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URSERY RHYMES

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Sing and play

12 3

9 6

Amelia Ruscoe 6579


Nursery rhymes – Sing and play This master may only be reproduced by the original purchaser for use with their class(es). The publisher prohibits the loaning or onselling of this master for the purposes of reproduction.

Published by Prim-Ed Publishing® 2011 Copyright© Amelia Ruscoe 2010 ISBN 978-1-84654-273-2 PR–6579

Copyright Notice Blackline masters or copy masters are published and sold with a limited copyright. This copyright allows publishers to provide teachers and schools with a wide range of learning activities without copyright being breached. This limited copyright allows the purchaser to make sufficient copies for use within their own education institution. The copyright is not transferable, nor can it be onsold. Following these instructions is not essential but will ensure that you, as the purchaser, have evidence of legal ownership to the copyright if inspection occurs.

Titles available in this series: Nursery rhymes – Early themes Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

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Internet websites

In some cases, websites or specific URLs may be recommended. While these are checked and rechecked at the time of publication, the publisher has no control over any subsequent changes which may be made to webpages. It is strongly recommended that the class teacher checks all URLs before allowing pupils to access them.

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Website: www.prim-ed.com


Foreword Nursery rhymes – Sing and play provides teachers with an anthology of popular nursery rhymes to explore with their pupils through music, movement and art and craft. The rhymes and activities can support and enhance the concepts investigated in existing teaching and learning programmes. Nursery rhymes are widely used by educators to provide a wealth of stimulus for children to learn about their world. They are building blocks on which to develop a foundation in literacy and with which to address key concepts in the curriculum. Nursery rhymes are easy to use, fun to perform and, of course, children love them!

Contents Teachers notes.............................................................. ii – iii

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Resource list.............................................................................. iv Curriculum links.................................................................. v – vii

Finger play......................................................................2–13

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Open, shut them.........................................................................2–5 Two little chicky birds..................................................................6–9 Where is Thumbkin?................................................................10–13

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Ten in the bed........................................................................14–17 This old man...........................................................................18–21 Ten little sausages...................................................................22–25 Three little speckled frogs.........................................................26–29 Three little ducks.....................................................................30–33 Johnny works with one hammer................................................34–37

Clock rhymes................................................................38–45

Hickory, dickory, dock.............................................................38–41 Cuckoo..................................................................................42–45

Weather..........................................................................46–53

It’s raining, it’s pouring............................................................46–49 Here we go round the mulberry bush.........................................50–53

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Counting games..........................................................14–37

Cooking...........................................................................54–69

Hot cross buns........................................................................54–57 Pat-a-cake..............................................................................58–61 Polly, put the kettle on..............................................................62–65 One potato, two potato...........................................................66–69

Favourites ...................................................................70–101

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Humpty Dumpty......................................................................70–73 Teddy bear, teddy bear...........................................................74–77 Hey diddle diddle...................................................................78–81 Miss Molly had a dolly............................................................82–85 If you’re happy and you know it...............................................86–89 Pussy cat, pussy cat.................................................................90–93 Jack-in-the-box........................................................................94–97 Looby loo.............................................................................98–101

Flashcards .................................................................102–114 Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

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Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Teachers notes

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Nursery rhymes are a fun, interactive tool for enhancing children’s early literacy, introducing them to simple language and rhyme, the sequencing of ideas, stimulating characters and settings, and simple story structures. In addition to literacy development, these nursery rhymes and their associated activities assist in the development of children’s counting skills, listening skills, music and movement skills; and their ability to follow directions and to understand concepts relating to their world, such as growing up, relationships, the natural world and communities.

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The tunes of nursery rhymes are based on simple melodies and rhythms, which help children recall them easily. The melody line of each rhyme has been included for teacher use.

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Children love to perform actions to songs and rhymes. These actions help children to recall and give meaning to the words of the rhyme. Each nursery rhyme is accompanied by a detailed description of actions to be performed. In some cases, they take the form of a simple game or story re-enactment.

Ideas for additional activities from across the curriculum have also been supplied to enrich the teaching and learning associated with each nursery rhyme. A simple activity sheet (with the words of the rhyme and a simple task for the children to complete) has also been included for each rhyme. These activity sheets can be used by the whole class for children to follow as the rhyme is sung.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

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Art and craft activities have been included to enhance the teaching and learning associated with each rhyme. The crafts have been designed to be able to be easily constructed by small children, with minimal need for adult help. Most of the activities involve simple colouring and assembly tasks (with uncomplicated lines to follow for cutting and gluing) appropriate for early childhood development. With activities which may prove challenging for children still developing their fine motor skills, reference has been made in the teachers notes to alert that additional help may be required. This allows the teacher to plan adequately for the lesson and organise support, if necessary. The teachers notes also include additional suggestions for using, playing with or displaying the completed craft.

Step-by-step instructions have been included to assist in directing whole-class or small group lessons. For best results, model the construction of the craft for the children before they complete the task themselves.

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Having a completed example of the craft helps the children visualise what their finished craft should look like and gives them the opportunity to make creative variations to the craft if they wish.

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Minimal additional craft materials are required for the completion of these activities. In most cases, the resources required can be found in commonly-stocked lower primary supply rooms. A list of the resources required for completing the craft activities in Nursery rhymes – Sing and play can be found on page iv.

Each nursery rhyme comes with a flashcard which can be copied onto card and laminated. These cards can be compiled and clipped onto a ring to create a flip book of nursery rhyme ideas. The simple illustrations make them ideal for children to use to identify well-known rhymes. They provide opportunities for transitional readers to experience achievement as they ‘read’ each card by using the picture and initial sound cues. As a flip book, this resource forms a comprehensive reference resource for teachers, with the added dimension of being suitable for children to use independently to select rhymes themselves for singing, role-playing and as discussion stimulus during group ‘floor time’.

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Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Resource list

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To ensure art and craft lessons run smoothly, it is essential to prepare resources beforehand. This list is a compilation of the additional craft resources required to complete the craft activities in this book.

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A4 paper acrylic paints adhesive tape coloured craft feathers coloured crayons coloured fabric scraps coloured paper coloured pencils coloured stickers cooking salt craft knife craft sticks crepe paper dot stickers drawing-pins edicol dye glitter glue sticks hole puncher large envelopes newspaper paper plates plasticine plastic bottle lids plastic sheeting plastic squeeze bottles polystyrene beads PVA glue recycled wrapping paper scissors sequins split pins sponges stapler staples string wax crayons white cardboard wide paintbrush

It is important that an appropriate workspace is created for each craft activity. Consider the medium being used and its potential for ‘mess’; e.g. lay newspaper or plastic sheet prior to painting tasks and ensure children are wearing appropriate protective clothing. Where children will be using glue or scissors, or sharp items such as split pins, be specific about your expectations related to correct procedure and safe practice.

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Curriculum links England – Early years foundation stage (40-60+months) Subject

Objective

Communication, language and literacy

Language for communication • listen with enjoyment, and respond to stories, songs, rhymes and poems

Creative development

Exploring media and materials • understand that different media can be combined to create new effects • experiment to create different textures • create constructions, collages, paintings and drawings • work creatively on a small scale • explore colour, texture, shape, form and space in two or three dimensions Creating music and dance • begin to build a repertoire of songs • sing simple songs from memory and match movements to music

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Northern Ireland – Foundation stage Objective

Language and literacy

Talking and listening • listen to a wide range of stories, poems, songs and music Reading • read a range of texts • listen to stories and poems

The arts

Art and design • investigate and talk about colours, lines, shapes, textures and patterns • explore and use a wide range of materials and processes • create and develop ideas using colours, lines, shapes, textures and patterns Music • listen to, join in and remember a range of rhymes and simple songs • take part in singing activities • sing in a range of situations throughout the day

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Subject

Republic of Ireland – Primary curriculum – Junior and senior infants Subject

Objective

English language

Receptiveness to language • listen to, enjoy and respond to stories, nursery rhymes, poems and songs • develop a sense of rhythm and rhyme Competence and confidence in using language • engage in shared reading activities Emotional and imaginative development through language • listen to, learn and retell a rich variety of stories, rhymes and songs • associate print with enjoyment through listening to stories and poems read aloud

Visual arts

Paint and colour • experiment with a variety of colour drawing instruments and media to develop colour awareness Fabric and fibre • make simple collages

Music

Performing • recognise and sing familiar songs and melodies

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Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Curriculum links Republic of Ireland – Aistear – The early childhood curriculum framework Subject

Objective

Well-being

• 2.3 discover, explore and refine gross and fine motor skills • 3.1 express themselves creatively and experience the arts

Communicating

• 2.2 explore sound, pattern, rhythm and repetition in language • 4.2 express themselves through the visual arts using skills such as cutting, drawing, gluing, sticking, painting and printing • 4.3 sing songs • 4.5 respond to and create literacy experiences through story, poetry and song

Scotland – Curriculum for excellence – Early level Objective

Literacy and English

Listening and talking/Reading • explore and play with the patterns and sounds of language • explore stories and other texts to read and listen to

Expressive arts

Art and design • create images and objects using a variety of materials Music • enjoy singing

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Subject

Wales – Foundation stage Objective

Language, literacy and communication skills

Oracy • listen to a variety of stories and poems • experience a range of stimuli, including simple rhymes, nursery rhymes, songs, stories and poetry Reading • experience and respond to a wide range of print, including stories, poems and chants

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Area of learning

Creative development

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

Art, craft and design • explore and experiment with a variety of techniques and materials • mix, shape, arrange and combine materials to create images and objects • develop and use their understanding of colour, texture, pattern and shape Music • sing a range of songs

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Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Finger play

œ

Op - en,

&b œ

9

œ

œ

œ

op - en,

œ

&b œ

œ

Op - en

œ

œ

wide your

Singalong actions

shut them.

œ

litt -

œ

le

œ

œ

litt - le

œ

Lay them

œ

œ

mouth, but

clap!

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in

your

œ œ œ œ

creep them,

U

a

œ

shut them.

soft - ly

œ

Give

œ

œ

œ

Creep them, creep them,

13

œ

œ

shut them,

œ

op - en,

right up

œ

œ

do

not

to

œ

let

(clap)

Ó

˙

Ó

lap.

your

chin.

œ

˙

them

Œ

œ Œ

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&b œ

5

shut them,

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Op - en,

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& b 44 œ œ œ œ

Open, shut them

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Open, – Hold hands open, fingers splayed. Shut them, – Clench fists. Open, – Hold hands open, fingers splayed. Shut them. – Clench fists. Give a little clap. – Clap Open, – Hold hands open, fingers splayed. Shut them, – Clench fists. Open, – Hold hands open, fingers splayed. Shut them. – Clench fists Lay them in your lap. – Lay hands in lap. Creep them, creep them, Softly creep them, right up to your chin. – Crawl fingers up the body, from lap to chin. Open wide your little mouth, – Open mouth, as if to allow fingers in. But do not let them in.

– Hide hands behind your back.

Teaching and learning suggestion • Sing the ‘Open, shut them’ rhyme and perform the actions before writing tasks, to help ‘limber up’ the children’s fingers so they are ready for fine motor activity. • Consolidate what is meant by ‘opposite’, using ‘open’ and ‘shut’ as a concrete representation. Children suggest other opposites. Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

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Open, shut them

Finger play

Open, shut them, Open, shut them. Give a little clap. Open, shut them, Open, shut them.

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Lay them in your lap.

Softly creep them,

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Right up to your chin.

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Creep them, creep them,

Open wide your

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But do not let them in!

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Instructions: Use paint or ink to make fingerprints on the tips of the fingers.

Little mouth,

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Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

Finger play

Open, shut them

activity

Resources • template on page 5 • scissors • coloured pencils or crayons • paper plates (2 per child) • stapler and staples

1. Cut out and colour each of the template pieces. 2. Cut one of the paper plates in half along the diameter.

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Instructions

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3. Align the paper plate halves together again and place a second plate on top, making sure the plates face each other. Staple them together, but only around the perimeter. 4. Fold across the diameter of the paper plates where the first plate has been cut to create two joined semicircular halves with internal cavities.

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5. Glue the ‘eyes’ template on the top piece, and the ‘mouth’ template facing upward on the bottom piece, to create a simple hand puppet.

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Play with it

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Have the children hold their paper plate puppets with fingers inserted in the top cavity and the thumb in the bottom cavity. They can then ‘open’ and ‘shut’ the puppets as the rhyme is sung. The children will also enjoy singing along to other rhymes with their puppets!

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Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Finger play

lit - tle

5

One 9

&

#

œ

named

Pe

œ

Fly

a - way,

# œ &

13

Come

chick - y

œ

œ

-

œ

œ

Pe

œ

œ

back,

Pe

Singalong actions

-

-

œ

birds

œ

œ

œ

on

a

wall.

œ

sit - ting

œ

œ

œ

œ

ter,

one

named

Paul.

œ

œ

œ

ter.

Fly

a - way,

œ

œ

ter.

Come

œ

œ

Œ Œ Œ

Paul.

œ

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back,

Paul.

Œ

– Have index fingers of each hand standing upright and facing front to represent the chicky birds. Left index finger wiggles as Peter’s name is said. Right index finger wiggles as Paul’s name is said. Left index finger ‘bird’ flies behind back. Right index finger ‘bird’ flies behind back. Left index finger ‘bird’ flies back into position in front of the body. Right index finger ‘bird’ flies back into position in front of the body.

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Two little chicky birds sitting on a wall.

– – – – – –

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One named Peter, One named Paul. Fly away, Peter. Fly away, Paul. Come back, Peter. Come back, Paul.

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Two

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# & 42 œ

Two little chicky birds

Teaching and learning suggestions • Use the ‘Two little chicky birds’ rhyme in conjunction with children’s literature that makes reference to birds or to being lost and found. • Sing the rhyme as a class to get little fingers ‘warmed up’ so they are ready for writing and other fine motor tasks. • Allow the children to take turns wearing finger puppets of birds in a makeshift puppet theatre to enact the rhyme. Encourage the children to listen to and follow the simple storyline.

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Finger play

Two little chicky birds Two little chicky birds Sitting on a wall. One named Peter,

Peter

One named Paul.

Paul

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Fly away, Peter.

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Come back, Peter.

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Come back, Paul.

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Instructions: The chicky birds have flown away. Draw a chicky bird on each finger to make them come back.

Fly away, Paul.

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Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

Finger play

Two little chicky birds

activity

Resources • template on page 9 • scissors • coloured pencils or crayons • stapler and staples • coloured craft feathers • adhesive tape

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Instructions 1. Colour and cut out each of the template pieces.

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2. Curl each of the ‘chicky birds’, with the wings pressed together at the stapler mark rather than curled to form a cylinder. 3. Staple into position at the staple mark and fold the wings forward to make two little chicky bird puppets.

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4. Use adhesive tape to attach a coloured craft feather to the back of each puppet to make a tail.

Play with it

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Children wear their chicky bird puppets on their fingers and perform the actions of the chicky bird rhyme. Encourage the children to take their chicky birds on other flying adventures.

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fold

fold

fold

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Peter

Finger play

Two little chicky birds

Paul

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Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Finger play & b 44 œ

Where is Thumbkin? œ œ

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Where is Thumb - kin?

œ œ œ œ &b œ

5

œ

How are you to - day, sir?

œ œ œ œ

Where is Thumb-kin?

œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ

Here

œ

Ve - ry well, I thank you.

I

am!

(Boo!)

Here

œ œ ˙

Run

œ œ œ

a - way!

I

am! (Boo!)

œ œ ˙

Run a - way!

Singalong actions

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Begin with two fists formed and thumbs tucked in. Where is Thumbkin? Where is Thumbkin? – Raise shoulders as if asking a question. Here I am! – Shout ‘Boo!’ as the left thumb ‘pops’ out of left fist. Here I am! – Shout ‘Boo!’ as the right thumb ‘pops’ out of right fist. How are you today sir? – Wiggle left thumb, as if it is talking. Very well I Thank you. – Wiggle right thumb, as if it is talking. Run away! – Tuck left thumb back into left fist and put fist behind back. Run away! – Tuck right thumb back into right fist and put fist behind back.

Teaching and learning suggestions

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• Use ‘Where is Thumbkin?’ to consolidate good manners and to open discussion regarding how we can introduce ourselves and initiate friendships with others appropriately. • Sing the rhyme together to get little fingers ‘warmed up’ and ready for writing and other fine motor tasks. • Use the ‘Where is Thumbkin’ rhyme as a ‘get to know you’ game, with the children taking turns to have their name substituted for Thumbkin’s. The individuals jump up when their name is called and respond to the groups request of ‘How are you today, (name)?’ with ‘Very well, I thank you’ and then sit as the group sings ‘Please sit down’ in place of ‘Run away’.

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Where is Thumbkin?

Finger play

Where is Thumbkin? Where is Thumbkin? Here I am! Boo! Here I am!

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Boo!

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How are you today, sir?

Run away!

Instructions: Draw a face and glue a tie onto Thumbkin.

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Run away!

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Very well, I thank you.

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Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

Finger play

Where is Thumbkin?

activity

Note: This craft activity will work most effectively if it is copied onto light card.

Resources • template on page 13 • scissors • coloured pencils or crayons • adhesive tape

Instructions

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1. Colour and cut out the Thumbkin template.

2. Fold along the marked lines so that the fingers on the left hand-side fold backwards to form the back of the fingers. Fasten in place with adhesive tape.

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3. Fold thumbkin down and then fold the hand in front to ‘close’ into a fist. Thumbkin should now be hiding behind the fingers.

Play with it

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Have the children use their craft to act out the actions for ‘Where is Thumbkin?’. They could work in pairs and have their paper Thumbkins talk to each other.

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fold fold

Finger play

Where is Thumbkin?

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fold

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Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Counting games

Ten in the bed

# & 44 œ

œ

There were

# œ &

4

o

-

˙

œ

ten

œ œ

ver!'

œ œ œ

œ œ

in the bed

So they

œ

all

and the

œ

œ œ œ

lit - tle one

œ œ œ

rolled

o - ver and

œ

œ

said, 'Roll

œ

one

œ

fell

œ ˙ o - ver,

œ roll

U

œ

out.

(Flop!)

Singalong actions

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There were nine in the bed and the little one said, ‘Roll over, roll over!’ So they all rolled over and one fell out. There were eight in the bed … There were seven in the bed ... There were six in the bed … There were five in the bed … There were four in the bed … There were three in the bed … There were two in the bed … There was one in the bed and the little one said, ‘Goodnight’.

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The children lie on the ground side by side to sing the rhyme. Each time the words ‘roll over, roll over’ are sung, they roll over and push out the child at the end of the ‘bed’ (at the end of the line). This child sits down, continuing to sing the song until everyone has been pushed out. Alternatively, the child pushed out of bed can get back in again at the opposite end just for fun. The rhyme can also be sung by counting backwards from any number.

Teaching and learning suggestions • Perform the rhyme to encourage the class to count the number of children ‘in bed’ and to count backwards, subtracting one or more than one child every time. • Use felt board characters or ‘finger people’ to demonstrate counting backwards as each person is removed. • Discuss why the ‘little one’ said ‘Goodnight’ at the end of the rhyme and did not fall out of bed like the others.

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Ten in the bed

Counting games

There were ten in the bed and the little one said, ‘Roll over, roll over!’ So they all rolled over and one fell out. Flop! There were nine in the bed and the little one said, ‘Roll over, roll over!’ So they all rolled over and one fell out. Flop! There were eight in the bed and the little one said, ‘Roll over, roll over!’ So they all rolled over and one fell out. Flop!

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There were six in the bed and the little one said, ‘Roll over, roll over!’ So they all rolled over and one fell out. Flop!

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There were five in the bed and the little one said, ‘Roll over, roll over!’ So they all rolled over and one fell out. Flop! There were four in the bed and the little one said, ‘Roll over, roll over!’ So they all rolled over and one fell out. Flop!

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Instructions: Draw sad faces on the children who fell out of bed and a happy face on the ‘little one’ who slept tight.

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There were seven in the bed and the little one said, ‘Roll over, roll over!’ So they all rolled over and one fell out. Flop!

There were three in the bed and the little one said, ‘Roll over, roll over!’ So they all rolled over and one fell out. Flop! There were two in the bed and the little one said, ‘Roll over, roll over!’ So they all rolled over and one fell out. Flop! There was one in the bed and the little one said, ‘Goodnight’.

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Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

Counting games

Ten in the bed

activity

Note: This craft activity will work most effectively if it is copied onto light card.

Resources • template on page 17 • scissors • coloured pencils or crayons • craft knife (optional)

Instructions

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1. Colour and cut out each of the template pieces.

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2. Make an incision along the dotted line at the edge of the bed template. This can be done by loosely folding along the dotted line and cutting along the fold one using a craft knife. (Note: Any task requiring a craft knife should be performed by an adult.) 3. Thread the tab at the edge of the ‘people in the bed’ template through the incision so that as the tab is pulled across, more and more people appear to fall out of bed.

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Use it

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Sing the rhyme together and have the children pull the tab to show each of the people falling out of bed. Count the people left in bed to consolidate counting and the concept of ‘taking away’. The activity could also be used to show basic subtraction facts by taking away or ‘rolling out’ more than one child at a time to reveal how many are left from 10.

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Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Counting games & b 44 œ œ œ Œ

This old man

This old man,

&b œ

5

œ

œ œ œ

œ œ

œ

œ Œ

he played one,

knick-knack, pad-dy-whack,

œ

œ

œ

he played knick-knack

œ œ œ œ œ Œ

give a dog a bone,

œ œ œ œ œ

on

œ œ œ œ

this old man came

my drum. With a

œ œ œ Œ

roll - ing home.

Singalong actions

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This old man, he played two, he played knick-knack on my shoe. With a knick-knack, paddywhack, give a dog a bone, this old man came rolling home. This old man, he played three, he played knick-knack on my knee. With a … This old man, he played four, he played knick-knack on my door. With a … This old man, he played five, he played knick-knack on my hive. With a … This old man, he played six, he played knick-knack on my bricks. With a … This old man, he played seven, he played knick-knack up in heaven. With a … This old man, he played eight, he played knick-knack on my plate. With a … This old man, he played nine, he played knick-knack on my vine. With a … This old man, he played ten, he played knick-knack on my hen. With a …

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This old man, he played one, – Hold up one finger. He played knick-knack on my drum. With a knick-knack, paddywhack, give a dog a bone, – Slap hands on thighs in rhythm with the song: leftright, left-right-left. This old man came rolling home. – Roll hands over one another. This old man, he played two ... – Hold up two fingers. Hold up an extra finger with each verse of the rhyme and repeat all other actions.

Teaching and learning suggestions • Sing the rhyme together to consolidate counting to 10. • Use pictures of everything ‘this old man’ played paddywhack on as something concrete to count for each verse. Demonstrate counting by ones as a simple addition strategy. • Encourage the children to explore rhyme by substituting other things the old man could have played paddywhack on.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

18

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


This old man

Counting games

This old man, he played one, He played knick-knack on my drum. This old man, he played two, He played knick-knack on my shoe.

pl e

This old man, he played three, He played knick-knack on my knee.

Sa m

This old man, he played four, He played knick-knack on my door.

ew

This old man, he played six, He played knick-knack on my bricks. This old man, he played seven, He played knick-knack up in heaven.

Vi

Instructions: Draw the missing things that the old man played ‘paddywhack’ on.

in g

This old man, he played five, He played knick-knack on my hive.

This old man, he played eight, He played knick-knack on my plate. This old man, he played nine, He played knick-knack on my vine. This old man, he played ten, He played knick-knack on my hen. Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

19

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

Counting games

This old man

activity

Resources • template on page 21 • scissors • coloured pencils or crayons

Instructions 1. Colour and cut out the ‘old man’ template.

pl e

2. Use a pencil or other sharp implement to make holes where indicated on the old man’s chest. (The children may require help cutting internal shapes.)

Sa m

Play with it

Vi

ew

in g

Children insert two of their fingers through the holes to be the old man’s arms. Sing the rhyme together, with the children using their fingers to perform the ‘knick-knacking’ on their shoe, knee and other suitable props.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

20

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


pl e Sa m in g ew Vi This old man Counting games Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

21

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Counting games & 44

Ten little sausages ΠTen litt-le sa-us-ages

sizz-ling in a pan.

‰J

One went 'Pop!'

Œ

A - noth-er went 'Bang!'

Eight little sausages sizzling in a pan. One went ‘Pop!’ Another went ‘Bang!’ Six little sausages sizzling in a pan. One went ‘Pop!’ Another went ‘Bang!’ Four little sausages sizzling in a pan. One went ‘Pop!’ Another went ‘Bang!’ Two little sausages sizzling in a pan. One went ‘Pop!’ Another went ‘Bang!’

Singalong actions

Sa m

pl e

Ten little sausages sizzling in a pan – Hold up 10 fingers and wiggle them, as if they are sizzling. One went ‘Pop!’ – Close hands into fists and then open them suddenly on the word ‘Pop!’ Another went ‘Bang!’ – Clap hands loudly while shouting the word ‘Bang!’ Repeat the actions, holding up two less fingers at the beginning of each verse.

Teaching and learning suggestions

Vi

ew

in g

• Use ‘Ten little sausages’ to practise counting backwards from any number by twos. • Create number stories based on the rhyme to practise the concept of subtraction. • Make felt sausages and a felt pan and encourage children to make up their own ‘disappearing sausages’ number stories. • Children stand up and pretend to be sausages. When the rhyme indicates that a sausage pops or bangs, a selected child can pretend to ‘explode’ and sit down.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

22

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


Ten little sausages

Counting games

Ten little sausages sizzling in a pan. One went ‘Pop!’ Another went ‘Bang!’ Eight little sausages sizzling in a pan. One went ‘Pop!’ Another went ‘Bang!’ Six little sausages sizzling in a pan.

pl e

One went ‘Pop!’ Another went ‘Bang!’

Sa m

Four little sausages sizzling in a pan.

One went ‘Pop!’ Another went ‘Bang!’

in g

Two little sausages sizzling in a pan.

Instructions: Draw ten little sausages sizzling in the pan.

Vi

ew

One went ‘Pop!’ Another went ‘Bang!’

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

23

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

Counting games

Ten little sausages

activity

Resources • template on page 25 • scissors • coloured pencils or crayons • craft glue • a variety of sausage shapes (Use found objects such as sticks, polystyrene packing beads, strips of rolled up paper or dried playdough rolled into miniature sausage shapes.)

1. Colour and cut out each of the template pieces.

Sa m

2. Find 10 items suitable for representing sausages.

pl e

Instructions

3. Glue the ‘Pop!’ and ‘Bang!’ templates onto the frying pan, along with the 10 ‘sausages’.

Display it

Vi

ew

in g

Use a barbecue theme to display the frying pans for all the class to see. The display could also include other items grouped in tens, such as plastic forks and napkins. Encourage the children to count the sausages in each of the frying pans to consolidate one-to-one correspondence and counting to 10.

POP!

BANG!

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

24

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


BANG!

Counting games

Ten little sausages

Vi

ew

in g

Sa m

pl e

POP!

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

25

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Counting games & 44 œ

Three little speckled frogs œœ œ œ œ

Three litt-le speck-led frogs

5

& œ

œ œœ œ œ

One jumped in-to a pool,

œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ

sat on a speck-led log,

œ œœ œ œ œ

where it was nice and cool.

eat-ing some most del-ici-ous

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

Then there were two

speck-led

œ

bugs. Yum! Yum!

œ

frogs. Glub! Glub!

pl e

Two little speckled frogs sat on a speckled log, eating some most delicious bugs. Yum! Yum! One jumped into a pool, where it was nice and cool. Then there was one speckled frog. Glub! Glub! One little speckled frog sat on a speckled log, eating some most delicious bugs. Yum! Yum! He jumped into a pool, where it was nice and cool. Then there were no speckled frogs. Glub! Glub!

Sa m

Singalong actions Three little speckled frogs Sat on a speckled log, Eating some most delicious bugs.

Vi

ew

in g

– Hold up three fingers. – Rest three ‘frogs’ (fingers) against a closed fist. – Use pincer fingers to pretend to put bugs into your mouth, alternating use of each hand. Yum! Yum! – Rub your tummy. One jumped into a pool, – Put flat hands together and push forward, as if diving. Where it was nice and cool. – Pretend to do breast stroke. Then there were two speckled frogs. – Hold up two fingers. Glub! Glub! – Make fists in front of eyes and open when saying ‘Glub’ to make ‘googly’ eyes. Repeat the actions for each verse, reducing the number of fingers held up as each frog jumps into the pool.

Teaching and learning suggestions • In front of the class, choose three children to be the speckled frogs. If a stable raised surface is available, let the children crouch on it, pretending it is the speckled log. Coloured dots can be added as speckles to the children’s faces. Sing the rhyme as a class, with each frog taking his or her turn to pretend to jump in the pool and swim around. • Use the rhyme to create number sentences to practise the concept of subtraction. • Use pictures or models of frogs as a visual aid for counting forwards and backwards by ones.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

26

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


Three little speckled frogs

Counting games

Three little speckled frogs sat on a speckled log, Eating some most delicious bugs. Yum! Yum! One jumped into a pool, where it was nice and cool. Then there were two speckled frogs. Glub! Glub! Two little speckled frogs sat on a speckled log,

pl e

Eating some most delicious bugs. Yum! Yum! One jumped into a pool, where it was nice and cool.

Sa m

Then there was one speckled frog. Glub! Glub! One little speckled frog sat on a speckled log,

in g

Eating some most delicious bugs. Yum! Yum! He jumped into a pool, where it was nice and cool.

ew

Vi

Instructions: This frog has lost its speckles. Draw or glue speckles on its body.

Then there were no speckled frogs. Glub! Glub!

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

27

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

activity

Counting games

Three little speckled frogs

Resources • ‘Three little speckled frogs’ activity sheet copied onto stiff card (see page 29) • coloured pencils or crayons • scissors • collage materials suitable for making the frog’s speckles; for example: dyed egg shell, glitter, crepe paper balls, polystyrene balls, dot stickers

1. Colour and cut out the speckled frog template. 2. Fold the template in half at the fold line.

Sa m

3. Add collage materials to create the speckles on the frog.

pl e

Instructions

Play with it

Vi

ew

in g

Place the frog, bent at the fold line, on a flat surface. Slide a finger away from the tail end of the frog to make it ‘jump’. Sing ‘Three little speckled frogs’ and make the frog jump at the appropriate time in the rhyme.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

28

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


pl e Sa m

Counting games

Three little speckled frogs

Vi

ew

in g

fold

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

29

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Counting games & 44 œ

Three little ducks œ œ œ

Three litt - le ducks

& œ œ œ

œ

œ went

œ

Mo -ther Duck said, 'Quack,

œ œ ˙

out

œ

œ œ œ œ

one day,

œ

o - ver the hills

œ.

quack, quack, quack!'

œ

and

j œ œ œ œ œœ

But

œ œ ˙

on - ly two litt-le

far

œ

a - way.

œ

˙

ducks came back.

Sa m

pl e

Two little ducks went out one day, over the hills and far away. Mother Duck said, ‘Quack, quack, quack, quack!’ But only one little duck came back. One little duck went out one day, over the hills and far away. Mother Duck said, ‘Quack, quack, quack, quack!’ But none of her sweet little ducks came back. Mother Duck went out one day, over the hills and far away. She called to her ducklings, ‘Quack, quack, quack!’ And all of her sweet little ducks came back.

Singalong actions Three little ducks went out one day,

Vi

ew

in g

– Hold three fingers upright to represent three ducks waddling. Over the hills and far away. – Using opposite arm, create a hill shape for the ‘ducks’ to waddle over. Mother Duck said, ‘Quack, quack, quack, quack!’ – Make a ‘quacking beak’, using the thumb as the bottom part of the beak and the other fingers for the top of the beak. Open and shut the hand in this position as the words ‘Quack, quack, quack, quack!’ are spoken. But only two little ducks came back. – Hold up two fingers on the opposite hand to represent the ducks returning.

Teaching and learning suggestions • Perform the nursery rhyme to reinforce the number concepts of counting, subtraction and addition. • Discuss stranger danger and the importance of staying with a trusted adult. • Investigate the relationship between mothers and their babies, and how babies need to be cared for. • Match adult and baby animal names and pictures.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

30

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


Three little ducks

Counting games

Three little ducks went out one day, Over the hills and far away. Mother Duck said, ‘Quack, quack, quack, quack!’ But only two little ducks came back. Two little ducks went out one day, Over the hills and far away. But only one little duck came back.

Sa m

One little duck went out one day,

pl e

Mother Duck said, ‘Quack, quack, quack, quack!’

Over the hills and far away.

Mother Duck said, ‘Quack, quack, quack, quack!’

in g

But none of her sweet little ducks came back.

ew

Mother Duck went out one day, Over the hills and far away.

Vi

Instructions: Draw the little ducks coming home to their mother.

She called to her ducklings, ‘Quack, quack, quack!’ And all of her sweet little ducks came back. ck! QuaQuack! Quack! ! Quack

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

31

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

Counting games

Three little ducks

activity

Resources • template on page 33 • scissors • craft sticks • coloured pencils or crayons • glue

Instructions

pl e

1. Colour and cut out each of the template pieces.

2. Fold the little duck template in half so that three ducks can be seen from either side.

Sa m

3. Insert and glue a craft stick into the fold of the centre of the template. 4. Glue a craft stick to the back of the mother duck.

Play with it

Vi

ew

in g

Use the little ducks and mother duck to act out the ‘Three little ducks’ rhyme. As each little duck disappears, the little ducks’ template can be folded so that one less duck is showing for each verse.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

32

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


Counting games

Three little ducks

Vi

ew

in g

Sa m

fold

pl e

fold

fold

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

33

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Counting games

Johnny works with one hammer j œ

j œ œ

John - ny works

&b œ

5

John

j œ œ

- ny works

œ.

with

j œ

with

one

ham - mer,

œ. one

j œ œ.

œ

œ

one

j œ œ

ham - mer,

then

Johnny works with two hammers, Two hammers, two hammers. Johnny works with two hammers, Then he works with three.

œ J

ham - mer,

j œ œ

he works

œ.

œ

one

j œ

with

j œ

ham - mer.

œ.

Œ.

two.

Sa m

Johnny works with three hammers … then he works with four. Johnny works with four hammers … then he works with five. Johnny works with five hammers … then he goes to sleep.

œ

pl e

& b 68 œ

Singalong actions

Vi

ew

in g

Begin with sitting on the ground. Each verse increases the number of hammers being used. Johnny works with one hammer. – Using the right hand, pretend to hammer. Johnny works with two hammers. – Using both hands, pretend to hammer. Johnny works with three hammers. – Pretend to hammer, using both hands and the right heel. Johnny works with three hammers. – Pretend to hammer, using both hands and both heels. Johnny works with four hammers. – Pretend to hammer using both hands, both heels and the forehead (using an exaggerated nodding motion). Then he goes to sleep. – Collapse exhausted on the floor.

Teaching and learning suggestions • Use the rhyme to illustrate the cumulative effect of addition. • Investigate other cumulative projects such as a group building project where every child in the class adds a block to create a building. The construction could also investigate such mathematical concepts as length, height or weight. • Play variations on the cumulative memory game ‘I went shopping’ to suit the building theme; for example: ‘I went building and I built a house’. Each successive child must repeat what has been said before them and then add something new they have built; for example: ‘I went building and I built a house and a bridge …’

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

34

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


Johnny works with one hammer

Counting games

Johnny works with one hammer, One hammer, one hammer. Johnny works with one hammer, Then he works with two. Johnny works with two hammers,

Then he works with three.

Sa m

Johnny works with two hammers,

pl e

Two hammers, two hammers.

Johnny works with three hammers,

in g

Three hammers, three hammers.

Johnny works with three hammers,

ew

Then he works with four.

Vi

Instructions: Draw the missing hammers in Johnny’s tool boxes.

Johnny works with four hammers, Four hammers, four hammers. Johnny works with four hammers, Then he works with five. Johnny works with five hammers, Five hammers, five hammers. Johnny works with five hammers, Then he goes to sleep. Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

35

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

Counting games

Johnny works with one hammer

activity

Resources • template on page 37 • scissors • coloured pencils or crayons

Instructions 1. Colour and cut out the hammer template.

pl e

2. Children write their names in the space provided and the number of hammers they would like to work with in the space on the handle.

Sa m

Display it

in g

Draw a large picture of ‘Johnny’ on a display board (just his head wearing a hard hat would suffice). Arrange and attach the children’s hammers around it so that they can practise reading and identifying numbers, their own names and the names of others.

Cliff

ew

(name

works with

8 hamm

ers!

works with

4

Jenny

hamm

ers!

)

Ashley )

(name

(name

works with

works with

10

6

ers!

hamm

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

(name

)

Vi

)

Jamie

ers!

hamm

36

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


(name)

Vi

hammers!

Counting games

Johnny works with one hammer

ew

in g

Sa m

pl e

works with

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

37

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Clock rhymes

Hickory, dickory, dock

6 &8 œ œ œ œ œ œ

Hi - ck - ory, di - ck - ory,

& œ

5

clock

U

œ œ J

struck one,

œ J

the

œ.

j œ œ

œ

dock,

œ

mouse

the

j U œ œ.

mouse

ran down,

œ œ œ ran

up

œ œ

the

œ œ œ œ œ œ

hi - ck - ory, di - ck - ory,

œ.

œ

clock.

œ.

dock.

j œ

The

œ.

Hickory, dickory, dock, the mouse ran up the clock. The clock struck two (Bong, bong!), the mouse ran down, hickory, dickory, dock.

Sa m

Singalong actions

pl e

Hickory, dickory, dock, the mouse ran up the clock. The clock struck three … (and so on).

– Hold up the left arm at the elbow with a clenched fist to represent the face of the clock. The mouse ran up the clock. – Crawl the fingers of the right hand up the ‘clock’ to represent the mouse running up the clock. The clock struck one (Bong!), – Open the left hand, representing the clock face as the clock strikes where the ‘bong’ has been inserted during the pause in the music. The mouse ran down, – Crawl the right hand’s fingers rapidly down the left arm to represent the mouse running down the clock. Hickory, dickory, dock. – The left arm remains upright in the clock position. Repeat these actions, opening and closing the left hand for the clock chime (with each hour subsequently added to the rhyme).

Vi

ew

in g

Hickory, dickory, dock,

Teaching and learning suggestions • Teach children about o’clock times using a ‘hickory, dickory, dock’-style clock. • Sing the rhyme repeatedly, with the clock striking a different random number each time, and the children pausing to make the ‘bong’ sound or clapping along with the clock’s strikes.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

38

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


Hickory, dickory, dock

Clock rhymes

Hickory, dickory, dock, The mouse ran up the clock. The clock struck one … BONG! The mouse ran down,

Sa m

pl e

Hickory, dickory, dock.

11

1

2

in g

10

12

3

ew

9

4 7

6

5

Instructions: Draw the mouse running up the clock.

Vi

8

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

39

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

activity

Clock rhymes

Hickory, dickory, dock

Note: This craft activity will work most effectively if it is copied onto light card.

Resources • template on page 41 • scissors • coloured pencils or crayons

Instructions

pl e

1. Colour and cut out each template piece. 2. Cut along the dotted line down the side of the clock to make a slit. (Children will require help to cut internal lines.)

Sa m

3. Thread the mouse template through the slit so that only the mouse can be seen and the handle can be moved up and down behind the clock template to make it move.

Use it/Play with it

in g

• Children can draw hands on their clock to represent their favourite time of the day.

Vi

ew

• Move the mouse up and down the clock as the nursery rhyme is sung.

12

3

9

6

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

40

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


12

pl e

3

Sa m

9

Clock rhymes

Hickory, dickory, dock

Vi

ew

in g

6

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

41

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Clock rhymes & 44 œ

Cuckoo œ œ œ

Tick-tock,

tick- tock,

5

& œ œ œ œ

Op - en wide the

œ œ œœ œ

says the

œ œ œ œ

lit - tle clock.

œ œ œ œœ œ

doors of the lit - tle clock:

Night and day,

œ œ Œ œ œ Œ

Cuck- oo!

Cuck- oo!

it

œ œ œ œ

just says

tick-tock.

œ œ Œ œ œ Œ

Cuck -oo!

Cuck-oo!

Singalong actions

Sa m

pl e

Three children take formation to act out being the clock and to say the ‘cuckoos’. Two of the children face one another with both hands held. The rear hands are held upward to create a roof and the front hands are held across the ‘entrance’ of the clock to create doors. The third child pretends to be the cuckoo and stands behind the doors.

in g

Tick-tock, tick-tock, says the little clock. Night and day it just says tick-tock. – Child behind the ‘doors’ of the clock moves head from side to side, touching ears to shoulders. Open wide the doors of the little clock: – The two children representing the clock move their front arms outward to show the doors opening. Cuckoo! Cuckoo! Cuckoo! Cuckoo! – The child behind the doors bobs out of the clock, pretending to be the cuckoo bird and saying the ‘cuckoos’.

ew

Teaching and learning suggestions

Vi

• Make a large clock face for the children to hold. Children take turns to represent the cuckoo and give the correct number of ‘cuckoo’ calls to match the time on the clock. • Make clock faces showing important times of the school day and place them around the classroom clock. Encourage the children to identify when the times match and to predict what is going to happen at that time; for example: ‘12.30 pm is lunchtime. We need to pack up our things and wash our hands, ready to eat lunch’.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

42

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


Clock rhymes

Cuckoo Tick-tock, tick-tock, Says the little clock. Night and day, It just says tick-tock.

pl e

Open wide the doors

in g

Sa m

Of the little clock.

ew

1

3

9

8

7

2

6

5

4

Vi

Instructions: Draw a cuckoo bird in the clock. Colour or decorate your bird.

10

11 12

Cuckoo!

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

43

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

Clock rhymes

Cuckoo

activity

Note: This craft activity will work most effectively if it is copied onto light card.

Resources • template on page 45 • scissors • coloured pencils or crayons • wooden craft stick • plasticine

pl e

• drawing pin (Those with a protruding knob for holding are ideal.)

1. Colour and cut out the metronome template.

Sa m

Instructions

2. Fold along the solid lines so that the ‘wings’ fold backwards and allow the metronome to stand upright. 3. With a drawing pin, pierce a hole in the metronome at the point marked X. Lay the template on a desk, leaving the tip of the pin facing outward.

in g

4. Press the end of a craft stick onto the tip of the drawing pin so that the stick points up towards the cuckoo bird. Cover the sharp tip of the drawing pin with plasticine if it is protruding.

ew

5. Stand the metronome upright and use the ‘handle’ on the drawing pin to swing the craft stick pendulum back and forth.

Vi

Use it

Sing the ‘Cuckoo’ rhyme together very slowly, encouraging the children to hear the beat. Ask the children to keep the beat by swinging the pendulum on their metronomes from side to side in the same way that a metronome keeps a beat.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

44

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


Sa TOC mK pl e Vi

ew

K C I T

in g

fold

Clock rhymes

Cuckoo

fold

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

45

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Weather j & b 68 œ It's

&b

5

œ bumped

It’s raining, it’s pouring œ. rain

-

œ

ing,

œ œ œ œ J

his head on the

œ J

œ.

it's

pour

-

j œ œ.

œ

ing.

œ œ œ œ

end of the bed,

The

j œ

and

old

œ

man

œ J is

œ. snor

œ œ œ œ œ œ

could-n't get up in the

-

œ

ing.

j œ

He

œ. œ ‰

morn - ing.

Singalong activity

Sa m

pl e

Provide the children with instruments that make rain and storm sounds; for example: triangles, cymbals and tambourines. Inspire the children to make their own storm sounds with instruments such as rice shakers and by wobbling sheets of heavy cardboard to create thunder sounds.

Teaching and learning suggestions

• Sing the rhyme on rainy days and discuss which indoor and outdoor things are fun to do when it is raining. Talk about clothing and accessories we wear for protection when it is raining.

Vi

ew

in g

• Place a water gauge in the playground to collect and measure rainfall during rainy periods. Compare rainfall from one day to the next and construct a simple graph to monitor changes.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

46

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


It’s raining, it’s pouring

Weather

It’s raining, it’s pouring. The old man is snoring. He bumped his head On the end of the bed,

Instructions: Draw or glue raindrops falling from the cloud.

Vi

ew

in g

Sa m

pl e

And couldn’t get up in the morning.

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

47

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

activity

Weather

It’s raining, it’s pouring

Resources • template on page 49 • scissors • wax crayons • blue paint made into a weak solution with water (suitable for a wash) or blue edicol dye • wide paintbrush • string

pl e

• hole puncher

Instructions

Sa m

1. Cut out the raindrop template.

2. Trace over the lines and colour in the picture with wax crayon.

3. Paint over the crayon drawing with a blue wash (paint or dye), using a wide paintbrush. Allow it to dry.

in g

4. Punch a hole where indicated at the top of the raindrop and attach string ready so it is ready for hanging.

ew

Display it

Vi

Hang two of the children’s raindrops back-to-back. Group the raindrops together and suspend from the ceiling to create a rain shower.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

48

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pl e Sa m in g ew Vi It’s raining, it’s pouring Weather Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

49

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Weather

Here we go round the mulberry bush

&

5

&

7

&

####

œ

mul

####

œ

Here

####

we

go

j œ

-

œ

berry

œ

we

œ

go

j œ

œ

cold

and

the

j œ

œ

bush,

œ

fro

mul

j œ

round

berry

mul

j œ

sty

bush,

j œ

-

j œ

-

œ.

berry

mor

-

the

œ.

berry

œ

the

-

-

œ

the

œ

mul

bush.

œ

œ

bush,

on

œ

a

œ.

ning.

ew

(sample verse) This is the way we wash our hands, Wash our hands, wash our hands. This is the way we wash our hands, On a cold and frosty morning.

round

j œ

œ

pl e

3

Here

œ

j œ

œ

Sa m

chorus

œ

j œ

in g

#### 6 & 8 œ

Vi

Singalong activity

Have the children suggest other things that could be done on a cold and frosty morning as they are getting ready for school. During the chorus, the children stand in a circle, hold hands and skip to the right. During the verse, the children stand still and pretend to perform the task. Some suggestions include: – This is the way we brush our hair – This is the way we clean our teeth – This is the way we put on our … shoes … socks … clothes – This is the way we make our bed – This is the way we pack our lunch.

Teaching and learning suggestions • Substitute ‘cold and frosty’ for whatever the weather conditions are for that day; for example: ‘clear and sunny’ or ‘cloudy and rainy’. • Show illustrations of different tasks the children need to perform to get ready for school in the morning. Have the children sequence them to describe what happens at their house in the morning. • Discuss the things we need to be responsible for and when it is appropriate to ask for help or permission. Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

50

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Here we go round the mulberry bush

Weather

Here we go round the mulberry bush, the mulberry bush, the mulberry bush. Here we go round the mulberry bush,

pl e

On a cold and frosty morning.

in g ew Vi

Instructions: Draw a picture of something you do to get ready for school in the morning.

Sa m

This is the way we …

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

51

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

activity

Weather

Here we go round the mulberry bush

Note: This craft activity will work most effectively if it is copied onto light card.

Resources • template on page 53 • scissors • coloured pencils or crayons • split pins

pl e

Instructions

Sa m

1. Colour and cut out each of the template pieces.

2. Place the circle with the title of the song on top of the other template circle. Make sure that it is centred and the crosses in the middle of both templates align.

in g

3. Pierce a hole at the cross marks in the centre of the template pieces and use a split pin to hold the pieces in place.

Play with it

Vi

ew

Have the children rotate the top circle to determine which activity will be performed during each of the verses. The children can also take the craft home to help remind them of their responsibilities when getting ready for school in the morning.

w e go roun

re

d

He

the mul

be

rr

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

52

y bush

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


o g re we

ro e u n d th

He

m u u l b erry b

ew Vi

Weather

Here we go round the mulberry bush

in g

Sa m

pl e

sh

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

53

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Cooking

Hot cross buns cross

&b œ

œ

&b œ

œ

5

One

9

If

&b œ

13

One

a

you

œ a

œ

buns!

œ

œ

œ

pen - ny,

two

œ

œ

œ

have

no

œ

œ

pen - ny,

Singalong activity

Hot

œ

œ

a

œ

pen - ny,

œ

daugh - ters,

œ

two

œ

œ a

œ

œ

œ

give

them

œ

œ

pen - ny,

buns!

œ

hot

œ

hot

Œ

œ

cross

œ

buns!

œ

to

your

œ

Œ

œ

cross

Sa m

Hot

Œ

œ

pl e

œ

cross

Œ

œ

sons.

œ

Œ

buns!

in g

& b 42 œ

Vi

ew

‘Hot cross buns’ has a simple melody and rhythm, making it ideal for teaching musical pitch and rhythm to beginners (with clear ‘high’, ‘middle’ and ‘low’ notes in the first eight bars). Demonstrate the three pitches vocally (and by using a xylophone or equivalent) to encourage auditory discrimination between pitches. Encourage the children to clap the rhythm of the rhyme by vocalising ‘ta’ for crotchets and ‘ti-ti’ for quavers, allowing them to hear the difference between the lengths of these notes.

Teaching and learning suggestions • Provide hot cross buns for the children to sample. Investigate why hot cross buns are (generally) only available at shops during Easter. • Introduce what is meant by a ‘dozen’. Have the children make groups of one dozen and half a dozen from a variety of concrete materials. Discuss why hot cross buns are often found in groups of one dozen or half a dozen.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

54

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


Cooking

Hot cross buns Hot cross buns! Hot cross buns! One a penny, Two a penny,

ew Vi

Instructions: Draw crosses on these hot buns to make them hot cross buns.

in g

Sa m

pl e

Hot cross buns!

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

55

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

Cooking

Hot cross buns

activity

Note: This craft activity will work most effectively if it is copied onto light card.

Resources • template on page 57 • scissors • brown paint or edicol dye • wide, flat paintbrush • newspaper or plastic sheeting (for protecting the work surface) • PVA glue

pl e

• white paint • cooking salt

Sa m

• plastic squeeze bottles (as used for sauce)

Instructions 1. Cut out the bun template.

in g

2. Lay the template on a protected work surface and ‘wash’ over with brown paint or edicol dye by using a wide paintbrush. Allow it to dry. 3. Mix white paint, cooking salt and PVA glue in a 2 : 2 : 1 ratio. Transfer mixture into a plastic squeeze bottle.

ew

4. Paint the bun template with PVA glue to give it a glazed effect.

Display it

Vi

5. Squeeze the mixture from the squeeze bottle onto the bun to make a cross.

Begin an ‘Easter traditions’ themed display by arranging the crafts on a display wall. Group them in dozens or half dozens to consolidate what is meant by these terms.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

56

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pl e Sa m in g ew Vi Hot cross buns Cooking Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

57

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Cooking

a

5

& œ

Bake

9

& œ

Pat

& œ

13

put

-

cake,

pat

œ

œ

me

œ

œ

œ

a

ca

it

and

œ it

in

the

Singalong actions

-

cake,

ke

o

-

ba

and

œ

ven

œ

fast

œ

œ

-

œ

as

it,

œ

˙

œ

œ

prick

œ œ

a

œ

œ

-

œ

œ

-

œ

mark

œ

œ

as

for

Ba

œ

ker's

man.

œ

˙.

you

œ

œ

˙.

can.

pl e

-

œ

it

with

œ

Sa m

Pat

œ

-

by

˙

œ

'B'.

œ

and

And

˙.

me.

in g

& 43 œ

Pat-a-cake

ew

Pretend to pass a cake back and forth from one hand to the other, backwards and forwards for the duration of the song.

Vi

Teaching and learning suggestions • Children share with the class the initial sound in their names. Sing ‘Pat-a-cake’ each time substituting the initial letter of a child’s name for the letter ‘B’ and inserting the child’s name in the last line of the rhyme. • Children make and ‘pat’ their own cakes from playdough, sand or mud and then mark them with a letter to show who they have made them for.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

58

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Pat-a-cake

Cooking

Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake, Baker’s man. Bake me a cake As fast as you can. Pat it and prick it,

pl e

And mark it with ‘B’.

Sa m

ew

in g

For Baby and me.

Vi

Instructions: The baker has baked you a pat-a-cake, too! Write the letter that makes the sound your name begins with.

And put it in the oven

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

59

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

Cooking

Pat-a-cake

activity

Resources • template on page 61 • scissors • coloured pencils or crayons

Instructions 1. Colour and cut out the oven template. Children write the initial letter of their names on the cake.

pl e

2. Make a slot along the dotted line at the top of the oven door. (Children may require help to cut internal lines.) 4. Draw a handle on the front of the oven door.

Play with it

Sa m

3. Fold the front door of the oven upwards to ‘close the door’, feeding the tab through the slot.

Vi

ew

in g

Pin the closed ovens to a display board. Children take turns to choose an oven to open. Sing ‘Pat-a-cake’, using the letter on the revealed cake and that person’s name in the rhyme.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

60

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


pl e Sa m

Cooking

Pat-a-cake

Vi

ew

in g

fold

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

61

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Cooking

Pol - ly,

Pol -

# œ &

9

&

#

œ

put

the

œ œ œ

ket - tle

œ

œ

œ

œ

ly,

put

the

ket

œ

Su - key,

13

œ

œ

Su - key,

œ take

œ take

œ

off

œ

œ

Singalong actions

-

on,

off

a

-

œ

œ

gain,

they've

œ

œ œ œ

the

ket - tle

have

tea.

œ

œ

œ

œ œ

take

all

it

gone

on.

˙

œ

all

Su - key,

œ

put

œ

we'll

œ

a - gain.

œ

œ

œ

tle

œ

Pol - ly,

œ œ œ

it

it

on.

œ

œ

œ

œ œ œ

off

a

a - gain.

-

˙

way.

in g

# œ &

5

œ

pl e

œ

Sa m

# 2 œ & 4

Polly, put the kettle on

Vi

ew

For this activity the children will be dramatising using an old-fashioned kettle over an open fireplace. Ask the children to sit in a circle. Have the children dramatise holding a kettle with their hands by holding a closed fist with their other hand. To place their kettle on the fire, they place their fists out in front of themselves, as if holding it over the open fireplace. Alternatively, provide the children with an object to represent the kettle (such as a block). Create a ‘fireplace’ in the middle of the circle, using red and orange fabric or paper. The children can pretend to ‘warm’ their hands while they are waiting for the rhyme to be sung. As the rhyme is sung, have the children move their kettle on and off the fire at the appropriate times.

Teaching and learning suggestions • Talk about times when the children have seen an open fire. Discuss the pleasures and dangers of sitting around an open fire. • Discuss how kettles and other household appliances have changed over time. Explore the reasons why alternate means of boiling water have been developed.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

62

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Polly, put the kettle on

Cooking

Polly, put the kettle on. Polly, put the kettle on. Polly, put the kettle on, We’ll all have tea. Sukey, take it off again. Sukey, take it off again.

pl e

Sukey, take it off again,

in g ew Vi

Instructions: Draw steam or glue cottonwool to show steam coming out of the kettle.

Sa m

They’ve all gone away.

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

63

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

activity

Cooking

Polly, put the kettle on

Note: This craft activity will work most effectively if it is copied onto light card.

Resources • template on page 65 • scissors • coloured pencils or crayons • PVA glue • 3 cm-wide lengths of coloured paper

Instructions

Sa m

1. Colour and cut out the kettle and shoe templates.

pl e

• plastic lids (for example, soft drink bottle or milk bottle lids)

2. Fold two lengths of coloured paper into concertinas to make wiggly legs. 3. Attach the shoes to one end of the concertina legs and the kettle to the other at the shaded tabs provided.

in g

4. Place the kettle face down and glue a plastic lid into the middle of the kettle’s back to create a handle for children to hold. Allow to dry.

ew

Play with it

Vi

Have the children sing the rhyme while making the kettle puppets dance by holding the handle at the back of them. Have the children create a makeshift ‘fire’, made of red fabric or paper, in the middle of the group.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

64

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


glue

pl e Sa m

glue

in g ew Vi Polly, put the kettle on Cooking Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

65

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Cooking

& œ

Five

9

& œ

One

& œ

13

Five

j œ œ

po - ta

po - ta

po - ta

to,

-

-

to,

two

j œ œ

-

j œ œ

œ œ J

-

six

j œ œ

to,

œ J

two

œ

to,

six

Singalong actions

j œ œ

po - ta

j œ œ

po - ta

-

-

to,

three

œ

seven

j œ

po - ta -

po - ta -

œ

to,

j œ

j œ œ

œ œ J

j œ

œ

to,

œ J

three

œ

j œ œ

po - ta

j œ œ

po - ta

to,

seven

-

-

j œ œ

j œ

œ.

to,

j œ

œ.

to,

j œ

po - ta -

j œ œ

po - ta

-

to,

j œ

to,

Œ.

four ...

Œ.

more!

œ.

pl e

5

po - ta

j œ œ

Sa m

One

j œ œ

Œ.

four ...

œ.

Œ.

more!

in g

& 86 œ

One potato, two potato

ew

Have children make fists with both their hands to represent potatoes. Count the potatoes by pounding them one on top of the other, fist over fist, to the beat of the song.

Vi

Teaching and learning suggestions • Conduct a potato investigation by looking at washed and unwashed potato varieties, identifying eyes and sprouts on old potatoes and describing how potatoes grow. • Make potato people sculptures by using potatoes and potato portions, and toothpicks with a variety of dried fruits to create details of the face and clothing. • Sing the rhyme to consolidate one-to-one correspondence when counting concrete materials.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

66

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Cooking

One potato, two potato

pl e

Two potato,

Sa m

Three potato,

in g

Four ...

Instructions: Trace the numbers inside the potatoes.

Vi

ew

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

One potato,

Five potato, Six potato,

Seven potato, More!

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

67

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

activity

Cooking

One potato, two potato

Resources • template on page 69 • scissors • paint (brown, white, black) • plastic plate or flat lid • sponges (for printing) • newspaper or plastic sheeting (for protecting the work surface) • glue

pl e

• coloured paper squares

Sa m

Instructions

1. Prepare a work surface ready for painting by spreading newspaper or covering with plastic sheeting. 2. Pour small amounts of black, white and brown paint (use very little black and a larger amount of white) onto a plastic plate or flat lid. Swirl the colours together without mixing completely.

in g

3. Using a sponge, dab into the paint and then onto the activity sheet, creating sponge prints over the potato shapes. Allow it to dry. 4. Cut out each of the potato shapes and arrange them on a sheet of coloured paper in the shape of a potato person.

Vi

Display it

ew

5. Glue the potatoes into position and allow to dry.

Display the children’s potato people on a board or wall at child height. Encourage the children to count how many potatoes make up each person. They could sing the potato rhyme as they count.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

68

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


pl e Sa m in g ew Vi One potato, two potato Cooking Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

69

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Favourites & 86 œ

j œ œ

Humpty Dumpty

j œ œ œ œ œ.

Hump - ty Dump - ty

5

& œ œ œ œ œ œ

All the king’s hor - ses and

œ

sat on the wall,

œ œ œ

j œ œ

j œ œ œ œ œ.

Hump - ty Dump - ty

œ.

all the king’s men

had

a great fall.

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ. could - n't put Hump- ty to - ge-ther a-gain.

Singalong actions Humpty Dumpty sat on the wall,

Sa m

pl e

– Make a wall with a horizontal forearm and sit the opposite fist on top. Humpty Dumpty had a great fall. – Roll hands over one another. All the king’s horses, and all the king’s men – Hold pretend reins and trot up and down to ‘gallop’. Couldn’t put Humpty together again. – Cup hands and press together as if passing the broken egg from one hand to the other.

in g

Teaching and learning suggestions

• Allow the children to peel cooled hard-boiled eggs and pull the egg apart to find the yolk. The shells can be washed, dried, crushed, dyed and used to make eggshell collages.

Vi

ew

• As a group, brainstorm to create a list of creatures that come from eggs. Provide a selection of eggs (or photographs) for children to classify according to size, shape and colour.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

70

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Favourites

Humpty Dumpty Humpty Dumpty sat on the wall, Humpty Dumpty had a great fall. All the king’s horses and all the king’s men

Vi

Instructions: Number the boxes to show the sequence of the rhyme.

ew

in g

Sa m

pl e

Couldn’t put Humpty together again.

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

71

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

Favourites

Humpty Dumpty

activity

Note: This craft activity will work most effectively if it is copied onto light card.

Resources • template on page 73 • scissors • coloured pencils or crayons • large envelope

1. Colour and cut out the Humpty Dumpty template. 2. Cut the template along the dotted lines.

Sa m

3. Put the puzzle pieces into a large envelope for safekeeping.

pl e

Instructions

Play with it

Vi

ew

in g

Children put their Humpty Dumpty puzzles together to begin the rhyme. When Humpty falls from the wall, they can break their puzzle apart and sing the remainder of the song. Allow the children to reform and play with their puzzles.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

72

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pl e Sa m in g ew Vi Humpty Dumpty Favourites Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

73

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Favourites

Teddy bear, teddy bear

Te - ddy

&b œ

œ

&b œ

œ

&b œ

œ

5

Te - ddy

9

Te - ddy

13

Te - ddy

œ

œ

bear,

bear,

œ

œ

bear,

bear,

œ

turn

a

œ touch

œ

œ

œ œ

œ

bear,

te - ddy

œ

bear,

œ

te - ddy

œ

œ

te - ddy

œ

œ

œ

œ

te - ddy

Teddy bear, teddy bear, jump up high. Teddy bear, teddy bear, touch the sky.

Teddy bear, teddy bear, tickle your tummy. Teddy bear, teddy bear, hug your mummy.

Teddy bear, teddy bear, stand on your toes. Teddy bear, teddy bear, touch your nose.

Teddy bear, teddy bear, stand on your head. Teddy bear, teddy bear, go to bed.

Teddy bear, teddy bear, wake up now. Teddy bear, teddy bear, take a bow.

œ

bear,

round.

Œ

œ

the

ground.

œ

œ shoe.

show

œ

-

Œ

œ

your

that

œ

will

œ

Œ Œ

do!

Vi

ew

in g

bear,

œ

pl e

œ

Sa m

& b 42 œ

Singalong actions ‘Teddy bear, teddy bear’ is a popular singalong rhyme that encourages children to listen to and follow instructions. Model the actions and encourage the children to join in and have fun.

Teaching and learning suggestions • Hold a teddy bears’ picnic, where each child brings along a teddy bear from home. The children could also each bring along an empty box to decorate and make a cart for the bears to travel to the picnic in. Attach string to the carts so the children can drag their bears to the picnic. • Children each share what is special about their teddy bear. • Classify the bears according to the children’s own criteria; for example: fur colour, ear size. Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

74

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


Teddy bear, teddy bear

Favourites

Teddy bear, teddy bear, Turn around. Teddy bear, teddy bear, Touch the ground.

pl e

Teddy bear, teddy bear,

Sa m

Show your shoe. Teddy bear, teddy bear,

ew Vi

Instructions: Draw your teddy on the grassy hill. Write what he or she is doing.

in g

That will do!

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

75

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

activity

Favourites

Teddy bear, teddy bear

Note: This craft activity will work most effectively if it is copied onto light card.

Resources • template on page 77 • scissors • coloured pencils or crayons

Instructions

pl e

1. Colour and cut out the teddy bear template. 2. Cut out the internal circles to create finger holes. (Note: Children will need help cutting the internal holes.)

Sa m

3. Insert fingers through the holes to create a finger puppet.

Play with it

Vi

ew

in g

Sing the rhyme together, encouraging the children to make their finger puppets perform the actions in the rhyme.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

76

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


pl e Sa m in g ew Vi Teddy bear, teddy bear Favourites Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

77

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Favourites

Hey diddle diddle

& 86 œ œ œ œ œ œ

Hey di - ddle di - ddle, the

5

œ œ

&œ œ œ œ

li - ttle dog laughed

to

œ œ œ œ œ œ

cat and the fi - ddle, the

œ see

j œ œ œ œ

such fun, and the

œ

j œ œ œ œ

cow jumped o - ver the

œ œ œ œ œ œ

dish ran

Œ œj œ.

moon;

a - way with the

the

˙.

spoon.

pl e

Singalong actions

Sa m

Hey diddle diddle, the cat and the fiddle, – Pretend to play a violin. The cow jumped over the moon; – Put one finger up at either side of the head (to make horns) and leap over an imaginary moon. The little dog laughed to see such fun, – Hold tummy and jiggle, as if laughing. And the dish ran away with the spoon. – Use first and second fingers of both hands to make the imaginary legs of the dish and the spoon and walk them away together.

in g

Teaching and learning suggestions

ew

• Listen to the rhyme and point out the rhyming words to the children. Encourage them to make up nonsense words to rhyme with ‘diddle’ and ‘fiddle’, and ‘moon’ and ‘spoon’. Listen for rhyming words in other familiar rhymes.

Vi

• Talk about things that are real and things that are made up. Encourage the children to think about different stories they have heard, read or viewed and discuss how we can determine whether or not something is real. Introduce the children to the terms ‘fiction’ and ‘nonfiction’ as a way of describing things which are, and are not, real. • Children draw nonsense pictures to illustrate their understanding of ‘fiction’.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

78

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Favourites

Hey diddle diddle Hey diddle diddle, the cat and the fiddle, The cow  umped over the moon; The little dog laughed to see such fun,

Instructions: Draw the moon and the spoon.

Vi

ew

in g

Sa m

pl e

And the dish ran away with the spoon.

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

79

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

Favourites

Hey diddle diddle

activity

Note: This craft activity will work most effectively if it is copied onto light card.

Resources • template on page 81 • scissors • coloured pencils or crayons • split pin

pl e

Instructions 1. Colour and cut out the template pieces.

Sa m

2. Make a small hole in the centre of each template, where indicated. (Note: The children may need help making the holes.) 3. Place the template with the wedge cut from it over the template with the rhyme’s characters. 4. Insert a split pin through both template pieces and fasten behind by splitting the pin.

in g

Use it

ew

Children turn the wheel so that the picture illustrating the beginning of the rhyme is showing (the cat and the fiddle). Sing the rhyme together, turning the wheel to show each part of the rhyme as it is sung.

Vi

did dle did

y He

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

dle, the cat and

80

the

fid dle ,

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


pl e Sa m

in g

ew Vi

es

d An

dish the

ran away with th

fid dle ,

do g

laughed to see s uc

h f un ,

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

ittle el Th

Hey diddle diddle

the

umped over the m oon cow ;

Favourites

dle, the cat and

Th e

po

on .

H

ey

did dle d i d

81

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Favourites

Miss Molly had a dolly

Miss

Mol - ly

5

& œ

œ

called

& œ

doc

13

& œ

œ

for

9

-

knock - ed

came

œ

on

dol - ly

œ

œ

doc - tor

œ

tor

a

œ

the

œ

œ

had

œ

the

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

door

come

œ

bag

œ

œ

œ

sick,

with

a

œ

sick

and

œ

his

œ œ œ

rat - a - tat

So

quick.

œ

hat,

-

œ

she

j œ

œ.

quick,

œ

œ œ

sick.

œ

quick,

his

œ

was

œ

œ

with

œ

who

œ

to

œ

œ

pl e

œ œ œ œ

Sa m

& 42 œ

The

œ

œ

and

he

Œ

tat.

ew

Singalong actions

in g

He looked at the dolly and he shook his head. And he said, ‘Miss Molly, put her straight to bed!’ He wrote on the paper for a pill, pill, pill. ‘I’ll be back in the morning with the bill, bill, bill.’

Vi

Miss Molly had a dolly who was sick, sick, sick. – She called for the doctor to come quick, quick, quick. – The doctor came with his bag and hat, – And he knocked on the door with a rat-a-tat-tat. –

Pretend to hold a baby and nurse it. Pretend to dial a number on a telephone. Put one hand on hip and the other on head. Pretend to knock on a door.

He looked at the dolly and he shook his head. – Shake head. And he said, ‘Miss Molly, put her straight to bed!’ – Point and wag finger. He wrote on the paper for a pill, pill, pill. – Pretend one hand is paper, and write on it with a finger of the other hand. ‘I’ll be back in the morning with the bill, bill, bill.’ – Bow and pretend to lift hat in farewell.

Teaching and learning suggestions • As a group, have children discuss and share medical experiences they have had. Discuss some of the common tasks doctors and nurses perform. Take turns role-playing the parts of medical staff and patients. • Provide the children with a range of medical supplies (such as bandages, preloved or pretend stethoscopes and crutches), allowing the children to have a turn experiencing each. • Talk about the dangers of playing with or taking unknown medicines or pills. Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

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Favourites

Miss Molly had a dolly Miss Molly had a dolly who was sick, sick, sick. She called for the doctor to come quick, quick, quick. The doctor came with his bag and hat, And he knocked on the door with a rat-a-tat-tat.

pl e

He looked at the dolly and he shook his head. And he said, ‘Miss Molly, put her straight to bed!’

Sa m

He wrote on the paper for a pill, pill, pill.

Instructions: Glue a blanket onto Miss Molly’s dolly.

Vi

ew

in g

‘I’ll be back in the morning with the bill, bill, bill.’

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

83

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

activity

Favourites

Miss Molly had a dolly

Note: This craft activity will work most effectively if it is copied onto light card.

Resources • template on page 85 • scissors • pencil or pen • glue • two short strips of red paper (5 cm × 2 cm) • one long strip of white cardboard (5 cm × 30 cm)

pl e

• stapler and staples

Sa m

Instructions 1. Cut out the hat template.

2. Glue two short strips of red paper onto the hat to form a medical cross where indicated. 3. Write the child’s name under the word ‘Doctor’ to personalise the hat.

in g

4. Staple one end of the white cardboard strip to one end of the hat template. 5. Hold the hat on the child’s head with the strip wrapped around behind, and hold it where the hat sits firmly around the head. Staple it into position at the other end of the template.

ew

Play with it

Vi

The children can wear their medical hats as they role-play the rhyme and other medical scenarios.

Name:

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

e n i m s Ja 84

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pl DOCTOR e

Sa m

glue

in g ew Vi

Name:

MIss Molly had a dolly Favourites Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

85

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Favourites

If you’re happy and you know it

& b œ.

œ œ.

ha

-

& b œ.

5

& b œ.

7

ha

-

it, clap

œ œ.

œ

œ œ.

ppy and

you know

œ œ.

œ

ha - ppy and

you know

œ.

œ

you know

œ œ.

it, clap

œ.

it, and

œ œ.

ppy and

you know

œ œ.

hands!

œ.

it,

clap

Œ

(clap)

(clap)

Œ

Œ

(clap)

(clap)

œ œ.

œ œ.

rea - lly want

œ

your

œ

hands!

to show

œ. œ If

œ. If

œ œ.

it,

if

Œ

Œ

(clap)

(clap)

you're

œ

you're

œ

you're

ew

If you’re happy and you know it … – stamp your feet – shout ‘Hooray’ – take a bow – wiggle your hips.

you

hands!

œ

your

œ

your

Œ

in g

3

ha - ppy and

œ

pl e

you're

If

œ

œ. œ œ. œ œ. œ œ. œ

Sa m

& b 44 œ .

Vi

Singalong activity

Children suggest actions for the group to perform for additional verses.

Teaching and learning suggestions • Discuss different scenarios that children are familiar with; for example, a visit to the dentist. Children share how they would feel in those situations. • Using concrete materials, such as textured finger paint or sand, children make faces showing different emotions. Encourage them to think about the expressions they give to the people in their drawings. • Introduce the use of simple face drawings for self-assessment tasks. Discuss what each of the face drawings represent and how they can be used to assess how we feel about our work and activities in the school environment; for example: very pleased, okay, not pleased.

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Favourites

If you’re happy and you know it If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands!

in g

Sa m

pl e

If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands!

ew

If you’re happy and you know it,

Vi

And you really want to show it,

Instructions: Colour the claps in loud colours.

If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands!

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

87

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

activity

Favourites

If you’re happy and you know it

Note: This craft activity will work most effectively if it is copied onto light card.

Resources • template on page 89 • scissors • coloured pencils or crayons • craft knife (optional)

pl e

Instructions 1. Colour and cut out each of the template pieces.

Sa m

2. Make cuts at the dotted lines on the face template. (Note: Children may need assistance cutting internal lines.) 3. Thread the mouth template through the slots in the face so the mouths can be seen one at a time.

Play with it

Vi

ew

in g

The children pull the tab back and forth to see different facial expressions on their person’s face. They can use their faces to give feedback on how they would feel in different situations or to describe how they feel about their own work (as a form of self-assessment).

PULL

PULL Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

88

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pl e Sa m in g ew Vi

If you’re happy and you know it Favourites

PULL

PULL Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

89

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Favourites

Pussy cat, pussy cat œ

'Pus - sy

& & &

#

been

#

œ

'Pus

#

œ

fright

cat,

up

œ

-

œ

sy

-

œ

ened

Lon

œ

cat,

pus

œ a

sy

œ

to

œ

œ

pus -

œ

œ

œ

œ

-

-

sy

œ

lit

cat,

where

œ don

you

œ

œ

œ

to

vi

œ

cat,

œ -

tle

œ

have

œ

œ

œ

œ

what

œ

-

mouse

been?'

you

œ

un

œ

-

'I've

œ.

the

œ

did

j œ

œ

sit

œ

j œ.

queen.'

der

j œ

œ

pl e

œ

Sa m

# & 68 œ

there?'

œ

her

'I

œ.

chair.'

ew

Singalong activity

in g

Different locations could be substituted for ‘London’ to make the rhyme more relevant to where the children live.

Vi

Take turns role-playing the song, choosing individual children to play the parts of the cat, mouse and queen. During the rhyme, the cat sits ready to pounce, the mouse plays happily and the queen (or king), who could wear a crown, sits on a large chair. At the conclusion of the rhyme, the cat chases the mouse under the chair and the queen (or king) stands on the chair in fright.

Teaching and learning suggestions • Discuss times when the children have taken a special journey. Have them describe the destination and any memorable events. • Investigate different kinds of pets and how they need to be cared for and protected. Discuss why some pets, such as cats and mice, might not be good to have together. • Read fairytales with royal characters. Provide royal dress-up costumes and accessories, including ‘rich’ fabrics and props for the children to role-play events from well-known fairytales.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

90

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Favourites

Pussy cat, pussy cat ‘Pussy cat, pussy cat, Where have you been?’ ‘I’ve been up to London to visit the queen.’ ‘Pussy cat, pussy cat,

pl e

What did you there?’

ew Vi

Instructions: Draw a mouse under the chair. Glue on it a long woollen thread tail.

in g

Sa m

‘I frightened a little mouse under her chair.’

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

91

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

Favourites

Pussy cat, pussy cat

activity

Note: This craft activity will work most effectively if it is copied onto light card.

Resources • template on page 93 • scissors • craft knife • coloured pencils or crayons • strips of card (3 cm x 30 cm) • coloured stickers or sequins and glue to decorate

1. Colour and cut out the mask template.

Sa m

Instructions

pl e

• stapler and staples

2. Cut holes for the eyes on the face template. (Note: Children will need assistance cutting internal lines—this should be done ahead of time for younger children.) 3. Decorate the crown with coloured stickers or sequins.

in g

4. Staple one end of the card strip to one of the tabs on the side of the mask template.

ew

5. Hold the mask in position on the child’s head and wrap the cardboard strip around the back of the head, holding it in position on the other side of the mask so that it will stay firmly around the head. Staple it into position.

Vi

Play with it

The children can wear their masks to play the role of the pussy cat in the rhyme or as a costume for their own invented stories.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

92

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pl e Sa m in g ew Vi Pussy cat, pussy cat Favourites Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

93

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Favourites

Jack-in-the-box œ

Jack - in

-

œ

the

-

5

& ˙.

Wait

9

& œ

Some - bo

-

œ

box,

œ

dy

qui

˙.

ing ...

œ

œ

so

˙.

-

œ

˙

wait

œ

o - pens

œ

˙

the

-

et

-

U

Œ.

œ

˙.

and

still.

˙

œ

ing ...

œ

'til

Œ

Œ

Surprise!

Sa m

Singalong activity

lid ...

œ

pl e

& 43 œ

in g

Have the children curl up in a ball on the ground, staying very still and quiet. Sing the song together, telling the children they cannot jump up until they hear a particular sound. Develop their listening skills by making several different noises before the nominated sound is made. When the children hear the correct sound, they spring up in the air like a jack-in-the-box.

ew

Teaching and learning suggestions • Introduce different sounds for the ‘surprise’ sound to develop listening skills. Suggestions include: a selection of different percussion instruments, animal or theme-related noises or recorded sounds.

Vi

• Investigate toys that move or make noises, comparing those with batteries to those with mechanisms that do not require batteries. • Decorate a large cardboard box and use it as a surprise ‘person-in-a-box’. Have the children close their eyes while one child climbs into the box to hide. When children open their eyes, have them guess who they think is in the box by using a process of elimination or by having the child in the box give vocal cues. Sing the song together to discover who has been hiding.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

94

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Favourites

Jack-in-the-box Jack-in-the-box So quiet and still. Waiting … Waiting …

pl e

‘til somebody opens the lid …

Vi

Instructions: Draw a picture of yourself jumping out of the box.

ew

in g

Sa m

Surprise!

SU R P R I S E ! Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

95

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

Favourites

Jack-in-the-box

activity

Note: This craft activity will work most effectively if it is copied onto light card.

Resources • template on page 97 • coloured pencils or crayons • strips of coloured card (1 cm x 10 cm) • adhesive tape

1. Colour and cut out each of the template pieces. 2. Fold the strip of coloured card into a concertina.

pl e

Instructions

Sa m

3. Tape one end of the concertina to the back of the jack-in-the-box template.

4. Fold the ‘box’ template along the fold lines and make an incision along the dotted internal line. (This should be done ahead of time for small children.)

in g

5. Tape the other end of the concertina to the middle of the centre third of the box template, so the flaps fold over the top of the jack-in-the-box and the tab can be threaded through the slot to hide the jester inside.

ew

Play with it

Vi

The children can use the craft while they sing the rhyme by pulling the box open to make their jack-in-thebox spring up at the appropriate time.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

96

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fold

Favourites

Jack-in-the-box

Vi

ew

in g

Sa m

pl e

fold

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97

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Favourites

Here we

go, loo

&b œ

put

your left

œ J

your left

hand

go, loo

-

œ œ œ œ œ œ

loo,

j œ œ.

hand

Here we

˙.

by

œ œ J

All

j œ œ

Œ

in,

y ou

œ. in

Œ

on

take

j œ

a

Sat

and

ur

j œ œ

j œ

your left

œ

day

hand

j œ œ

shake

it

all

˙.

by

light,

œ.

Œ

œ.

Œ

night.

You

out.

j œ

a -

j œ

j œ You

˙.

about!

Vi

You: put your right hand in … put your left foot in … put your right foot in … put your left side in … put your right side in … put your whole self in …

loo,

j œ

in g

put

j œ œ

œ œ œ œ

ew

&b œ

go, loo

˙.

by

j œ

&b œ œ œ œ Here we

-

j œ

pl e

œ œ œ

Sa m

& b 68 œ

Looby loo

Singalong activity

Ask the children to stand in a circle. Sing the rhyme together, following the actions in the song. When asked to ‘put your left hand in’, the children hold their left hands towards the middle of the circle. When asked to ‘take your left hand out’, the children hold their left hands outside of the circle. When asked to ‘put your left hand in and shake it all about’, the children hold their left hands towards the middle of the circle and shake them. During the chorus, the children hold hands with the people to their right and left and dance around in a circle, going in a clockwise direction. Repeat this process for the remaining verses, moving as a circle in a clockwise direction if discussing ‘left’, and anticlockwise if discussing ‘right’.

Teaching and learning suggestions • Introduce the concepts of left and right and consolidate them through repetition of announcing different body parts, alternating from left to right with each verse. • Consolidate children’s understanding of other body parts by introducing additional verses. Suggestions include: shoulder, knee, elbow or forehead. Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

98

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Favourites

Looby loo Here we go, looby loo, Here we go, looby light, Here we go, looby loo, All on a Saturday night. You put your right hand in,

pl e

You put your left hand in,

Sa m

You take your left hand out. You take your right hand out. You put your right hand in

and shake it all about!

and shake it all about!

Vi

Instructions: Colour the left hand red. Colour the right hand green.

ew

in g

You put your left hand in

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

99

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Craft

Favourites

Looby loo

activity

Note: This craft activity will work most effectively if it is copied onto light card.

Resources • template on page 101 • scissors • coloured pencils or crayons • craft stick • PVA glue

pl e

Instructions 1. Colour and cut out each of the hand templates.

Sa m

2. Have the children trace over the dotted lines to write the words ‘left’ and ‘right’ on the correct hands. 3. Brush glue onto the back of one of the hands. Place a craft stick at the bottom of the hand so it extends below the palm to make a handle. 4. Place the second hand on top so that they align exactly, encasing the handle. Leave it to dry.

in g

Play with it

Vi

ew

The children can use the ‘left/right’ hand to help consolidate understanding of positional terms ‘left’ and ‘right’. Demonstrate how to hold their own hand next to the crafted hand, with fingernails showing to make sure they have their hand facing the correct way as they learn.

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

100

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pl e Sa m in g ew Vi Looby loo Favourites Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

101

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Sa m

pl e

Open, shut them

Vi

ew

in g

Two little chicky birds

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

102

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


Sa m

pl e

Where is Thumbkin?

Vi

ew

in g

Ten in the bed

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

103

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Sa m

pl e

This old man

Vi

ew

in g

Ten little sausages

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

104

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


Sa m

pl e

Three little speckled frogs

Vi

ew

in g

Three little ducks

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

105

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Sa m

pl e

Johnny works with one hammer

Vi

ew

in g

Hickory, dickory, dock

10

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

12 11 106

1

2

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


Cuckoo 10

11 12

1

7

6

5

4

Sa m

pl e

8

2 3

9

Vi

ew

in g

It’s raining, it’s pouring

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

107

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Sa m

pl e

Here we go round the mulberry bush

Vi

ew

in g

Hot cross buns

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

108

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


Sa m

pl e

Pat-a-cake

Vi

ew

in g

Polly, put the kettle on

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

109

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Sa m

pl e

One potato, two potato

Vi

ew

in g

Humpty Dumpty

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

110

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Sa m

pl e

Teddy bear, teddy bear

Vi

ew

in g

Hey diddle diddle

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

111

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Sa m

pl e

Miss Molly had a dolly

Vi

ew

in g

If you’re happy and you know it

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

112

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


Sa m

pl e

Pussy cat, pussy cat

Vi

ew

in g

Jack-in-the-box

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

113

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play


Vi

ew

in g

Sa m

pl e

Looby loo

Nursery rhymes – Sing and play

114

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6579 Nursery Rhymes - Sing and Play