh in Co. Mayo. My family are very poor and live in the shadow of the Nephin Beg Mountains surrounded by poor soil, poor weather and poor prospects for the future. To help my family and also to have a better life for myself, I have decided to join my cousins in Chicago, Illinois in the United States of America. They left Ireland three years ago, and tell me they are leading a very comfortable life. My extended family have helped me cobble together the £7.15s.- for my fare aboard the magnificent ship, the RMS Titanic. I could only afford a third class ticket, or what the rich people call ‘cattle class.’ I met the great ship at Queenstown and left the familiar world I knew for the excitement of a new life in America.

I was born in Liverpool in 1878. Before working on Titanic I was a steward on the SS Olympic, Titanic’s sister ship. I sailed across to New York on the Olympic in 1911. I thought that mighty ship was luxurious and it was, but Titanic is something else. The passengers I serve are as grand as the ship we sailed on. The restaurant I work in can accommodate 500 people dressed in all their finery. The restaurant is on D deck between the second and third funnels, to give the diners the smoothest possible ride. Some of the food I serve in the restaurant I cannot pronounce never mind recognise! I take great pride in my work. The passengers say Titanic is the ship of dreams. I am making that dream come true!

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All our resources are available to buy in our Primary Science Teaching Trust Trading Ltd. online shop. For more information please take a look at our resource pages:

www.pstt.org.uk/resources 32

PSTT International Conference 2019 33


PROGRAMME DETAILS DAY 1 – THURSDAY 6 JUNE 14.00 SESSION 1 PRACTICAL WORKSHOPS

DEVELOPING TALK AND EXPLANATION SKILLS IN SCIENCE

CREATIVE APPROACHES TO “WORKING SCIENTIFICALLY” IN THE PRIMARY CLASSROOM

GETTING HANDS-ON IN YOUR CLASSROOM – USING THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD

JO MOORE ROOM: HARRIS 1 AGE RANGE: 4-11

DEBBIE ECCLES ROOM: OCHIL 2 AGE RANGE: All

CLARYSLY DELLER ROOM: CARRICK 2 AGE RANGE: 7-11

JAYNE QUOIANI ROOM: HARRIS 2 AGE RANGE: 7-11

This workshop supplies creative ideas supporting teaching about population change over time, variation and natural selection, inspired by Darwin’s observations of moths. Based on his prediction of the existence of a moth with a 30cm proboscis to feed from the Madagascan Comet orchid, the session commences with a dramatic dialogue between Darwin and his wife. A brief drama activity follows, modelling how differing length proboscises link to different flowers. This scaffolds understanding of the symbiosis between plant and animal, leading to insights into how evolution by natural selection occurs. Participants also gain practical ideas to make ‘flowers’ and moth ‘proboscises’.

Pupils are engaged and motivated when they are involved in planning their own experiments. This hands-on workshop will improve your confidence in using and teaching the scientific method. You will create and carry out your own unique experiment using earthworms with support from staff at the University of Edinburgh’s Easter Bush Science Outreach Centre and Understanding Animal Research. Every participant will receive a box of resources to take back to their classroom that includes materials and activity guides to support hands-on activities that explore the scientific method and the use of animals in research.

This session will look at a range of practical strategies to use in the classroom to promote talk and higher order thinking skills. These were developed as part of a PSTT funded Research Learning Community project by a PSST science cluster in Islington and have been used successfully in classrooms across the group of five schools. There will be time to prepare resources for your own class.

This hands-on practical session offers a host of creative practical activities and ideas to help ensure children are working scientifically. The session will provide delegates with ideas for creative contexts and opportunities to try out activities for all the different types of enquiry that form part of the primary science curriculum. There will be chance to raise questions and share ideas as part of the session.

LET’S GO! TAKING CHILDREN ON A STEM TRAIL

SCIENCE IS ALL AROUND

JEANNETTE MORGAN ROOM: CROMDALE (EXHIBITION HALL) AGE RANGE: All

MIKE HARGREAVES ROOM: CARRICK 3 AGE RANGE: 4-11

In this workshop we will look at how the immediate environment around your school can enhance the STEM curriculum for your children. Trails can be used in many different ways for lots of STEM topics. We will:

School Outdoor Learning the UK’s largest provider of outdoor learning solutions for schools will be embarking on a curriculum linked exploration of science outside the classroom. Linked to their Learning Outside the Classroom Teaching Handbook you will explore teaching matter from EYFS through to Key Stage 2 in an experiential and sensory way. You will come away with greater confidence, ideas and inspiration to innovate your teaching using the outdoors. Each delegate will also receive with a free pack of tried and tested outdoor lesson plans and a copy of the ‘Tips and Tools Handbook’ for outdoor learning. This workshop is for anyone who would like to enhance engagement, the social skills, attainment, health and wellbeing of their pupils.

MAGNIFICENT MOTHS: CREATIVE APPROACHES TO UNDERSTANDING NATURAL SELECTION AND POPULATION CHANGE, USING MODELS AND SCAFFOLDS TO SUPPORT LEARNING

EXPLORE, ENGAGE, EXTEND TRACY TYRRELL ROOM: KILSYTH AGE RANGE: 7-11 This workshop will share Explore, Engage, Extend –a set of engaging practical activities designed to support teachers with assessment for learning in science in upper primary school. In this hands on session, you will explore a topic through a carousel of focused activities – the aim of which is to elicit children’s knowledge and understanding by stimulating discussion and giving them opportunities to practise memory recall. You will see how the use of the activities helps increase engagement, highlight relevant vocabulary, find out what children know and would like to know, and identify misconceptions - enabling teachers to plan new learning experiences in response to children’s specific needs and interests and ensuring maximum impact with minimum time and effort.

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PRACTICAL WORKSHOPS

OLD WAYS, NEW WAYS: AUSTRALIAN ABORIGINAL TOOL-MAKING JASON BARROW, CAROLINE BISHOP AND MAGDALENA WAJRAK ROOM: OCHIL 1 AGE RANGE: 7-11 In this workshop participants will be guided through an example of Traditional Australian Aboriginal glue making practices for the construction of knives and axes. During the glue making process, through conversation, we explore the knowledge and wisdom of this ancient technique of the Nyoongar people from the South West of Western Australia. The characteristics and physical properties of the glue produced will be compared to that of Polymorph. Throughout the workshop we provide elaborations, and give context to, the Traditional intergenerational knowledge of what, where, how and why the resources from the Australian bush were gathered and used.

• Look at the Trail projects – where did it start? • Look at the trails that have already been created. • Look at the outdoors in our immediate environment around the Edinburgh International Conference Centre as a way to inspire us. • Generate ideas for our own trails that we can use back in our schools. • Look to the future and see how the trails projects could grow.

15:15

COFFEE/TEA IN THE EXHIBITION HALL

Primary Science Education Conference 2019 35


PROGRAMME DETAILS

PSTT RESOURCE

DAY 1 – THURSDAY 6 JUNE 15:45 SESSION 2

LET’S GO! SCIENCE TRAILS AND LET’S GO! STEM TRAILS A holistic way of looking at science, technology, engineering and maths using the local environment.

INTERACTIVE TALKS

These trails inspire and support teachers to find science in the outdoor environment of the school grounds and locality. Written and trialled by practising teachers, the trails provide in valuable support for outdoors learning from EYFS to the upper primary age.

biology chemistry and physics. Let’s Go! STEM trails has an additional focus on technology, engineering and maths and their links with science. Both books include comprehensive glossaries to support teachers with background knowledge and understanding.

Each book includes 29 science trails. Let’s Go! Science Trails focuses on primary science concepts relating to

WRITTEN BY JEANNETTE MORGAN

KEY VOCABULARY Horizontal Vertical Perpendicular Parallel Quadrilateral Triangle – equilateral, isosceles, scalene right angle Reflex angle Dimensions Vertically opposite Circumference Radius Diameter Polygon Vertices Acute Obtuse Regular Irregular

CONCEPTS/OBJECTIVES EXPLORED „ Identify and name common and less common 2D and 3D shapes. „ Use mathematical vocabulary for 2D and 3D shapes, including different quadrilaterals and triangles. „ Use appropriate vocabulary, including horizontal, vertical, perpendicular, parallel, various angles, etc., to describe shapes. „ Describe the features of circular shapes including circumference, radius and diameter.

LOCATION „ 2 locations in the school building „ 2 locations in the playground „ 2 locations beyond the school grounds

SCIENTIFIC SKILLS „ „ „ „ „

Observing Recording Collecting data Presenting results Drawing conclusions based on evidence

RESOURCES AND PREPARATION

INVESTIGATION TYPE

„ Ask the children what shapes they would expect to find outdoors; where these might be and their purpose; and where they would expect to see the greatest range of shapes. Debate whether the children should go to one location, or compare and contrast locations to see which one has more shapes. Consider a vote on which approach they would prefer. „ If the intention is to use the Trail to assess the children’s current understanding of shape (e.g. the names and properties that are known), this may be done on the Trail. „ If the Trail is to be used to determine how the children can apply their knowledge of shape, ensure that any key vocabulary or concepts are taught in advance.

Digital cameras Clipboards Pencils/pens Paper or tally chart proforma Vocabulary cards with key properties of shapes on them as well as names of shapes Sound buttons or tablet computer for recording responses

ON THE TRAIL WHAT TO DO „ Activity 1: Walk around as a class, looking for shapes within the environment. Some shapes may be found in isolation, whereas others may be within or part of a structure. Ask key questions 1 – 3. „ Activity 2: Using vocabulary strips or cards, ask the children to find an example of some of these quadrilaterals: square, rectangle, parallelogram, rhombus, irregular quadrilateral, trapezium, isosceles trapezium, kite, and name those they have located . Ask them to find examples of 3 different triangles (for example: equilateral, isosceles, scalene, or right angle) and name these. Ask the children to record or photograph each example (making sure that the vocabulary card is in the photograph), looking for examples that are different sizes and made of different materials. „ Activity 3: Ask the children to look for shapes or lines that include one or more of the following properties and record or photograph these (you can add to this list or modify it depending on the age of the children). They should state whether each is a 2D or 3D shape. If it is helpful, the children could use chalk to mark angles, or use a protractor to measure these. „ Activity 4: Ask key question 4. Complete a tally chart of some of the properties found above, depending on what you want the children to focus on. „ Activity 5: Ask key questions 5 and 6. Ask the children to photograph or record the most unusual shape they can see. Examples are: A horizontal line A vertical line A perpendicular line Parallel lines An acute angle A right angle A reflex angle

Vertically opposite angles (look at examples of lines crossing each other) 2 circles with different sizes of circumference 2 different lengths of radius (if possible measure them so that the circumference can be calculated back in class) 2 different lengths of diameter (as above)

„ Ask key question 7. „ Go to a new location and repeat, or finish the Trail in school.

„ Exploration „ Survey „ Classification 12

MEET THE AUTHOR at the PSTT stand Saturday 1.30 – 1.50

THE ‘BRIAN COX SCHOOL EXPERIMENTS’ USING THE ROYAL SOCIETY’S RESOURCE

TALK 1: EDUCATION FOR OUR PLANET

JO COX ROOM: PENTLAND

MATT LARSEN-DAW

LET’S GO!

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How can science educators help to save the planet? Starting with an introduction to the wealth of educational resources and free multimedia content available to educators through the Our Planet project, this practical talk will use real-life examples and demonstrations to explain how you can embed environmental education into your lessons and wider school life, and why you should. Includes an interactive guide to involving your students in the Our Planet global citizen science programme, building understanding of local and global biodiversity and the role they can play in sustaining it for the future.

SEIZE THE DAY! MAKING THE MOST OF PRE-SERVICE TEACHERS’ EXPERIENCE OF PRIMARY SCIENCE WITHIN AN INITIAL TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMME.

TALK 2: ENGAGING WITH NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUMS TO INVIGORATE YOUR SCIENCE CURRICULUM AT SCHOOL

JOHN MCCULLAGH AND ANDREA DOHERTY ROOM: OCHIL 3

FRAN LONG

As pre-service teachers’ experience of primary science during the course of their initial teacher education programme is most surely a key determinant of the quantity and quality of their future science teaching, it is vital that they are encouraged and supported to engage in reflective classroom practice during this formative stage of their careers. This talk will describe how activities such as co-teaching and the use of video-supported reflection can be used to develop competence and confidence within the classroom. Alongside their BEd studies, students are encouraged to gain accreditation through a degree enhancement accreditation programme by working to support and develop science provision in local primary schools. As well as addressing the needs of the present we feel our approach goes some way to preparing the science leaders of the future.

Each group needs: INTRODUCTION This Trail aims to expand on the ideas and activities used in the KS1 Shape Trail, extending the vocabulary the children use to describe 2D and 3D shapes in the environment. The children will continue to investigate a number of key concepts associated with shapes and observe how they are used and where they are found. The children will be encouraged to name more complex shapes or use more technical vocabulary. You could complete this Trail in your school and playground, or you could compare and contrast your school and its grounds with locations beyond the school to give children a wider experience. It is also an opportunity to assess what is already known and to consider next steps. This Trail can link with a variety of topics, be part of a maths week or be used to make a maths lesson on shape more relevant or interesting.

Two for One! This session will include two half hour talks ROOM: FINTRY

Do you sometimes struggle to get started with experimental science? Do you find it hard to link your experiments to the real world? Do you worry that you might be caught off-guard by questions that children may ask or things that can go wrong? Do you need more support with terminology around the scientific method? Or you might just want to bring Brian Cox to your classroom! If the answer to any of these questions is yes then come along and try out the Brian Cox School Experiments. You will be able to take away a set of the videos and resources to use in your classroom.

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AND 3D SHAPES – KS2 Let’s Go! 2D WHAT SHAPES CAN WE FIND IN OUR SCHOOL AND BEYOND?

SESSION 2

15:45

How can science educators help to save the planet? Starting with an introduction to the wealth of educational resources and free multimedia content available to educators through the Our Planet project, this practical talk will use real-life examples and demonstrations to explain how you can embed environmental education into your lessons and wider school life, and why you should. Includes an interactive guide to involving your students in the Our Planet global citizen science programme, building understanding of local and global biodiversity and the role they can play in sustaining it for the future. Discover how museum collections and practical study of real specimens can be used to enrich the KS2 curriculum. A recent pilot study using the British Insect Collection demonstrated the impact of using of museum specimens to successfully increase knowledge. Development of working scientifically skills were evident whilst sparking curiosity and a passion for natural history. Learn about opportunities to showcase STEM careers (role of an entomologist) and link to work of famous scientists such as Carl Linnaeus. Many ideas can easily be replicated in the classroom and school grounds whilst demonstrating the benefits of collaboration with local museums and organisations.

All our resources are available to buy in our Primary Science Teaching Trust Trading Ltd. online shop. For more information please take a look at our resource pages:

www.pstt.org.uk/resources 36

Primary Science Education Conference 2019 37


PROGRAMME DETAILS DAY 1 – THURSDAY 6 JUNE 15:45 SESSION 2 REFLECTIVE SEMINARS EFFECTIVE PRIMARY SCIENCE SUBJECT LEADERSHIP ROOM: SIDLAW

Primary Science Quality Mark is a CPD programme that enables science subject leaders to develop and strengthen their leadership practice, whilst increasing the profile and quality of science within their school.

On completing PSQM, teachers from across the school were able to talk confidently about the changes and improvements to their science practice which had impacted positively on children’s learning. Head teacher - Hertingfordbury Cowper Primary School

PSQM will make a positive impact to science in your school whatever your starting point.

OVERVIEW The seminar will begin with a review of the academic literature relevant to the leadership of primary science and consider what effective primary science leadership might look like from a theoretical perspective. The second talk will consider the expectations which others, including senior leaders and OFSTED, will have of subject leaders. The CPD and distributed leadership which might support subject leaders to increase their effectiveness will also be discussed. The seminar will conclude with the findings of recent research into the way in which the Primary Science Quality Mark (PSQM) supports the development of the professional identity of science subject leaders in their roles as both leaders and science teachers. Consideration will be given to the elements of the (PSQM) and the contexts in which subject leaders work which offer affordances and constraints in such developments. Talk 1 – Derek Bell Subject leadership in primary schools is a relatively under researched area of study but, at the same time, it has a key role in successful teaching and learning across the curriculum. Based on research undertaken in primary schools in England, this talk will review and reflect on the development of the role, its challenges and its benefits. In particular the presentation will consider contrasting views on the tensions which arise for the vast majority of subject leaders who are also classroom teachers (see HammersleyFletcher & Brundrett, 2005, Busher and Harris, 2000)

Talk 3 – Clare Warren Bell and Ritchie (1999) describe subject leaders as “agents of change” and my PSQM experiences as both a participant and hub leader lead me to believe that PSQM is supportive of science subject leaders as they lead change in their schools. This prompted me to investigate the developing identity and agency of science subject leaders as they work towards gaining a PSQM award and the affordances and constraints which influence any such development. The results of my research will be shared. Chaired by Jane Turner References Bell, D. and Ritchie, R. (1999) Towards Effective Subject Leadership in the Primary School. Open University Press. Buckingham and Philadelphia Busher, H. and Harris, A. (2000) Subject Leadership and School Improvement. Paul Chapman Publishing Ltd., London Busher, H., Hammersley-Fletcher, L. and Turner, C. (2007) Making sense of middle leadership: community, power and practice, School Leadership and Management. Vol. 27, No. 5, pp. 405-422 Hammersley-Fletcher, L. and Brundrett, M. (2005) Leaders on leadership: the impressions of primary school head teachers and subject leaders. School Leadership and Management. Vol. 27, No. 5, pp. 423-435 Wellcome Trust (2017) ‘State of the nation’ report of UK primary science education. CFE research. London.

Talk 2 – Julia Burger In the primary settings the science subject leaders will usually assume responsibility for other roles in their schools. Despite performing multiple roles, effective subject leaders need to be aware of the expectations of senior leaders, colleagues, OFSTED and pupils. These expectations will be explored as will the CPD opportunities which should be available. The ways in which, through distributed leadership, subject leaders can not only raise the profile of science in school, but develop themselves as leaders will be considered. Finally, the talk will discuss preparation for a visit from Ofsted.

To start your PSQM journey register your interest now! www.PSQM.org.uk

m.nice@herts.ac.uk

01707 281034

@PSQM_HQ Primary Science Education Conference 2019 39


PROGRAMME DETAILS DAY 1 – THURSDAY 6 JUNE 15:45 SESSION 2 REFLECTIVE SEMINARS

REFLECTIVE SEMINARS

REVIEWING YOUR PRACTICE FROM DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVES

OUTDOOR LEARNING

ROOM: CARRICK 1

ROOM: HARRIS 2 Talk 1 – Jeannette Morgan Using the outcomes of the project ‘Let’s Go! Science Trails’, Jeannette will outline the benefits of taking children outdoors to learn science. The principles behind these science trails, and the new ‘Let’s Go! STEM Trails’ will be explored with reference to particular trails and the impact on learning associated with them. Talk 2 – Nicky Collins Nicky will describe the process of creating a science trail, using an example of one based on the seashore. She will share this trail and consider the science learning opportunities that can be provided through the seashore and other natural environments as well as more urban environments. Having taken part in a Bioblitz, where children and parents had the opportunity to work with marine biologists, Nicky will also describe her experiences of studying the biodiversity of an

area and to consider how this model could be applied in a school setting. She will share weblinks and other relevant material that could help teachers organise their own Bioblitz or become involved in a Bioblitz being run in their area. Her talk will consider which science objectives can be taught through this type of activity. Talk 3 – Leigh Hoath Much of the existing published work focusing on the outdoors relates to the children’s learning. Teachers often however talk of children’s behaviour being different or the challenges to managing the classroom outside. Leigh will discuss what an effective pedagogy for the outdoor setting looks like and the theoretical underpinnings of this. Her talk will suggest that in order to support children’s learning beyond the classroom the teachers’ teaching should be a priority in terms of adjusting practice and approaches. Chaired by Katherine Forsey

Out now from children’s poetry book specialists

The Emma Press:

OVERVIEW – talks presented by Sarah Frodsham and Clarysly Deller This seminar will focus on three different ways to gather data that can be used to assess the nature of impact teaching has on learning within a lesson teaching about evolution. However, the research instruments that will be considered include questionnaires; observations and interviews that could be applied to any lesson. There will be video clips that can be observed that will provide raw data. The ways that these three different kinds of research tools can be used to gather evidence to inform practice will be demonstrated. The wide range of data it is possible to collect with these tools will also be shared for participants to consider. The seminar will also give the opportunity to engage in some of the processes of analysis to ‘see’ how judgements about the impact of teaching on learning can be made. This could be useful for anyone interested in (1) engaging in action research (McGregor & Woodhouse 2015; Woodhouse & McGregor 2015; 2016) focused on improving practice, (2) consideration of the ways that challenging ideas (in this case evolution) in science can be addressed, and (3) reflecting on ways (McGregor & Cartwright 2011) to develop others’ practice.

Chaired by Kendra McMahon References McGregor, D. and Cartwright, L. (Eds) (2011) Developing Reflective Practice: A handbook for Beginning Teachers. 301 pp Buckingham : Open University Press Woodhouse, F. and McGregor, D. (2016) Action Research in the classroom 3 : Suggestions about collecting data in everyday science classroom situations. Education in Science. 263 p. 32- 33 Woodhouse, F. and McGregor, D. (2015) Action Research in the classroom 2 : Preparing to collect data. Education in Science. 261 p, 30 – 31 McGregor, D. and Woodhouse, F. (2015) Action Research in the classroom 1 : Introducing Action Research for Science teachers. Education In Science. 260 p. 30 – 31

Download our free STEM teaching and learning resources at stemresources.raeng.org.uk/resources

A new anthology of children’s poems designed to educate and excite readers about the wonders of insects. Fully illustrated, and featuring fun facts and poem-writing prompts. Edited by award-winning poet Isabel Galleymore and primary science specialist teacher Fran Long. Aimed at KS2. ISBN 978-1-912915-11-8 RRP £10.99

The Royal Academy of Engineering has developed its STEM-focused teaching and learning resources in partnership with teachers to help them engage and inspire their pupils with science and engineering. Each activity is linked to the National Curriculum and provides hands-on, engineering-themed learning to enhance and add context to lessons.

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PROGRAMME DETAILS DAY 1 – THURSDAY 6 JUNE 15:45 SESSION 2 PRACTICAL WORKSHOPS

PRACTICAL WORKSHOPS

TAPS: SUPPORTING PROGRESSION BY FOCUSING ON SCIENCE SKILLS

PLAYGROUND SCIENCE - ENABLING CHILD-LED ENQUIRY AT BREAKTIMES

SARAH EARLE, NEIL MCALLISTER AND HEATHER WHITE ROOM: HARRIS 1 AGE RANGE: 4-11

TOM HOLLOWAY ROOM: MOORFOOT AGE RANGE: 4-11

This workshop will explore how to select a focus for teaching and learning during practical activities, to support progression and assessment of enquiry skills. We will draw on the bank of TAPS Focused Assessment plans and examples, together with presenting new activities created as part of TAPS in Northern Ireland (TAPS-NI).

Playground science bags are a great new resource from the PSTT. They are a fantastic way of enabling your pupils to carry out their own scientific enquiries at break and lunchtimes. In this workshop you will be able to try out the different activities that the bags contain and receive practical advice on how to set them up in your school.

STANDING ON THE SHOULDERS OF GIANTS

DISCOVER THE NATURAL WORLD: BRINGING BIOLOGY INTO THE CLASSROOM

ALEX SINCLAIR AND ALISON TREW ROOM: TINTO AGE RANGE: 4-11

JOSEPH BURTON ROOM: OCHIL 1 AGE RANGE: 4-11

A workshop for teachers and schools to develop a methodology for using both famous and contemporary scientists in their science curriculum. We will share research-informed and trialled strategies of how to use scientists to model how to work scientifically. Delegates will take away resources which will provide a structure for an overall whole-school approach to teaching about scientists which demonstrates how scientific ideas have developed through time. In addition to this a number of practical activities will be provided which mimic how specific famous scientists worked. Activities are taken from the new PSTT resource, “Standing on the Shoulders of Giants”.

The Linnean Society offers free-to-hire resources across the UK with our Discovery Kit scheme, as well as free online activity packs, worksheets and videos. This workshop will take a look at the breadth of resources available to hire, giving a quick-fire CPD session and illustrating simple methods of bringing biology into the classroom, as well as integrating nature into other subjects.

SSERC AND CLEAPSS PRIMARY PRACTICAL WORKSHOP JASON HARDING, HAYLEY SHERRARD, MARIA PACK AND GEORGIE PARKER ROOM: CROMDALE (EXHIBITION HALL) AGE RANGE: 4-11

ROBIN JAMES ROOM: CARRICK 2 AGE RANGE: 4-11

A circus of activities for you to try which are often perceived as being tricky to deliver because of safety, or which are commonly delivered but where the safety is often ignored. In either case, you will leave the session knowing how to run the activities in your classroom and feeling reassured that they (and other practical activities) are all easy to implement safely. You will take away the practical procedures, including the model risk assessments, for each of the showcased activities.

Exciting ‘hands-on’ science activities often pass by in a flash, so how can teachers ensure the most is made from this learning through reflection and peer assessment? This project, funded by the Primary Science Teaching Trust, shows you how to make and use short films to stimulate children’s dialogue about their own and each other’s learning.

WRITING SCIENCE

DEVELOPING YOUR SCIENCE PEDAGOGY THROUGH THE SCOTTISH NATIONAL MODEL OF PROFESSIONAL LEARNING

RUTH SHALLCROSS ROOM: KILSYTH AGE RANGE: 7-11

ALISON WEATHERSTON AND LISE MCAFFERY ROOM: OCHIL 2 AGE RANGE: ALL

For primary aged children to write with a scientific voice, they need to understand the science subject matter that they wish to write about and the language demands of writing like a scientist. In this workshop we will use a range of strategies (including vocabulary, talk and drama) to support children’s understanding of the complex requirements of scientific writing. The approach has been used in a range of schools to achieve outstanding results in both scientific understanding and writing.

All national support programmes for Scottish educators provided by Education Scotland are underpinned by the national model of professional learning. Central to this model is the importance of practitioner as learner and the direct impact on learners. This workshop will explore how this model can be used a critical element of self-reflection and will support professionals to consider the development of pedagogy through the use of coaching tools. Participants in this workshop can then access these resources and further online tools to develop and support their understanding.

17:00

18:30

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LOOKING FOR LEARNING: A WAY TO PROMOTE PEER ASSESSMENT USING SHORT SELF-MADE FILMS

DRINKS RECEPTION IN THE EXHIBITION HALL HOSTED BY THE PRIMARY SCIENCE TEACHING TRUST END OF DAY ONE

Primary Science Education Conference 2019 43


PROGRAMME DETAILS

PSTT RESOURCE

DAY 2 – FRIDAY 7 JUNE

PLAYGROUND SCIENCE Self-directed activities to support learning in science and add purpose and enjoyment to playtimes

08:30

ARRIVAL AND REGISTRATION

Playground Science is a set of fun and informal science activities that children can carry out in their playtimes. The activities use simple instructions and a small amount of equipment to encourage the children to explore the world around them and to develop scientific skills. They are deliberately semi-structured so that children can follow the suggestions if they want, but they also have the option to make their own decisions about what to do. The children can do the activities independently or with other children.

09:00

KEYNOTE TALK – THE ANNE GOLDSWORTHY LECTURE DELIVERED BY PROFESSOR LAURA SCHULZ

WRITTEN BY TOM HOLLOWAY AND RUTH SHALLCROSS

Self-directed activities to support learning in science and add purpose and enjoyment to playtimes

The resource includes five printed drawstring bags (colours as shown), five activity cards and a teacher’s guide. The science equipment needed is not included.

TOM HOLLOWAY AND RUTH SHALLCROSS A Primary Science Teaching Trust Resource

Playground Science TG V6.indd 2

19/04/2019 09:21

LOWER PRIMARY

UPPER PRIMARY

LET’S EXPLORE WITH COLOUR PADDLES…

LET’S EXPLORE WITH STOPWATCHES…

THINGS YOU COULD EXPLORE…

THINGS YOU COULD EXPLORE…

What colours can you make when you overlap different colours? • How many colours did you make? • Can you overlap 3 or more colours? What happens?

What can you find in the playground that matches the colours on your paddles? • Which colour did you find the most? Why do you think this is? • Which colour did you find the least? Why do you think this is? • Is this the same all year round?

What colours are trees and plants? What colours are toys, buildings and cars? • Do you notice any patterns?

STAY SAFE • Don’t look at the Sun through the colour paddles.

LET’S LOOK

How many times can you throw and catch a ball in 30 seconds? • What factors do you think affect this? • How do you think it would be different on the Moon?

Look closely at a leaf. Look at it carefully for 10 seconds. Is it all the same colour or are there different colours or shades? What else do you notice after looking carefully? Ask a friend to mix your leaf with other leaves. Can you find your leaf?

How many times can your friend hop on one leg without needing to put their other foot down? • How could your friend increase the number of hops?

WHAT CAN YOU THINK OF?

STAY SAFE • Make sure that you have plenty of space if you’re going to do star jumps. • Be careful not to swing the stopwatches round by the strap.

LET’S WORK SCIENTIFICALLY… Here is an investigation you could do with stopwatches. 1. Collect some different objects (4 -5 is a good number) from around the playground that are suitable for dropping. Feathers, leaves, stones and twigs are great objects to use.

WHAT CAN YOU OF? 2. Drop an object and use the THINK stopwatch to time how long it takes the object to reach the ground. Record how long it takes to fall.

How many times do you breathe out in 30 seconds? • Is this the same as your friend? Why do you think it might be different? How many times do you breathe out if you do star jumps for 30 seconds? Why do you think this is different? • How do you think that this would be different on top of Everest?

• How do different colours make you feel?

LET’S THINK

Repeat 2 and record the results. Findthe thestopwatches? average of the results. • What ideas doxyou have for exploring using 3.questions Repeat step 2 forthe all the objects you found. • What about world around you would a stopwatch Which object took the longest time to fall? Why? Which object took the shortest time to fall? Why? help4.you to answer? 5. How could you improve your investigation? 6. How would you present your results? Share them with a friend or adult.

How many solids, liquids or gases can you find in 5 minutes? • What did you find the most of – solids, liquids or gases? Why do you think this is?

• Why are animals different colours? • Why do the leaves on some trees change colour? TOP TIPS…

Well done! You have just carried out a comparative test. TOP TIPS…

How many living things (organisms) can you find in 5 minutes? • What is the most common living thing that you found? Why do you think this is?

• Try exploring with the paddles in a shady place and then in a bright place. Do the colours look different?

• Practise exploring the stopwatches – do you know what each button does? If you’re stuck, who could you ask for help?

LET’S WONDER In your bag you should find: 2 or 3 stopwatches. If these are missing, please tell your teacher.

In your bag you should find: a set of different coloured, plastic paddles. If these are missing, please tell yourquestions teacher. What could you ask each other about colours in the world around you? KS1 Playground Science Cards V5.indd 1

Why… Where… How… When… What if… 18/04/2019 08:09

KS1 Playground Science Cards V5.indd 11

ROOM: PENTLAND THE SURPRISINGLY LOGICAL MINDS OF BABIES By the time children are five years-old, they have solved all the hard problems of cognitive science: problems of face recognition, natural scene understanding, motor planning, navigation, number understanding, causal reasoning, language acquisition, understanding others’ thoughts, desires, and feelings, and understanding right and wrong.  The rapidity, robustness, and flexibility of children’s learning exceeds anything mastered by our most powerful artificial intelligence systems – and yet children achieve this remarkable learning while they appear to be busy climbing on jungle gyms, playing with blocks, and talking to stuffed animals.  Here I will talk about children’s remarkable ability to draw rich, abstract inferences from sparse data – and the puzzling gap between our formal theories of learning and the actual behaviour of our most powerful learners.  I will point to the ways that children’s play has provided insight into the ways that they learn (and the many mysteries that remain), and I will show experiments looking at the relationship between uncertainty and children’s exploratory play, and trade-offs between exploration and instruction.  In the second part of the talk, I will discuss how children deploy some of their remarkable learning abilities to reason about their own and others’ goals, abilities, and emotions.  I will also introduce a new, open source, online developmental laboratory (Lookit!), which has the potential to expand both the questions we ask and the populations we reach.  I’ll end with some thoughts about what cognitive science has to offer education – and more importantly, the ways that educators might help transform the practice of cognitive science.  Finally, time allowing, I’ll show a few cartoons. LAURA SCHULZ is a Professor of Cognitive Science in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at MIT. She graduated from the University of Michigan with a degree in philosophy in 1992 and then spent seven years working part-time jobs at after school programs, summer camps, outdoor science schools, and agencies for youth-at-risk. She debated long and hard between a career as a camp director and graduate school but ultimately ended up with a PhD in developmental psychology from the University of California, Berkeley in 2004.  She started at MIT in 2005 and has been happily ensconced there ever since.  She is primarily interested in the problem of induction: how children learn so much from so little so quickly.  She has worked on exploration, play, and causal learning, and also on social cognition and emotion.  Her research is influenced by computational models of cognition and she is especially interested in bridging the gap between formal models of learning and children’s behaviour. She has been honoured with the American Psychological Association Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contributions to Psychology, the Society for Research in Child Development Award for Early Career Contributions, the Troland Award from the National Academy of Sciences, and the Presidential Award Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.  Her work has been featured in the New York Times, Scientific American, the Economist, the Time Magazine and TED.  However, she may be proudest of a series of cartoon shorts (Yana and Egbert) featured on Utah Educational Network, designed to promote STEM learning in young children. 

RESEARCH You could use the internet or non-fiction books to explore:

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• What happens if a hammer and a feather are dropped on the Moon at the same time. • How parachutes work and what difference the shape and design makes.

Primary Science Teaching Trust 12 Whiteladies Road Bristol, BS8 1PD www.pstt.org.uk

Primary Science Teaching Trust 12 Whiteladies Road Bristol, BS8 1PD www.pstt.org.uk

KS1 Playground Science Cards V5.indd 2

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MEET THE AUTHOR at the PSTT stand Thursday 1.30 – 1.50

KS1 Playground Science Cards V5.indd 12

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All our resources are available to buy in our Primary Science Teaching Trust Trading Ltd. online shop. For more information please take a look at our resource pages:

ANNE GOLDSWORTHY is one of the most highly regarded experts in the field of primary science and at PSTT we are delighted that she supports us in an advisory capacity. Anne is the creator of numerous excellent classroom resources and is an exceptional trainer and speaker. She has raised the confidence of countless teachers, providing manageable, practical and rigorous advice, and she reminds us all to keep the focus on children’s learning. Although she describes herself as ‘pretty much retired’, Anne continues to be an inspiration to all primary science educators.

www.pstt.org.uk/resources PSTT International Conference 2019 44

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PROGRAMME DETAILS DAY 2 – FRIDAY 7 JUNE 11:15 SESSION 3 10:30

REFLECTIVE SEMINARS

COFFEE/TEA IN THE EXHIBITION HALL SESSION 3

11:15

CHILDREN’S SCIENTIFIC QUESTIONING – ARE WE NEARLY THERE YET ROOM: TINTO

INTERACTIVE TALKS EARLY YEARS AND CREATIVITY

THE BRAIN AND LEARNING: WHAT DO TEACHING PROFESSIONALS REALLY NEED TO KNOW?

ESME GLAUERT ROOM: FINTRY

KENDRA MCMAHON AND ALISON LEE ROOM: CARRICK 1

This talk will provide an introduction to curriculum and training materials produced by the EU funded project Creativity in Early Years Science (2014-1017) designed to support creative, inquirybased approaches to early years science (children aged 3-8). It will include an overview of ways in which project materials were developed through partnerships between researchers, teachers, teacher educators and school leaders. Participants will be involved in discussion and practical activities to explore the nature of creative, inquiry-based approaches to learning and teaching. They will share classroom examples that illustrate both opportunities and challenges in fostering young children’s creativity in science.

We hear a lot about the brain and learning these days. How can we know what is true and how can we know what is useful to primary science education? This interactive talk will give an overview of what is known, how it is known, and what is still a mystery! We value science, but in education we value other things too - how can we use the science of learning in ways that we think are right? A primary science educator and neuropsychologist bring their perspectives together to discuss these issues with the audience.

TOWARDS DEVELOPING A MODEL TO ADDRESS THE CRISIS OF TEACHING AND LEARNING IN SCIENCE IN SOUTH AFRICAN SCHOOLS SHAHEED HARTLEY ROOM: OCHIL 3 The poor results of learners in science and mathematics at schools in South Africa have been a point of debate for many decades. This paper reports on an outreach project delivered by the University of the Western Cape’s Science Learning Centre to improve science teaching and learning in schools. This project serves to address the science education dilemma through a number of developmental stages. The first stage of the project involves the training of both primary and secondary science teachers to be confident, effective and efficient propagators of the science curriculum. The second stage involves providing opportunities for learners to engage with science and mathematics activities. The third stage to science development involves the construction of a science laboratory called a UWC science learning centre. The construction of a science learning centre provides the teachers and learners with a creative space in which the teaching and learning of science and mathematics can be harnessed.

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OVERVIEW This seminar project spotlights the scientific skill of child-led questioning. Wellcome (2017) suggest that child-led and child-designed investigations are undertaken ‘occasionally’ or ‘never’ in 47% of schools. Children’s question posing and devising investigations to answer them has been the basis of curriculum reform since Science 5/13 (1972). Although an intention in many curricula, evidence suggests that children still have limited opportunity for such activity (Biddulph, 1986; OFSTED 2013) Systematic evaluation of classroom-based science teaching and learning, drawn from SEERIH’s (University of Manchester) Deep Dives Project (2013-current) offers strong evidence of need for a powershift in primary classrooms as the flow of talk in the classroom is predominantly directed by the teacher and based on their levels of confidence, interests, and that which links most directly to pre-prepared resources and worksheets. Children’s ideas and questions are rarely authentically elicited and responded to as drivers for scientific investigations (OFSTED 2013). Recent evidence from the ‘Great Science Share for Schools’ national campaign showed that this offered increased opportunity for children to investigate their own scientific questions. The seminar explores current learning, experience and challenges to adopting this pedagogy in the primary classroom.

Talk 3 – Bryony Turford In this talk, the issues relating to progression in learning, when adopting a child-led approach to questioning and investigation will be explored. The talk will prompt participants to consider the expectations of learners when learning in this way and how teacher questioning and assessmentfor-learning approaches. This third talk in the seminar challenges us to review whether current assessment approaches in the primary years befits this model of pedagogy. Chaired by Sue Luke References

BIANCHI L (2013a) ‘The keys to Wonder-rich Science Learning’ in: EGAN K (Eds) Wonder-full Education, Imaginative Education Research Group, Vancouver with Open University Press. BIANCHI L (2013b), Working Wonders, Primary Science Journal, Association for Science Education, May/June, 128, 19-22) DEEP DIVES, Science & Engineering Education Research and Innovation Hub Professional Learning Programme, www.fascinate.manchester.ac.uk OFSTED (2013) Maintaining Curiosity: A Survey into Science Education in Schools, www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/379164/ Maintaining_20curiosity_20a_20survey_20into_20science_20education_20in_20schools. pdf WELLCOME TRUST (2017) State of the Nation Report of UK Primary Science Education, www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/education/research/aspires/ASPIRES-final-reportDecember-2013.pdf

Talk 1 – Dr Lynne Bianchi This introductory talk will explore the issue of child-led learning from a constructivist theoretical perspective. Drawing on a range of academic and professional publications, including that focusing on wonder-filled science education (Bianchi, 2013a and 2013b) as well as evidence drawn from direct experience working with in-service teachers on ‘Deep Dives’, the talk will set the scene - including perspectives, issues and challenges arising from this approach. Talk 2 – Dr Amy Bonsall This talk will focus on reviewing four principle papers guiding the research and development study into children’s scientific questioning. These papers form the basis for the QuSmart 2-year project, funded by the Primary Science Teaching Trust, and lead by SEERIH at The University of Manchester. In particular this talk explains the themes emergent from these papers and also the process through which practitioners have been supported to engage with research in the development of practice.

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T H E G R E AT S C I E N C E S H A R E F O R S C H O O L S G R E AT S C I E N C E S H A R E . O R G 18

T H

J U N E

PROGRAMME DETAILS DAY 2 – FRIDAY 7 JUNE 11:15 SESSION 3 REFLECTIVE SEMINARS

2 019

PRIMARY SCIENCE CAPITAL: A WHOLE SCHOOL TEACHING APPROACH ROOM: SIDLAW

Let’s make this Great Science Share for Schools the greatest! The Great Science Share for Schools offers an opportunity for young people to communicate their scientific questions and investigations in their own words and ways.

It’s ethos is: CHILD-LED SCIENCE COMMUNICATION TO NEW AUDIENCES INCLUSIVE AND NON-COMPETITIVE PROMOTES COLLABORATION Teachers and educators anywhere are invited to take part! It’s simple and adaptable - hosted in schools, community settings, Universities and STEM organisations, the Great Science Share for Schools can be moulded to suit your setting.

W H AT

S H O U L D

YO U

D O ?

Register involvement now at greatscishare2019.eventbrite.co.uk Visit greatscienceshare.org for more information and to download resources Follow us on social media:

OVERVIEW The concept of science capital is a way of encapsulating all the science related knowledge, attitudes, experiences and social contacts that an individual may have. To help more students engage with science, the Science Capital Teaching Approach builds on good teaching practice. Professor Louise Archer will give an introduction to science capital and the Science Capital Teaching Approach which, to date, has been secondary focussed. Paul Tyler will share experiences of developing science capital at Mearns Primary in Glasgow and Ruth Shallcross will share experiences of working with diverse schools across London and the South East. The session will explore some of the nuances of developing science capital in a primary setting ahead of the UCL & Kings KCL Research and Development Project funded by The Primary Science Teaching Trust and The Ogden Trust Project. Talk 1 – Professor Louise Archer Professor Louise Archer joined the UCL Institute of Education (IOE) in March 2017 as Karl Mannheim Professor of Sociology of Education. As a researcher her work focuses on educational identities and inequalities, particularly in relation to gender, ethnicity and social class. She is passionate about social justice approaches to education and to the potential for academic research to ‘make a difference’ to educational policy and practice. Science capital is a concept that can help us understand patterns in science participation - why some people engage with science and others do not. In particular, it helps shed light on why particular social groups remain underrepresented in post-16 science, and why many young people do not see science careers as being ‘for me’, nor see themselves as a ‘science person’. The original science capital project focused on developing the secondary Science Capital Teaching Approach which was co-developed with 43 science teachers in diverse settings. From September 2019, the focus will be on developing the Science Capital Teaching Approach for the primary setting. In addition to her work on science capital, her role involves directing three large national research projects (ASPIRES 2, Enterprising Science, and Youth Equity & STEM).

Talk 2 – Paul Tyler Paul Tyler is a teacher, and science co-coordinator, at Mearns Primary school in East Renfrewshire. He will outline how his school have been developing a science capital teaching approach over the last two years and the impact it is having on pupils. Paul will discuss the initial survey of pupils that was carried out, the planning and resources that the school have developed, and the training that has been delivered to staff. He will outline the challenges faced by staff and the areas of success. The school have had a lot of success with developing STEM partnerships, which has had a huge impact on pupils’ science capital and their aspirations in science. Talk 3 – Ruth Shallcross Ruth has been Regional Mentor for London and the South East for PSTT since September 2017. Since taking up the role she has coached and mentored a range of colleagues in the development of primary science teaching and learning, and science subject leadership; her focus is on the empowerment of colleagues and building capacity. Ruth is passionate about helping all children to succeed and seeks to achieve this through creative approaches to teaching often using cross-curricular links to deepen engagement. Ruth feels that the Science Capital Teaching Approach provides an excellent framework for creating equity in the primary science classroom. Chaired by Louise Stubberfield

@greatscishare #GreatSciShare #AskAQuestion @greatscishare @GreatSciShare4Schools

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PROGRAMME DETAILS DAY 2 – FRIDAY 7 JUNE 11:15 SESSION 3 PRACTICAL WORKSHOPS THE ASE PLAN RESOURCES

FAIRYTALES WHERE PROBLEMS ARE NOT SOLVED BY MAGIC BUT BY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

NAOMI HISCOCK ROOM: HARRIS 1 AGE RANGE: 7-11

JITKA HOUFKOVÁ ROOM: KILSYTH AGE RANGE: 7-11

The ASE’s PLAN resources have been developed to support teachers to confidently assess the knowledge content of the English national curriculum. The resource contains planning sheets and collections of evidence to show how teachers have supported children to become secure. The PLAN team are continuously working on new collections which can be used flexibly in schools for planning, assessment, moderation and CPD. This workshop will ensure participants are familiar with the full range of resources available and have time to share how they have used them or reflect on how they could be used in their schools.

As well as hands-on experimenting children love fairy tales and stories. Therefore we have joined both together and developed and tested stories, where problems are not solved by magic but by physics experiments. The experiments used in the stories are not thematically chosen but are used to solve the situations where in classical tales magic is used thus the experiments represent different parts of physics. At the workshop the well-known children fairy tales as well as newly developed stories with experiments will be introduced and the participants will try to do the experiments themselves.

TAILORING SCIENCE LEARNING TO BE SUITABLE TO THE ADDITIONAL SUPPORT NEEDS OF CHILDREN WITH LEARNING DIFFICULTIES

SUNSPACEART – INSPIRING CHILDREN AND IGNITING THEIR SCIENTIFIC CURIOSITY

SINEAD RHODES ROOM: MOORFOOT AGE RANGE: 7-11

DR HELEN E. MASON WITH HELEN SCHELL ROOM: OCHIL 2 AGE RANGE: 7-11

Learning difficulties such as those associated with autism, ADHD, and DCD are very common with one in every five children affected. Children with these conditions show characteristic profiles in language, cognition, motor learning, sensory processing and anxiety that impact how they learn academic subjects including science. This workshop will explore the typical profiles children with one or more of these conditions have in relation to learning science. The workshop will have a strong practical focus with participants working through case examples in small groups. Guidance will be provided for tailoring teaching to meet the additional support needs of these children.

The SunSpaceArt project brings together scientists and artists to run workshops in primary schools (7-11 year olds). The project, funded by STFC (Science and Technology Facilities Council), is led by Dr Helen Mason OBE. The feedback has been excellent from teachers and children, e.g. ‘Today I loved this lesson because the science and art inspired me’. The resources link closely to the Science National Curriculum. Through these creative STEAM activities, the children have produced impressive, original, imaginative and beautiful art that communicates a deeper understanding of the Sun, the solar system, space travel, polar science and ‘Our Place in the Universe’.

EXPLORING CHEMISTRY IN SEND SCHOOLS DR SARAH BEARCHELL ROOM: CROMDALE (EXHIBITION HALL) AGE RANGE: ALL SEND School teachers told me they needed free, simple, hands-on, adaptable science lesson plans which were also easy to prepare and low cost. So I wrote some, with the help of funding from the Royal Society of Chemistry and the input of classroom staff and pupils. Together we have created a booklet of six hands-on chemistry lessons for use throughout mixed-ability SEND schools and in mainstream primary schools. Come along to get a copy of the lessons and to test some for yourself. Be prepared to get your hands in something squishy!

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PRACTICAL WORKSHOPS Two for One! This session will include two half hour workshops ROOM: HARRIS 2

Two for One! This session will include two half hour workshops ROOM: CARRICK 3

WHERE THE GREAT FIRE OF LONDON MEETS SCIENCE ENQUIRY

CAN YOU TELL WHO’S MORE CREATIVE THAN ME?

KATHY SCHOFIELD AGE RANGE: 4-11

PEDRO ZANY CALDEIRA AND ANA PAULA BOSSLER AGE RANGE: 4-11

Health and Hygiene in 1666; an interactive workshop outlining a programme of investigations linked to the Great Fire of London. From decaying food to cleaning teeth this workshop will provide teachers with a wealth of ideas to help bring 1666 and Stuarts to life through science related to the children’s everyday experiences. Participants will experience first-hand investigations via a carousel of activities linked to boats, spread of diseases, the combustion triangle and teeth. Plus they will leave with copies of other investigations to try out back at school.

The participants will be challenged to make three drawings. The drawings will correspond to three different challenges. According to our experience, the answer to each of these challenges will be relatively diverse: some drawings will be relatively common, while others will be very resourceful. The ingenuity of the answers will correspond to different degrees of creativity. Later on typical drawings of children from 9 to 11 years of age will be presented and compared to the drawings made by the participants of our presentation: The drawings of the participants will be much more creative than the drawings of the children.

SWINGING SIXTIES SCIENCE

ORIGAMI SCIENCE

MICHELE GRIMSHAW AGE RANGE: 7-11

ANTHONY ARTIST AGE RANGE: 4-11

The Space Race, World Cup Final, flavoured crisps and heart transplants. These are some of the topics fuelled by historical events of the 1960s which can be used to inspire teachers’ and their pupils to discover more about this era whilst linking to the science curriculum for upper KS2. A practical workshop with suggestions for investigations and also ideas for linking different writing genres and speaking and listening activities.

Teach science with minimal resources! All schools have paper, so why not put it to good use and teach science through origami? During the workshop, participants will create a penguin, fly, food chain, fortune teller, and samurai helmet. Teachers will experience how creating simple objects using nothing more than folded paper can support student learning across Years 1 to 4. This workshop will provide teachers with practical ideas that link to a variety of programmes of study, such as identifying animals, food chains, animal offspring, functions of flowering plants, and grouping and classifying living things and objects.

CO-PRESENTED BY NAOMI SHALLCROSS

SCIENCE THROUGH INSECTS: BEYOND THE BUG HUNT

SMELLY SCIENCE

LUKE TILLEY ROOM: CARRICK 2 AGE RANGE: 7-11

TIM HARRISON ROOM: OCHIL 1 AGE RANGE: 7-11

Eighty percent of the world’s animals are insects. Insects are biologically fascinating and essential to life on earth. For most children their insect education starts and ends with the bug hunt. Whilst nothing can or should replace the joy of going outside and looking for invertebrates. This workshop will provide an opportunity to test and use some of the new resources from the Royal Entomological Society, bringing insect science (entomology) into the classroom. The aim of the resources is to promote curiosity of the natural world, and to deepen children’s understanding of insects and many fundamental scientific concepts.

The workshop will outline the science behind smell and fragrances, and afford the opportunity for teachers to touch upon the stages required to design and blend their own fragrance. The purpose is to upskill teachers and others so they can talk effectively and correctly about this interesting topic to their children. The small bottle of fragrance produced will be available to be taken away with the course delegate. Delegates will need to bring a small bottle of water with them.

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PROGRAMME DETAILS THE PSTT CHILDREN’S CONFERENCE AT PSEC

DAY 2 – FRIDAY 7 JUNE

12:30

FRIDAY 7TH JUNE 2019

LUNCH – SERVED IN THE EXHIBITION HALL

PSTT’s commitment to improving the science education of all children in the UK includes educating children about our planet and their role in looking after it.

A LUNCHTIME BONUS IN THE EXHIBITION HALL Come to stand A28 to see a selection of excellent suggestions and resources for delivering exciting practical science lessons. PRACTICAL PICK AND MIX

STAND A28 EXHIBITION HALL

FINDING THE SCIENCE: PRACTICAL IDEAS FOR EYFS

MILK – AND ALL THE GOOD THINGS MILK IS “RESPONSIBLE” FOR

CHRIS LAWSON

LEENA BROELL

Come and find out more about using stories in EYFS as a basis for practical, adult-led activities that encourage children to investigate, work scientifically and use simple scientific vocabulary.

Come and find out how to make butter, buttermilk, curd cheese and whey quickly and easily in a way that is highly fascinating for children? Leena will show you how children can learn how versatile milk is, what products are made from it and that it can be found in many foods – even in those where you would not expect it at first glance. Using special work sheets without text, means that the project can be done in the early years.

ORIGAMI SCIENCE

STEMASTORY

ANTHONY ARTIST

ALEX MCLAUGHLIN

Teach science with minimal resources! All schools have paper, so why not put it to good use and teach science through origami? Come and have a go at creating a penguin, fly, food chain, fortune teller, or samurai helmet and learn more about how using nothing more than folded paper can support children’s learning in a variety of programmes of study, such as identifying animals, food chains, animal offspring, functions of flowering plants, and grouping and classifying living things and objects.

STEMaStory uses books and texts as a context to deliver practical interdisciplinary STEM activities which develop scientific enquiry skills all whilst being easy to resource and aligned to the curriculum. Come and see some practical activities, supported by task cards, which can be used in a variety of ways in the classroom.

THE PSTT CHILDREN’S CONFERENCE AT PSEC The PSTT Children’s Conference at PSEC will be in the Strathblane hall on Friday 7th June. Groups of children from approx. 20-25 primary schools will be presenting their science projects based on a climate change issue local to them. Delegates can come and talk to the children about their work at any time over lunchtime. This is also an option for the session at 1.30.

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Over 200 schools have taken part in a climate change project in which they have carried out a scientific investigation into how to address a climate change issue that is local to their area. 120 children from 20 schools have been selected to present their projects to each other and to all the teachers at the conference. We warmly welcome the children and their teachers from these schools and we encourage all delegates to talk to the children and find out more about their projects, either during the lunchtime or in session 4.

The climate change project pack contains a wealth of project ideas and supporting resources to enable schools to set up their own projects that are relevant to issues in their locality. It includes links to the best online materials, templates and a special ‘Topical Science Update’ relating to climate change. The project pack is still available as a free downloadable pdf. Please visit www.primaryscienceconference.org/programme/ pstt-childrens-conference-psec to register your school and download the pack.

CHILDREN’S CONFERENCE TIMETABLE For participating schools only, apart from the showcase for PSEC delegates from 12.30 – 14.15 9:15 – 9:45

Schools arrive and set up their project displays in the Strathblane Hall

10.00 – 11.20

Presentations in Lecture Theatre 1. Three schools to present their projects 2. Heather Reid – Ocean Acidification 3. Dudley Shallcross - Atmospheric Pollution Effects

11:20 – 11:45

Schools’ Lunchtime in the Strathblane Hall

11:45 – 12:25

‘Schools’ Showcase open for schools to look at each other’s projects STEM careers zone open

12:30 – 14.15

SCHOOLS’ SHOWCASE OPEN FOR PSEC DELEGATES Lunchtime from 12.30 – 13.30 Session 4 from 13.30 – 14.15

14.15 - 14.30

Schools pack up their project displays

14:30 – 15:10

Science Show in Lecture Theatre

15:15 – 15:30

Schools depart

Primary Science Education Conference 2019 53


PROGRAMME DETAILS

PSTT RESOURCE

DAY 2 – FRIDAY 7 JUNE 13:30 SESSION 4

See Through Science See Through Science is a fabulous set of fifteen high-resolution digital images (included with the book as a digital download). The book is packed with practical advice for teachers about using the image pack to develop children’s observation, questioning and discussion skills. These photographic images provide a fantastic hook to science lesson topics that are accessible to all children.

The images have been selected to be inspiring and thought-provoking. They cover a range of scientific phenomena, enabling children to explore and discuss science in a variety of contexts, and to appreciate many different applications of science. Each image comes with associated background information and key scientific words.

The images inspire awe and wonder while developing questioning and explaining.

WRITTEN BY PAUL TYLER AND ALEX FARRER See Through Science image pack sample slides See Through Science

KEY WORDS

HABITATS

EARTH & SPACE

ROCKS

SENSES

ENERGY

CHANGING MATERIALS

ANIMALS

LIGHT

MATERIALS

ANIMALS – SIMILARITIES & DIFFERENCES

ELECTRICITY

THE ENVIRONMENT

PLANTS

FORCES

CHEMICAL REACTIONS

See Through Science sample pages

What happened here?

rubbish environment recycle pollution decompose biodegradable nonbiodegradable plastic synthetic

KEY WORDS

What happened here?

rubbish environment recycle pollution decompose biodegradable nonbiodegradable plastic synthetic

Plastic rubbish is everywhere. A great deal of the rubbish that a household throws away each day can be recycled or reused, such as paper, metal or many plastics. Some items cannot be recycled at the moment and go to landfill. The public are now becoming more aware of the problems with plastic pollution and how plastics are making their way into food chains. The plastic problem is a world-wide problem though. It takes about 20 years for a plastic bag to decompose and about 450 years for some types of plastic bottles to decompose. Plastic is

cheap to make, flexible, lightweight, waterproof, strong and can be moulded, so it is no wonder it has so many uses. What can be done about the world-wide plastic problem? Information for teachers (with some hard-hitting images) can be found here: The Plastic Tide >

SUPPLEMENTARY QUESTIONS

FOLLOW-ON ACTIVITIES

KEY WORDS

What do you know about this topic? How long does it take for a plastic bottle to decompose? In what ways is your family helping combat the plastic problem? What do you think should be done about the plastic problem?

Try the Terrific Scientific Plastics activity here:

rubbish

biodegradable

environment recycle

nonbiodegradable

pollution

plastic

decompose

synthetic

BBC >

RATIONALE RATIONALEFOR FOR SEE SEETHROUGH THROUGHSCIENCE SCIENCE

See Through Science

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They Theyallow allowchildren childrento tosee seeunusual unusualthings thingsinindifferent differentcontexts contextsand andbecause becausethey theyare arestatic, static,they theyenable enable children childrento tofocus focuson onsmall smalland andoften oftenunnoticed unnoticedfeatures. features.This Thisleads leadsto toexcellent excellentopportunities opportunitiesfor fordetailed detailed observation, observation,description descriptionand anddiscussion. discussion.Using Usingphotographic photographicimages imagesalso alsogives givesthe theoption optionto tozoom zoomininto to see seedetail detailand andzoom zoomout outto tosee seethe thewhole wholecontext. context.This Thisallows allowschildren childrento tostudy studyminute minutedetail detailwithin withinaalarger larger context. context.For Forencouraging encouragingobservation observationofofreally reallyfine finedetail, detail,electron electronmicrographs micrographsshowing showinghighly highlymagnified magnified objects objectsor ormaterials materialscan canbe beused. used.Micrographs Micrographsopen openup upaawhole wholenew newand andamazing amazingworld worldthat thatchildren childrenmay may never neverbefore beforehave haveenvisaged. envisaged.

Using Usingscientific scientificvocabulary vocabulary

INTERACTIVE TALKS RIGHT FROM THE START: PLAY, RELATIONSHIPS AND LEARNING

THERE IS NO PLANET B: LISTEN TO THE CHILDREN THEY WANT TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE

PAUL RAMCHANDANI ROOM: SIDLAW

IAN MILNE ROOM: FINTRY

Giving children the best start in life and preparing them to take life’s opportunities and deal with its challenges is central to what all of us in education, child care and health services aspire to achieve. To help children to learn, but also to develop as people, requires us to grapple with evidence and to focus on what are the best ways for children to learn and develop.

This talk presents both the student and teacher voice as the narrative of an organic teaching and learning intervention that sought to seamlessly integrate science, mathematics, literacy and technology into a blended learning schools generic inquiry programme. Rationales for the changes to both teacher and children’s learning roles and core conceptual ideas are identified and discussed as exemplars of the children learning scientifically are shared and discussed.

In this talk I will present evidence assessing the role that play and relationships have in child development - right from the start of life. This includes during pregnancy and into the postnatal period, where the quality of early play-based interactions of mother, fathers and their infants predict a range of later outcomes for children, including important aspects of their cognitive development and emotional and social development. I hope to make the case that finding the right place for play is critical for all aspects of children’s development.

THE IMPORTANCE OF EXCELLENT STORYTELLING IN SCIENCE (WITH A FOCUS ON THE KS2 TOPIC OF EVOLUTION)

What happened here?

WHY WHYUSE USEPHOTOGRAPHIC PHOTOGRAPHICIMAGES? IMAGES?

SESSION 4

13:30

JULES POTTLE AND RUFUS COOPER ROOM: TINTO Novels, picture books and oral stories can all provide a context for science learning, but what makes an excellent science story? How can non-fiction be used in the same way as a narrative? How can we best use stories to engage primary children (and their teachers) in science? This interactive session, with some take-home ideas for use in the primary classroom, will answer some of these questions. Jules will also showcase a new picture book, developed with illustrator and primary science teacher Rufus Cooper on the topic of evolution and show how this book can be used with KS2 children.

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Using photographic images to engage and inspire children to ask scientific questions about the world around them

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ALEX FARRER AND PAUL TYLER A Primary Science Teaching Trust Resource

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MEET THE AUTHOR at the PSTT stand Saturday 1.30 – 1.50

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All our resources are available to buy in our Primary Science Teaching Trust Trading Ltd. online shop. For more information please take a look at our resource pages:

www.pstt.org.uk/resources 54

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PROGRAMME DETAILS

PSTT RESOURCE

DAY 2 – FRIDAY 7 JUNE 13:30 SESSION 4

THE MOLLIEBIRD

REFLECTIVE SEMINARS

An evolution story

UNDERSTANDING CHILDREN BETTER TO SUPPORT PROGRESS IN THEIR LEARNING ROOM: OCHIL 3 Talk 1 – Zoe Crompton This seminar considers children’s interest in science and nature, illustrated by data from one case study child. The evidence is drawn from a larger qualitative study that tracks a group of eight children’s emerging interest in science from the age of 5 to 7 years old. The purpose of the study is to gain a greater understanding of the ways in which children express their interest in science. Using a creative multi-method tool to collect data, I have viewed a child’s world through a number of different windows – the child’s own words and actions, and the words of her parents and teaching staff. Findings suggest that there is a mismatch between adults’ perceptions of a child’s interests and the child’s self-perception, which has implications for early years practice.

Talk 2 – Craig Martin This interactive talk (requiring audience participation) will explore ways of assessing children’s argumentation - reasoning skills - within a socio-scientific context. Through a number of practical examples, together we will explore the ModTAP Analytical Framework as a tool for assessing children’s understanding of the world around them. The use of the framework allows classroom practitioners to ascertain individual/ group levels of knowledge and understanding, which guides appropriate differentiated teaching, leading to up-levelling of the children’s socioscientific reasoning skills. This interactive talk will provide an insight into ways to discretely raise attainment not only in S.T.E.M based subjects but across the curriculum. Chaired by Jo Moore

Beautifully written as a narrative poem by PSTT Fellow Jules Pottle, and exquisitely illustrated by PSTT Fellow Rufus Cooper, The Molliebird tells the story of natural selection. After a natural disaster that leaves her badly camouflaged in her surroundings, the bright blue Molliebird becomes desperate for her babies to survive. She notices that brown baby birds thrive, and so tries painting herself brown in the hope that her babies will be born brown, and she is devastated when this does not work. The Molliebird provides a highly engaging fictional context for discussion about evolution. The story skilfully supports teachers with how to identify and address children’s misconceptions about inheritance and changes within species. The free to download teacher’s handbook includes background information, additional supporting ideas and cross-curricular activities. WRITTEN BY JULES POTTLE ILLUSTRATED BY RUFUS COOPER

SUPPORTING TEACHERS AS PROFESSIONALS ROOM: CARRICK 1 Talk 1 – George Walsh Our psychological health exerts a powerful influence on our quality of life, relationships, work performance and physical health. Teaching can be a stressful occupation and teacher well-being has significant implications for the individual teacher, their colleagues, their students and the school more broadly. The research shows how teacher well-being directly correlates with student achievement; the higher the teacher morale, the greater the student achievement. Teachers can benefit from proven techniques to manage high workload, difficult conversations and demanding deadlines.

Talk 2 – Sue Marks As research enlightens us as to the processes of learning, making memories, learning engagement, short term to long term memory transfer, memory recall and much else, we are challenged to reflect upon and consider together, as professionals, the effect of our classroom approaches to teaching and learning. Research notes the importance of prior learning and the use of stories to provide chronology and context to new learning as key strategies for successfully embedding memories and retaining learning. Whilst the ‘super factor’ of Collective Teacher Efficacy, also suggests that when teachers are united in their desire to continuously improve their professional performance and develop as a collective, they offer their pupils the best opportunities for learning. The Primary Science Teaching Trust embodies this philosophy providing opportunities for the sharing of effective strategies and engagement in open discourse to continually reflect upon and improve our professional practice together. Chaired by Lynne Bianchi

MEET THE AUTHOR at the PSTT stand Friday 1.00 – 1.20

All our resources are available to buy in our Primary Science Teaching Trust Trading Ltd. online shop. For more information please take a look at our resource pages:

www.pstt.org.uk/resources 56

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PROGRAMME DETAILS DAY 2 – FRIDAY 7 JUNE 13:30 SESSION 4 PRACTICAL WORKSHOPS

PRACTICAL WORKSHOPS

BRINGING THE WONDER OF THE JURASSIC COAST TO YOUR CLASSROOM

HELP! HOW CAN I GET MORE SCIENCE INTO MY TEACHING?

SCIENCE OUT OF THE BOX

SCIENCE IN MY POCKET

CAROL SAMPEY ROOM: HARRIS 1 AGE RANGE: 7-11

LOUISE STUBBERFIELD ROOM: CARRICK 2 AGE RANGE: 4-11

P STEWART/ N WHITE ROOM: HARRIS 2 AGE RANGE: 7-11

NINA SPILSBURY ROOM: MOORFOOT AGE RANGE: 4-11

Have you ever wished that you lived closer to the Jurassic Coast so that you could inspire children to learn about rocks and fossils? In this practical workshop you will try out some of the activities from the FREE Big Jurassic Classroom resources which will not only support you to deliver high quality teaching and learning but also help you to make the most of your own locality. Find out how to borrow the new Rocks and Fossil Boxes from the Jurassic Coast Trust and make creative Cross-Curricular links in Literacy, Numeracy, Geography and Art and Design.

A hands-on fast-paced session to help you get the most out of a completely free digital resource, Explorify, from Wellcome. There’s never enough time in the timetable, so how can we support children to apply their learning in different contexts and show them that science is all around them, as well as developing much needed highly transferable skills? This interactive session will help you understand how Explorify’s easy-to-use activities can help you and your colleagues deliver great science, and develop much needed thinking and communication skills along the way. You’ll enhance your teaching, and your pupils will love it too!

East Ayrshire Learning Outdoors Support Team have developed a set of 6 Science boxes to help Primary Teachers take their Science lessons outdoors. The strands covered at three levels are; Biodiversity, Forces, Space, Vibrations and Waves, Senses and Properties and use of materials. Each box contains a set of resources and lessons plans. The worksheet will be a practical, hands on session where you will get a chance to try out many of the resources and also be able to discuss the scientific ideas behind each of the lessons.

THE UNIVERSE IS MADE OF LEGO! THE ELEMENTS AND THE PERIODIC TABLE AT PRIMARY SCHOOL

ENGAGING LEARNERS THROUGH CROSS-CURRICULAR REAL LIFE PROBLEMS

JOHN SANDFORD ROOM: OCHIL 1 AGE RANGE: 7-11

JOSH PAYNE AND JENNIE DEVINE ROOM: CROMDALE (EXHIBITION HALL) AGE RANGE: 4-11

Science in My Pocket is a set of structured activities for primary school teaching assistants to use with individual children who for whatever reason need to leave the classroom. The workshop aims to practically share with you some of the materials and examine the research and the outcome of trials in a variety of school settings. You will see how the materials aims to help children to develop the personal skills and habits of mind to enable them to be self-regulating and motivated learners. To use engagement with science to help deal with their own emotional and/or behavioural difficulties. Like the children you will explore science concepts through small focused practical activities. The workshop will demonstrate how the materials support teaching assistants to develop new strategies to work on a one-to-one basis with children in their care whose emotional/behavioural difficulties prevent them from accessing the curriculum in the classroom.

LITERACY IN SCIENCE – A NATIONAL LITERACY TRUST WORKSHOP

LINKING SCIENCE AND LITERACY FOR IMPROVED STUDENT OUTCOMES

Actually, there’s very little Lego involved! It’s 150 years since the development of the periodic table. Although we provide children with maps of what the world looks like, we often hold off before a child experiences this ‘map’ of the building blocks of the entire universe! Frequently, the periodic table is stuck into the secondary science book with the expectation that they’ll just ‘get it’. This workshop will try to encourage an elementary (pun intended) understanding of the elements and the periodic table at primary school level. Most definitely NOT for chemistry geeks - but they’re welcome too!

Join Josh & Jennie from the NFU Education team in dreaming up your own Great British food start up. While you cook and taste test your first ever product, they will guide you through their new cross-curricular project-based STEM scheme of work that uses real life problems faced by the nation’s farmers and business owners as engaging contexts for learning. Expect a session of ideas for exciting practical activities and projects and a free scheme of teaching and learning resources, allowing you to infuse your wider curriculum with engaging STEM learning opportunities.

CATHARINE DRIVER AND RUTH SHALLCROSS ROOM: KILSYTH AGE RANGE: 7-11

BILL BADDERS ROOM: OCHIL 2 AGE RANGE: 4-11

EEF/Royal Society research published in 2017 found that the strongest factor affecting pupil achievement in science was understanding scientific vocabulary and written texts. This workshop uses evidence-based research to investigate effective literacy strategies for teaching and learning in science. Participants will explore a toolkit of resources to support direct teaching of subject - specific vocabulary and ways of reading non- fiction science texts. All teaching and learning approaches will focus on key scientific text types, supporting teachers to deconstruct, annotate and create useful models of science information reports, explanations and comparisons.

Come explore strategies for linking science and literacy that support students’ abilities to read, write, and discuss in the context of science and inquiry-based learning using fiction and non-fiction texts. Hands-on examples of how science supports literacy and literacy supports science will be used.

THE PSTT CHILDREN’S CONFERENCE AT PSEC The PSTT Children’s Conference at PSEC will be in the Strathblane hall on Friday 7th June. Groups of children from approx. 20-25 primary schools will be presenting their science projects based on a climate change issue local to them. Delegates can come and talk to the children about their work at any time over lunchtime.

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PROGRAMME DETAILS

PSTT RESOURCE

SCIENCE IN MY POCKET Science In My Pocket: a box of structured science activities for teaching assistants to use with children who need emotional and behavioural support. Science In My Pocket offers an invaluable addition to a teaching assistant’s toolkit. Schools have a critical role to play in supporting children’s mental health and emotional wellbeing. The classroom can be a challenging place for many children and it often falls to a teaching assistant to supervise them and support their learning on a oneto-one or small group basis. Science In My Pocket has been shown to support children to become better at selfregulating their behaviour, enabling them to return to a whole class setting more ready to learn and participate.

SCIENCE IN MY POCKET STRUCTURED SCIENCE ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT TEACHING ASSISTANTS WORKING WITH CHILDREN WITH EMOTIONAL AND BEHAVIOURAL NEEDS

Guide for teachers and teaching assistants

SCIENCE

NINA SPILSBURY AND MICHELE GRIMSHAW

MEET THE AUTHOR at the PSTT stand Saturday 1.30 – 1.50

Science In My Pocket consists of a guidebook for teachers and teaching assistants, a poster and a box of ten cloth pockets, each containing carefully designed and simple activities that can be used with children from nursery up to year 6. They can be used once or repeated multiple times. They can be used indoors and outdoors, and most involve moving around which suits the needs of many children. WRITTEN BY NINA SPILSBURY AND MICHELE GRIMSHAW All our resources are available to buy in our Primary Science Teaching Trust Trading Ltd. online shop. For more information please take a look at our resource pages:

www.pstt.org.uk/resources

DAY 2 – FRIDAY 7 JUNE 15:30 SESSION 5 14:45

COFFEE/TEA IN THE EXHIBITION HALL SESSION 5

15:30

INTERACTIVE TALKS Two for One! This session will include two half hour talks ROOM: OCHIL 1

ATTENTION PLEASE! A FOCUSED APPROACH TO INCLUSIVE TEACHING AND LEARNING PRIMARY SCIENCE

TALK 1: USING STEM TO ENRICH AND SUPPORT CROSS-PHASE INITIATIVES

JOELLE HALLIDAY, ANDY BULLOUGH, GREGORY MACE AND SAM KENNY

RACHEL WOOLFORD

ROB FLOYD ROOM: HARRIS 2 Primary Science for All (PSFA) is a project to develop adaptable resources to help children to focus on exploration and enquiry. Members of the PSFA community will describe how they have collaborated to develop innovative approaches to address some of the challenges of engaging in enquiry activities and demonstrating progress. We will explore thinking frames and the wonder cupboard and explain how we think they help children to focus on their science learning. There will be an opportunity to learn about the project, explore the resources, and reflect on how they might be used and adapted for your setting.

Primary Science Transition - How do I do it? Why would I want to do it? Will it benefit my pupils? Come along, find out and discuss the answers to these and other questions surrounding cluster primary to secondary science transition. Hear about two successful year 6 / P7 transition projects that evolved from primary and engaged pupils, promoted science skills and collaboration and shared their success with parents. Find out about using kitchen science resources – not expensive hard to access equipment! Interested? Got questions? Want to create your own transition project?

A Primary Science Teaching Trust Resource

LET’S TALK ABOUT ANIMALS AND THEIR LIFESTYLES

TALK 2: USING STEM TO ENRICH AND SUPPORT CROSS-PHASE INITIATIVES

STUART NAYLOR ROOM: FINTRY

SHARON SMITH

Teaching about animals and their lifestyles isn’t as easy as it looks. There’s lots of information for children to grapple with, there aren’t many obvious practical investigations, and didactic teaching can often take the place of enquiry-based learning. This interactive talk demonstrates how to provide access to information so children interact with and apply new ideas. It demonstrates interactive strategies and techniques that encourage systematic reflection, discussion and research. It illustrates how you can engage and inspire children to learn about animals, and how you can make teaching this topic more enjoyable.

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The purpose of this talk is to show participants resources linking Science to literacy in Early Years. This was used as a transition project at Gavinburn Primary to bring Science into Early Years transition to enhance active learning. Primary 5 children were used within transition activities to develop their own scientific questioning skills and develop the buddy system. All resources will be shared with participants.

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PROGRAMME DETAILS DAY 2 – FRIDAY 7 JUNE 15:30 SESSION 5 REFLECTIVE SEMINARS

INTERACTIVE TALKS HOW DO TEACHERS LEARN TO ASK GOOD QUESTIONS IN SCIENCE

CREATIVE APPROACHES IN PRIMARY SCIENCE

COLIN FORSTER, JUDE PENNY AND RUSS SHALOFSK ROOM: TINTO

ROOM: SIDLAW

How do teachers learn to ask good questions in science? This session reports on an innovative action research project undertaken with a group of undergraduate student teachers, in which they utilised published research and their own empirical evidence to evaluate the quality of their questioning and to analyse the impact on children’s learning.

REFLECTIVE SEMINARS PLAYING TO TEACH AND LEARN: PEDAGOGIES, CHALLENGES AND IDEAS ROOM: CARRICK 1 OVERVIEW We want to put the fun back into science teaching! Innovative pedagogies are discussed to develop teacher presence and children’s enjoyment in primary science. Paper 1 reports on work completed with award winning teachers to identify an empowering model of classroom delivery based on principles of play embodied in traditional and modern ideas of Clown (Bala, 2010). In particular we follow Winnicott’s (1971) seminal work on developing the idea of ‘self’ through play in order to deconstruct ITE students’ ideas of what effective teaching might look like. This study is on-going doctoral research into outstanding science teaching in primary schools and seeks to develop a transformative pedagogy of teaching based on paedic and ludic principles (Gaulier, 2016; Kendrick, 2011; Caillois, 1958). Talk 1 – Deborah Herridge Using ideas of movement, mime, characterisation and voice captured on film from research in schools, the presentation draws parallels between exemplary science teaching and the idea of clowning. Here we use traditional and modern archetypes to model key elements of effective delivery and reframe the idea of ‘fun’ in the curriculum. In an age where our children are often depicted as being miserable and stressed and our student teachers show increasingly poor mental health, we seek to examine whether we have become so concerned with the technical elements of pedagogy and achieving learning objectives that we have failed to understand that learning can be fun and what fun is. We explore the innovative pedagogy of ‘clown’ in the classroom and its empowering effects.

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Talk 2 – Debbie Myers Leonardo da Vinci’s Apprentices or tinkering belles and boys at ludic play? In this paper I report how tinkering ‘playshops’ and play spaces offer children opportunities to investigate, pull apart and manipulate simple mechanisms providing a foundation from which to re-construct, build and invent their own models, mechanisms and toys. In accordance with a constructivist epistemology such explorations and ludic play support the development of the pre-frontal cortex facilitating the (re) configuration of cognitive architecture and the maturation of the brain’s executive control functions, enabling the child to manage self, plan, solve problems and to work collaboratively with others through complex social interactions (Papert, 1980; Martinez and Stager, 2014). Talk 3 – Maria McGrory and Cathy Westgate IChildren encounter the world holistically (Dewey, 1938; Alexander 2013) should one of the roles of education therefore be to enable children to respond to the world as authors, artists, poets, painters, scientists, mathematicians and makers? In this paper school leaders explain how playful approaches to learning have transformed teachers’ practice and children’s engagement in (science) learning within their school. Chaired by Paul Ramchandani References

Bala, M. (2010) The Clown: An Archetypal Self-Journey. Jung Journal, Volume 4, 2010 - Issue 1 Dewey, J. (1938) Experience and Education. Simon and Schuster.

Talk 1 – Sarah Frodsham This paper focuses on the development of creative thinking within primary school. More specifically, it examines the ways in which teachers engage with children to promote creativityin-science-lessons. Teachers, recognised as ‘creative’ by national agencies, were observed. It became apparent they shared characteristics which could be illustrated. For example, three aspects of creative practice (namely, verbal interactions, autonomy and risk-taking) can be assimilated on a minute-byminute basis to develop visual interpretations of the extent of creativity. Additionally, an events map can illustrate the detail of creative enactments by chronologically displaying activities, actions and pupil responses to teacher’s questions and instructions. The ways that children verbally interact can also be examined and represented in a diagram. This presentation, therefore, offers three graphical illustrations created from analysing one science lesson, using the three analytical frameworks outlined above. It highlights how different analytical approaches can illuminate the many ways a teacher can nurture creativity-in-science. Talk 2 – Rufus Cooper How can we encourage and support children to be more creative learners in their science lessons? Rufus will share his experience and strategies for setting up a creative learning environment. Talk 3 – John McCullagh and Andrea Doherty, Stranmillis University College Belfast Promoting a playful approach to science within teacher education. This presentation will report on the latest outcomes of the ‘Playful Approaches to Science’ (PATS) project and provide examples of how a playful theme or narrative can enhance pupil engagement and learning. Examples from popular science topics will be used to show how to plan, facilitate and assess pupil learning and explore the relationship between play and science enquiry. This coupling of playfulness with scientific exploration offers incredible potential to address the challenges of relevance, accessibility and progression within our science curriculum. The presentation will also report on the impact of the project on the current and future practice of participating in-service and pre-service teachers.

Chaired by Esme Glauert References

Davies, D. and McGregor, D. (2017) Teaching science creatively. 2nd ed. London: Routledge. DeHaan, R.L. (2009) ‘Teaching creativity and inventive problem solving in science’, CBE – Life Sciences Education, 8, pp. 172-181. Frodsham, S. (2018) Demonstrating Creativity-in-Learning Through Classroom Talk: Towards A Fresh Theoretical Framework. BERA conference. 13th September 2018 Frodsham, S. (2017) Evidencing Creativity in Talk: Toward a Fresh Theoretical Framework. Poster presentation at Association for Science Education (ASE) Annual Conference. January 11th 2017. Frodsham, S. (2016a) Interpreting pedagogical practices (concerning creativity) through visual representations of primary science lessons. Poster presentation at ASE Annual Conference. January 9th 2016. Frodsham, S. (2016b) Generating representations of creativity in the primary science classroom. BERA conference. 14th September 2016. Frodsham, S. (2015a) Interpreting teacher observations (concerning creativity) through visual representations. Poster presentation at ASE Annual Conference. January 10th 2015. Frodsham, S. (2015b) Interpreting pedagogical practices (concerning creativity) through visual representations of primary science lessons. ESERA conference. August 31st 2015. Frodsham, S. (2015c) Interpreting science teacher’s practice (related to creativity) through visual representations of their actions. BERA conference. 16th September 2015. Henriksen, D. and Mishra, P. (2015) ‘We teach who we are: creativity in the lives and practices of accomplished teachers’, Teachers College Record, 117 (7), No. 17947. [Online]. [Accessed 12 September 2018] Available from: http://www.tcrecord.org McGregor, D. (in press). Chapter 8: Development of creative thinking. Ofsted. (2003) Expecting the unexpected: developing creativity in primary and secondary schools. HMI. [online]. [Accessed 12 September 2018] Available from: http://dera.ioe.ac.uk/4766/1/Expecting_the_ unexpected_%28PDF_format%29.pdf Ofsted (2010) Learning: Creative approaches that raise standards. HMI. [online]. [Accessed 12 September 2018] Available from: http://webarchive. nationalarchives.gov.uk/20141116012722/http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/node/2405 Oliver, A. (2006) Creative teaching science in the early years and primary classroom. London: David Fulton Publishers Ltd. Sawyer, R.K. (2012) The science of human innovation: explaining creativity. 2nd ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Sternberg, R. J. (2003) Wisdom, intelligence, and creativity synthesized. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Martinez, S. and Stager, G. (2014) The maker movement: A learning revolution. Learning & Leading with Technology, 41 (7), 12–17. Papert, S. (1980). Mindstorms: Children, computers and powerful ideas. New York, NY: Basic Books.

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PROGRAMME DETAILS DAY 2 – FRIDAY 7 JUNE 15:30 SESSION 5 PRACTICAL WORKSHOPS

PRACTICAL WORKSHOPS

LANGUAGE SKILLS THROUGH EXPERIMENTS

SENSORY SCIENCE – LOOK, LISTEN, SNIFF, FEEL.

NURTURING SCHOOLS “NATUREHOODS”

RECORDING IN PRIMARY SCIENCE

HEIDRUN BOLL ROOM: CARRICK 3 AGE RANGE: 4-11

EUAN MITCHELL AND LYN DALEY ROOM: CROMDALE (EXHIBITION HALL) AGE RANGE: EY-7

MEGAN EVANS ROOM: OCHIL 3 AGE RANGE: ALL

ELEANOR ATKINSON ROOM: KILSYTH AGE RANGE: 4-11

Why is the mirror foggy when you take a shower? Why do you see yourself upside-down in a spoon? And what effect does a carpet have on pushing or pulling a sofa to another position? In this workshop you will discover ‘inexplicable’ observations in bathroom, kitchen and living room with children’s eyes. Learn how to support the natural curiosity of your students for scientific phenomena with easy hands-on experiments while simultaneously training their language skills. The workshop is based on the teaching brochure ‘Lilu’s House: Language Skills through Experiments’ which will be provided for free.

Explore the senses with a range of simple, yet effective, resources for use in the nursery or primary classroom. Using a range of recycled materials, you will make and take away a range of materials that will encourage learners to investigate the world around them. The SSERC team have developed alternatives to some expensive resources, all designed to encourage and support the development of skills in literacy and numeracy while exploring science and having fun! Come prepared to look, listen, sniff and feel.

This workshop introduces the idea of schools noticing and recording what wildlife they have in the school grounds as part of a national Citizen Science Project, Naturehood, sharing our learnings from schools based outdoor learning science activities and inspiring schools based action for nature. This workshop will look at how making tangible contributions to Citizen Science projects can empower teachers and students and give them the agency needed to undertake further pro-environmental actions. Practical session, with take home resources and ideas for curriculum linked activities.

Having a grasp of scientific knowledge, understanding concepts and learning scientific skills are all important aspects of primary science but do we have to record everything they do and what is really meant by recording in science? This workshop examines the most effective strategies for recording science learning. A variety of ideas and activities (including the use of FLOOR BOOKS or Big Books) will be experienced in order to demonstrate that recording of science can be done more creatively and for a variety of purposes.

SCIENCE THROUGH STORIES

SCOTLAND BENEATH YOUR FEET 17:00

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JULES POTTLE ROOM: MOORFOOT AGE RANGE: 4-11

SUSAN BURR ROOM: CARRICK 2 AGE RANGE: 4-11

Stories are often used to provide a context for science lessons e.g. testing materials to build the strongest house for the three little pigs. ‘Science Through Stories’ goes one step further. By teaching children to tell a science story, you teach them to tell the science. Oral rehearsal of the facts and sequences in a science topic can help children to visualise and internalise the learning. Children write about science concepts in English tasks and improve their understanding of the story in their science lessons. Come and learn how to tell a story and teach lessons that are truly cross-curricular.

A series of hands on activities to enthuse pupils and develop their understanding of the processes that have created Scotland’s soils, diverse landscapes and have caused natural disasters. The workshop also explains the crucial role played by Scotland’s resources.

SCIENCE THROUGH THE SENSES

RUNNING A STARGAZING EVENT

JESS BOLTON ROOM: OCHIL 2 AGE RANGE: EY-7

JENNY LISTER ROOM: HARRIS 1 AGE RANGE: ALL

Without engagement, we cannot have true learning; so leave your pens and paper at the door, don’t expect to sit down… and experience how science can be taught through the senses! Learn about an immersive approach to learning adopted at Merefield School for pupils with severe learning difficulties. See how to take an element of our National Curriculum for Science (year 1 Animals including Humans/working scientifically) and immersive yourself in an exploration of your senses and hopefully pick up some practical ideas and useful pedagogy throughout your journey, whether you teach children with additional needs, Early Years or in mainstream Key Stage One.

Hear from a primary teacher/ science lead who has run successful stargazing events. Advice on how to organise a successful star gazing session and hands-on experience of activities that can be included as part of the event. Details of charities that donate telescopes to schools and contacts of local Astronomical Societies to support.

DRINKS RECEPTION IN THE EXHIBITION HALL HOSTED BY THE WELLCOME TRUST

END OF DAY TWO

18:30

FREE STUFF

N AT U R E C L A S S I F I CAT I O N BIODIVERSITY EVOLUTION PLANTS H A B I TAT S L I F E CYC L E S

We’re named after:

CARL LINNAEUS The father of naming things

LinneanLearning has a whole bunch of freebies for you!

We have a range of Discovery Kits which we can loan to your school for free.* We also have free resources to download covering the whole scope of nature in the Primary curriculum. Visit www.linnean.org/learning to #DiscoverMore * Fine, you got me, you do need to pay for return postage ~£15

Pssst! I’m Sjupp and I just want to tell you that LinneanLearning also has great videos for primary schools on our website. Do not, I repeat, do not, watch my video: “The Raccoon Called Sjupp” - *spoiler* it doesn’t end well for me.

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PROGRAMME DETAILS

PSTT RESOURCE

DAY 3 – SATURDAY 8 JUNE

CHILDREN’S UNIVERSITY SCIENCE CLUB RESOURCES Aimed at teachers or other adults wanting to introduce a science or STEM club to children, PSTT is creating 4 freely accessible resource packs that will each cover a series of 8 sessions for an extra-curricular science or STEM club. The first of these resource packs, Engineering Our World, is already available to download from the PSTT website. Based around a famous scientist, engineer or artist, each session includes an activity to challenge the children and a fact sheet to take home so the children can share their learning with their friends and families. The other three resource packs will be available in the near future.

All activities are validated by the Children’s University and as such count towards accredited learning for any children taking part. CREATED BY KATE REDHEAD

September 23, 1843 New York, United States

Died

February 28, 1903 (aged 59) New Jersey, United States

Nationality

American

EMILY ROEBLING What is she most famous for?

09:00

KEYNOTE TALK – THE MIKE RANCE LECTURE DELIVERED BY KATE BELLINGHAM ROOM: PENTLAND STEM – WHAT, WHY AND HOW? A PERSONAL PERSPECTIVE FROM KATE BELLINGHAM Although probably best known for her TV work, Kate’s background includes Science, Tech, Engineering and Maths along with experience of teaching and of running a primary school STEM club. Before looking at the role of STEM in primary schools, Kate will question what STEM actually means to the various stakeholders who may become involved or offer support. She will then consider the implications of under-representation of ‘Women in STEM’ in society as a whole, and the impact this may have on primary school teaching. She will also include a whistle-stop update of relevant research into STEM education, with particular emphasis on gender issues.

New York, United States

She is most famous for her contribution to the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge in New York.

Emily Roebling

Why is this important?

To build a bridge between two supports that will hold 50g

LINKED CHALLENGE

„ She was the first woman field engineer.

RESOURCES

„ She undertook most of the work of the Chief Engineer and project-managed the completion of the Brooklyn Bridge when her husband was taken ill. „ The bridge is one of the most famous in the world.

ARRIVAL AND REGISTRATION

KATE BELLINGHAM is a TV Presenter and Engineer Champion for girls in Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics STEM. She has had what is best described as a ‘portfolio’ career. With a degree in Physics, MSc in Electronics and Qualified Teacher Status, she has worked as a computer programmer, broadcast engineer, TV presenter (including ‘Museum of Life’ and ‘Tomorrow’s World’), secondary school maths teacher and as the National Careers Coordinator for STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths). Kate is Patron of WISE and is also a volunteer STEM Ambassador. In 2004 she was awarded the ‘Public Promotion of Engineering’ Medal by the Royal Academy of Engineering and in 2011 won the UKRC ‘Women of Outstanding Achievement Award for Communication of Science, Engineering and Technology to Society’. Kate has also been awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Science by the Universities of Hull, Kent and the West of England (UWE), an Honorary Doctorate in Engineering from the University of Bradford as well as an Honorary Doctorate in Technology by Staffordshire University and De Montfort University in Leicester. 

KEY FACTS Born

08:30

ACTIVITY OVERVIEW The Brooklyn Bridge

„ She worked for and gained a Law degree, at a time when few women were able to go to university.

Lollipop sticks

Activity leader to encourage children to explore different masses: 10g, 20g, 50g.

Paperclips

When testing as a group, activity leader to begin with the smallest mass and work upwards to test the strength of the bridge.

„ She worked on many women’s causes and for the Relief Society during the Spanish-American War.

KEY FACTS/SCIENCE Bridges are built to cross an area without blocking the way underneath; for example, a stretch of water or a road. There are many different types of bridges, built for different specifications. *Check out the QR code for more information.

Where could your learning take you? „ What is a field engineer? „ What are your big questions? Can you do some research at home to find answers? „ Use the QR code to find out more about different types of bridges.

The Brooklyn Bridge is a suspension bridge. This is a bridge that has towers to which are attached cables, as well as anchors at either side of the deck. This allows the forces on the bridge to spread out, creating tension in the cables and pushing down through the towers. A beam bridge is the simplest bridge. The deck (the beam) rests across supports at each end. This is the type that children will be most likely to make.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oVOnRPefcno

GROUP 2 Garden canes

Cardboard

Activity leader to set initial challenge for children and let them explore the equipment. Children reminded they can decide to ask for a ‘top tip’ as a group if they find the challenge difficult. Activity leader to then determine how much of a pointer the group needs to get on track. *Building the bridge between two tables will make this easier.

What were her other achievements?

GROUP 1 Newspaper

Two groups with two different sets of equipment (see resources list).

MIKE RANCE has been an exceptional trustee of the PSTT for thirteen years, with ten years as Chair. He retires this year. During his tenure, the Trust developed into an important and much needed network to enhance the quality of teaching science in primary schools in the United Kingdom. Mike has been awarded an MBE for his services to a number of charities, in particularly those based in Macclesfield.

GENERAL RESOURCES 10g, 20g and 50g masses Sticky tape Scissors

QUESTIONS/FURTHER LEARNING „ Which is the strongest bridge? „ How do the materials used effect how much the bridge can hold? „ How could you improve your bridge? „ What different types of bridges are there?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oVOnRPefcno

MEET THE AUTHOR lunchtimes at the PSTT stand

PSTT College Fellow and Regional Mentor Kate Redhead will be sharing activities from these club resources on the PSTT stand in the exhibition hall. Please come and have a look and pick up a free printed exemplar pack. For more information please take a look at our resource pages:

www.pstt.org.uk/resources 66

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PROGRAMME DETAILS Education

Bringing learning alive We provide the tools and resources that bring learning alive and inspire the next generation to engineer a better world.

DAY 3 – SATURDAY 8 JUNE 10:15 SESSION 6 SESSION 6

10:15

INTERACTIVE TALKS

GIRL’ BRAINS AND ‘BOY’ BRAINS: PINK AND BLUE OR FIFTY SHADES OF GREY?

USING ENGINEERING HABITS OF MIND WITH PRIMARY TRAINEE TEACHERS TO SUPPORT CHILDREN’S LEARNING IN SCIENCE, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY AND COMPUTING

GINA RIPPON ROOM: FINTRY

SALLY HARDMAN AND SUE LUKE ROOM: OCHIL 1

25 years of human brain imaging have reignited centuries’ old speculations about sex differences in the brain. Are there sex differences in the brain? If so, where do they come from and what do they mean for the brains’ owners? Public communication of such findings can be a mixture of ‘neuronews’ and ‘neurononsense’ and we need to be alert to the difference.

This presentation outlines how the concept of signature pedagogies was used with primary trainee teachers to develop children’s thinking skills within working scientifically, designing and making and coding. Using an engineering habits of mind (EHoM) framework (Lucas, Hanson and Claxton, 2014) trainee teachers worked with local engineers and schools to develop activities in school. Some of the creative activities planned and taught by the trainee teachers to cultivate EHoM within science, design and technology and computing will be shared. Opportunities to integrate EHoM into the primary curriculum will be actively explored in the session.

Recent advances in brain imaging technology are now allowing us to investigate the human brain’s early years and ask the same questions. Do we have the same problem with neuronews and neurononsense? This talk will review key findings to date and discuss what they mean for our children.

Take a look at our amazing free STEM resources for primary and secondary schools, including classroom posters, careers packs, videos, activities and lesson plans. Explore our engineering competitions for schools including the worldrenowned FIRST ® LEGO® League competition.

Professor Gina Rippon is Emeritus Professor of Cognitive Neuroimaging at the Aston Brain Centre, Aston University, Birmingham. Her research involves state-of-the-art brain imaging techniques to investigate how the brain interacts with what is going on around it, and what happens when this process goes wrong. She has researched atypical conditions such as schizophrenia, as well as developmental disorders such as dyslexia and autism. Her current research focus is on Autism Spectrum Disorders, trying to measure ‘misfiring’ feedback loops in ASD brains . She is also involved in research investigating girls on the autistic spectrum and whether they present a different biological and behavioural profile to the classic profile associated with boys on the spectrum. Gina is heavily involved in the critical neuroscience community, commenting on the use of neuroscience techniques to explore social processes such as gender stereotyping and stereotype threat. She is against the idea that there are two sorts of ‘hardwired’ brains’, male and female, and notes that brains are much more complicated than that! She is an outspoken critic of ’neurotrash’, the populist (mis)use of neuroscience research to (mis)represent our understanding of the brain and, most particularly, to prop up outdated stereotypes. She is a past-President of the British Association of Cognitive Neuroscience and, in 2015, was awarded an Honorary Fellowship of the British Science Association.

Find out more at

www1.aston.ac.uk/lhs/staff/az-index/rippong/

theiet.org/education @IETeducation IETeducation

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gina_Rippon

QWISP COLETTE VAN NIFTRIK ROOM: CARRICK 1 Teaching Science for Sustainability: Introducing Qwisp® Qwisp® is a curriculum framework designed to be used anywhere in the world by teachers and learners alike, starting at the preschool level and continuing as a tool for lifelong learning. Qwisp® learning starts with our essential survival needs where nature declares us equal - a fertile foundation for the strong humanitarian values embedded in its structure. It fires our innate curiosity and shows that science is an integral part of all aspects of life, integrating the left and right brain, enhancing the learner’s problem-solving capacity and giving rise to new heights of creativity. It opens up the world of learning in a natural and seemingly effortless way.

The Institution of Engineering and Technology is registered as a Charity in England and Wales (No. 211014) and Scotland (No. SC038698).

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PROGRAMME DETAILS DAY 3 – SATURDAY 8 JUNE 10:15 SESSION 6 REFLECTIVE SEMINARS

REFLECTIVE SEMINARS

ENGAGING CHILDREN IN SCIENCE THOUGH CUTTING-EDGE, REAL SCIENCE RESEARCH PROJECTS

PRIMARY-SECONDARY TRANSITION

ROOM: PENTLAND

ROOM: SIDLAW

OVERVIEW This seminar will consider the benefits of introducing current scientific research to primary age children and how this can be done in primary schools. Dudley Shallcross will describe how making links to science research makes learning more meaningful and engages children. He will explain that cutting-edge research can be linked to the primary science curriculum and share examples from ‘I bet you didn’t know…’ articles published in ‘Why & How’, the PSTT Newsletter. Julia Nash will talk about how as a teacher she has used some of the practical ideas in the ‘I bet you didn’t know…’ articles with her class. She will describe how the children in her class have responded and the impact on their learning and perception of science and scientific research. Ex-biochemist and primary teacher, Alison Trew, will briefly describe what is meant by ‘science capital’ [1] and describe how student engagement with science is shaped by students’ interests, dispositions and past experiences [2]. She will suggest that ‘I bet you didn’t know…’ provides teachers with an accessible, practical way to raise children’s science capital and inspire the next generation of scientists. Talk 1 – Dudley Shallcross Fundamental science principles are explored at primary school and many cutting-edge science projects can be explained using these principles. For example, a recent study showed that Greenland sharks can live for many hundreds of years and the principle behind this was making a good calibration chart, something that can be replicated in primary school. In another study scientists believe that they have found a hidden planet in the Kuiper Belt, even though telescopes are not powerful enough to see the planet! Using ideas from primary science investigations it is possible to carry out investigations that mirror these studies. The principles of camouflage are discussed in another paper and these investigations can be carried out in a primary school setting (outdoors of course). Linking with cutting edge science at an early age is, we hope, an exciting way to stimulate children and their teachers and provide rich contexts for learning.

Talk 2 – Julia Nash Engaging children in ‘real life science’, has for me, been paramount in inspiring young science learners in the classroom. I teach full-time in a class of 7-8 year olds and have used the ‘I bet you didn’t know…’ articles to provide a starting point for a series of science lessons. I want to show that this resource is accessible and enjoyable for everybody, all teachers and children, whatever the Key Stage. The articles explain clearly, in language that children can understand, what scientists have discovered and provide questions for children and teachers to consider in the classroom. There are suggestions of practical activities that the children might carry out to find their own answers to some of these questions. Children love to take ownership of their learning and this is exactly what happened in my class. The children enjoyed exploring new ideas and carrying out their own science research. Talk 3 – Alison Trew Science capital combines all an individual’s science-related resources: knowledge, attitudes, experiences and contacts. The more science capital young people have the more likely they are to engage with the subject. We believe that teachers can make a difference to student engagement with science by sharing examples of cutting-edge research because: • Linking scientist’s research findings to real-life situations enables pupils to see science as relevant to their everyday life and has a positive impact on their attitude towards science. • Encouraging discussion and providing simple practical challenges linked to research has a positive impact on children’s science-related knowledge and experiences. • Exposure to current research may stimulate engagement in sciencerelated media in the future. Within PSTT there are primary teachers who have postdoctoral degrees in science subjects who are writing ‘I bet you didn’t know…’ articles so that all teachers (including those who are not science specialists) can introduce science research to children. Chaired by Craig Early References

[1] Bourdieu, P. (1986). The forms of capital. In J. Richardson (Ed.), Handbook of theory and research for the sociology of education (241-258). New York, NY: Greenwood. [2] Godec, S., King, H. & Archer, L. (2017) The Science Capital Teaching Approach: engaging students with science, promoting social justice. London: University College London.

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Talk 1 – Cerian Angharad Science Enquiry Wales – See Science managed a project to support Scientific Enquiry and the transition between primary and secondary schools. The process – Secondary schools and their feeder primary schools collaborated with each other and STEM Ambassadors – people who want to share their passion and encourage pupils to take an interest in STEM Subjects. The schools and Ambassadors worked together to develop a sequence of lessons which improved pupils’ science skills and knowledge, which pupils then applied in an investigation. This investigation was carried out in the classroom by the teacher and the STEM Ambassadors. Project outcomes

Talk 3 – Allen Tsui There had been a steep decline in the number of applications entering computer science at university level. Based on examinations boards data, there were less than 8,000 A-level computer science candidates in 2017 with less than ten percent female. The Willow Brook Primary School Academy collaboration with Kano represents an opportunity to try to make a bigger impact by offering primary school aged children, especially the girls, the chance to at least be exposed to considering subjects like computer science beyond GCSE or whatever post-16 examination system they will be faced with in the future. Using Kano computers to learn coding also potentially enables what the 2018 winner of the Varkey Foundation Global Teacher Prize describes as the opportunity for individual learners to unlock personal levels of creativity which some like Ken Robinson regard as an important facet for all our futures.

• An improvement in the standards achieved by pupils in science skills.

Chaired by Sarah Earle

• Greater variety of recording methods used in science lessons.

Holland, D., Skinner, D., Lachicotte Jr., W., and Cain,. (2001) Identity and agency in cultural worlds. Cambridge, Massachusetts and London: Harvard University Press

• An increased understanding by teachers in both phases of the progression in science skills. • A greater awareness of the STEM Ambassadors program. • An improvement in pupils’ attitudes towards science and scientists. Talk 2 – Kate Redhead Based on the above PSTT funded project co-ordinated by See Science, PSTT Regional Mentor Kate Redhead developed the idea for use with a group of schools in the West Midlands. The project involved a secondary school and three of its feeder primaries, working collaboratively over a two-term period. The project began with two days of focussed training for teachers who then, alongside STEM Ambassadors, planned and delivered a series of curriculum-based lessons in school. The schools themselves determined the main focus of training: the development and exploration of scientific enquiry skills through drama. The project culminated in a celebration day at the secondary school where children shared their investigations in both presentations and a market-place style approach. Visiting scientists, STEM Ambassadors and older children from the secondary school were all part of this event.

References

Kemp, P.E.J., Wong, B., and Berry, M.G. (2016) The Roehampton Annual Computing Education Report. London: University of Roehampton. The Royal Society (2017) After the Reboot: Computing Education in UK Schools https:// royalsociety.org./~/media/policy/projecdts/computing-education/computingeducationreport.pdf (accessed April 2018) Webb, M., Davis, N., Bell, T., Katz, Y.J., Reynolds, N., Chambers, D.P., and Syslo, M.M. (2017) ‘Computer Science in the K-12 school curricula of the 21st century: What, why and when?’ Education and Information Technology, 22, 445-468. Wong, B. (2017) ‘I’m good, but not that good’: Digitally-skilled youth’s identity in computing. Computing. Computer Science Education, 26, 299-317.

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PROGRAMME DETAILS

PSTT RESOURCE

DAY 3 – SATURDAY 8 JUNE 10:15 SESSION 6

“I CAN EXPLAIN!” A highly accessible approach to introducing and developing scientific understanding through group talk. The resource, developed by teachers, contains beautifully illustrated, high-quality picture cards and language prompts to facilitate rational discussion. The comprehensive and easy to follow teachers’ guide supports teachers to develop new strategies for confidently leading discussion in science. Working in small groups, children develop the skills to: • Support their ideas with evidence • Learn effectively through group talk • Make confident challenges to the ideas of others

• Change their minds on the basis of new evidence • Explore scientific concepts and develop deeper understanding WRITTEN BY ALISON ELEY

All our resources are available to buy in our Primary Science Teaching Trust Trading Ltd. online shop. For more information please take a look at our resource pages:

PRACTICAL WORKSHOPS SCIPADS – USING TECHNOLOGY TO SUPPORT SCIENCE TEACHING AND LEARNING

FAT, FINS, FEATHERS, FUR AND THE FREEZING COLD

TOM JONES ROOM: OCHIL 2 AGE RANGE: 4-11

ROBBIE TAYLOR ROOM: CARRICK 2 AGE RANGE: 4-11

In an ever-increasing digital world, enabling children to use technology to enhance learning is becoming more important. Children love science and they love technology so why not combine the two? This session will focus on how a range of apps and websites can support the teaching and learning of science for all learners. You will also see how children at West Jesmond Primary School in Newcastle have used technology to showcase their science work to a wider audience and the benefits of this. Bringing a Wifi enabled device to this session would be beneficial.

Join Robbie on a practical, creative workshop discovering some of the wonderful animals of Antarctica, how they have adapted to survive the extreme cold and their interactions. Robbie Taylor spent several years working for the British Antarctic Survey before becoming a Primary Teacher.

LIGHT FANTASTIC!

MICROSCOPY: ENRICHING AND EXTENDING THE PRIMARY CURRICULUM

HAYLEY SHERRARD ROOM: TINTO AGE RANGE: ALL

PETER SAINSBURY ROOM: HARRIS 1 AGE RANGE: ALL

Light Fantastic – make light work of teaching the concepts behind reflection, refraction and the visible spectrum! In this practical workshop from the SSERC team you will explore a range of simple activities that are easy to transfer to the classroom. Using safe and inexpensive resources you will mix coloured light, investigate reflection and refraction and take a closer look at perception. Common misconceptions will be addressed. This workshop, incorporating physics, biology, art and history, has already provided solid foundations for primary/secondary transition projects. Delegates will get to make and take away a range of resources to support teaching and learning in their setting.

This hands-on, interactive workshop will illustrate the use of microscopes within and beyond the science curriculum, developing extensive ideas generated in the primary sector. The overall aim is to use the microscope’s power to engage and ‘wow factor’ to promote the exploration of everyday things in a different context, maximising the impact in STEM subjects and exploring how creative approaches can incorporate other disciplines including art and literacy. This enjoyable workshop shows the impact that microscopes have upon children’s learning, their cross curricular benefits and their future in the classroom. The workshop will also introduce the Microscope Activity Kit, a free resource to primary schools developed by the Royal Microscopical Society and used by over 90,000 children nationally to support science learning, with ready-made activities, resources and worksheets.

PREMIER LEAGUE PRIMARY STARS PRIMARY SCIENCE

WHAT’S IN MY TRAY?

SARAH EAMES ROOM: HARRIS 2 AGE RANGE: 7-11

KATHERINE FORSEY ROOM: CROMDALE (EXHIBITION HALL) AGE RANGE: 4-11

Come along and take part in some practical activities that will help children work as scientists. A series of lessons have been developed that use the theme of space and football to engage and excite teachers and children to work scientifically. ‘Pitch Perfect’, ‘Feel the Pressure’, ‘Kick Off, Lift Off’ and ‘The roar of the crowd’ are just some of the titles of the lessons. Come and find out how we have used simple equipment to create a reason to collect data and look for patterns.

An energetic, hands-on carousel of practical, curriculum-based activities. Easily recreated in your own setting. Useful as lesson starters, to support theory work, for science week or STEM clubs. Five stations, five minutes per station, five areas of the primary science curriculum. Full resource pack and equipment list provided in addition to prizes for the winning team. Tweeting is encouraged via #WhatsInMyTray. See www.learning-rooms.com/teachingresources/ for more free practical science activities.

www.pstt.org.uk/resources 72

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PROGRAMME DETAILS

Explore primary computational thinking

DAY 3 – SATURDAY 8 JUNE 10:15 SESSION 6 PRACTICAL WORKSHOPS WHAT MIGHT HAPPEN? SCIENCE ENQUIRY THROUGH DEMONSTRATIONS AND ACTIVITIES

TURN YOUR INTERESTING IDEA INTO SCHOOL-BASED RESEARCH

DAVID KEENAHAN ROOM: KILSYTH AGE RANGE: ALL

ISABEL HOPWOOD-STEPHENS ROOM: OCHIL 3 AGE RANGE: ALL

This workshop has been inspired by the philosophy and the festivals of Science on Stage. The workshop incorporates a wide range of demonstrations and activities. The materials used are inexpensive and readily accessible in most cases. Participants will be actively engaged throughout. Many of the demonstrations have surprising outcomes which invite prediction, discussion and validation. There is an atmosphere of playfulness in the demonstrations that are used. The activities are quite short and simple but emphasize good principles of working as a scientist.

This interactive, discussion-based workshop combines research design principles and project management skills to give practitioners the opportunity to think systematically about the aims of their next project in primary science teaching. Do you want to pilot a new teaching strategy? Or perhaps use your Science Week to conduct some research? Bring along your ideas and we will cover: defining project objectives; how and when to collect data to demonstrate impact; the timeline, milestones and possible issues you will face; and ways to share your results beyond your school walls. Sources of funding for science projects will also be discussed.

Free resources @BarefootComp

LISTENING TO EINSTEIN’S UNIVERSE: THE DISCOVERY OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVES

DR MARGARET RITCHIE ROOM: MOORFOOT AGE RANGE: ALL

PROFESSOR MARTIN HENDRY ROOM: CARRICK 3 AGE RANGE: 7-11

The unique University of the West of Scotland Summer STEM Academy residential event included team building workshops in forensics, engineering and molecule building, followed by ‘Hands On’ workshops including Astrobiology, Highland STEM Journey, F1 in Schools, Air Race Challenge and Solar Energy concluding with an industrial placement. Primary teachers and S5 pupils worked together in an academic environment aligned with industry and supported by academia to develop STEM activities for future use in schools and communities. STEM Academy practical workshops and follow on co-created activities for use in Primary schools will be delivered and links to industry and careers identified.

Gravitational waves are ripples in the fabric of space and time, produced by some of the most violent events in the cosmos: colliding black holes, exploding stars, even the Big Bang itself. They were predicted by Albert Einstein more than a century ago but only detected in 2015, by the twin LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) detectors in the US, the most sensitive scientific instruments ever built. This remarkable discovery – in which many scientists at the University of Glasgow played a leading role – was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 2017, and has opened a whole new way of exploring the universe.

Curriculumaligned

/Barefootcomputing

barefootcomputing.org Principal partners

Call FREE: 0800 028 0041

CO-CREATED STEM ACTIVITIES – FUN STEM ACADEMY ACTIVITIES DEVELOPED FOR USE IN PRIMARY SCHOOL AND LINKED TO CREATIVITY AND PROGRESSION

Hands-on workshops

Principal partners

EQUIPMENT RESOURCES CPD

So how on Earth do you detect gravitational waves? Join University of Glasgow astronomer and senior LIGO scientist Martin Hendry as he explores the remarkable the science and technology behind LIGO’s breakthrough discoveries. Using simple, everyday analogies and hands-on demonstrations, Martin brings to life the amazing world of black holes, neutron stars and gravitational waves – showing how primary students and teachers can become “black hole hunters”.

Supp Supported by

It simply makes science easier to teach Davey Henson – Year 5 Teacher at Frederick Bird Primary School

Everything you need to deliver amazing practical science in your classroom. Available on annual subscription for Key Stage 1 and 2.

Contact us for more details 74

Telephone: 01865 670 067 | Email: info@empiribox.org | Website: www.empiribox.org Empiribox Limited Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, R71 Office 17a, Harwell, OXON, OX11 0QX


PROGRAMME DETAILS DAY 3 – SATURDAY 8 JUNE 12:00 SESSION 7 11:30

COFFEE/TEA IN THE EXHIBITION HALL

INTERACTIVE TALKS

SESSION 7

12:00

PAUL TYLER AND ALEX FARRER ROOM: SIDLAW

INTERACTIVE TALKS Two for One! This session will include two half hour talks ROOM: PENTLAND

TALK 1: RAISING STEM CAREER ASPIRATIONS THROUGH THE PRIMARY YEARS FRAN LONG Discover tried and tested ways of incorporating engineering into the primary curriculum. With a national shortage of engineers, learn about a research study conducted to ascertain ways of raising STEM career aspirations by the age of 10 through a programme of specific enrichment activities. Hear the impact on pupils of monthly contact with real scientists and engineers from a diverse range of careers. STEM career aspirations, perceptions of the roles of engineers and Engineering Habits of Mind (EHOM) exhibited by pupils were all measured and the results statistically significant. Find out how this initiative could be replicated in your school.

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SCIENTIST OF THE WEEK: BREAKING DOWN STEM STEREOTYPES JOE SHIMWELL ROOM: CARRICK 2 NUSTEM have piloted and evaluated a simple STEM intervention that has proven effects on reducing primary aged children’s stereotypes regarding scientists. In this talk, we’ll share our process, the research and the resources so you too can break down limiting stereotypes in your schools. You will be able to apply our learning easily in your own school from Y1 through 6, and will have unlimited access to a large number of supporting resources through our website. You will also be able to use our research tools to conduct your own stereotype busting research in your classroom.

TALK 2: SPACE IN THE PRIMARY CURRICULUM

LEARNING ABOUT THE EARTH FROM A SCOTCH EGG: HOW CHILDREN LEARN WITH ANALOGIES AND HOW TO TEACH WITH THEM EFFECTIVELY

OLIVIA JOHNSON

MATTHEW SLOCOMBE ROOM: CARRICK 1

Space can be an inspiring context for learning across the primary curriculum, from science and mathematics to literacy and health & wellbeing. Current research in astronomy and advances in space technology address a wealth of big questions that excite and inspire young minds: How was our Sun made? Can humans travel to another planet? Are we alone in the Universe? In this interactive talk, we will explore a range of resources and activities, based on ongoing research, which tap into pupils’ excitement about space and support learning in the primary curriculum.

SEE THROUGH SCIENCE: USING PHOTOGRAPHIC IMAGES TO INSPIRE AND ENGAGE CHILDREN TO ASK SCIENTIFIC QUESTIONS

Analogies are a powerful method in a teacher’s toolkit. They allow children to use their real-life experience to support the construction of new abstract knowledge. As such, they are particularly useful for teaching science concepts that often describe forces and structures that are invisible to the eye. In this presentation, I will first describe how children learn with analogies from a cognitive science perspective. Using this knowledge, we will discuss how best to introduce analogies when teaching, how using analogies can lead to misconceptions if used incorrectly and how to support children when they struggle with this powerful teaching method.

‘See through science’ is an exciting new resource, from the PSTT, which uses images to stimulate scientific thinking and discussion. This session will explain the theory behind the resource, including the importance of focused questioning and the power of using images, and the research that has been done to measure its effectiveness. We will present different ways schools can use it to develop thinking and discussion. Participants will get an opportunity to explore some of the images and support materials and discuss the types of questions they could use to develop their pupils’ scientific thinking, vocabulary and discussion skills.

REFLECTIVE SEMINARS CAREERS AND THE PRIMARY SCIENCE CURRICULUM ROOM: FINTRY OVERVIEW This seminar will explore the current research and practice with regards STEM careers guidance in Primary school. The first speaker will share current careers research and understanding, and explore the increasing importance place upon careers messages from the Early Year and throughout primary school. The second speaker, a primary STEM coordinator, will share their experience of embedding careers messages in science lesson at a personal and subject leadership level. The final speaker, a university academic who runs STEM outreach in schools, will share their experience of crafting targeted careers messages to promote STEM disciplines. Talk 1 – Carol Davenport Carol’s talk will share the underpinning research that supports embedding careers in the primary classroom and the approach that the NUSTEM group at Northumbria University has developed in its outreach work with primary schools in the north east of England.

Talk 2 – Mark Storey Mark is a STEM leader in a primary school in north east of England. He has been working closely with Northumbria University to develop methods of careers intervention and embedded teaching practices in his school. Mark will share his experience of using a careers approach to teaching STEM and what this looks like at the chalk-face, both at an individual teacher and subject coordinator level. He’ll also share some of the careers aspiration research completed in his school, which has given him a clearer picture of the aspirations of his pupils and how he has used this to adjust his STEM teaching approach across his school. Embedding the approach is not without its challenges and Mark will share these as part of his talk, and identify strategies that have worked in his setting. Talk 3 – Kate Winter Kate is an academic and researcher working the department of Environmental Sciences at Northumbria University. She has taken the approach described by Carol and used this to develop careers-based, research-linked STEM outreach activities in schools. Kate will discuss her experiences of design, development and delivery of careers led STEM outreach. She’ll also provide the audience with an increased understanding of the variety of STEM careers that are avail-able to young people, and share ideas on how to link them directly to the children in the primary classroom. Chaired by Kate Bellingham

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PROGRAMME DETAILS DAY 3 – SATURDAY 8 JUNE 12:00 SESSION 7 PRACTICAL WORKSHOPS

PRACTICAL WORKSHOPS

MAKING ELECTRONIC BOOKS FOR SCIENCE

COOKING LIKE A POLAR EXPLORER

SCIENCE CEILIDH: EXPLORE STEM THROUGH DANCE AND THE ARTS

OCEAN LITERACY: USING THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT TO ENGAGE STUDENTS (AND TEACHERS!)

PAUL HOPKINS ROOM: CARRICK 3 AGE RANGE: 4-11

BRYONY TURFORD AND HELEN SPRING ROOM: KILSYTH AGE RANGE: 7-11

LEWIS HOU ROOM: TINTO AGE RANGE: 7-11

RUSSELL ARNOTT ROOM: MOORFOOT AGE RANGE: ALL

This workshop will explore a range of software for the creation of interactive books for children to create. Drawing on work done by trainee teachers it will look at how interactive books give scope from creativity and recording that “traditional” methods do not. Interactive books allow children to use multimedia to collect and present their data and findings in ways that enhance the understanding of science.

Come and find out about the vital role food has played in the work of researchers and explorers in the Polar regions historically and to the present time. This brand-new free resource can be accessed and used in classrooms anywhere. Ready to go ideas for linking STEM subjects to a real context with opportunities for your children to meet a range of inspirations STEM professionals and chance for you to try out the activities first hand.

This session will explore the Science Ceilidh approach to exploring STEM topics in the curriculum through dance and arts with your students to support interdisciplinary learning. We’ll share our learnings, how this approach can help breaking stereotypes about STEM, develop learner confidence through performance and can be used as a way of engaging families. A hands-on session, you’ll have a chance to have a go at writing your own science-themed dances with scientist-musician Lewis Hou, ask your questions and take away free resources and lesson plans to be able to do this in your own classroom.

The oceans are fascinating and vital to life on Earth yet they hardly feature in the National Curriculum. A hands-on workshop that looks at the concept of ocean literacy and introduces practitioners to a carousel of simple, inexpensive classroom experiments to support science (and ocean) learning at all key stages.

DATA HUNTERS ON MARS

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND: A CREATIVE COLLABORATION

BIG BOOKS OR LITTLE BOOKS: WHY & HOW FLOOR BOOKS ENHANCE TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT.

SUPERMARKET SCIENCE

ALISON TREW AND CAROLINE SKERRY ROOM: HARRIS 2 AGE RANGE: ALL

JENNI MONACH ROOM: OCHIL 2 AGE RANGE: 4-11

In this workshop there will be:

This practical CPD is intended to provide attendees with a bank of easy to use ideas that they can take away with them to enable pupils to conduct experiments and have fun. Hands-on experience promotes curiosity and engagement and provides opportunities for the discussion and questioning which develop understanding. All activities within the session have been designed to be affordable for any school budget, with resources easily purchased at your local supermarket. This course is designed to support Working Scientifically objectives.

SOPHY PALMER ROOM: CROMDALE (EXHIBITION HALL) AGE RANGE: 4-11

EMMA BENNETT, HANNAH WILLIAMS AND PETER SAINSBURY ROOM: HARRIS 1 AGE RANGE: 4-11

Learn how to navigate a maze, write a short program and control a robot and hold a small piece of Mars! Computing plays an ever more important role in all of our lives and has changed the way scientists and engineers work and collaborate. Inspire your pupils with computing, using the stories of space and our solar system as a ‘hook’. Our experienced deliverers will demonstrate a series of interactive modular activities which tell the story of how space scientists use data, linking to the Computing and Earth and Space topics for KS1 and KS2.

Tricky Ticks and Operation Outbreak are flexible resources developed to assist teachers in incorporating scientific and public health learning into their schemes of work. They promote tick awareness, understanding about how infectious diseases spread, and portray a range of careers that are possible within public health. They also develop links to other areas of the curriculum: including geography, history, mathematics and PSHE. This workshop will provide the opportunity to explore these exciting and significant resources. We intend to showcase the successful collaboration between a science cluster and a scientific institute.

• Examples of Floor Books used in PSTT Fellows’ schools that show evidence of children’s enquiry skills and how they have been used for formative and summative assessment • Illustrations of resources that stimulate children to think and talk in science and show how this can be recorded in a Floor Book • Discussion on the advantages and disadvantages of using traditional Floor Books to record science in primary schools • Suggestions on how current technology might provide an alternative type of shared science book

CURIOSITY LED LEARNING AND THE SCIENCE OF THE SEASONS RENEE WATSON ROOM: OCHIL 1 AGE RANGE: ALL

13:15

LUNCH – SERVED IN THE EXHIBITION HALL

This workshop will discuss the benefits of curiosity-led learning on engagement with STEM and a child’s love of learning. We will explore the science in all of the seasons. Why do leaves turn brown? How can we create snow? What are the properties of kinetic sand? How do we make seeds spring up and why are bees so important? Why is it so important to encourage curiosity and to explore the science in our every day?

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PROGRAMME DETAILS

A LUNCHTIME BONUS IN THE EXHIBITION HALL

DAY 3 – SATURDAY 8 JUNE 14:00

Come to stand A28 to see a selection of excellent suggestions and resources for delivering exciting practical science lessons. PRACTICAL PICK AND MIX

STAND A28 EXHIBITION HALL

MAKERS’ SPACE – TINKERING WITH STEAM

FIZZ POP

TRACEY ELLICOTT

MHAIRI SCULLION

14:00

SCIENCE SHOW DUDLEY SHALLCROSS AND TIM HARRISON ROOM: PENTLAND ‘A POLLUTANT’S TALE’ A PSTT WILD RIDE THROUGH THE SCIENCE OF THE ATMOSPHERE AND CLIMATE CHANGE.

Come and find out about Tracey’s journey of creating a makers’ space Mhairi will share some fun activities to explain a range of scientific in her school, the impact this has had on the children and practical concepts. All the activities are based around simple chemical examples of how you can implement this in your own school. reactions using everyday chemicals found around the home. Come and see ‘Foaming Lemon Juice’,‘Exploding Bags’ and ‘Bath Bombs’. These experiments are simple and use only a few chemicals, but they create a big bang.

This lively and entertaining show will explore science relating to: • The composition of the Earth’s atmosphere in comparison to other planets • The structure of the atmosphere • Some of the chemistry and properties of nitrogen and oxygen • A few of the tropospheric pollutants including carbon dioxide Throughout the show there will be exciting demonstrations involving liquid nitrogen, oxygen foam, dry ice and a few explosions.

INVESTIGATION STATION IDEAS FOR EARLY YEARS

MODELLING SCIENTIFIC IDEAS WITH FOIL

JANE CATTO

AMY WOOLGAR

Want to set up an investigation station for early years? Come and see some ideas for activities that you can put out on a table for children to explore independently.

Come and see how using foil as a modelling material can support exploration and understanding of scientific concepts, e.g. food chains, relative sizes of planets.

TIM HARRISON

DUDLEY SHALLCROSS

Tim Harrison FRSC CChem, MRSB, MRSSa is the first School Teacher Fellow at Bristol ChemLabS., University of Bristol. He is also a Reader in Chemistry, the Science Communicator in Residence and Director of Outreach. Prior to this he has been a Head of Chemistry and Science College Director.

Prof. Dudley Shallcross was awarded the first National Teaching Fellowship from the Higher Education Academy in Chemistry in the UK in 2004 and has subsequently won several national and international awards for his research in science (atmospheric chemistry) and contributions to Science Education and Science engagement at primary, secondary and tertiary levels. In education he has worked on enabling effective transition from secondary to tertiary education in science, effective transition from primary to secondary in science, effective Outreach by HEIs to secondary and primary schools and teaching mathematics in context at all levels.

Tim has taught chemistry for more than 38 years and his work is mainly in the promotion of chemistry. Tim won the Secondary Education Teaching Award from the Royal Society of Chemistry in 2005. In 2007 he won University of Bristol’s Engagement Award for the Faculty of Science. In March 2010 Tim was awarded an inaugural, and only, Hawksbee Award from the Royal Society for a chemist. Together with Dudley Shallcross he has jointly won several other national awards for science education.

PSTT RESOURCE

GROWING MUSIC Growing Music is a WOMAD Foundation project which brings together music, science and design technology within a cultural context.

He was Director of Outreach for Bristol ChemLabS from 2005-2010, where he developed a number of innovative programs linking tertiary science education with secondary and primary school partners, as well as the general public. He became Director of the Primary Science Teaching Trust in March 2010.

It was developed by Annie Menter and Mauricio Velasierra supported by Anne Goldsworthy. The detailed lesson plans were devised entirely by PSTT College Fellow Carol Sampey with Kulvinder Johal. The project is based on growing bamboo and making and playing Colombian ‘sikus’ or pan pipes. It features science, music and DT with other cross-curricular links. There are also details about how to bring a Colombian musician or other artists from across the world into your school. It is suitable for upper primary aged children. Growing Bamboo GROWING BAMBOO IN YOUR SCHOOL GARDEN Some of the key science elements in this project include identifying requirements of the Bamboo plant to grow; observing, measuring and recording the growth of Bamboo; and comparing and contrasting Bamboo with other plants. If you are lucky enough to have outside green space in your school, planting a Bamboo plant can be an exciting element to this project and really bring it to life for the children, Bamboo is also very easy to care for. You cannot plant Bamboo in the hope of cultivating Bamboo canes strong enough to make panpies, but you can use it for the children to learn more about the plant and the material. Bamboo is either classed as running or clumpforming. It’s important you know the difference between the two before buying a plant for your school. Running Bamboos, also known as invasive Bamboos, produce long rhizomes (underground stems), which grow away from the main plant and will spread rampantly if not contained. The following are running Bamboos1: Arundinaria, Bashania, Chimonobambusa, Clavinodum, Hibanobambusa, Indocalamus, Phyllostachys (note: may remain clump-forming in poor or dry soils but can become invasive in warm, moist or favourable conditions), Pleioblastus, Pseudosasa, Sasa, Sasaella, Sasamorpha, Semiarundinaria, Sinobambusa and Yushania.

INCLUDES: How to make panpies Growing Bamboo Science Planning & Learning Objectives Teacher Tips Cross-Curricular links & Background Science Knowledge

15:00

CONFERENCE CLOSE

Clump-forming Bamboos grow in tight clumps and are less invasive and include1: Bambusa, Chusquea, Dendrocalamus, Drepanostachyum, Fargesia, Himalayacalamus, Schizostachyum, Shibataea and Thamnocalamus. 1 www.rhs.org.uk Digging the ground

Measuring our Bamboo

Large Bamboo arrives!

Our Bamboo 3 years later! Node up close

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why& how? PRIMARY SCIENCE TEACHING TRUST

www.pstt.org.uk www.womadfoundation.org © WOMAD Foundation

Back to Contents

For more information please take a look at our resource pages:

www.pstt.org.uk/resources Primary Science Education Conference 2019 81


PSTT RESOURCE

PSTT CPD UNITS AND RESOURCES PSTT’s online and downloadable CPD units and classroom materials support teachers’ professional development and are suitable for sharing with colleagues in staff meetings. Many have video clip exemplars, and many contain associated classroom materials which are ready to use and free to download.

PERSONAL PROGRAMME PLANNERS The following daily timetables include spaces for you to create your personal conference schedule or to record reminders for yourself about what would like to visit in the exhibition hall. You can also create a personalised timetable in Sched.

DRAMATIC SCIENCE The Dramatic Science approach provides a first hand opportunity for children to engage directly with scientific processes and concepts. It facilitates enactment and exploration in various ways to examine appropriate scientific objects, ideas and perspectives. It encourages the development of curiosity and confidence in acting and talking about science in the primary classroom, and appears to support the development of scientific understanding.

THURSDAY 6 JUNE

LOCATION

10.30

Arrival and Registration

Strathblane Hall

Coffee

Cromdale (Exhibition Hall)

12.00

Welcome

Pentland Theatre

• Parents develop a greater understanding of how their children are learning science at school and they value the opportunity to spend some quality time with their child, engaged in something they are both enjoying.

12.15

Keynote Talk

• Teachers are given quality CPD in science. They also develop a greater understanding of the children by seeing them working in a family learning environment.

13.15

Lunch

14.00

SESSION 1

15.15

Coffee/tea

15.45

SESSION 2

17.00

PSTT Drinks Reception

CREATED FROM A PROJECT LED BY DEB MCGREGOR

LEARNING SCIENCE TOGETHER – FAMILY LEARNING RESOURCES This resource provides family learning sessions in science. Children come to school with a parent, and they learn science together through problem solving and investigative activities. These positive learning experiences bring benefits to all involved: • Children are empowered by learning alongside, and helping their parents.

Jim Al-Khalili

Pentland Theatre

Cromdale (Exhibition Hall)

CREATED BY ALISON ELEY

FLOORBOOKS A floorbook is a large book for recording children’s science learning, individually and collaboratively. Floorbooks are used as a strategy for developing and assessing children’s understanding of science and can be used with any age group. Floorbooks can include photographs, children’s comments, drawings, tables, graphs, annotated diagrams, classification keys and writing. Having a class record means it is easier to track changes in children’s ideas and understand how children are developing their understanding of science.

Cromdale (Exhibition Hall)

WRITTEN BY ALISON TREW AND CAROLINE SKERRY (The original PSTT Floorbook CPD unit was developed by Kendra McMahon (Bath Spa University) and teacher Rhiannedd Baker in 2002. The unit was revised in 2018)

Cromdale (Exhibition Hall)

For more information please take a look at our resource pages:

www.pstt.org.uk/resources Primary Science Education Conference 2019 83


PSTT RESOURCE

PERSONAL PROGRAMME PLANNERS

THE TEACHER ASSESSMENT IN PRIMARY SCIENCE (TAPS) The Teacher Assessment in Primary Science (TAPS) project is based at Bath Spa University and funded by the Primary Science Teaching Trust (PSTT). TAPS aims to develop support for a valid, reliable and manageable system of primary school science assessment which will have a positive impact on children’s learning.

FRIDAY 7 JUNE

LOCATION

08.30

Arrival and Registration

Strathblane Hall

The TAPS pyramid tool provides a structure to help schools evaluate and develop their assessment processes. The rich formative assessment information collected by teachers in the course of ongoing classroom work is also utilised for summative purposes – the orange arrow represents information flowing up the pyramid. Schools should begin with a focus on the ‘Pupil layer’ and the ‘Teacher layer’ at the base of the pyramid. These foundations encapsulate the principles of Assessment for Learning and this is where changes will have the most impact on pupil progress in Primary Science.

09.00

Keynote Talk

10.30

Coffee/tea

11.15

SESSION 3

12.30

Lunch

Cromdale (Exhibition Hall)

12.30

Children’s Conference

Strathblane Hall

13.30

SESSION 4

14.45

Coffee/tea

15.30

SESSION 5

17.00

The Wellcome Trust Drinks Reception

The pyramid PDF is designed to be a supportive source of examples – by clicking on each box you will be taken to examples from a range of schools. It can also provide a structure to support school self-evaluation since the interactive functions allow you to traffic light your assessment systems (on your own saved copy) and make notes on the approaches in your school. PROJECT LEADS – SARAH EARLE AND KENDRA MCMAHON

Science assessment: school self-evaluation tool

The Teacher Assessment in Primary Science (TAPS) school self-evaluation tool TAPS project team: Sarah Earle, Kendra McMahon, Chris Collier and Alan Howe from Bath Spa Institute of Education, with Dan Davies from Cardiff Metropolitan University

SCHOOL:

Laura Schulz

Pentland Theatre

Cromdale (Exhibition Hall)

DATE:

= NO EVIDENCE = SOME EVIDENCE = STRONG EVIDENCE

DIRECTION OF INFORMATION FLOW THROUGH SCHOOL

4. WHOLESCHOOL REPORTING

Science assessment processes provide a valid and reliable summary of pupil achievement at the end of Key Stages

3. SUMMATIVE REPORTING

2. MONITORING OF PUPIL PROGRESS

January 2017 1. ONGOING FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT

Parents/carers receive oral and written reports that identify the next steps for their children

E.g. progress in skills is passed onto the next teacher.

E.g. at parents’ evening, comments on homework.

Teachers base their summative judgements of pupils’ learning on a range of types of activity

Teachers take part in moderation/ discussion with each other of pupils’ work in order to align judgements

E.g. not reliant on one snapshot to make overall judgement.

E.g. staff meeting discussions of science work.

Teachers plan opportunities to elicit pupils’ science knowledge and skills E.g. plans show range of elicitation strategies at variety of times E.g. beg/mid/end lesson.

Pupils identify their existing ideas, learning needs and interests, and consider those of peers. E.g. mindmaps, annotated drawings, KWL grids, mini whiteboards, post its, talk partners.

Teachers involve pupils in discussing learning objectives and criteria for success E.g. discuss what good observation or conclusions look like.

Pupils focus on science knowledge, understanding, skills and attitudes in learning objectives and success criteria E.g. be clear about science focus rather than presentation etc.

FEEDBACK FROM DIALOGUE WITH SCHOOL LEADERSHIP, GOVERNORS AND PARENTS INFORMS CHANGES TO SCIENCE ASSESSMENT

Teachers summarise achievements in terms of what pupils can do, not only in terms of levels, grades or %

Teachers gather evidence of their pupils’ learning through questioning/ discussion and observation E.g. Open Qs, class mindmap/ concept cartoon, TA postit quotes, floorbook, annotated photos.

There is a shared understanding of progression in science E.g. staff map progression of skills, TAs are involved in assessments.

Teachers gather evidence of their pupils’ learning through study of the products of activities and tasks E.g. any recording, models, sorting.

Summaries of pupil progress across the cohort draw on a range of information E.g. learning across a range of contexts is used to decide support or extension needs

Pupils are aware of the criteria by which their work over a period of time is judged

A manageable system for recordkeeping is in operation to track and report on pupils’ learning in science

E.g. examples of what good science looks like are displayed.

E.g. expectations on planning which annotate, end of topic grids, I cans.

Teachers use assessment to advance pupils’ learning by adapting the pace, challenge and content of activities E.g. support or challenge in response to pupils.

Pupils assess their own ideas and work against known criteria

Pupils assess peers’ ideas and work against known criteria

E.g. traffic lighting or highlighting objective, commenting on whether predictions are supported.

E.g. comment on another group’s presentation, give 2 stars and a wish for piece of work.

Teachers use assessment to advance pupils’ learning by giving feedback to students about how to improve E.g. marking, oral feedback, next steps, extension Qs.

Pupils use assessment to advance their learning by acting on feedback E.g. respond to mini plenary advice in second half of lesson, make improvements in next investigation.

TEACHERPUPIL/PARENT CONFERENCES INCLUDE DIALOGUE ON ATTAINMENT IN SCIENCE

Teachers use assessment to advance pupils’ learning by providing time for students to reflect on and assess their own work E.g. read and respond time.

Pupils collaboratively (with peers/ teachers) identify next steps in learning E.g. identify which part of the success criteria is missing, consider how to make the measurement more accurate.

Cromdale (Exhibition Hall)

Produced by the Teacher Assessment in Primary Science Project, Bath Spa University, developed from from Harlen et al., (2012).

Cromdale (Exhibition Hall)

For more information please take a look at our resource pages:

www.pstt.org.uk/resources/ curriculum-materials/assessment 84

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PSTT RESOURCE

PERSONAL PROGRAMME PLANNERS

CHAIN REACTION An engaging primary school STEM project for upper KS2 children that is easily adapted to suit any age group. The Chain Reaction project provides children with the opportunity to: design, test and refine their own chain reaction ideas, making use of both DT and simple engineering skills; explore the science of forces, simple machines and energy transfers, whilst also working scientifically. There are many opportunities for further cross-curricular links.

SATURDAY 8 JUNE

LOCATION

08.30

Arrival and Registration

Strathblane Hall

09.00

Keynote Talk

10.15

SESSION 6

11.30

Coffee/tea

12.00

SESSION 7

13.15

Lunch

Cromdale (Exhibition Hall)

14.00

Science Show

Pentland Theatre

15.00

Conference Close

Pentland Theatre

Kate Bellingham

Pentland Theatre

Chain Reaction

WRITTEN BY SUE MARTIN, PETER SAINSBURY AND CAROLINE GALPIN

Sue Martin, Caroline Galpin, Peter Sainsbury

An engaging primary school STEM project for upper KS2 children that is easily adapted to suit any age group. The notion of ‘cause and effect’ is one that comes easily to most children; their own life experiences are likely to have provided many examples. Given a collection of simple toys, perhaps cars, ramp/tracks and dominoes, you might expect that even very young children will explore ways to make a car run quickly along the track to knock over dominoes that have been set up on end, so that these then fall over one by one. Adding further components to the selection, it soon becomes apparent that it is possible to link more of these actions together - and the concept of a ‘mechanical chain reaction’

develops: the movement of one object leads to that of another and then another, limited by the number of components that are available and the skill of the creator to arrange these in such a way that sufficient energy from one component is passed to the next to enable that object to move. The ‘Chain Reaction’ project provides children with the opportunity to: design, test and refine their own chain reaction ideas, utilising both D&T and simple engineering skills; explore the science of forces, simple machines and energy transfers, whilst also working scientifically; and many opportunities for further cross-

Cromdale (Exhibition Hall)

curricular links (some of which will be explored within this resource). The project has been trialled successfully in 23 schools in the PSTT Wessex region, with a number of these participating in interschools’ events to showcase and extend the ideas. Other schools across the UK have run similar activities. This resource, along with other supporting materials, is intended as a starting point for others to explore the possibilities of using cheap, readily available resources to deliver an age-appropriate STEM activity. It also aims to support teachers with background science information and relevant context.

For more information please take a look at our resource pages:

www.pstt.org.uk/resources PSTT International Conference 2019 86

Primary Science Education Conference 2019 87


THE EXHIBITION HALL

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF EXHIBITORS

Exhibition Stands Catering Point

Exhibitor Loading Bay

A28

STAGE

A30

A31 A32 A36

Tech Desk

E24

E22

E20

E18

E16

E14

E12

E10

Exhibitor Info Desk

B32 B20 A26 B30 B18 D26 A24

B16

D24 D16 B28 D22 D14

A22

C20

D20 D12

C10

LIST OF EXHIBITORS BY STAND NUMBER

B26 B12

A40

B24 B11

A42

D18 D10 B22 B10 A44 A20 A16

88

A14

A10

Primary Science Teaching Trust Academic Collaborators D26 Royal Academy of Engineering D12 Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh B12 iSandBOX D20 School Outdoor Learning A40 SciChem B11 Science & Technology Facilities Council B32 Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA) B20 SSERC/CLEAPSS C20 STEM Ambassador Hub E18 STEM Learning D14 Curiosity Box D16 The Geological Society A32 The Institution of Engineering and Technology A22 The Linnean Society of London B18 The Royal Society A10 The Royal Institution D21 TTS Group B30 Twig Education B22 Twinkl Scotland E16 BP Educational Service D22 The Wellcome Trust E24 Whizz Pop Bang B28 YPO A14

A38

B14

D21

Amazonas Comics B10 Association for Science Education A36 Canada-UK Foundation A44 Data Harvest E20 Easter Bush Science Outreach Centre E10 Edinburgh International Science Festival A30 Education Scotland/SCEL A42 Fun and Fit Bike B14 Gratnells Ltd. A26 Hands on Science E22 Hi-impact consultancy A20 Hope Education B24 Incredible Oceans D10 Institute of Physics A31 KAPLA E12 Medical Mavericks A38 Mindsets / Redfern Education A24 National Farmers’ Union D24 National Literacy Trust B16 National Museums Scotland D18 now>press>play B26 Outside Classroom Boards E14 Practical Action A16 Practical Pick & Mix A28 Primary Science Teaching Trust C10

A10 The Royal Society A14 YPO A16 Practical Action A20 Hi-impact consultancy A22 The Institution of Engineering and Technology A24 Mindsets / Redfern Education A26 Gratnells Ltd. A28 Practical Pick & Mix A30 Edinburgh International Science Festival A31 Institute of Physics A32 The Geological Society A36 Association for Science Education A38 Medical Mavericks A40 School Outdoor Learning A42 Education Scotland/SCEL A44 Canada-UK Foundation B10 Amazonas Comics B11 SciChem B12 Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh B14 Fun and Fit Bike B16 National Literacy Trust B18 The Linnean Society of London B20 Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA) B22 Twig Education B24 Hope Education

B26 now>press>play B28 Whizz Pop Bang B30 TTS Group B32 Science & Technology Facilities Council C10 Primary Science Teaching Trust C20 SSERC/CLEAPSS D10 Incredible Oceans D12 Royal Academy of Engineering D14 STEM Learning D16 Curiosity Box D18 National Museums Scotland D20 iSandBOX D21 The Royal Institution D22 BP Educational Service D24 National Farmers’ Union D26 Primary Science Teaching Trust Academic Collaborators E10 Easter Bush Science Outreach Centre E12 KAPLA E14 Outside Classroom Boards E16 Twinkl Scotland E18 STEM Ambassador Hub E20 Data Harvest E22 Hands on Science E24 The Wellcome Trust

Primary Science Education Conference 2019 89


THE EXHIBITION HALL

A10

A14

A16

A20

A22

A28

A30

A31

A38

A40

A42

B11

B12

B14

Practical Pick & Mix A24

A26

A32

A36

A44

B10

YPO

Hope Education

90

B16

B18

B20

B22

B24

B26

B28

B30

B32

C10

C20

C20

D10

D12

D14

D16

D18

D20

D21

D22

D24

D26

E10

E12

E14

E16

E18

E20

E22

E24

Visit us in the exhibition hall at STAND C20. Ask us about practical activities you’d like to try and take away lots of free resources.

Activities on our stand:: • Thursday – owl pellets & chromatography • Friday – balloon kebabs & lava lamps • Saturday – invisible ink & rockets


Primary Science Teaching Trust Trading Ltd 12 Whiteladies Road Bristol, BS8 1PD www.pstt.org.uk

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