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First published SADDLEBACK PUBLISHING, INC. Three Watson Irvine, CA 92618-2767

Published under licence 2006 by R.I.C. PUBLICATIONS® PTY LTD PO Box 332 Greenwood 6924 Western Australia www.ricpublications.com.au

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Distributed by: Australasia R.I.C. Publications, PO Box 332, Greenwood 6924, Western Australia: www.ricpublications.com.au United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland Prim-Ed Publishing, Bosheen, New Ross, Co. Wexford, Ireland: www.prim-ed.com Asia R.I.C. Publications, 5th Floor, Gotanda Mikado Building, 2-5-8 Hiratsuka, Shinagawa-Ku Tokyo, Japan 142-0051: www.ricpublications.com ©2006 Saddleback Publishing Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without the written permission of the publisher. CODE: ISBN:

6785 978-1-84654-135-3


FOREWORD This Prim-Ed Publishing® series of nonfiction chapter books will grab a student’s interest from the very first page! Designed with reluctant readers in mind, these riveting 64-page softcover books offer short chapters on astonishing headlines. The books begin with a chapter explaining the headline. Each subsequent chapter features a specific event. Chapters begin with a spread titled Datafile, designed to provide background information helpful in preparing students before reading the chapter. Datafile lists key terms, provides a historical time line, a map and interesting facts. Fascinating black and white photographs keep the pages

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turning.

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This teachers guide offers ideas and reproducible worksheets to support the book and extend students’ reading skills. Answers and sample responses are provided for ease of marking.

Teachers Notes................................... 4–5 Teachers Notes— Suggested Lesson Plan............................ 6

Attacked

Kidnapped

Stowed away

Vocabulary...................................... 37–38 Initial understanding....................... 39–40 Interpretation.................................. 41–42 Reflection.............................................. 43 Critical response.................................... 44 Research project.............................. 45–46

Vocabulary...................................... 77–78 Initial understanding........................ 79–80 Interpretation.................................. 81–82 Reflection.............................................. 83 Critical response.................................... 84 Research project.............................. 85–86

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Vocabulary.......................................... 7–8 Initial understanding......................... 9–10 Interpretation.................................. 11–12 Reflection.............................................. 13 Critical response.................................... 14 Research project............................. 15–16

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CONTENTS

Stranded at sea

Vocabulary...................................... 47–48 Initial understanding....................... 49–50 Interpretation.................................. 51–52 Reflection.............................................. 53 Critical response.................................... 54 Research project.............................. 55–56

Vocabulary...................................... 87–88 Initial understanding....................... 89–90 Interpretation.................................. 91–92 Reflection.............................................. 93 Critical response.................................... 94 Research project.............................. 95–96

Missing

Trapped

Vocabulary....................................... 57–58 Initial understanding........................ 59–60 Interpretation.................................. 61–62 Reflection.............................................. 63 Critical response.................................... 64 Research project.............................. 65–66

Vocabulary...................................... 97–98 Initial understanding..................... 99–100 Interpretation.............................. 101–102 Reflection............................................ 103 Critical response.................................. 104 Research project.......................... 105–106

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Lost and found

Captured

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Vocabulary...................................... 17–18 Initial understanding....................... 19–20 Interpretation.................................. 21–22 Reflection.............................................. 23 Critical response.................................... 24 Research project.............................. 25–26

Condemned

Vocabulary...................................... 27–28 Initial understanding....................... 29–30 Interpretation.................................. 31–32 Reflection.............................................. 33 Critical response.................................... 34 Research project.............................. 35–36

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Shot down Vocabulary...................................... 67–68 Initial understanding........................ 69–70 Interpretation.................................. 71–72 Reflection.............................................. 73 Critical response.................................... 74 Research project.............................. 75–76

Astonishing headlines

Answers...................................... 107–112

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TEACHERS NOTES The activities in this teachers guide focus on giving lower-level readers the tools to construct, extend and examine the meaning of text. The activities focus on the essential elements in reading literacy.

Vocabulary

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Vocabulary skills include decoding words, using words correctly, understanding meanings and extending the actual amount

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of words the student knows. Increased competency with vocabulary increases fluency when reading both silently and aloud. As a student decodes or recognises words more easily,

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he/she will also be able to determine and extend the meaning of entire passages more easily.

Initial understanding

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Initial understanding of text is the initial impression or unreflected understanding of what was read. Skills include identifying

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details and facts from text read, and recognising aspects of literal text, such as sequence of events or main ideas. Without initial understanding, no reader would be able to comprehend

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the text on a higher level.

Interpretation Developing interpretation goes beyond the initial impression to a more complete understanding of what was read. The reader must distinguish between and compare separate concepts in a text to extend its meaning. Examples of interpreting skills include differentiating facts from opinions, making comparisons, summarising and identifying cause and effect relationships.

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TEACHERS NOTES Reflection Personal reflection and response requires the reader to relate topics to his/her own experience. As each student connects his/ her own experiences with the text, information becomes clearer.

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Having internalised ideas, the reader can much more easily

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Critical response

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express his/her response.

Demonstrating a critical response requires the reader to detach

himself/herself from the text in order to consider and evaluate it. A critical stance may include identifying the intended audience

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and critiquing the text.

Research project Students need to develop research skills for academic competency, as well as personal advantage. Research requires problem-solving skills and writing proficiency, along with reading ability.

For many people—including students and teachers—learning about the events in the Astonishing headlines series can be both interesting and frightening. You may wish to discuss with the class unsuitable remarks and behaviour. Point out that people often react oddly to scary or sad situations. Mention that some people laugh when they are uncomfortable. Remind students not to encourage inappropriate behaviour. Disasters are typically tragic and shape the lives of many people. Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

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TEACHERS NOTES—Suggested lesson plan Purpose: The student will be able to successfully read a nonfiction text and complete relevant comprehension and research activities which correspond to the text.

Materials: • one copy of the Prim-Ed Publishing Astonishing headlines title per student • sufficient copies of the related reproducibles for all students

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Before reading: • Introduce students to the vocabulary they will encounter within the text. Students should be encouraged to use a dictionary wherever possible to strengthen dictionary skills and expand their knowledge of words and their meanings. • Set up an ‘Astonishing headlines dictionary’ by stapling together 13 sheets of paper. Write a different letter of the alphabet at the top of each page (front and back). As students read, they are encouraged to write any challenging or unfamiliar words and their definitions on the correct page. Add new vocabulary words as each book in the Astonishing headlines series is read. • Reading the book as an entire class might be helpful for lower-functioning readers. Students who are more confident may be encouraged to read the book on their own after reading one or two chapters as a class. For all levels, introduce the topic and highlight key terms, time lines and maps. • Point out that studying the information in the Datafile pages can aid understanding later when reading the text. • Although most activities are designed for use after reading the book, some are best completed before students read. A few activities may be used during the reading. These activities were designed for a variety of teaching styles. You can distribute all of the activities at once or pick and choose the skills you want to reinforce.

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During reading: • Provide a comfortable place for students to read. It is important that the reading experience be made as enjoyable as possible for students. Soft music can also be playing in the background while students are reading.

After reading: • Encourage discussion between students about the events outlined in the text. Allow students to express their opinions and feelings. • Complete any relevant activities using available resources.

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Name:

Vocabulary

WORD SCRAMBLE Read the definitions. Unscramble the letters to form a word from the book. Then write a synonym or related word for each. Definition

Scrambled word

to kill a group of people violently

srmsacae

(b)

very scared

darfia

(c)

an armed fighter

delsior

(d)

a sheltered body of water

rbraohu

(e)

a body of salt water

aneoc

(f)

an aircraft

aepnl

(g)

an exploding device

(h)

an exploding device fired underwater

pdrteoo

(i)

a person who studies

tdutens

(j)

a rally to protest against an issue

nitonsmrateod

(k)

people ruled by one government

tanion

(l)

something used to treat illness

dcmieine

Synonym or related word

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(a)

Unscrambled word

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mbbo

(m) cruel and savage (n)

a ship that travels underwater

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trlbau srbmeuina Astonishing headlines

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A

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ttacked

Name:

Vocabulary

CROSSWORD PUZZLE Use the clues below to complete the crossword puzzle.

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Across:

Down:

3. An underwater ship

1. A male monarch

5. A battle between two peoples or countries

2. America was attacked here in 1941

3. A floating vessel

7. A settler in a new colony

4. England is part of this country

9. National soldiers shot students in Kent State University

6. The capital city of Massachusetts

8. An underwater missile

11. The Vietnam War was fought here 12. Sarajevo is a city in this state

10. These people attacked the Muslims in Sarajevo

13. This US state is home to Kent State University 8

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ttacked Initial understanding

KEY FACTS As you read Attacked, fill in the chart about each attack. The complete chart might come in handy when reviewing events in the book. Where did the attack happen?

Why did the attack happen?

Another fact about the attack

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Boston massacre

Pearl Harbour bombing

Results

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When did the attack happen?

Kent State shooting

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Siege of Sarajevo

Pentagon attack

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ttacked

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Initial understanding

BEFORE, DURING, AFTER In the book Attacked, the Sunday morning attack caught the soldiers at Pearl Harbour by surprise. Use the information and clues from each event to determine what the people felt before, during and after the attack. During

After

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Pearl Harbour bombing

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Boston massacre

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Kent State shooting

Siege of Sarajevo

Pentagon attack

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ttacked Interpretation

VENN DIAGRAM To compare is to tell how things are alike. To contrast is to tell how things are different.

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Choose two events described in the book. Write their names at the top. List the ways the events are alike and the ways they are different. In the space below, create a flow chart for an attack of your choice.

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ttacked

Date:

Name:

Interpretation

FACT OR OPINION? A fact is a statement that can be proved or tested. An opinion is a statement of someone’s feelings or beliefs.

1.

Read these sentences from and about each event. Tick the appropriate box for either a fact or an opinion.

Fact

(a) King George II was unfair to the colonists................................................................

(b) The king’s soldiers killed five colonists and injured others........................................

(c) I do not like the seventh of December anymore.......................................................

(d) The men aboard USS Arizona served America well..................................................

(e) More than 1100 men died aboard USS Arizona.......................................................

(f) The Ohio National Guard killed four students and wounded nine others....................

(g) Vietnam should solve its own problems...................................................................

(h) Sarajevo was once a beautiful place.......................................................................

(i) The Serbs were brutal in their attack on innocent people.........................................

(j) More than 3500 shells slammed into Sarajevo in one day........................................

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Opinion

Write a statement of fact and an opinion you hold about one event in Attacked. Opinion

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Fact

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Name:

Date:

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ttacked Reflection

POINT OF VIEW A story can change your mind about an issue. It might change your point of view or your attitude about an issue.

1. Before you read:

2.

After you read: I ndicate your point of view about the issues below. Write A for agree or D for disagree.

(a) Aeroplane and airport safety measures were fine before 11 September 2001.

(a) Aeroplane and airport safety measures were fine before 11 September 2001.

(b) Deadly force should not be used to stop protests.

(b) Deadly force should not be used to stop protests.

(c) Fighting for independence is often deadly.

(c) Fighting for independence is often deadly.

(d) If people are conscripted to fight in a war, they should also have the right to vote.

(d) If people are conscripted to fight in a war, they should also have the right to vote.

(e) In the battle for cities, the innocent civilians suffer most.

(e) In the battle for cities, the innocent civilians suffer most.

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I ndicate your point of view about the issues below. Write A for agree or D for disagree.

Use what you know about the Pentagon attack and your own point of view to answer the question above.

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If you worked in one of the world’s landmarks today, such as the Eiffel Tower, would you be concerned about future terrorist attacks on landmarks?

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Date:

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Critical response

DIFFERENT PEOPLE, DIFFERENT USES One article might have different meanings to different people. For example, a newspaper article about the attack on the Pentagon would be meaningful to several people, but in very different ways. To a relative of a defence employee, the article would be a source of information about his or her relative’s final moments. To a rescue worker, the article could be a source of pride or recognition of her good work in saving many people from the burning building.

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For each type of person below, write how the person might view or use the information from this book about attacks.

(b) A reporter working in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, today.

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(a) A child living in Boston, USA, in 1770.

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(d) A firefighter living in Sydney, Australia, on 11 September 2001.

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(c) A Japanese tourist in Hawaii, USA, today.

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(e) A student attending Kent State University, Kent, USA, in 1970.

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WHO ELSE? Think of someone else who might find the information in this book useful. Write a sentence or two telling who this person is, and why he or she would be interested in the information.

Astonishing headlines

Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com


Name:

Date:

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ttacked Research project

RESEARCH TIPS Choose another well-known case of an attack from the list below, or find one of your own. Use these tips to help you write a report about an attack. • August 2004, A rabid otter bites a six-year-old boy while he swims at a public lake in Putnam County, USA.

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• September 2005, A saltwater crocodile attacked Russell Butel, an experienced diver, in Darwin, Australia

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• April 2004, A great white shark attacks Randall Fry, a famous sports fisherman, while he is diving 16 kilometres north of Fort Bragg, USA.

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• March 2004, 10 bombs aboard four trains in Madrid, Spain, kill 191 people and wound more than 1400 others. • July 2005, Terrorists attempt to explode four bombs in London, Britain, following attacks only a week earlier. • September 2001, Aboard Flight 93, passengers attack the cockpit door in an attempt to wrestle the plane from the hijackers’ control.

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Use a newspaper or magazine article, books or the Internet to research the event. Use two or more sources, such as three different websites, including a newspaper site.

How to use newspapers and magazines …

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• Sources the author used are often listed at the end of the article. Find the books or articles to learn more details. Remember to list all of your sources.

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• Take notes about the information, but remember to use your own words when writing about it. If you use a direct quote, use quotation marks and state the reference, including the title, the article and page number where you found it.

How to look for a book on the subject … • Using your library’s catalogue, do a title search or a subject search. Type the keyword ‘attacked’ and the place, date, person’s name involved in the event.

• If a book is shelved by author, it is a fictional or biographical book. Most nonfiction books are shelved by number using the Dewey decimal system. Use nonfiction or biographical books only.

Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

Astonishing headlines

How to find information on the Internet … • Photographs, maps, diagrams, charts and displays always make research projects more interesting. Use these visual aids to print and use with your report. • Not everything on the Internet is correct! Be sure to find the information on a site that ends with .edu, .org or .gov. Or find the same information in three separate places. Maybe your school knows of some websites that may be of use. Ask your teacher or librarian for help.

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Research project

WRITE A REPORT Use the outline below to organise information about your research subject. You might not use every category listed. On a separate sheet of paper, copy the outline. Add your own headings, subheadings or numbers, if necessary.

2. Time and place

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1. Title:

(b) Place

(i) Information about why the time was important to the event:

(i) Information about why the place was important to the event:

(ii) Another well-known event that occurred around the same time:

(ii) Background information the reader should know about the place:

(iii) Other well-known places near by, in case the reader isn’t familiar with the place:

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4. Result of the attack

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3. Sequence of events

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(a) Date

(a) How the attack started

(a) Effects

(i) Why the attack started:

(i) What places were affected:

(ii) Background information the reader should know about the cause:

(ii) What animals were affected:

(iii) Who was affected:

(b) Results

(i) Bad results from the attack:

(c) What happened after the attack

(ii) Good results from the attack:

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(b) What happened during the attack (i) Details:

(i) Details:

(ii) Recovery, clean-up, repairs:

(c) Actions taken

(i) What else has been done to prevent another attack:

(ii) What else can be done to prevent another attack:

Write a short report on the attack using your notes and your outline. Also add images, such as a map or a photograph. Be sure to proofread and edit your report. List your references at the end. 16

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Name:

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aptured Vocabulary

CLOZE

Before you read: Read the paragraph below about a famous capture. Write words in the blanks that make sense in the sentences. 1 Eichmann, stuffed him into a car, and gagged and tied him. Soon

The agents

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1.

2. At first he denied who he was, but then he

became

3 and nervous. Suddenly, he was eager to

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he knew.

After you read:

Now write words in the blanks that make sense in the sentences and in the story. Reread or skim the book, if needed.

The agents

1 Eichmann, stuffed him into a car, and gagged and tied him. Soon

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they had him back at their safe

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they had him back at their safe became

2. At first he denied who he was, but then he

3 and nervous. Suddenly, he was eager to

4 all

he knew.

Write a sentence or two to summarise the event above.

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3.

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aptured

Date:

Name:

Vocabulary

COMMON MISSPELLINGS What is wrong with the list of words below? They are all misspelled.

mised

(c)

afrad

(d)

terible

(e)

falt

(f)

crim

(g)

iland

(h)

prisonar

(i) (j)

trii

cel

Astonishing headlines dictionary How did you do on correcting the misspellings? List any words you found difficult in your own ‘Astonishing headlines dictionary’.

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(b)

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waet

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(a)

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Correctly rewrite each word. Use a dictionary or find the word in the book, if needed. Then define the word.

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1.

3.

As you read, write any difficult or unfamiliar words and their definitions on the correct page. Add new words as you read each Astonishing headlines book.

Set up your own ‘Astonishing headlines dictionary’ by stapling together a 13-page booklet. Write a letter or a group of letters on each side. For example, X–Z words should fit on one page.

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Name:

1.

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Date:

aptured Initial understanding

KWL CHART Before you read the book Captured, write in the K column facts you already know about famous captures. In the W column, write questions you would like answered. While you read the book, look for answers to your questions. After reading, write what you learned about famous captures in the L column.

know

What I

want to know

l

What I earned

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What I already

2. 3.

RESEARCH What questions were not answered? Where do you think you could find the answers?

Choose one question from the W column that the book did not answer. Research it and write the question and answer on another sheet of paper.

Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

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Name:

Initial understanding

FLOW CHART A flow chart can show cause and effect relationships. It can also show a sequence of events.

1.

Complete the flow chart about another captured person or thing described in the book.

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DC Snipers 2 Oct:

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First sniper victim shot and killed.

3 Oct:

4, 7 Oct:

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Woman and boy wounded.

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Five more victims shot and killed.

9, 11, 14 Oct:

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Two more men and a woman shot and killed.

19, 22 Oct:

Man wounded; another killed.

24 Oct: Snipers Muhammad and Malvo captured. 20

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aptured

BRAINSTORM RESULTS

Interpretation

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Think about what might have happened if one of the captured people mentioned in the book escaped. What might the results have been? Write a few ideas to explain how things might be different.

Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

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Interpretation

BEFORE, DURING, AFTER Choose one event described in the book. Brainstorm as many words as you can to describe the people’s experience before they were captured, while they were held captive, and if possible, after they escaped. List up to five words under each heading.

While held captive

After they escaped

ILLUSTRATE Draw pictures to show what you think happened before, during and after the event. Write a brief caption under each picture to explain it.

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Before the capture

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aptured

PERSONAL RESPONSE

Reflection

Answer the questions below based on your own opinions and knowledge. T hink of a well-known person or thing that has recently been captured. Who is that person or what is that thing?

2.

Do you think this event will be remembered in 10 years? Why or why not?

4.

How are the events similar and different?

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Does the recent event remind you of an event in the book? If so, which one?

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What feelings do you experience when you read about people being captured— excitement, fear, sadness or something else?

Could you capture a famous fugitive? Write a sentence or two about what you might do or say to capture him or her.

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Date:

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Critical response

AUTHOR’S PURPOSE Authors write books for many different reasons. Many books are written to inform the reader about certain facts, events or people. Some books are written to persuade the reader to think, feel, or act in a certain way. Many are written to entertain the reader. Often books are written for more than one purpose.

To inform—What features or chapters in the book make it informative?

2.

To persuade—What features or chapters in the book make it persuasive?

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Think about the book Captured. Identify the author’s purpose for writing the book.

3. To entertain—What features or chapters in the book make it entertaining?

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Name:

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aptured Research project

RESEARCH TIPS Choose another well-known captured person, animal or thing from the list below, or find one of your own. Use these tips to help you write a journal about it.

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• May 1998, Brendan Abbott, Australia’s most wanted criminal, is captured in Darwin, Australia. Abbott was wanted for the robberies of several banks.

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• November 2001, John Walker-Lindh is captured by US forces in Afghanistan. Lindh is later charged with fighting against the coalition allies, the Northern Alliance.

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• April 1996, Unabomber Ted Kaczynski is captured inside his cabin in Lincoln, USA. Kaczynski is later charged with 16 bombing incidents. • May 1934, Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow are captured and killed by a posse outside Sailes, USA. Police believed Bonnie and Clyde killed 13 people.

Use a newspaper or magazine article, books or the Internet to research the event. Use two or more sources, such as three different websites, including a newspaper site.

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How to use newspapers and magazines …

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• Sources the author used are often listed at the end of the article. Find the books or articles to learn more details. Remember to list all of your sources.

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• Take notes about the information, but remember to use your own words when writing about it. If you use a direct quote, use quotation marks and state the reference, including the title, the article and page number where you found it.

How to look for a book on the subject … • Using your library’s catalogue, do a title search or a subject search. Type the keyword ‘captured’ and the place, date, person’s name involved in the event. • If a book is shelved by author, it is a fictional or biographical book. Most nonfiction books are shelved by number using the Dewey decimal system. Use nonfiction or biographical books only.

Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

Astonishing headlines

How to find information on the Internet … • Photographs, maps, diagrams, charts and displays always make research projects more interesting. Use these visual aids to print and use with your report. • Not everything on the Internet is correct! Be sure to find the information on a site that ends with .edu, .org or .gov. Or find the same information in three separate places. Maybe your school knows of some websites that may be of use. Ask your teacher or librarian for help.

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Research project

JOURNAL WRITING Journal writing is your chance to talk about how you feel about an event. When you write in a journal, you write about your feelings and what is important to you. Your journal can be like a descriptive essay.

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Write a journal entry exploring your feelings about a captive. Think about what the word ‘captured’ means to you. Then think about how it relates to this particular case. List the key facts, including dates, location and who was captured.

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Name:

Date:

C

ondemned Vocabulary

COMMON MISSPELLINGS What is wrong with the list of words below? They are all misspelled.

(c)

staton

(d)

historick

(e)

wolve

(f)

wegh

(g)

growh

(h)

readwood

e

whitchcraft

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(b)

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evidance

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(a)

(i)

guiltie

(j)

polic

‘Astonishing headlines dictionary’ How did you do on correcting the misspellings? List any words you found difficult in your own ‘Astonishing headlines dictionary’.

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2.

Correctly rewrite each word. Use a dictionary or find the word in the book, if needed. Then define the word.

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1.

3.

As you read, write down any difficult or unfamiliar words and their definitions on the correct page. Add new words as you read each Astonishing headlines book.

Set up your own ‘Astonishing headlines dictionary’ by stapling together a 13-page booklet. Write a letter or a group of letters on each side. For example, X–Z words should fit on one page.

Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

Astonishing headlines

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ondemned

Name:

Vocabulary

SYNONYMS AND ANTONYMS Synonyms are words that mean the same thing, or words that mean almost the same thing. Antonyms are words that are opposite in meaning.

2.

(b)

angry – mad .....................

(c) match – mismatch..................

(d)

settle – live . .....................

(e) earth – dirt..............................

(f)

save – lose .......................

(g) common – rare........................

(i) winter – summer.....................

(k) stay – leave.............................

SYNONYMS ORDER

Sa m

pl

e

(a) live – die.................................

(h)

killer – murderer................

(j)

litter – group......................

(l)

confess – tell.....................

g

For each pair of words, write ‘A’ if the words are antonyms, or ‘S’ if the words are synonyms.

Organise these synonyms from least to greatest. (a) (b)

light

weighty

backbreaking

child

adult

infant

teen

detained

jailed

freed

captured

stone

pebble

boulder

rock

say

call out

whisper

shout

Vi

heavy

ew in

1.

(c)

(d) (e) 28

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ondemned

READ FOR DETAIL

Initial understanding

Before you read:

1.

Read the paragraph below about being condemned. Write words in the blanks that make sense in the sentences. 1. Two young girls, Ann

e

The people of Salem were in

2. They screamed

pl

Putnam and Abigail Williams, fell

3 . However, Dr Griggs could find

and had terrible

His conclusion: It must be

7 them. The girls said the accused must be

spirits

ew in

g

8.

2.

5! The girls blamed some

6. The girls said the people’s

townspeople for their

After you read:

Sa m

4 wrong.

Now write words in the blanks that make sense in the sentences and in the story. Reread or skim the book, if necessary. 1. Two young girls, Ann

The people of Salem were in

2. They screamed

Vi

Putnam and Abigail Williams, fell and had terrible

3 . However, Dr Griggs could find

4 wrong.

His conclusion: It must be

5! The girls blamed some 6. The girls said the people’s

townspeople for their

7 them. The girls said the accused must be

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Date:

ondemned

Name:

Initial understanding

FLOW CHART A flow chart can show cause and effect relationships between events. It can also show a sequence of events. When one event causes more than one result, a separate box is used for each result.

e

Read the first flow chart. Then complete the second flow chart using facts from the book. Then, on a separate sheet of paper, create another flow chart about another condemned person or thing described in the book.

Number Ten shot dead

pl

Snaggletooth murderer

McKittrick saw a silver-grey wolf.

Sa m

Ray Krone lived near the CBS Lounge.

He ran to get his gun and aimed.

g

He played darts at the CBS Lounge.

ew in

He often talked to Kim.

Vi

Someone with crooked teeth bit and killed Kim Ancona.

Ray Krone had crooked teeth.

The police thought he was the Snaggletooth Murderer.

30

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ondemned Interpretation

CAUSE AND EFFECT A cause makes another event happen. An effect happens as a result of a cause.

1.

Underline the cause and circle the effect in each sentence.

e

(a) When they opened the fence, Number Ten walked out of the pen.

pl

(b) The two wolves played and snuggled, because they liked each other.

Sa m

(c) Because the shirt still had saliva on it, the shirt could be tested for DNA evidence. (d) So she would not hurt Luna’s bark, Butterfly took off her shoes.

(e) Butterfly climbed into Luna’s branches, so that the timber company could not cut it down. (f) Butterfly stayed dry after her friends helped her build a tree house.

g

(g) Wolves sometimes ate farm animals, so farmers killed them.

ew in

(h) Because Dr Griggs could find nothing wrong, he thought it must be witchcraft! (i) Giles Corey was scared because the court had already hanged 11 people that summer. (j) Corey could hardly breathe because of the weight on his chest.

Vi

(k) Jackie was often seen on TV, so she thought New Yorkers might listen to her.

2.

BRAINSTORM RESULTS Choose one of the cause and effect relationships above and change either the cause or the effect. Write a sentence to describe what might now have happened.

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ondemned

Date:

Name:

Interpretation

HEADLINES Newspapers and web pages often use large print to headline an article or page. They help to grab people’s attention. Stories often include both a headline and a subheading.

pl

Choose one event from each chapter. Write a headline and subheading for each one. An event from Chapter 1 is already done for you.

Chapter 1

Headline

Subheading

Giles Corey crushed to death for refusing to speak

‘More weight’, is his only reply

(b)

Chapter 2

Chapter 3

Vi

(c)

ew in

g

(a)

Sa m

1.

• The subheading tells other important details about the event. It is set in slightly smaller type.

e

• The headline tells the most important information, or main idea, about an event. It is set in large type.

32

(d)

Chapter 4

(e)

Chapter 5

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ondemned

PERSONAL RESPONSE

Reflection

Answer the questions below, based on your own opinions and knowledge.

1.

Think of a well-known person or thing that has recently been convicted of a crime, or was in some other way condemned. Who is that person or thing?

3.

Does the recent event remind you of an event in the book? If so, which one?

4.

How are the events similar or different?

o you think this event will be remembered in D 10 years? Why or why not?

What feelings do you experience when you read about people or things being condemned—sadness, fear or something else?

Vi

5.

Different

ew in

g

Similar

Sa m

pl

e

2.

6.

Could you prevent a person or thing from becoming condemned? Write a short paragraph about what you might do to protect a person or a thing from becoming condemned.

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ondemned

Date:

Name:

Critical response

USEFUL INFORMATION A newspaper article about an innocent person being condemned might be meaningful to different people for different reasons. To a law student, the article might show how unjust the justice system is. For each person below, write how the person might view or use the information from this book about people or things being condemned. (b) A history student

(c) A police officer

ew in

g

Sa m

pl

(a) A child who loves nature

e

1.

(e) The mayor of a city

(f) An adult who loves animals

Vi

(d) An architect

34

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C

ondemned Research project

RESEARCH TIPS Choose another well-known case of someone or something condemned from the list below, or find one of your own. Use these tips to help you write a newspaper article about it.

e

• 2009, the Three Gorges Dam Project in China will submerge 632 square kilometres of land, 113 cities, 140 towns, 1352 villages and 657 factories; and will force the relocation of more than 1.3 million people.

pl

• July 2004, Bird flu caused Thai government officials to kill 25 000 fowl in an attempt to wipe out the virus.

Sa m

• January 1999, Mary Chipperfield and her husband, Roger Cawley, are condemned on charges of animal cruelty. They are world famous circus trainers. • April 2006, Martin Stephens is condemned to 20 years’ imprisonment for drug smuggling. He is known as a member of the ‘Bali Nine’.

Use an encyclopedia, books, or the Internet to research the event. Use two or more sources, such as three different websites, including a newspaper site.

g

How to use an encyclopedia …

ew in

• Sources the author used are often at the end of the article. Find the books or articles to learn more details. Remember to list all of your sources.

Vi

• Take notes about the information, but remember to use your own words when writing about it. If you use a direct quote, use quotation marks and state the source including the encyclopedia, the article, and the volume and page number where you found it.

How to look for a book on the subject … • Using your library’s catalogue, do a title search or a subject search. Type the keyword ‘condemned’ and the place, date, person’s name involved in the event. • If a book is shelved by author, it is a fictional or biographical book. Most nonfiction books are shelved by number using the Dewey decimal system. Use nonfiction or biographical books only.

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How to find information on the Internet … • Photographs, maps, diagrams, charts and displays always make research projects more interesting. Use these visual aids to print and use with your report. • Not everything on the Internet is correct! Be sure to find the information on a site that ends with .edu, .org or .gov. Or find the same information in three separate places. Maybe your school knows of some websites that may be of use. Ask your teacher or librarian for help.

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Date:

ondemned

1.

Name:

Research project

NEWSPAPER ARTICLE Answer the questions below about your research subject. (b) When did it happen?

(c) Was anyone else condemned?

(e) What was the punishment, if any?

ew in

g

(d) What was the charge, if any?

Sa m

pl

e

(a) Where did the event take place?

Vi

(f) List any other interesting facts about the (g) List any other facts that might affect you event. personally. (Do you know the condemned person or animal? Have you visited Bali? Have you visited China? Do you like going to the circus?)

2.

36

Use the facts above to write a newspaper article about the event. Write your article on a separate sheet of paper. Include an attention-grabbing headline and images, such as maps or photos. Write the most important facts first. Then add the least important details at the end. Mention or quote your references. Be sure to proofread and edit your article. Astonishing headlines

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idnapped Vocabulary

SYLLABLES What is a two-syllable word that is the theme of this book?

Kidnapped

A syllable is a word part containing one vowel sound. ‘Kidnapped’ contains two syllables: kid/ napped.

(b)

Three-syllable word that means ‘a study done on a dead body to determine the cause of death’.

(c)

Three-syllable word that means ‘a codename’.

(d)

One-syllable word that means ‘to shine brightly’.

(e)

Three-syllable word that means ‘a sleep-like state that can help people remember forgotten events’.

(f)

g

Two-syllable word that means ‘a person held captive until certain promises or conditions are met’.

Use each key term above in a sentence about kidnapping.

Vi

2.

pl

Two-syllable word that means ‘to make public’.

Sa m

(a)

e

Use the clues to determine each key term. Use the Key Terms feature at the beginning of each chapter, if needed.

ew in

1.

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K

Date:

idnapped

Name:

Vocabulary

PLACE NAMES

1.

Draw lines to match the place names on the right with the descriptions on the left. (a) A city in Utah that is home to the Smart family.

Tehran

(b) A city in Iran that was the site for the 1979 US Embassy siege.

(e) A tourist site in New Hampshire.

WORD SCRAMBLE

(a)

A city in Utah.

(b)

Elizabeth Smart was found in this state.

huta

Beirut is located in this country.

nnaoebl

Terry Anderson was abducted here.

tieubr

The 1979 US Embassy siege occurred here.

hrnate

(f)

A state next to Vermont.

wne emhpsiarh

(g)

The Hills came from here.

hutomtsorp

(h)

The capital city of France.

rasip

(i)

This state was home to the Lindberghs.

nwe yjsere

(j)

The Woodlawn Cemetery was here.

xrbno

(c) (d)

Vi

(e)

38

e

Read the definitions. Unscramble the letters to form place names from the book. slta lkea cyit

g

2.

Salt Lake City

ew in

Beirut

Sa m

(d) A quiet town in New Jersey where the Lindberghs made their home.

White Mountains

pl

(c) A city in Lebanon where Terry Anderson was taken hostage.

Hopewell

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K

idnapped Initial understanding

KWL CHART Before you read the book Kidnapped, write in the K column facts you already know about kidnapping. In the W column, write questions you would like answered. While you read the book, look for answers to your questions. After reading, write what you learned about famous captures in the L column.

know

What I

want to know

l

What I earned

Vi

ew in

g

Sa m

pl

e

What I already

2. 3.

RESEARCH What questions were not answered? Where do you think you could find the answers?

Choose one question from the W column that the book did not answer. Research it and write the question and answer on another sheet of paper.

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K

Date:

idnapped

Name:

Initial understanding

WORD WEB What does the word ‘hostage’ mean? Use the word web to show and expand your understanding of the word. Hostage: a person held captive until certain promises or conditions are met.

Beirut

How

ew in

g

Where

Sa m

pl

e

Add three or more related words to each circle to complete the word web.

Hostage

Vi

Why

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idnapped Interpretation

ARTEFACT FILE A display about the Lindbergh baby kidnapping might include the following artefacts: the wood from the ladder, the baby’s sleepsuit and the ransom note. If you were making a display or collage about one event in the book, what kinds of objects or artefacts would you use?

e

List up to ten artefacts you would use to illustrate or explain one of the kidnapping cases in the book. Have someone guess which kidnapping case you chose.

pl

1.

3.

4.

ew in

5.

g

2.

Sa m

1.

6.

7.

Vi

8.

9.

10.

2.

ARTEFACT DISPLAY Using the artefacts listed above, design a display about the kidnapping case on another sheet of paper. You can make your display look like a bulletin board or a web page.

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K

Date:

idnapped

Name:

Interpretation

PUNCTUATION Punctuation helps you read and understand the text. Full stops tell you when a sentence ends.

,

Commas show you where to pause.

?

Question marks show when someone asks a question.

‘ ’

Quotation marks show what a person said.

pl

e

.

Read the following passage about Elizabeth Smart’s kidnapping. Add the correct punctuation.

Sa m

1.

The man entered the girls’ bedroom First he looked around the room He stood over Mary Katherine for a moment Then he walked back to Elizabeth’s side He pulled her out of bed It seemed as if he had a gun

g

At first Mary Katherine was too scared to move She hid in her bed It was several hours before

2.

REVIEW

Read the passage to yourself once you are done. Does it make sense now? If not, try again.

The man entered the girls’ bedroom First he looked around the room He stood over Mary

Vi

ew in

she finally left her room Hiding behind a blanket she told her parents

Katherine for a moment Then he walked back to Elizabeth’s side He pulled her out of bed It seemed as if he had a gun

At first Mary Katherine was too scared to move She hid in her bed It was several hours before she finally left her room Hiding behind a blanket she told her parents

42

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idnapped

REACTION

Reflection

What is your first reaction when you hear the word ‘kidnapped’? Do you think of children or adults being kidnapped? Write down ten words or phrases that describe what you think of when you hear the word ‘kidnapped’. Include both positive and negative reactions.

REFLECTION

Sa m

pl

e

1.

Write a sentence to answer each question.

ew in

2.

g

When you reflect on something, you think deeply about it.

(b) Which is worse: kidnapping a child or taking an adult hostage? Why?

Vi

(a) How does the Amber Alert help find kidnapped children?

(c) Do you think the Amber Alert will deter kidnappers from snatching children? yes

no

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K

idnapped

Date:

Name:

Critical response

WHAT DO YOU THINK? Kidnappings happen every day. In the US in 1999, 58 200 children were abducted by non-family members, and 203 900 children were the victims of family abductions. In Kidnapped, the author did not list every type of kidnapping, nor did she talk about every famous kidnapping that has occurred in the world.

Vi

ew in

g

Sa m

pl

e

What do you think of the kidnappings discussed in the book? Were they the most interesting ones you had ever heard about? What other kidnappings do you want to learn about? Should the author have replaced a story with the one you want told? Why?

44

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Name:

K

Date:

idnapped Research project

RESEARCH TIPS Choose another kidnapping case from the list below, or find one of your own. Use these tips to help you write a journal about it.

• June 2005, Douglas Wood, 63 years old, is kidnapped and held hostage in Baghdad, Iraq.

Sa m

pl

e

• February 2004, Carlie Brucia, 11 years old, is kidnapped and murdered in Sarasota, USA. • October 2002, Imari Brooks, five years old, is taken from her home by James Bennett and Daryl Davis. She was found in a Euclid, USA, apartment building thanks to the Amber Alert program. • November 2002, Ryan Schmitt, seven years old, is found unharmed when a man who allegedly kidnapped him overnight heard his name broadcast on a statewide alert system and turned himself into police at Stockton, USA. • January 1996, Amber Hagerman, nine years old, is kidnapped and brutally murdered in Arlington, USA. Use newspapers, documentary films or TV shows, or the Internet to research the kidnapping. Use two or more sources, such as three different websites, including a newspaper site.

Use the reference section of the library to find current newspapers. Past newspapers are sometimes filed in the reference section.

ew in

g

How to use the library to find information …

Take notes about the information, but remember to use your own words when writing. If you use a direct quote, use quotation marks and state the reference, including the article, the date and the page number where you found it.

Vi

How to use a documentary film or TV show for information ... •

First make sure the film or TV show is a documentary and not historical fiction or ‘based on a true story’. Actual facts and fiction are combined in historical fiction.

Take notes as you watch the film or TV show. Watch it more than once. You will probably hear and understand more information the second or third time you watch it.

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How to find information on the Internet … • Photographs, maps, diagrams, charts and displays always make research projects more interesting. Use these visual aids to print and use with your report. • Not everything on the Internet is correct! Be sure to find the information on a site that ends with .edu, .org or .gov. Or find the same information in three separate places. Maybe your school knows of some websites that may be of use. Ask your teacher or librarian for help.

45


K

idnapped

Date:

Name:

Research project

JOURNAL WRITING Journal writing is your chance to talk about how you feel about an event. When you write a journal, you discuss your feelings and what is important to you. Your journal can be like a descriptive essay.

Vi

ew in

g

Sa m

pl

e

Write a journal entry exploring your feelings about a kidnapping case. Think about what the word ‘kidnapped’ means to you. Then think about how it relates to this particular case. List the key facts, including dates, location and who was involved in the kidnapping you researched.

46

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L

ost and found Vocabulary

MAKE CONNECTIONS Explain how each pair of words relates to each other when applied to the subject of lost and found.

(a)

buried – ash

(b)

hidden – city

(c)

pilot – missing

(d)

plane – wreckage

ew in

g

Sa m

pl

e

1.

adoption – reunion

Vi

(e)

(f)

2.

escape – recovery

SENTENCES Choose a pair and use it in a sentence about being lost and found.

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L

ost and found

Date:

Name:

Vocabulary

PAST TENSE Verb forms indicate the time the action happens: past, present or future. The verb form that tells that action happened in the past is called past tense. • Most verbs form the past tense by adding ‘–ed’, or adding ‘–d’ if the verb ends in ‘e’. erupt—The volcano erupted violently.

e

• Verbs that end in y form the past tense by changing ‘y’ to ‘i’ and adding ‘–ed’.

marry—Amelia Earhart did not take her husband’s name after she married him.

pl

Sa m

• Verbs with a consonant-short vowel-consonant pattern, double the final consonant before adding ‘–ed’. plan—Amelia planned to fly around the equator.

• Irregular verbs form the past tense in their own unique way.

Use the rules above to change each verb to its past tense form. (a) stop (c) destroy

(b) lose

(d) cover

(f) fly

(g) know

(h) forget

(i) move

(j) find

(k) study

(l) take

ew in

(e) dig

WRITE IN THE PAST Choose three or more words from the activity above. Use them to write a few sentences about what happened in an event from Lost and found.

Vi

2.

g

1.

run—Tuffy ran away from home.

48

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ost and found Initial understanding

WORD WEB What do the words ‘lost’ and ‘found’ mean? Use the word web to show and expand your understanding of the words.

Who/What

Pompeii

ew in

g

Where

Sa m

pl

e

Add related words to complete the word web.

Vi

Lost and found

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L

ost and found

Date:

Name:

Initial understanding

HEADLINES Newspapers and websites often use large print to headline an article or page. They help to grab people’s attention. Stories often include both a headline and a subheading.

pl

Choose one event from each chapter. Write a headline and subheading for each one. An event from Chapter 1 is already done for you.

Chapter 1

Headline

Subheading

Lost city of Pompeii found!

Ancient city buried under volcanic ash

(b)

Chapter 2

Chapter 3

Vi

(c)

ew in

g

(a)

Sa m

1.

• The subheading tells other important details about the event. It is set in slightly smaller type.

e

• The headline tells the most important information, or main idea, about an event. It is set in large type.

50

(d)

Chapter 4

(e)

Chapter 5

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ost and found Interpretation

FLOW CHART A flow chart can show cause and effect relationships. It can also show a sequence of events. When one event causes more than one result, a separate box is used for each result.

1.

Complete the flow chart about another lost and found person or thing described in the book.

e

Pompeii

Sa m

pl

Pompeii is built near Mount Vesuvius.

Mount Vesuvius erupts.

ew in

g

The volcano spews fiery ash into the air.

Vi

Pompeii burns.

The city of Pompeii is buried under ash.

Archaeologists find Pompeii.

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L

ost and found

Date:

Name:

Interpretation

DESIGN THE TOOLS Veterinarians use equipment, such as scanners, to find identification chips. Diagrams often use both art and text to give information.

Vi

ew in

g

Sa m

pl

e

Create a diagram by drawing any equipment or tools a veterinarian may need. Label and explain what each part is or what it does.

52

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ost and found Reflection

POINT OF VIEW

1.

A story can change your mind about an issue. It might change your point of view or your attitude about an issue.

Before you read: Indicate your point of view about the issues below.

e

Write A for agree or D for disagree.

pl

(a) Archaeologists should not disturb ancient cities..............................................................

Sa m

(b) Pilots should not expect others to search for them if they get lost.................................. (c) Owners need to be responsible for their pets.................................................................. (d) Adopted children should have access to information about their birth parents................ (e) Searching for lost ships or planes is very costly and is not worth it................................

2.

After you read:

g

Indicate your point of view about the issues below.

ew in

Write A for agree or D for disagree.

(a) Archaeologists should not disturb ancient cities.............................................................. (b) Pilots should not expect others to search for them if they get lost.................................. (c) Owners need to be responsible for their pets..................................................................

Vi

(d) Adopted children should have access to information about their birth parents................ (e) Searching for lost ships or planes is very costly and is not worth it................................

3.

If you found an old coin that might have formed part of a lost treasure, who would you tell first? Use what you know about the events in Lost and found and your own point of view to answer the question above.

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ost and found

Date:

Name:

Critical response

USEFUL INFORMATION A newspaper article about the return of a loved pet might be meaningful to different people for different reasons. To dog owners, the article might show how kind people help each other to find their pets. To science and technology students, the article might show the latest developments in microchips. For each person below, write how the person might view or use the information from this book about people, places or things that are lost and found.

A technology student

(c)

A police officer

A teacher

Vi

(d)

Sa m

(b)

g

A veterinarian

ew in

(a)

pl

e

1.

(e)

2.

54

A history student

WHO ELSE? Think of someone else who might find the information in Lost and found useful. Write a sentence or two telling who this person is, and why he or she would be interested in the information.

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ost and found Research project

RESEARCH TIPS Choose another well-known lost and found person, animal or thing from the list below, or find one of your own. Use these tips to help you write a news article about it. • September 2004, Zookeepers find ‘Chucky’, a 3.6-metre alligator who went missing from the Alabama Gulf Coast Zoo during Hurricane Ivan.

e

• November 1922, Howard Carter finds the entrance to the tomb of Tutankhamen, a pharaoh, or king, of ancient Egypt.

pl

• April 1912, Titanic sinks 640 kilometres off the coast of Newfoundland. In September 1985, divers find Titanic.

Sa m

• September 1994, David Noble finds a Wollemi pine, which were thought to be extinct, in Wollemi National Park, Australia. • 1906–Today, More than one million fossils have been found in the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits, Los Angeles, California. Use newspapers, magazines, books, or the Internet to research the event. Use two or more sources, such as three different websites, including a newspaper site.

References the author used are often at the end of the article. Find the books or articles to learn more details. Remember to list all of your sources.

ew in

g

How to use newspapers and magazines …

Take notes about the information, but remember to use your own words when writing it down. If you use a direct quote, use quotation marks and state the source including the title, the article, the date and page number where you found it.

Vi

How to look for a book on the subject …

Using your library’s catalogue, do a title search or a subject search. Use the keywords ‘lost and found’ and the place, date or names of the people involved in the event.

If a book is shelved by author, it is a fictional or biographical book. Most nonfiction books are shelved by number using the Dewey decimal system. Use nonfiction or biographical books only.

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How to find information on the Internet … • Photographs, maps, diagrams, charts and displays always make research projects more interesting. Use these visual aids to print and use with your report. • Not everything on the Internet is correct! Be sure to find the information on a site that ends with .edu, .org or .gov. Or find the same information in three separate places. Maybe your school knows of some websites that may be of use. Ask your teacher or librarian for help.

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ost and found

1.

Date:

Name:

Research project

WRITE A NEWS ARTICLE Answer the questions below about your research subject. (b) When did it happen?

(c) Who or what was lost?

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e

(a) Where did the event take place?

(e) Who found the person, place, animal or thing?

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(d) Where was the person, place, animal or thing found?

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(f) List any other interesting facts about the (g) List any other facts that might affect you event. personally. (Do you know someone or something that was lost? Was he, she or it ever found?)

2.

56

Use the facts above to write a news article about the event. Write your article on a separate sheet of paper. Include an attention-grabbing headline and images, such as maps or photos. Write the most important facts first. Then add the least important details at the end. Mention or quote your sources. Be sure to proofread and edit your article. Astonishing headlines

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issing Vocabulary

CROSSWORD PUZZLE Use words from Missing and the clues below to complete the crossword puzzle.

e

1.

pl

2.

Across: 1. A spaceship that landed on Mars in 1997

Sa m

3.

3. Hunted by law enforcement

4.

4. A puzzling event 6. Lost

8. A large body of salt water

g

5.

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8.

7.

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6.

9. Lowell thought he saw these on Mars 10. A vessel that sails on water 11. The shape of a mysterious body of water near Bermuda

Down: 1. A vehicle that flies in the air 2. A focused study of a crime 5. A pattern of ridges on the fingertip

9.

7. A Martian moon

10.

11.

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issing

Date:

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Vocabulary

WORD SCRAMBLE

1.

Read the definitions. Unscramble the letters to form a word from Missing. Then write a synonym or related word for each. Scrambled word

A group of people working towards a common goal.

amte ohep

(d) Very old

enitacn

(e) To defeat by force

qocunre

(f) To see

kloo

(g) Great riches

useretar

g

Sa m

(c) To strongly wish

usn

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(h) Our star

‘Astonishing Headlines Dictionary’ How did you go with unscrambling the scrambled words? List any words you found difficult in your own ‘Astonishing headlines dictionary’.

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2.

kihe

e

(b)

Set up your own ‘Astonishing headlines dictionary’ by stapling together a 13-page booklet. Write a letter or a group of letters on each side. For example, X–Z words should fit on one page.

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Synonym or related word

pl

(a) A walk through the forest

Unscrambled word

Astonishing headlines

3.

As you read, write any difficult or unfamiliar words and their definitions on the correct page. Add new words as you read each Astonishing headlines book.

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issing Initial understanding

KWL CHART Before you read the book Missing, write down the facts you already know about missing people, animals, or things in the K column. In the W column, write questions you would like answered. While you read the book, look for answers to your questions. Write everything you learned about a missing person, animal or thing in the L column.

know

What I

want to know

l

What I earned

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What I already

e

1.

Date:

2.

Write a sentence describing the most interesting thing you learned about a missing person, animal or thing while reading Missing.

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M

Date:

issing

Name:

Initial understanding

TRUE OR FALSE?

Before you read

1.

Read the statements and decide whether they are true or false. As you read, watch for facts that prove the statements true of false. Before reading

True

False

Phobos I landed on Mars in 1998.

(b)

Sojourner landed on Mars in 1997.

(c)

The Bermuda Triangle is off the coast of Florida.

(d)

J Edgar Hoover created the name ‘Bermuda Triangle’.

(e)

Hoover created a fingerprint file in 1926.

(f)

(h)

Osama bin Laden was added to the FBI’s Most Wanted list in 2001. Another name for the Bermuda Triangle is the ‘Devil’s Triangle’. Captain Sharpe was a brutal pirate.

(i)

El Muerto means ‘the mouse’.

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(a)

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(g)

(j)

False

e

True

After reading

The ivory-billed woodpecker is America’s only woodpecker.

After you read

Use information in the book to correct your answers above. Choose one true statement above and write examples from the book that prove it. Then choose a false statement above and write examples that disprove it.

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2.

True:

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False:

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issing Interpretation

ANALOGIES Boats and planes are to the Bermuda Triangle as spacecraft are to Mars. The sentence above is an analogy. Analogies can also be written like this:

Boats and planes : Bermuda Triangle / Spacecraft : Mars

pl

• antonyms (opposites) – Missing : Found

e

Analogies are based on relationships between word meanings, such as:

• synonyms (alike) – Detective : Investigator

• descriptive – Large Bird: Ivory-billed woodpecker

Sa m

• part to whole (or whole to part) – Minutes : Hour

• item to category (or category to item) – Nozomi : Spacecraft Decide how the first pair of words relates to each other. Write the type of analogy first. Then write a word to complete the analogy. Fingerprint : Finger / Thumbprint :

(b)

Seek : Hide / Run :

(c)

g

(a)

(d)

Bin Laden :

(e)

Mysterious : Disappearances /

Criminal : Outlaw / Detective :

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/ Hoover : Crime fighter : Bermuda Triangle

WRITE YOUR OWN ANALOGIES

Write your own analogies to describe an event in Missing. Make sure both pairs of words relate to each other in the same way.

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Date:

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Interpretation

BRAINSTORM RESULTS

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g

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pl

e

Think about what might have happened if one of the missing people or animals was found. What might the results have been? Write a few ideas to explain how things might be different.

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issing Reflection

REACTION

1.

Before you read: Choose one photograph from the book. Write a description of, and your reaction to, the photo.

e

Description:

Description:

ew in

My reaction:

Choose the chapter you found most interesting. Write a brief paragraph explaining the reasons why you found it interesting. Then, in a small group, discuss what you wrote. Compare and contrast the reasons you chose your favourite chapter with other students’ choices in your group. After the discussion, add to your paragraph.

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3.

Sa m

Write a description of, and your reaction to, the same photo.

g

2.

After you read:

pl

My reaction:

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issing

Date:

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Critical response

DIFFERENT PEOPLE, DIFFERENT USES One article might have different meanings to different people. For example, a newspaper article about an escaped fugitive would be interesting to many people, but in different ways. To local people, the article would inform them of a dangerous criminal in their area. To other people, they might be excited by the idea of an escaped criminal.

A police officer

(c)

A mother

(d)

A young child

(e)

A fugitive

WHO ELSE? Think of someone else who might find the information in Missing useful. Write a sentence or two explaining who this person is, and why he or she might be interested in the information.

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2.

pl

(b)

Sa m

A birdwatcher

g

(a)

e

For each person below, write how the person might view or use the information from this book about missing people or animals.

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1.

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Name:

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issing Research project

RESEARCH TIPS Choose another well-known missing person, animal or thing from the list below, or find one of your own. Use these tips to help you write a book chapter about it. • August 2004, Edward Munch’s famous painting, The Scream, is stolen from the Munch Museum in Norway.

pl

e

• April 2003, the Iraqi National Museum in Baghdad is looted. Sculptures, paintings, photographs, records and computer files are stolen and destroyed. • June 1924, Mallory and Irvine disappear while climbing Mt Everest. Mallory’s body is found in May 1999. Irvine’s body has never been found.

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• August 1871, D Mackenzie sees an unknown creature in the waters of Loch Ness, Scotland. Later called the Loch Ness Monster, the mystery is still unsolved.

Use a newspaper or magazine article, books or the Internet to research the event. Use two or more sources, such as three different websites, including a newspaper site.

How to use newspapers and magazines …

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• Sources the author used are often listed at the end of the article. Find the books or articles to learn more details. Remember to list all of your sources. • Take notes about the information, but remember to use your own words when writing about it. If you use a direct quote, use quotation marks and state the reference, including the title, the article and page number where you found it.

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How to look for a book on the subject …

• Using your library’s catalogue, do a title search or a subject search. Type the keyword ‘missing’ and the place, date or person’s name involved in the event. • If a book is shelved by author, it is a fictional or biographical book. Most nonfiction books are shelved by number using the Dewey decimal system. Use nonfiction or biographical books only.

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How to find information on the Internet …

• Photographs, maps, diagrams, charts and displays always make research projects more interesting. Use these visual aids to print and use with your report. • Not everything on the Internet is correct! Be sure to find the information on a site that ends with .edu, .org or .gov. Or find the same information in three separate places. Maybe your school knows of some websites that may be of use. Ask your teacher or librarian for help.

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Date:

issing Research project

Write a chapter Answer the questions below about your research subject. (b) Where was he, she or it last seen?

(c) What were the results?

(d) Was the missing person, animal or thing ever found? How was he, she or it found?

e

(a) When did the person, animal or thing go missing?

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1.

Name:

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(e) What are the key terms used and which words did you need to look up?

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(f) What is the sequence of events?

(g) Where did you find your information? Use the facts above to write another chapter for the book, or expand upon one of the stories mentioned. Use each chapter as a model, adding a time line, a map, key terms and a ‘Did you know?’ section. Proofread and edit your chapter. List your sources at the end of the chapter.

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hot down Vocabulary

Label groups What do these words have in common? aviator

pilot

They both mean a ‘person who flies an aeroplane’.

(a) take-off

depart

(b) fly

soar

breeze

Britain

Germany

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(c) France

exit

g

pl

What do these words have in common?

Sa m

1.

e

Tell what the words or phrases in each group have in common. Add another word or phrase to each list.

(d) FW190

U-2

747

Soviet

French

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(e) American (f) New York

Fallujah

Bordeaux

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hot down Vocabulary

secret – spy

(c)

formation – position

(d)

parachute – rescue

(e)

mission – purpose

pl

(b)

Sa m

rage – war

g

(a)

e

Make connections Explain how each pair of words relates to each other when applied to the subject of being shot down.

(f)

helicopter – plane

Choose two pairs and use them in two sentences about being shot down.

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Name:

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1.

Date:

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hot down Initial understanding

TRUE OR FALSE?

Before you read

1.

Read the statements below and decide whether they are true or false. As you read, watch for facts that prove the statements true or false. After reading, use information in the book to correct your answers. Before reading

(c) (d) (e)

Black boxes are not black, they are orange.

(g)

Flight 007 was a Vietnamese aeroplane.

(h)

Soviet fighter planes shot down Flight 007.

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g

(f)

(i)

2.

The US president gave the ‘shoot down’ order on 11/9/01. Fewer than 2000 people died at the World Trade Centre. Capt. Kimberly Hampton was the first pilot to be killed in Iraq. Capt. Hampton’s helicopter’s code name was ‘Dark Horse Six’.

False

pl

(b)

Some aeroplanes have air marshals on board.

True

Sa m

(a)

False

e

True

After reading

Francis Gary Powers was traded for a Russian spy.

Do it yourself

Choose one true statement above and write examples from the book that prove it. Then choose a false statement above and write examples that disprove it.

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True:

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False:

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hot down

Date:

Name:

Initial understanding

Identify structure The ideas in a well-written paragraph can be related to each other in one of these ways: • Main idea and supportive details • Cause and effect • Sequence of events

pl

Write the following abbreviations in the blanks to show how the ideas are related: MI/SD = main idea and supportive details, C/E = cause and effect, SOE = sequence of events and C/C = compare and contrast. It was a dangerous mission. German fighter planes protected the airfields. They patrolled the skies, looking for American and English planes to shoot down.

(b)

As the bullets hit the plane, they cut its elevator cables. Yeager could not control his plane’s altitude.

(c)

Yeager pulled open the cockpit. He rolled into the air. He fell toward the ground. Then his parachute opened.

(d)

Yeager’s parachute snapped him to an almost dead stop in midair. Below him, his plane fell until it crashed to the earth.

(e)

(f)

g

Yeager spoke no French. The French people spoke no English.

Because of its long wings, the U-2 could fly higher than any other plane. At first his instruments did not show any problems. But then he felt a change. The plane tipped forward a little. Then, it tipped a little more!

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(g)

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(a)

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• Compare and contrast

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(h)

The U-2 had one small bomb. But it was not for dropping on the enemy. It was to destroy the plane itself, before it crashed.

(i)

Because Powers was caught with a spy plane, the Soviet government said that Powers was a spy.

(j)

The Su-15 fighter pilots called to Flight 007 by radio. The pilot did not answer. The Su-15 fighter pilots then flew in front of Flight 007. The plane did not turn.

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hot down Interpretation

BEFORE, DURING, AFTER Choose one event described in the book. Brainstorm as many words as you can to describe the people’s experience before they were shot down, while they were being shot down and after they were shot down, if possible. List up to five words under each heading.

While being shot down

After they were shot down

ILLUSTRATE Draw pictures to show what you think happened before, during and after the event described above. Write a brief caption under each picture to explain it.

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2.

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e

Before being shot down

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Date:

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Interpretation

Design the Tools Pilots wear special gear and use equipment, such as parachutes, when they fly their planes. Diagrams often use both art and text to give information.

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pl

e

Create a diagram by drawing clothes, equipment and other tools a pilot might need. Label and explain what each part is or does.

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hot down Reflection

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pl

e

Discussion group Choose the chapter you found most interesting. Write a brief summary, stating the reasons why you found it interesting. Then discuss what you wrote in a small group. Compare and contrast the reasons you chose the chapter with other students in your group. After the discussion, add to your summary.

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hot down

Date:

Name:

Critical response

Many planes are shot down during times of war. However, a few are also shot down during peacetime. Answer the following questions about an event from the book that happened during your lifetime.

1.

What happened?

3.

Was this event important to you? Why or why not?

4.

How is the description in the chapter different from what you remember about the event?

How did you first find out about this event?

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2.

5.

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Did you learn any important new information? If so, what?

6.

Did the chapter leave out information you think is important? If so, what?

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hot down Research project

RESEARCH TIPS Choose another well-known case of someone or something becoming shot down from the list below, or find one of your own. Use these tips to help you write a chapter about it. • August 2004, A US Marine helicopter is shot down by men loyal to radical cleric Moqtada al-Sadr near the southern city of Najaf, Iraq.

e

• May 2006, Five British Marines are killed when their helicopter is shot down over Basra, Iraq.

pl

• April 1994, The presidents of the African states of Rwanda and Burundi are killed when their plane is shot down near the Rwandan capital, Kigali.

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• April 1918, The Red Baron, Manfred Freiherr von Richthofen, is shot down by Allied troops over the Somme Valley, France.

Use a newspaper or magazine article, books or the Internet to research the event. Use two or more sources, such as three different websites, including a newspaper site.

Use the reference section of the library to find current newspapers. Past newspapers are sometimes filed in the reference section.

ew in

g

How to use the library to find information …

Take notes about the information, but remember to use your own words when writing. If you use a direct quote, use quotation marks and state the reference, including the article, the date and the page number where you found it.

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How to use a documentary film or TV show for information ... •

First make sure the film or TV show is a documentary and not historical fiction or ‘based on a true story’. Actual facts and fiction are combined in historical fiction.

Take notes as you watch the film or TV show. Watch it more than once. You will probably hear and understand more information the second or third time you watch it.

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How to find information on the Internet … • Photographs, maps, diagrams, charts and displays always make research projects more interesting. Use these visual aids to print and use with your report. • Not everything on the Internet is correct! Be sure to find the information on a site that ends with .edu, .org or .gov. Or find the same information in three separate places. Maybe your school knows of some websites that may be of use. Ask your teacher or librarian for help.

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hot down

1.

Name:

Research project

write a chapter Answer the questions below about your research subject. (b) When did the event happen?

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pl

e

(a) Where did the event happen?

(c) Who was involved?

(e) What information do officials still need?

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g

(d) What resulted from the event?

(g) What is the sequence of events?

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(f) What are the key terms used and what words did you need to look up?

(h) Where did you get your information?

2. 76

Use the facts above to write another chapter for Shot down. Use each chapter as a model, adding a time line, a map, key terms and a ‘Did you know?’ section. Proofread and edit your chapter. List your references at the end of your chapter. Astonishing headlines

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towed away

multiple meaning words

Vocabulary

English words can have more than one meaning. For example: The ship left the harbour.

1.

Charles decided to ship himself to Texas.

Read each sentence. Circle the definition that best fits how the word is used in the sentence.

(ii) a piece of luggage

pl

(i) a set of circumstances or conditions

e

(a) The police quickly solved the case.

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(b) He felt he had no choice. (i) a cloth made of wool and fur

(ii) to believe or be aware of

(c) The treasure went down with the ship. (i) to love or hold as precious

(ii) vast riches

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(i) the shoreline

g

(d) Balboa arrived at the coast four days later.

(ii) to move along without much effort

(e) Balboa feared the captain would leave him behind. (i) a holiday from work

(ii) to fail to include or take along

(f) The brown tree snake’s eyes have a yellow centre.

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(i) the middle

(ii) a space for a certain activity

(g) It took her months to recover. (i) to get well again

(ii) to find

(h) Harriet planned to go back and free her family. (i) the rear part of the body between the neck and the hips

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(ii) to return

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towed away

Date:

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Vocabulary

Word ladders Climb these word ladders to make words related to the book Stowed away. Change one or more letters in each word to create the next word described.

2. the upper atmosphere

to rescue

to take flight

to move the hands as a signal

cunning or crafty

cave

sly

of or relating to me

ew in

g

to give in

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pl

a person forced to serve others

e

1.

3.

to remain in one place

4.

stay

to speak

given up for money

to have permission

to lay one part over another

a protected body of water

brave

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having a low temperature

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towed away Initial understanding

FLOW CHART A flow chart can show cause and effect relationships between events. It can also show a sequence of events. When one event causes more than one result, a separate box is used for each result. Read the first flow chart about Juan Guzman. Then complete the second flow chart about Charles McKinley, using facts from the book.

ew in

g

Stowed away in wheel compartment

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Dreamed of living in America

Learned about wheel compartments

Charles McKinley

e

Juan Guzman

pl

Arrived in Miami

Vi

Sent back to Colombia

Stowed away a second time

Sent back to Colombia

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towed away

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Initial understanding

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pl

e

Concept web Complete the concept web about stowing away, using information from the book and facts you already know.

Where

Who

g

Stowed away

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How

Why

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When

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towed away Interpretation

Fact or opinion? A fact is a statement that can be proved or tested. An opinion is a statement of someone’s feelings or beliefs.

1.

Read these sentences from and about each event. Tick the appropriate box for either a fact or an opinion.

Fact

(a) More than 170 Americans die from heatstroke each year.....................................

(b) Transporting illegal immigrants is wrong..............................................................

(c) Edson was trapped with two others, both of whom were dead.............................

(d) Governments should tighten security around cargo..............................................

(e) Juan felt his mother did not want him anymore....................................................

(f) Living in America was the answer to all of Juan’s problems.................................

(g) Juan stowed away in a wheel compartment, twice...............................................

(h) Most people who stow away in a wheel compartment die during the flight..........

(i) ‘Don’t worry, I know what I’m doing.’...................................................................

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e

Opinion

(j) I think stowaways are brave.................................................................................

2.

Write a statement of fact and an opinion you hold about an event in Stowed away. Opinion

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Fact

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towed away

Name:

Interpretation

POINT OF VIEW A story can change your mind about an issue. It might change your point of view or your attitude about an issue.

1.

Before you read: Indicate your point of view about the issues below.

e

Write A for agree or D for disagree.

pl

(a) Governments should allow all illegal immigrants to stay in the country they’ve arrived at.....

Sa m

(b) Stowing away is a dangerous thing to attempt..................................................................... (c) We should find a way to secure cargo and keep animals or people out of it......................... (d) It is good that slavery is illegal.............................................................................................. (e) Stowaways do not have any other choice but to stow away.................................................

Indicate your point of view about the issues below.

g

2.

After you read:

ew in

Write A for agree or D for disagree.

(a) Governments should allow all illegal immigrants to stay in the country they’ve arrived at..... (b) Stowing away is a dangerous thing to attempt..................................................................... (c) We should find a way to secure cargo and keep animals or people out of it.........................

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(d) It is good that slavery is illegal.............................................................................................. (e) Stowaways do not have any other choice but to stow away.................................................

3.

If you worked at an airport or shipping company and found a stowaway, would you turn him or her over to the authorities? Why or why not?

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towed away Reflection

Personal Response Answer the questions below based on your own opinions and knowledge.

1.

Think of a well-known person or thing that has recently stowed away on a vehicle. Who is that person or thing? Does the recent event remind you of an event in the book? If so, which one?

3.

Do you think this event will be remembered in 10 years? Why or why not?

4.

How are the events similar or different? Similar

Sa m

pl

e

2.

5.

What feelings do you experience when you read about stowaways—excitement, fear, sadness, or something else?

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6.

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Different

Could you stop someone from stowing away? Write a sentence or two about what you might do or say to stop someone from stowing away.

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Critical response

Author’s purpose Authors write books for many different reasons. Many books are written to inform the reader about certain facts, events or people. Some books are written to persuade the reader to think, feel or act in a certain way. Many are written to entertain the reader. Often books are written for more than one purpose. Think about the book Stowed away. Identify the author’s purpose for writing the book.

1.

To inform—What features or chapters in the book make it informative?

3.

To entertain—What features or chapters in the book make it entertaining?

e

To persuade—What features or chapters in the book make it persuasive?

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2.

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towed away Research project

RESEARCH TIPS Choose another well-known case of someone or something stowing away from the list below, or find one of your own. Use these tips to help you write a chapter about it. • July 2004, Six Dominican stowaways are caught by the tug Sea islander’s onboard camera.

e

• February 2001, Chinese stowaways arrive in Dover, Britain. They arrive in a cargo container; 58 people are found dead.

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• December 2002, 12 Romanian stowaways arrive in Halifax, Canada aboard the Zim California. They had stowed away in a cargo container.

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• November 1988, Microbes stow away on the International Space Station hardware and on the bodies of the astronauts that later assembled the station. Use a newspaper or magazine article, books or the Internet to research the event. Use two or more sources, such as three different websites, including a newspaper site.

Use the reference section of the library to find current newspapers. Past newspapers are sometimes filed in the reference section.

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How to use the library to find information …

Take notes about the information, but remember to use your own words when writing. If you use a direct quote, use quotation marks and state the reference, including the article, the date and the page number where you found it.

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How to use a documentary film or TV show for information ... •

First make sure the film or TV show is a documentary and not historical fiction or ‘based on a true story’. Actual facts and fiction are combined in historical fiction.

Take notes as you watch the film or TV show. Watch it more than once. You will probably hear and understand more information the second or third time you watch it.

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How to find information on the Internet … • Photographs, maps, diagrams, charts and displays always make research projects more interesting. Use these visual aids to print and use with your report. • Not everything on the Internet is correct! Be sure to find the information on a site that ends with .edu, .org or .gov. Or find the same information in three separate places. Maybe your school knows of some websites that may be of use. Ask your teacher or librarian for help.

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towed away

Date:

Name:

Research project

Journal WRITING Journal writing is your chance to talk about how you feel about an event. When you write in a journal, you write about your feelings and what is important to you. Your journal can be like a descriptive essay.

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Write a journal entry exploring your feelings about a stowaway. Think about what the word ‘stowaway’ means to you. Then think about how it relates to this particular case. List the key facts, including dates, location and who stowed away.

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Name:

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tranded at sea Vocabulary

Specialised vocabulary Sailors have their own specialised vocabulary when talking about the sea.

1.

Write a definition for each word or phrase. rigged

e

torpedo

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mutiny

voyage chronometer deck

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adrift

g

scurvy

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set sail

pirate crew

chart

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whaleboat sprung

2.

‘Astonishing Headlines Dictionary’ List any words you found difficult in your own ‘Astonishing headlines dictionary’. Set up your own ‘Astonishing headlines dictionary’ by stapling together a 13-page booklet. Write a letter or a group of letters on each side. For example, X–Z words should fit on one page.

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Astonishing headlines

3.

As you read, write any difficult or unfamiliar words and their definitions on the correct page. Add new words as you read each Astonishing headlines book.

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tranded at sea

Name:

Vocabulary

CLOZE

Before you read:

1.

Read the paragraph below about a famous shipwreck. Write words in the blanks that make sense in the sentences. 1. They were so

e

The crew had little hope when they left the

the

4. A

5 blew up and the three boats were separated. 6 seen again.

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One boat was

After you read:

2.

3. The men just lay there in

pl

2 that they could no longer

Now write words in the blanks that make sense in the sentences and in the story. Reread or skim the book, if needed. 1. They were so

g

The crew had little hope when they left the

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2 that they could no longer

the

One boat was

5 blew up and the three boats were separated.

6 seen again.

Write a sentence or two to summarise the event above.

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3.

4. A

3. The men just lay there in

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Name:

Date:

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tranded at sea Initial understanding

HEADLINES Newspapers and websites often use large print to headline an article or page. Stories often include:

1.

• The caption tells about the picture.

pl

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• The story tells us about the topic in detail. It is set in regular-sized type.

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• The headline tells the most important • The subheading information, or tells other main idea, about important details an event. It is set in about the event. large type. It is set in slightly smaller type.

Read the headline, subheading and story beginning below.

Mutiny on HMS Bounty! Fletcher Christian Leads Mutiny Against Bligh

Find another important event in Stranded at sea. Write a headline about the event. Write a subheading to tell another important detail. Then draw a picture and write a caption for it.

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2.

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28 April 1789, Christian and most of the crew dragged Capt. Bligh on deck with his hands tied …

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tranded at sea

Date:

Name:

Initial understanding

CAUSE AND EFFECT A cause makes another event happen. An effect happens as a result of a cause. Cause Hundreds of people crammed onto a small boat. Effect The boat sank under their weight. For each sentence below, draw one line under the part that tells the cause, and draw two lines under the part that tells the effect.

pl

e

1.

(a) Because word spread about the pirates, many people headed for Malaysia.

Sa m

(b) Many Jewish people returned to the horrors of the Nazis, after they were taken in by Holland, France and Belgium. (c) Hoffman was not allowed to bring anything on board with him, so he met Schiendick on shore. (d) The Jews were upset because Schiendick sang Nazi songs.

g

(e) By zigzagging, British ships hoped to avoid being torpedoed by the Germans.

ew in

(f) With only 19 of 25 boilers in use, Lusitania could not travel at top speed.

BRAINSTORM RESULTS

Choose one of the cause and effect relationships above and change either the cause or the effect. Write a sentence to describe what might have happened.

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2.

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Name:

Date:

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tranded at sea Interpretation

Compare and Contrast To compare is to tell how things are alike. To contrast is to tell how things are different. Choose two events described in the book. List the ways they are alike and the ways they are different.

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Comparisons

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Contrasts

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tranded at sea

Date:

Name:

Interpretation

Sequence The order events happen in a story is called the sequence. A flow chart shows the sequence of events in a story. Complete the flow chart using facts from ‘The wreck of Essex’. Then, on a separate sheet of paper, create a flow chart about ‘Lusitania caught off guard’.

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The wreck of Essex

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Name:

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tranded at sea Reflection

Similes A simile compares two unlike things using the words ‘like’ or ‘as’. For example: Tahiti seemed like paradise to the Bounty’s crew. Captain Turner was as fearless as a lioness protecting her cubs.

scapegoat

(c)

refugee

(d)

Nazi

(e)

boat people

(f)

2.

pl

(b)

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recluse

g

(a)

e

Create similes about the vocabulary words below.

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1.

mutiny

Answer the following question about an event in the book.

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What were the signs that told you that Essex’s crew suffered while they were stranded at sea?

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tranded at sea

Date:

Name:

Critical response

AUTHOR’S PURPOSE Authors write books for many different reasons. Many books are written to inform the reader about certain facts, events or people. Some books are written to persuade the reader to think, feel or act in a certain way. Many are written to entertain the reader. Often books are written for more than one purpose.

To inform—What features or chapters in the book make it informative?

2.

To persuade—What features or chapters in the book make it persuasive?

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1.

pl

e

Think about the book Stranded at sea. Identify the author’s purpose for writing the book.

3. To entertain—What features or chapters in the book make it entertaining?

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Name:

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tranded at sea Research project

RESEARCH TIPS Choose another well-known case of someone or something becoming stranded at sea from the list below, or find one of your own. Use the tips to help you create a news segment about it. • April 1959–Today, Many Cuban refugees are stranded at sea off the US coast every year after escaping from communist Cuba.

e

• January 2004, More than 250 Liberian refugees are stranded at sea off the coast of West Africa when the El Shaddei’s engines failed.

pl

• January 1998, Tom and Eileen Lonergan are left at sea after scuba diving on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

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• September 2003, 500 sheep are stranded at sea aboard the Cormo Express in the Persian Gulf because the Saudi government believed the sheep were infected by the disease scabby mouth. • April 2002, The crew of the tugboat American quest rescues a small, white dog that has been stranded aboard a refueling tanker off the coast of Honolulu, USA, for 24 days.

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Use a newspaper or magazine article, books or the Internet to research the event. Use two or more sources, such as three different websites, including a newspaper site.

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How to use newspapers and magazines … • Sources the author used are often listed at the end of the article. Find the books or articles to learn more details. Remember to list all of your sources.

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• Take notes about the information, but remember to use your own words when writing about it. If you use a direct quote, use quotation marks and state the reference, including the title, the article and page number where you found it.

How to look for a book on the subject …

• Using your library’s catalogue, do a title search or a subject search. Type the keywords ‘stranded at sea’ and the place, date, person’s name involved in the event. • If a book is shelved by author, it is a fictional or biographical book. Most nonfiction books are shelved by number using the Dewey decimal system. Use nonfiction or biographical books only.

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How to find information on the Internet … • Photographs, maps, diagrams, charts and displays always make research projects more interesting. Use these visual aids to print and use with your report. • Not everything on the Internet is correct! Be sure to find the information on a site that ends with .edu, .org or .gov. Or find the same information in three separate places. Maybe your school knows of some websites that may be of use. Ask your teacher or librarian for help. 95


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tranded at sea

1.

Name:

Research project

news segment Answer the questions below about your research subject. (b) When did it happen?

(c) Who was stranded at sea?

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pl

e

(a) Where did the event take place?

(e) How did they become stranded at sea?

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(d) Where did they come from and where were they going?

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(f) List any other interesting facts about the (g) List any other facts that might affect you event. personally. (Do you know someone or something that was stranded at sea? Do you like travelling by boat?)

2.

Use the facts above to write a newspaper article about the event. Write your article on a separate sheet of paper. Include an attention-grabbing headline and images, such as maps or photos. Write the most important facts first. Then add the least important details at the end. Mention or quote your references. Then watch a news segment to see how information is presented. Think about how a news segment is similar to and different from a news article. Be sure to edit and practise reading your article. Then perform your news segment to the class or record your segment using a video or digital camera.

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Name:

Date:

T

rapped Vocabulary

Word ladders Climb these word ladders to make words related to the book Trapped. Change one, two or three letters in each word to create the next word described.

2.

a type of music

a large container that holds liquid

to express gratitude

cap

to use your mind

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g

something worn on the head

stank

pl

to catch someone and hold them

the past tense of ‘stink’

map

Sa m

a picture that tells where you are

e

1.

3.

when land is underwater

4.

flood

an underwater vehicle another word for ‘bath’

the way to leave a building

a heavy stick

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what people walk on

one part of a building

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room

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sub

to stroke firmly and quickly

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rapped

Name:

Vocabulary

word parts The word ‘inspector’ comes from the word parts ‘inspect’ meaning ‘to study closely’ and ‘or’ meaning ‘a person who does’. An inspector is someone who studies things closely.

(b)

worker

(c)

everywhere

(d)

‘shop’: a factory

‘work’: to toil

‘er’: a person who does

‘every’: total

‘un’: not

g

‘where’: place

unsafe

‘safe’: free from harm

government

‘govern’: to rule

‘ment’: a condition or thing

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(e)

‘sweat’: to perspire

pl

sweatshop

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(a)

e

Use the explanations of the word parts to write your own definition for each word. Use the book or a dictionary, if needed.

ew in

1.

When you look at a new word, try to find word parts that are familiar to you.

2.

98

Draw a line to match each word to its definition.

(a) sunken

• an underwater vehicle

(b) survivor

• a state of being free

(c) submarine •

• lying on the bottom of a body of water

(d) rescuer

• a person who remains alive

(e) freedom

• a person who saves others

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Name:

Date:

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rapped Initial understanding

Sa m

pl

e

Concept web Complete the concept web about traps, using information from the book and facts you already know.

When

g

Traps

Who

Where

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How

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rapped

Date:

Name:

Initial understanding

summary chart A summary is a short description of events; it ‘sums up’ what you read. A summary lists the main ideas, not the supporting details.

pl

After you read each chapter in Trapped, write a summary of the chapter. Use only one or two sentences to tell the main idea.

Sa m

1.

Summary: At 1.00 a.m., the small, cage-like basket lifted the first man to the surface.

e

Passage: The basket was like a cage. It was just 55 centimetres wide. The basket carried food and drink for the men. After eating, the first man climbed into the basket. At 1.00 a.m., he was lifted to the surface.

Summary of chapter

Chapter 1

(b)

Chapter 2

Chapter 3

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(c)

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(a)

100

(d)

Chapter 4

(e)

Chapter 5

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rapped Interpretation

ANALOGIES Fire is to New York as Tank Rupture is to Boston. The sentence above is an analogy. Analogies can also be written like this: Fire : New York / Tank Rupture : Boston

• antonyms (opposites) – Burn : Extinguish

• descriptive – Large : Kursk

pl

• synonyms (alike) – Rescuer : Firefighter

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Analogies are based on relationships between word meanings, such as:

Sa m

• part to whole (or whole to part) – Minutes : Hour

• item to category (or category to item) – Steamer : Ship Decide how the first pair of words relates to each other. Write the type of analogy first. Then write a word to complete the analogy. East Germans : Trapped / West Germans :

(b)

Sailor : Crew / Teacher :

(c)

g

(a)

(d)

Midnight : Night / Midday :

(e)

Gram : Kilogram / Metre :

City : Town / Large :

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1.

WRITE YOUR OWN ANALOGIES

Write your own analogies to describe an event in Trapped. Make sure both pairs of words relate to each other in the same way.

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2.

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Date:

rapped

1.

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Interpretation

BEFORE, DURING, AFTER Choose one event described in the book. Brainstorm as many words as you can to describe the people’s experience before they were trapped, while they were trapped and after they escaped. List up to five words under each heading.

While trapped

After they escaped

ILLUSTRATE Draw pictures to show what you think happened before, during and after the event. Write a brief caption under each picture to explain it.

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2.

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pl

e

Before becoming trapped

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rapped Reflection

REACTION

1.

Before you read: Choose one photograph from the book. Write a description of, and your reaction to, the photo.

e

Description:

Description:

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My reaction:

Choose the chapter you found the most interesting. On another sheet of paper, write a brief summary stating the reasons why you found it interesting. Then, in a small group, discuss what you wrote. Compare and contrast the reasons you chose the chapter with other student’s choices in your group. After the discussion, add to your summary.

Vi

3.

Sa m

Write a description of, and your reaction to, the same photo.

g

2.

After you read:

pl

My reaction:

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rapped

Date:

Name:

Critical response

USEFUL INFORMATION One article might have different meanings to different people. For example, a newspaper article about someone being rescued from a collapsed mineshaft would be meaningful to many people, but in different ways. To the rescue worker, the article would be a source of pride or recognition of his or her work. To the people of the small mining town, the article could celebrate a triumph over adversity. For each person below, write how the person might view or use the information from this book about being trapped.

A miner

(c)

A submarine captain

A tourist about to visit Germany

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(d)

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(b)

g

A Russian child

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(a)

pl

e

1.

(e)

A Boston news reporter

2.

WHO ELSE? Think of someone else who might find the information in Trapped useful. Write a sentence or two telling who this person is, and why he or she would be interested in the information.

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Name:

Date:

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rapped Research project

RESEARCH TIPS Choose another well-known case of someone or something trapped from the list below, or find one of your own. Use these tips to help you write a newspaper article about it.

e

• July 2004, 20 people are trapped 107 metres in the air aboard a hot-air balloon when its winch failed near Baltimore’s (USA) inner harbour.

pl

• July 2004, 4000 pilgrims are trapped by mudslides while travelling to the holy town of Badrinath, India. • November 1999, Seven explorers are trapped in a flooded cave in Southern France.

Sa m

• September 2001, Alan Mann is trapped along with 24 other people in No. 13 Elevator in the South tower of the World Trade Centre. • June 1985, Joe Simpson is trapped high on a mountain, and thought to be dead, in Peru. Use an encyclopedia, books or the Internet to research the event. Use two or more sources, such as three different websites, including a newspaper site.

g

How to use an encyclopedia …

You can find encyclopedias in the reference sections of libraries as well as online.

Most encyclopedias include cross-references at the end of each article. This means that it lists other places in the encyclopedia where the event is mentioned. For example, facts about Kursk might be found under ‘Kursk’, ‘submarine’ and ‘sinking’. Sometimes the crossreference will not be labelled, but it might be in small capital letters or italics.

Vi

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How to look for a book on the subject …

• Using your library’s catalogue, do a title search or a subject search. Type the keyword ‘trapped’ and the place, date, person’s name involved in the event. • If a book is shelved by author, it is a fictional or biographical book. Most nonfiction books are shelved by number using the Dewey decimal system. Use nonfiction or biographical books only.

Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

Astonishing headlines

How to find information on the Internet … • Photographs, maps, diagrams, charts and displays always make research projects more interesting. Use these visual aids to print and use with your report. • Not everything on the Internet is correct! Be sure to find the information on a site that ends with .edu, .org or .gov. Or find the same information in three separate places. Maybe your school knows of some websites that may be of use. Ask your teacher or librarian for help.

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rapped

1.

Name:

Research project

KWL CHART Before you read the book Trapped, write in the K column facts you already know about being trapped. In the W column, write questions you would like answered. While you read the book, look for answers to your questions. After reading, write what you learned about being trapped in the L column.

know

What I

want to know

l

What I earned

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e

What I already

2.

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Share your KWL chart with your class. Meet as a group with your fellow classmates who researched the same topic. Share what you learned and what you would still like to know. Perhaps someone found an answer you could not. Astonishing headlines

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ANSWERS Attacked

Captured

(a) massacre, kill (b) afraid, frightened (c) soldier, fighter (d) harbour, shelter (e) ocean, sea (f) plane, aircraft (g) bomb, rocket (h) torpedo, missile (i) student, pupil (j) demonstration, rally (k) nation, country (l) medicine, drug (m) brutal, cruel (n) submarine, underwater boat

Crossword puzzle

Answers will vary.

Before, during, after

Answers will vary.

Vi

(a) Opinion (b) Fact (d) Opinion (e) Fact (g) Opinion (h) Opinion (j) Fact Answers will vary.

Point of view

page 12

(c) Opinion (f) Fact (i) Opinion

page 13

page 14

(a) wait: to linger; remain (b) missed: failed to reach or meet (c) afraid: frightened (d) terrible: very awful; horrible (e) fault: a weakness (f) crime: an illegal act (g) island: a piece of land entirely surrounded by water (h) prisoner: a jailed person (i) try: to attempt to do something (j) cell: a room with a locked door and bars on the windows 2 – 3. Answers will vary

KWL chart

Flow chart

page 22

Answers will vary.

Personal response

page 21

Answers will vary.

Before, during, after

page 20

Answers will vary.

Brainstorm results

page 19

Answers will vary.

page 23

Answers will vary.

page 24

Answers will vary.

Research project pages 15–16

page 18

e

1.

Author’s purpose

Answers will vary.

Research project

page 11

Answers will vary.

Different people, different uses

page 10

Answers will vary.

Fact or opinion? 1. 2.

page 9

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Venn diagram

Common misspellings

g

Key facts

page 17

1 – 2. grabbed (1) house (2) frightened (3) tell (4) 3. Answers will vary.

page 8

Across: 3. submarine, 5. war, 7. colonist, 9. guard, 11. Vietnam, 12. Bosnia, 13. Ohio Down: 1. king, 2, Pearl Harbour, 3. ship, 4. Britain, 6. Boston, 8. torpedo, 10. Serb

Cloze

Sa m

1.

page 7

pl

Word scramble

pages 25–26

Answers will vary.

Answers will vary

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107


ANSWERS

(a) (b) (c) (d) (e)

evidence: something that shows proof witchcraft: the use of magic station: a place to catch trains or buses historic: important to a community wolf: a member of the dog family that hunts and lives in packs (f) weigh: to have a certain heaviness (g) growth: the process of growing (h) redwood: a tree that has red wood (i) guilty: deserving of punishment; not innocent (j) police: law enforcement officials 2–3. Answers will vary.

Synonyms and antonyms A (b) S S (e) S A (h) S S (k) A light, weighty, heavy, backbreaking infant, child, teen, adult freed, captured, detained, jailed pebble, stone, rock, boulder whisper, say, call out, shout

(c) A (f) A (i) A (l) S

g

(a) (d) (g) (j) (a) (b) (c) (d) (e)

page 28

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1. 2.

Sa m

1.

page 27

Read for detail

1 –2. hysterics (1) nothing (4) tortured (7)

page 29

ill (2) witchcraft (5) witches (8)

Flow chart

fits (3) illness (6)

page 30

Vi

Possible answers include: Dusty Steinmasel told McKittrick not to shoot. McKittrick fired. Number Ten fell dead.

Cause and effect 1. (a) (b) (c)

108

e

Common misspellings

(d) Cause: So she would not hurt Luna’s bark. Effect: Butterfly took off her shoes. (e) Cause: So that the timber company could not cut it down. Effect: Butterfly climbed into Luna’s branches. (f) Cause: After her friends helped her build a tree house. Effect: Butterfly stayed dry. (g) Cause: Wolves sometimes ate farm animals. Effect: So farmers killed them. (h) Cause: Because Dr Griggs could find nothing wrong. Effect: He thought it must be witchcraft. (i) Cause: Because the court had already hanged 11 people that summer. Effect: Giles Corey was scared. (j) Cause: Because of the weight on his chest. Effect: Corey could hardly breathe. (k) Cause: Jackie was often seen on TV. Effect: So she thought New Yorkers might listen to her. 2. Answers will vary.

pl

Condemned

Headlines

page 32

Answers will vary.

Personal response

page 33

Answers will vary.

Useful information

page 34

Answers will vary.

Research project

pages 35–36

Answers will vary.

Kidnapped Syllables page 31

Cause: When they opened the fence. Effect: Number Ten walked out of the pen. Cause: Because they liked each other. Effect: The two wolves played and snuggled. Cause: Because the shirt had saliva on it. Effect: The shirt could be tested for DNA evidence.

1. 2.

page 37

(a) release (b) autopsy (d) blaze (e) hypnosis Answers will vary

Place names 1.

Astonishing headlines

(a) e (c) d (e) c

(c) alias (f) hostage

page 38 (b) a (d) b

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ANSWERS Salt Lake City Lebanon Tehran Portsmouth New Jersey

(b) Utah (d) Beirut (f) New Hampshire (h) Paris (j) Bronx

KWL chart

page 40

Answers will vary.

page 41

Answers will vary.

See page 53 of Kidnapped.

page 43

Answers will vary.

What do you think?

page 44

Answers will vary.

Answers will vary.

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pages 45–46

g

Research project

Lost and found

Make connections

page 47

Answers will vary.

Past tense

(a) stopped (c) destroyed (e) dug (g) knew (i) moved (k) studied Answers will vary.

Vi

1. 2.

page 48

(b) lost (d) covered (f) flew (h) forgotten (j) found (l) took/taken

Word web

page 53

Answers will vary.

Answers will vary.

Research project

Crossword Puzzle

Word scramble 1. 2.

1. 2.

page 57

Across: 1. Pathfinder, 3. wanted, 4. mystery, 6. missing, 8. ocean, 9. canals, 10. ship, 11. triangle Down: 1. plane, 2. investigation, 5. fingerprint, 7. Phobos

page 58

(a) hike/trek (b) team/group (c) hope/wish (d) ancient/old (e) conquer/beat (f) look/gaze (g) treasure/jewels (h) sun/star Answers will vary.

page 59

Answers will vary.

True or False?

page 50

page 55–56

Missing

page 49

page 54

Answers will vary.

KWL chart

Answers will vary.

Headlines

Answers will vary.

Useful information

page 42

page 52

Point of view

Reaction

Answers will vary.

Sa m

Punctuation

page 51

Design the tools

Answers will vary.

Artefact file

page 39

Word web

Flow chart

e

(a) (c) (e) (g) (i)

pl

2.

(a) F (b) T (d) F (e) T (g) T (h) T (j) F Answers will vary.

page 60 (c) T (f) F (i) F

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Astonishing headlines

109


ANSWERS (a) Thumb—part to whole (b) Walk—antonyms (c) Investigator—synonyms (d) Terrorist—item to category (e) Dangerous—descriptive Answers will vary.

Brainstorm results

page 63

page 64

Answers will vary.

pages 65–66

Answers will vary.

page 67

ew in

g

(a) They are all things planes do., lift off (b) They all describe flying., float (c) They are all country names., Australia (d) They are all names of planes., Su-15 (e) They are all names of nationalities., British (f) They are all names of cities., Sydney Answers will vary.

page 68

Answers will vary.

Vi

(a) True (b) True (d) False (e) True (g) False (h) True Answers will vary.

Identify structure

110

(a) (d) (g) (j)

MI/SD C/C SOE SOE

page 74

Answers will vary.

pages 75–76

Answers will vary.

Multiple meaning words 1.

True or false?

1.

Answers will vary.

Stowed away

Make connections

1. 2.

page 73

Research project

Answers will vary.

Label groups

Answers will vary.

Discussion group

Shot down 1.

page 72

Critical response

Research project

Answers will vary.

Different people, different uses

Answers will vary.

Design the tools

page 62

Reaction

page 71

pl

Before, during, after

Sa m

1. 2.

page 61

e

Analogies

page 69

(c) False (f) True (i) True

page 70 (b) C/E (e) C/C (h) MI/SD

(c) SOE (f) C/E (i) C/E

(a) i (d) i (g) i

(b) ii (e) ii (h) ii

Word ladders

1. 2. 3. 4.

Answers will vary.

page 80

Answers will vary.

Fact or opinion? 1. 2.

page 81

(a) F (b) O (d) O (e) O (g) F (h) F (j) O Answers will vary.

Point of view

Astonishing headlines

page 78

page 79

Concept web

(c) ii (f) i

slave, save, wave, cave sky, fly, sly, my stay, say, may, bay cold, sold, fold, bold

Flow chart

page 77

(c) F (f) O (i) O

page 82

Answers will vary.

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ANSWERS Answers will vary.

Author’s purpose

page 84

Answers will vary.

Research project

pages 85–86

Specialised vocabulary

page 87

Answers will vary.

Cloze

page 88

1 –2. island (1) weak (2) boats (4) storm (5) 3. Answers will vary.

Headlines Answers will vary.

Cause and effect

Essex leaves Nantucket, USA on a two-year whaling voyage. A sperm whale twice charges Essex. Essex sinks in 10 minutes. The crew sails in whaleboats to Henderson Island. Most of the crew leaves the island in search of more food. Dying of starvation, the crew decides to eat each other. The crews of Indian and Dauphin rescue the crew. Chase writes a famous novel about his experience. Answers will vary.

Similes

navigate (3) never (6)

page 89

g

ew in

Vi

pages 95–96

Answers will vary.

Trapped Word ladders

1. 2. 3. 4.

Word parts 1. 2.

Answers will vary. (a) c (b) d (d) e (e) b

page 98 (c) a

page 99

Answers will vary.

Summary chart

page 97

map, trap, rap, cap stank, tank, thank, think flood, floor, door, room sub, tub, club, rub

Concept web

page 91

page 94

Answers will vary.

Research project

page 90

page 93

Answers will vary.

Author’s purpose

1. (a) Cause: Because word spread about the pirates Effect: many people headed for Malaysia. (b) Effect: Many Jewish people returned to the horrors of the Nazis Cause: after they were taken in by Holland, France and Belgium. (c) Cause: Hoffman was not allowed to bring anything on board with him Effect: so he met Schiendick on shore. (d) Cause: because Schiendick sang Nazi songs. Effect: The Jews were upset (e) Cause: By zigzagging Effect: British ships hoped to avoid being torpedoed by the Germans. (f) Cause: With only 19 of 25 boilers in use Effect: Lusitania could not travel at top speed. 2. Answers will vary.

Compare and contrast

page 92

Sa m

Answers will vary.

Stranded at sea

Sequence

e

page 83

pl

Personal response

page 100

Answers will vary.

Answers will vary.

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Astonishing headlines

111


ANSWERS Analogies (a) Free – descriptive (b) Staff – item to category (c) Small – antonyms (d) Day – synonyms (e) Kilometre – part to whole Answers will vary.

Answers will vary.

Reaction

Answers will vary.

Useful information

Answers will vary.

Research project Answers will vary.

page 104

pages 105–106

Vi

ew in

g

page 103

pl

page 102

e

Before, during, after

Sa m

1. 2.

page 101

112

Astonishing headlines

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6785 Astonishing Headlines Teachers Resource Guide